The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.
Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)
A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.
A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.
A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.
Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
A congenital defect with major fissure in the ABDOMINAL WALL lateral to, but not at, the UMBILICUS. This results in the extrusion of VISCERA. Unlike OMPHALOCELE, herniated structures in gastroschisis are not covered by a sac or PERITONEUM.
Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.
Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors occurring within the abdominal cavity, which can be benign or malignant, and affect various organs such as the pancreas, liver, kidneys, or intestines.
CONNECTIVE TISSUE of the anterior compartment of the THIGH that has its origins on the anterior aspect of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine, and its insertion point on the iliotibial tract. It plays a role in medial rotation of the THIGH, steadying the trunk, and in KNEE extension.
A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)
Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.
Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.
The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.
General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.
Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.
Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Surgical removal of excess abdominal skin and fat and tightening of the ABDOMINAL WALL. Abdominoplasty may include LIPECTOMY of INTRA-ABDOMINAL FAT, tightening of the ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, and re-creation of the UMBILICUS.
Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.
Inferior and external epigastric arteries arise from external iliac; superficial from femoral; superior from internal thoracic. They supply the abdominal muscles, diaphragm, iliac region, and groin. The inferior epigastric artery is used in coronary artery bypass grafting and myocardial revascularization.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.
A childhood counterpart of abdominal or extra-abdominal desmoid tumors, characterized by firm subcutaneous nodules that grow rapidly in any part of the body but do not metastasize. The adult form of abdominal fibromatosis is FIBROMATOSIS, ABDOMINAL. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.
Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.
Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.
The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)
Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).
Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.
Inflammation of the fascia. There are three major types: 1, Eosinophilic fasciitis, an inflammatory reaction with eosinophilia, producing hard thickened skin with an orange-peel configuration suggestive of scleroderma and considered by some a variant of scleroderma; 2, Necrotizing fasciitis (FASCIITIS, NECROTIZING), a serious fulminating infection (usually by a beta hemolytic streptococcus) causing extensive necrosis of superficial fascia; 3, Nodular/Pseudosarcomatous /Proliferative fasciitis, characterized by a rapid growth of fibroblasts with mononuclear inflammatory cells and proliferating capillaries in soft tissue, often the forearm; it is not malignant but is sometimes mistaken for fibrosarcoma.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.
That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.
An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.
The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.
An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.
Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.
The local implantation of tumor cells by contamination of instruments and surgical equipment during and after surgical resection, resulting in local growth of the cells and tumor formation.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
An absorbable suture material used also as ligating clips, as pins for internal fixation of broken bones, and as ligament reinforcement for surgically managed ligament injuries. Its promising characteristics are elasticity, complete biodegradability, and lack of side effects such as infections.
An abscess located in the abdominal cavity, i.e., the cavity between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A birth defect in which the URINARY BLADDER is malformed and exposed, inside out, and protruded through the ABDOMINAL WALL. It is caused by closure defects involving the top front surface of the bladder, as well as the lower abdominal wall; SKIN; MUSCLES; and the pubic bone.
A procedure whereby the body is stimulated to generate extra soft tissue by the application of stretching forces that stimulate new growth of tissue which, over a period of time, results in a 2-dimensional expansion of the tissue. The procedure is used in reconstructive surgery for injuries caused by trauma, burns, or ablative surgery. Various types of TISSUE EXPANSION DEVICES have been developed that exert stretching forces.
A birth defect due to malformation of the URETHRA in which the urethral opening is above its normal location. In the male, the malformed urethra generally opens on the top or the side of the PENIS, but the urethra can also be open the entire length of the penis. In the female, the malformed urethral opening is often between the CLITORIS and the labia, or in the ABDOMEN.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
A condition in which functional endometrial tissue is present outside the UTERUS. It is often confined to the PELVIS involving the OVARY, the ligaments, cul-de-sac, and the uterovesical peritoneum.
ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.
Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.
Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.
Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.

Expiratory flow limitation during exercise in COPD: detection by manual compression of the abdominal wall. (1/300)

Manual compression of the abdomen (MCA) during spontaneous expiration is a simple method for the detection of flow limitation in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients during resting breathing, based on comparison of flow/volume curves obtained during MCA with that of the preceding control breath. It was assessed whether this nonstandardized technique is also feasible during exercise. MCA was performed during resting breathing and constant-exercise work at one- and two-thirds maximal mechanical power output (W'max) in six normal subjects and 12 COPD patients. Changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were also studied. With the aid of inspection, abdominal palpation and lung auscultation, MCA could always be applied during expiration. Flow limitation was never detected in the six normal subjects, whereas four of the COPD patients were flow limited at rest, seven during exercise at one-third W'max and nine during exercise at two-thirds W'max. Expiratory flow limitation detected by MCA was always associated with an increase in EELV during exercise, indicating dynamic hyperinflation occurrence or increase. It is concluded that manual compression of the abdomen is a very simple and reliable method for the detection of flow limitation during exercise.  (+info)

How should an infected perinephric haematoma be drained in a tetraplegic patient with baclofen pump implanted in the abdominal wall? - A case report. (2/300)

BACKGROUND: We present a case to illustrate controversies in percutaneous drainage of infected, perinephric haematoma in a tetraplegic patient, who had implantation of baclofen pump in anterior abdominal wall on the same side as perinephric haematoma. CASE PRESENTATION: A 56-year-old male with C-4 tetraplegia had undergone implantation of programmable pump in the anterior abdominal wall for intrathecal infusion of baclofen to control spasticity. He developed perinephric haematoma while he was taking warfarin as prophylactic for deep vein thrombosis. Perinephric haematoma became infected with a resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and required percutaneous drainage. Positioning this patient on his abdomen without anaesthesia, for insertion of a catheter from behind, was not a realistic option. Administration of general anaesthesia in this patient in the radiology department would have been hazardous. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Percutaneous drainage was carried out by anterior approach under propofol sedation. The site of entry of percutaneous catheter was close to cephalic end of baclofen pump. By carrying out drainage from anterior approach, and by keeping this catheter for ten weeks, we took a risk of causing infection of the baclofen pump site, and baclofen pump with a resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The alternative method would have been to anaesthetise the patient and position him prone for percutaneous drainage of perinephric collection from behind. This would have ensured that the drainage track was far away from the baclofen pump with minimal risk of infection of baclofen pump, but at the cost of incurring respiratory complications in a tetraplegic subject.  (+info)

Presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in abdominal aortic aneurysms is not associated with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases. (3/300)

OBJECTIVE: to test the hypothesis that the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is associated with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and/or MMP-9. DESIGN: case-control study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: in a series of 40 patients with AAA > or =5cm in maximal cross-sectional diameter, C. pneumoniae-DNA was identified in the aneurysm wall by nested PCR in 14 (35%) patients. Another 14 C. pneumoniae-DNA-negative AAA patients from the same series, matched for gender and aneurysm diameter, were used as controls. In each group there were 7 asymptomatic (aAAA) and 7 ruptured (rAAA) aneurysms. MMP-2 and -9 activity was estimated in AAA wall biopsies by gelatin zymography. RESULTS: patients with a C. pneumoniae-DNA-positive aneurysm wall specimen showed an over-all lower activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (pro- and active enzyme) compared to the C. pneumoniae-DNA negative patients. However, there were no statistically significant differences in MMP activity between the two groups of patients with aAAA. Among patients with rAAA both pro-MMP-9 (p=0,026) and active-MMP-9 (p=0.007) were significantly lower in C. pneumoniae-DNA-positive patients compared to C. pneumoniae-DNA-negative patients, whereas there were no significant differences in pro-MMP-2 or active-MMP-2. CONCLUSION: this preliminary study does not support the hypothesis that the presence of C. pneumoniae in the AAA wall is associated with increased activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9.  (+info)

Involvement of the mural thrombus as a site of protease release and activation in human aortic aneurysms. (4/300)

Acquired abdominal aortic aneurysms are usually associated with a mural thrombus through which blood continues to flow. Some early data suggest that aneurysmal evolution correlates with the biological activity of the thrombus. Our hypothesis was therefore that the thrombus could adsorb blood components and store, release, and participate in the activation of proteases involved in aneurysmal evolution. For this purpose, we have explored both the metalloproteinase and fibrinolytic systems in the thrombus and the wall of human aneurysms. We have first investigated blood clot formation and lysis in vitro. Spontaneous clotting induces a release of promatrix metalloproteinase (pro-MMP)-9 into the serum that was fourfold higher than in paired control plasma (P < 0.001). Fibrinolysis progressively released more MMP-9 in a time-dependent manner (P < 0.01). After selective isolation, we demonstrated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes are the main source of MMP-9 release during clot formation. Protease content was then analyzed in 35 mural thrombi and walls of human abdominal aortic aneurysms sampled during surgical repair. In 15 aneurysms, the liquid phase at the interface between the thrombus and the wall was sampled separately. Both thrombus and wall contained MMP-2 and MMP-9 but the ratio MMP-9/MMP-2 was higher in the thrombus than in the wall. The liquid interface also contained active MMP-9. Immunohistochemistry of the thrombus confirmed these findings, showing the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes at the luminal pole of the thrombus, co-localizing with MMP-9 storage. In contrast, MMP-3 and MMP-7 were only present in the aneurysmal wall. Plasminogen was present in the mural thrombus but plasmin activity was present in both thrombus and wall. In the liquid interface, plasmin-alpha(2)-anti-plasmin complexes were detected demonstrating in vivo the activation of plasminogen. In contrast, u-PA and t-PA were detectable only in the wall, suggesting that plasminogen present in the thrombus could be activated by factors secreted by the arterial wall. This was demonstrated in vitro, in which co-incubation of thrombus and wall extracts generated plasmin in the presence of a fibrin matrix and activated MMPs. In conclusion, our study strongly suggests that the mural thrombus, by trapping polymorphonuclear leukocytes and adsorbing plasma components could act as a source of proteases in aneurysms that may play a critical role in enlargement and rupture.  (+info)

The tetrapeptide AcSDKP, an inhibitor of primitive hematopoietic cell proliferation, induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. (5/300)

The tetrapeptide acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro (AcSDKP), purified from bone marrow and constitutively synthesized in vivo, belongs to the family of negative regulators of hematopoiesis. It protects the stem cell compartment from the toxicity of anticancer drugs and irradiation and consequently contributes to a reduction in marrow failure. This current work provides experimental evidence for another novel biologic function of AcSDKP. We report that AcSDKP is a mediator of angiogenesis, as measured by its ability to modulate endothelial cell function in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. AcSDKP at nanomolar concentrations stimulates in vitro endothelial cell migration and differentiation into capillary-like structures on Matrigel as well as enhances the secretion of an active form of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo, AcSDKP promotes a significant angiogenic response in the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in the abdominal muscle of the rat. Moreover, it induces the formation of blood vessels in Matrigel plugs implanted subcutaneously in the rat. This is the first report demonstrating the ability of AcSDKP to interact directly with endothelial cells and to elicit an angiogenic response in vitro and in vivo.  (+info)

The ultrasonic trocar provides an easy, sharp, bloodless, and repeatable approach to the abdominal cavity. (6/300)

Reusable trocars have the advantage of being more cost-effective than disposable trocars. However, the reusable trocar does lose its sharpness on insertion with repetitive insertion. Nonreusable trocars are expensive, but the sharpness of the knife facilitates insertion. Nonreusable trocars have a safety shield system designed to decrease abdominal organ injury, though the potential problem of bleeding from the abdominal wall port site has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a novel ultrasonic vibrating trocar that does not lose its sharpness even with repetitive insertion. This trocar prevents bleeding by means of an ultrasonic cavitation effect. The ultrasonic vibrating trocar has the advantage of ease of insertion, and the force required for new reusable trocar insertion was only 34% of the force required for insertion of commercially available nonreusable trocars. The force required for multiply used conventional reusable ultrasonic vibrating trocar insertion, ie, 900 insertions, was maintained at less than 46% of the force required by the corresponding nonreusable trocars. Bleeding from the abdominal wall was prevented by an ultrasonic cavitation effect.  (+info)

The abdominal compartment syndrome following aortic surgery. (7/300)

BACKGROUND: multi-organ failure is a leading cause of death following aneurysm surgery, especially in the emergency setting. Intra-abdominal hypertension is an important factor in the development of multi-organ failure. Prevention, early recognition and prompt treatment of abdominal hypertension and the abdominal compartment syndrome may reduce mortality following aneurysm surgery. METHODS: a descriptive review of the literature from a Medline search. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: the abdominal compartment syndrome is the result of diverse physiological effects caused by increased intra-abdominal pressure. The syndrome has been most widely described in trauma victims, but occurs in patients following aortic surgery, particularly following ruptured aneurysm repair. Preventative therapy should be instituted to minimise its development in patients at risk, and monitoring of intra-abdominal pressure may allow prompt treatment of this condition.  (+info)

Definitive surgical treatment of infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh. (8/300)

OBJECTIVE: To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. METHODS: Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. RESULTS: Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). CONCLUSIONS: Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh.  (+info)

The abdominal wall refers to the group of muscles, fascia (sheaths of connective tissue), and skin that make up the front and sides of the abdomen, extending from the thorax (chest) to the pelvis. It provides protection to the abdominal organs, supports the trunk, and allows for movement of the torso.

The main muscles of the anterior abdominal wall include:

1. Rectus sheaths (Rectus Abdominis): paired vertical muscles running from the pubic symphysis to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs 5-7.
2. External obliques: thin, irregular muscles that lie over the lower part of the abdomen and run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (pelvic bone) and pubic tubercle.
3. Internal obliques: thicker muscles that lie under the external obliques, running diagonally upward and forward from the iliac crest to the lower ribs.
4. Transverse abdominis: deepest of the abdominal muscles, lying horizontally across the abdomen, attaching from the lower ribs to the pelvis.

These muscles are interconnected by various layers of fascia and aponeuroses (flat, broad tendons), forming a complex structure that allows for both stability and mobility. The linea alba, a fibrous band, runs down the midline of the anterior abdominal wall, connecting the rectus sheaths.

Damage to the abdominal wall can occur due to trauma, surgery, or various medical conditions, which may require surgical intervention for repair.

The abdominal muscles, also known as the abdominals or abs, are a group of muscles in the anterior (front) wall of the abdominopelvic cavity. They play a crucial role in maintaining posture, supporting the trunk, and facilitating movement of the torso. The main abdominal muscles include:

1. Rectus Abdominis: These are the pair of long, flat muscles that run vertically along the middle of the anterior abdominal wall. They are often referred to as the "six-pack" muscles due to their visible, segmented appearance in well-trained individuals. The primary function of the rectus abdominis is to flex the spine, allowing for actions such as sitting up from a lying down position or performing a crunch exercise.

2. External Obliques: These are the largest and most superficial of the oblique muscles, located on the lateral (side) aspects of the abdominal wall. They run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (the upper part of the pelvis) and the pubic tubercle (a bony prominence at the front of the pelvis). The external obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in side-bending and exhalation.

3. Internal Obliques: These muscles lie deep to the external obliques and run diagonally downward and backward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest, pubic tubercle, and linea alba (the strong band of connective tissue that runs vertically along the midline of the abdomen). The internal obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in forced exhalation and increasing intra-abdominal pressure during actions such as coughing or lifting heavy objects.

4. Transversus Abdominis: This is the deepest of the abdominal muscles, located inner to both the internal obliques and the rectus sheath (a strong, fibrous covering that surrounds the rectus abdominis). The transversus abdominis runs horizontally around the abdomen, attaching to the lower six ribs, the thoracolumbar fascia (a broad sheet of connective tissue spanning from the lower back to the pelvis), and the pubic crest (the front part of the pelvic bone). The transversus abdominis helps maintain core stability by compressing the abdominal contents and increasing intra-abdominal pressure.

Together, these muscles form the muscular "corset" of the abdomen, providing support, stability, and flexibility to the trunk. They also play a crucial role in respiration, posture, and various movements such as bending, twisting, and lifting.

An abdominal hernia refers to the protrusion of an organ or tissue through a weakened area in the abdominal wall, resulting in a bulge. This condition can occur due to various factors such as congenital defects, aging, obesity, pregnancy, persistent coughing, or previous surgeries that have left behind weak spots in the abdominal wall.

There are several types of abdominal hernias, including:

1. Inguinal Hernia: This is the most common type of hernia, occurring when the intestine or bladder protrudes through the inguinal canal in the lower abdomen. Inguinal hernias are more prevalent in men than women.
2. Femoral Hernia: This type of hernia occurs when the intestine or fatty tissue pushes through a weakened area near the femoral artery, located in the upper thigh region. Femoral hernias are more common in women, especially those who are pregnant or obese.
3. Incisional Hernia: This type of hernia develops at the site of a previous abdominal surgery where the abdominal muscles have weakened or failed to heal properly.
4. Umbilical Hernia: An umbilical hernia occurs when the intestine protrudes through the abdominal wall near the navel, often visible as a bulge around the belly button. This type of hernia is more common in infants but can also affect adults, particularly those who are overweight or have had multiple pregnancies.
5. Epigastric Hernia: An epigastric hernia occurs when fatty tissue protrudes through a weakened area between the breastbone and the navel. These hernias are usually small and often painless but can cause discomfort or complications if they become incarcerated or strangulated.

Abdominal hernias can vary in size, from small and barely noticeable to large and severely painful. Symptoms may include a visible bulge, localized pain or discomfort, especially when lifting heavy objects, coughing, or straining during bowel movements. In some cases, hernias may become incarcerated (trapped) or strangulated (blood supply is cut off), which can lead to severe pain, nausea, vomiting, and require immediate medical attention.

Treatment for abdominal hernias typically involves surgical repair, either through open surgery or laparoscopic techniques. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, including the size and location of the hernia, the patient's overall health, and their personal preferences. In some cases, watchful waiting may be recommended for small, asymptomatic hernias, but it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional to determine the best course of action.

An umbilical hernia is a type of hernia that occurs at the umbilicus, or belly button. It results from a protrusion of abdominal contents through a weakened area in the abdominal wall surrounding the navel. This condition is common in newborns and infants, especially premature babies, due to incomplete closure of the abdominal muscles during development.

In most cases, umbilical hernias in children close on their own by age 3-4 or by the time they reach school age. However, if the hernia is still present after this age, surgical intervention may be required to prevent potential complications such as incarceration (where the herniated tissue becomes trapped and cannot be pushed back in) or strangulation (where the blood supply to the herniated tissue is cut off, leading to tissue death).

Adults can also develop umbilical hernias, often as a result of increased pressure in the abdomen due to obesity, pregnancy, heavy lifting, or persistent coughing. Umbilical hernias in adults are generally more likely to require surgical repair due to the higher risk of complications.

A ventral hernia is a type of hernia that occurs in the abdominal wall, specifically in the anterior (front) aspect. It can occur due to a weakness or defect in the abdominal wall muscles and fascia, which allows the internal organs or tissues to push through and create a bulge or swelling.

Ventral hernias can be classified into several types based on their location, size, and cause. Some of the common types include:

1. Incisional Hernia - occurs at the site of a previous surgical incision, where the abdominal wall has not healed properly or has become weakened over time.
2. Epigastric Hernia - located in the upper middle part of the abdomen, between the breastbone and the navel.
3. Umbilical Hernia - occurs around the belly button, most commonly seen in infants but can also affect adults.
4. Spigelian Hernia - a rare type of hernia that occurs lateral to the rectus sheath, usually at the level of the semilunar line.
5. Diastasis Recti - a separation of the abdominal muscles in the midline, which can lead to a ventral hernia if not treated.

Symptoms of a ventral hernia may include pain or discomfort, especially when lifting heavy objects, straining, coughing, or during physical activity. In some cases, a hernia may become incarcerated or strangulated, which requires immediate medical attention. Treatment options for ventral hernias typically involve surgical repair, either through open surgery or laparoscopic techniques.

Surgical mesh is a medical device that is used in various surgical procedures, particularly in reconstructive surgery, to provide additional support to weakened or damaged tissues. It is typically made from synthetic materials such as polypropylene or polyester, or from biological materials such as animal tissue or human cadaveric tissue.

The mesh is designed to be implanted into the body, where it can help to reinforce and repair damaged tissues. For example, it may be used in hernia repairs to support the weakened abdominal wall, or in pelvic floor reconstruction surgery to treat conditions such as pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence.

Surgical mesh can come in different forms, including sheets, plugs, and patches, and may be either absorbable or non-absorbable. The choice of mesh material and type will depend on the specific surgical indication and the patient's individual needs. It is important for patients to discuss the risks and benefits of surgical mesh with their healthcare provider before undergoing any surgical procedure that involves its use.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

Gastroschisis is a congenital abdominal wall defect, characterized by an opening, usually to the right of the umbilical cord, through which the abdominal organs such as the intestines protrude. It's typically not covered by a sac or membrane. The exact cause of gastroschisis is unknown, but it's thought to be related to disrupted blood flow in the area where the abdominal wall develops during pregnancy. This condition is usually detected prenatally through ultrasound and requires surgical repair shortly after birth.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polypropylenes" does not have a medical definition as it is not a medical term. Polypropylene is a type of plastic that is used in various medical and non-medical applications. It is a thermoplastic polymer resin that is produced by the polymerization of propylene.

In the medical field, polypropylene is sometimes used to make single-use surgical instruments, sutures, and medical devices due to its resistance to heat, chemicals, and electricity. It is also biocompatible, meaning it can be safely used in the body without causing adverse reactions. However, "Polypropylenes" as a medical term is not recognized or used in the medical community.

Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the abdomen that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can occur in any of the organs within the abdominal cavity, including the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, spleen, and kidneys.

Abdominal neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Some common symptoms include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel habits, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. In some cases, abdominal neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they have grown quite large or spread to other parts of the body.

The diagnosis of abdominal neoplasms typically involves a combination of physical exam, medical history, imaging studies such as CT scans or MRIs, and sometimes biopsy to confirm the type of tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Fascia lata is a medical term that refers to the thick, fibrous sheath of connective tissue that envelops and surrounds the thigh muscles (specifically, the quadriceps femoris and hamstrings). It is a type of fascia, which is the soft tissue component of the deep (internal) fascial system.

The fascia lata is continuous with the fascia of the hip and knee joints and plays an important role in providing stability, support, and protection to the muscles and other structures within the thigh. It also helps to facilitate the gliding and movement of muscles and tendons during physical activity.

Injuries or inflammation of the fascia lata can cause pain and discomfort, and may limit mobility and range of motion in the thigh and lower extremity. Conditions such as fascia lata strain, tears, or myofascial pain syndrome may require medical treatment, including physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, surgery.

The rectus abdominis is a paired, flat, and long muscle in the anterior (front) wall of the abdomen. It runs from the pubic symphysis (the joint where the two pubic bones meet in the front of the pelvis) to the xiphoid process (the lower end of the sternum or breastbone) and costal cartilages of the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs.

The rectus abdominis is responsible for flexing the lumbar spine (lower back), which helps in bending forward or sitting up from a lying down position. It also contributes to maintaining proper posture and stabilizing the pelvis and spine. The muscle's visibility, especially in its lower portion, is often associated with a "six-pack" appearance in well-trained individuals.

Abdominal wound closure techniques refer to the methods used to close and repair surgical incisions in the abdomen. The goal of these techniques is to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, minimize the risk of infection or dehiscence (wound separation), and promote optimal healing. Several abdominal wound closure techniques are available, and the choice of which one to use depends on various factors such as the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and medical history, and the surgeon's preference. Here are some commonly used abdominal wound closure techniques:

1. Continuous running suture: This technique involves using a continuous strand of suture material to close the wound in a single pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall, including the fascia (the strong connective tissue that surrounds the muscles), and then passed continuously along the length of the incision, pulling the edges of the wound together as it goes. This technique can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
2. Interrupted suture: In this technique, the surgeon uses individual stitches placed at regular intervals along the incision to close the wound. Each stitch is tied separately, which can make the closure more secure and reduce the risk of infection or wound breakdown. However, interrupted sutures can be more time-consuming than continuous running sutures.
3. Mass closure: This technique involves using a large, continuous suture to close the entire length of the incision in one pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall and tied at both ends, pulling the edges of the wound together. Mass closure can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
4. Retention sutures: These are additional sutures that are placed deep within the abdominal wall to provide extra support and strength to the closure. They are often used in high-tension areas or in patients who are at increased risk of wound dehiscence, such as those with obesity or diabetes.
5. Layered closure: In this technique, the surgeon closes the incision in multiple layers, starting with the deepest layer of muscle and fascia and working outward to the skin. Each layer is closed separately using either interrupted or continuous sutures. Layered closure can provide added strength and stability to the closure, but it can be more time-consuming than other methods.
6. Skin closure: The final step in wound closure is to close the skin, which can be done using a variety of techniques, including staples, sutures, or surgical glue. The choice of closure method depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise.

Overall, the choice of wound closure technique depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise. The goal is to provide a strong, secure, and cosmetically appealing closure that minimizes the risk of infection, wound breakdown, or other complications.

A laparotomy is a surgical procedure that involves making an incision in the abdominal wall to gain access to the abdominal cavity. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various conditions such as abdominal trauma, tumors, infections, or inflammatory diseases. The size of the incision can vary depending on the reason for the surgery and the extent of the condition being treated. Once the procedure is complete, the incision is closed with sutures or staples.

The term "laparotomy" comes from the Greek words "lapara," which means "flank" or "side," and "tome," which means "to cut." Together, they describe the surgical procedure that involves cutting into the abdomen to examine its contents.

The umbilicus, also known as the navel, is the scar left on the abdominal wall after the removal of the umbilical cord in a newborn. The umbilical cord connects the developing fetus to the placenta in the uterus during pregnancy, providing essential nutrients and oxygen while removing waste products. After birth, the cord is clamped and cut, leaving behind a small stump that eventually dries up and falls off, leaving the umbilicus. In adults, it typically appears as a slight depression or dimple on the abdomen.

Abdominal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the abdomen, an area of the body that is located between the chest and the pelvis. This region contains several vital organs such as the stomach, liver, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Abdominal injuries can range from minor bruises and cuts to severe internal bleeding and organ damage, depending on the cause and severity of the trauma.

Common causes of abdominal injuries include:

* Blunt force trauma, such as that caused by car accidents, falls, or physical assaults
* Penetrating trauma, such as that caused by gunshot wounds or stabbing
* Deceleration injuries, which occur when the body is moving at a high speed and suddenly stops, causing internal organs to continue moving and collide with each other or the abdominal wall

Symptoms of abdominal injuries may include:

* Pain or tenderness in the abdomen
* Swelling or bruising in the abdomen
* Nausea or vomiting
* Dizziness or lightheadedness
* Blood in the urine or stool
* Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
* Rapid heartbeat or low blood pressure

Abdominal injuries can be life-threatening if left untreated, and immediate medical attention is necessary to prevent complications such as infection, internal bleeding, organ failure, or even death. Treatment may include surgery, medication, or other interventions depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Herniorrhaphy is a surgical procedure where the herniated tissue or organ is placed back into its original position, and the weakened or damaged muscle wall is repaired. This is typically done to correct a hernia, which is a protrusion of an organ or tissue through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. The surgical incision may be closed with sutures or staples, and sometimes a mesh patch is used to reinforce the repair.

Surgical wound dehiscence is a medical condition that refers to the partial or complete separation of layers of a surgical incision after a surgical procedure, leading to the disruption of the wound closure. This can occur due to various factors such as infection, poor nutrition, increased tension on the sutures, hematoma or seroma formation, and patient's underlying health conditions like diabetes or immunodeficiency. Dehiscence may result in the exposure of internal tissues and organs, potentially causing severe complications such as infection, bleeding, or organ dysfunction. Immediate medical attention is required to manage this condition and prevent further complications.

Reconstructive surgical procedures are a type of surgery aimed at restoring the form and function of body parts that are defective or damaged due to various reasons such as congenital abnormalities, trauma, infection, tumors, or disease. These procedures can involve the transfer of tissue from one part of the body to another, manipulation of bones, muscles, and tendons, or use of prosthetic materials to reconstruct the affected area. The goal is to improve both the physical appearance and functionality of the body part, thereby enhancing the patient's quality of life. Examples include breast reconstruction after mastectomy, cleft lip and palate repair, and treatment of severe burns.

In medical terms, sutures are specialized surgical threads made from various materials such as absorbable synthetic or natural fibers, or non-absorbable materials like nylon or silk. They are used to approximate and hold together the edges of a wound or incision in the skin or other tissues during the healing process. Sutures come in different sizes, types, and shapes, each designed for specific uses and techniques depending on the location and type of tissue being sutured. Properly placed sutures help to promote optimal healing, minimize scarring, and reduce the risk of infection or other complications.

Abdominoplasty is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of excess skin and fat from the abdomen and tightening of the abdominal muscles. This procedure is also known as a "tummy tuck." It is typically performed on individuals who have loose or sagging abdominal skin due to weight loss, pregnancy, or aging. The goal of an abdominoplasty is to improve the appearance of the abdomen by making it flatter and more toned.

The procedure involves making an incision across the lower abdomen, just above the pubic area, and another incision around the navel. The skin is then separated from the abdominal muscles, which are tightened using sutures. Excess fat and skin are removed, and the remaining skin is repositioned and sutured closed. In some cases, liposuction may be used to remove additional fat deposits.

Abdominoplasty is typically performed under general anesthesia and requires a hospital stay of one to three days. Recovery time can vary depending on the individual, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within four to six weeks. It is important to note that abdominoplasty is not a substitute for weight loss or exercise, and it is not recommended for individuals who plan to become pregnant in the future.

Tissue adhesions, also known as scar tissue adhesions, are abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that form between two or more internal organs, or between organs and the walls of the chest or abdominal cavity. These adhesions can develop after surgery, infection, injury, radiation, or prolonged inflammation. The fibrous bands can cause pain, restrict movement of the organs, and potentially lead to complications such as bowel obstruction. Treatment options for tissue adhesions may include medication, physical therapy, or surgical intervention to remove the adhesions.

The epigastric arteries are a pair of blood vessels that supply the anterior abdominal wall. The inferior epigastric artery originates from the external iliac artery and ascends toward the umbilicus (navel), passing along the posterior surface of the rectus sheath. It anastomoses (joins) with the superior epigastric artery, which is a branch of the internal thoracic artery. Together, these arteries supply blood to the muscles and skin of the anterior abdominal wall.

A surgical flap is a specialized type of surgical procedure where a section of living tissue (including skin, fat, muscle, and/or blood vessels) is lifted from its original site and moved to another location, while still maintaining a blood supply through its attached pedicle. This technique allows the surgeon to cover and reconstruct defects or wounds that cannot be closed easily with simple suturing or stapling.

Surgical flaps can be classified based on their vascularity, type of tissue involved, or method of transfer. The choice of using a specific type of surgical flap depends on the location and size of the defect, the patient's overall health, and the surgeon's expertise. Some common types of surgical flaps include:

1. Random-pattern flaps: These flaps are based on random blood vessels within the tissue and are typically used for smaller defects in areas with good vascularity, such as the face or scalp.
2. Axial pattern flaps: These flaps are designed based on a known major blood vessel and its branches, allowing them to cover larger defects or reach distant sites. Examples include the radial forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap.
3. Local flaps: These flaps involve tissue adjacent to the wound and can be further classified into advancement, rotation, transposition, and interpolation flaps based on their movement and orientation.
4. Distant flaps: These flaps are harvested from a distant site and then transferred to the defect after being tunneled beneath the skin or through a separate incision. Examples include the groin flap and the latissimus dorsi flap.
5. Free flaps: In these flaps, the tissue is completely detached from its original blood supply and then reattached at the new site using microvascular surgical techniques. This allows for greater flexibility in terms of reach and placement but requires specialized expertise and equipment.

Surgical flaps play a crucial role in reconstructive surgery, helping to restore form and function after trauma, tumor removal, or other conditions that result in tissue loss.

Artificial pneumoperitoneum is a medical condition that refers to the presence of air or gas in the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs within the abdomen. This condition is typically created intentionally during surgical procedures, such as laparoscopy, to provide a working space for the surgeon to perform the operation.

During laparoscopic surgery, a thin tube called a trocar is inserted through a small incision in the abdominal wall, and carbon dioxide gas is pumped into the peritoneal cavity to create a pneumoperitoneum. This allows the surgeon to insert specialized instruments through other small incisions and perform the surgery while visualizing the operative field with a camera.

While artificial pneumoperitoneum is generally safe, there are potential complications that can arise, such as injury to surrounding organs or blood vessels during trocar insertion, subcutaneous emphysema (air trapped under the skin), or gas embolism (gas in the bloodstream). These risks are typically minimized through careful technique and monitoring during the procedure.

Aggressive fibromatosis, also known as Desmoid tumor or Desmoid-type fibromatosis, is a rare, non-cancerous (benign) connective tissue neoplasm. It is characterized by the proliferation of fibroblasts and excessive deposition of collagen in the affected area.

Aggressive fibromatosis typically involves the deep soft tissues such as muscle, fascia, or aponeurosis. The tumor can grow aggressively, invading surrounding tissues but rarely metastasizing to distant organs. It can cause significant morbidity due to local invasion and destruction of adjacent structures.

The exact cause of aggressive fibromatosis is unknown, although it has been associated with genetic mutations in the beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1) or familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Treatment options for aggressive fibromatosis include surgical resection, radiation therapy, medical management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The choice of treatment depends on the location, size, growth rate, and symptoms associated with the tumor.

Polyglactin 910 is a type of synthetic absorbable suture made from copolymers of lactide and glycolide. It is designed to gradually break down and be absorbed by the body over time, typically within 56 to 70 days after being used in surgical wounds. This property makes it an ideal choice for soft tissue approximation and laceration repairs.

Polyglactin 910 sutures are often used in various surgical procedures, including orthopedic, ophthalmic, cardiovascular, and general surgery. They come in different sizes and forms, such as plain, reverse cutting, and braided, to suit various surgical needs.

The gradual absorption of Polyglactin 910 sutures helps minimize scarring and reduces the need for suture removal procedures. However, it is essential to note that inflammation may occur during the degradation process, which could potentially lead to adverse reactions in some individuals. Proper wound care and follow-up with healthcare professionals are crucial to ensure optimal healing and manage any potential complications.

A fascia is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, that covers, connects, and separates muscles, organs, and other structures in the body. It provides support and stability, allows for smooth movement between structures, and has the ability to transmit forces throughout the body. Fascia is found throughout the body, and there are several layers of it, including superficial fascia, deep fascia, and visceral fascia. Injury, inflammation, or strain to the fascia can cause pain and restriction of movement.

A hernia is a protrusion of an organ or tissue through a weakened area in the abdominal wall, often appearing as a bulge beneath the skin. This condition can occur in various parts of the body such as the groin (inguinal hernia), navel (umbilical hernia), or site of a previous surgical incision (incisional hernia). Hernias may cause discomfort or pain, especially when straining, lifting heavy objects, or during bowel movements. In some cases, they may lead to serious complications like intestinal obstruction or strangulation, requiring immediate medical attention.

Tensile strength is a material property that measures the maximum amount of tensile (pulling) stress that a material can withstand before failure, such as breaking or fracturing. It is usually measured in units of force per unit area, such as pounds per square inch (psi) or pascals (Pa). In the context of medical devices or biomaterials, tensile strength may be used to describe the mechanical properties of materials used in implants, surgical tools, or other medical equipment. High tensile strength is often desirable in these applications to ensure that the material can withstand the stresses and forces it will encounter during use.

Suture techniques refer to the various methods used by surgeons to sew or stitch together tissues in the body after an injury, trauma, or surgical incision. The main goal of suturing is to approximate and hold the edges of the wound together, allowing for proper healing and minimizing scar formation.

There are several types of suture techniques, including:

1. Simple Interrupted Suture: This is one of the most basic suture techniques where the needle is passed through the tissue at a right angle, creating a loop that is then tightened to approximate the wound edges. Multiple stitches are placed along the length of the incision or wound.
2. Continuous Locking Suture: In this technique, the needle is passed continuously through the tissue in a zigzag pattern, with each stitch locking into the previous one. This creates a continuous line of sutures that provides strong tension and support to the wound edges.
3. Running Suture: Similar to the continuous locking suture, this technique involves passing the needle continuously through the tissue in a straight line. However, instead of locking each stitch, the needle is simply passed through the previous loop before being tightened. This creates a smooth and uninterrupted line of sutures that can be easily removed after healing.
4. Horizontal Mattress Suture: In this technique, two parallel stitches are placed horizontally across the wound edges, creating a "mattress" effect that provides additional support and tension to the wound. This is particularly useful in deep or irregularly shaped wounds.
5. Vertical Mattress Suture: Similar to the horizontal mattress suture, this technique involves placing two parallel stitches vertically across the wound edges. This creates a more pronounced "mattress" effect that can help reduce tension and minimize scarring.
6. Subcuticular Suture: In this technique, the needle is passed just below the surface of the skin, creating a smooth and barely visible line of sutures. This is particularly useful in cosmetic surgery or areas where minimizing scarring is important.

The choice of suture technique depends on various factors such as the location and size of the wound, the type of tissue involved, and the patient's individual needs and preferences. Proper suture placement and tension are crucial for optimal healing and aesthetic outcomes.

Peritoneal diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the peritoneum, which is the thin, transparent membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers the organs within it. The peritoneum has several functions, including providing protection and support to the abdominal organs, producing and absorbing fluids, and serving as a site for the immune system's response to infections and other foreign substances.

Peritoneal diseases can be broadly classified into two categories: infectious and non-infectious. Infectious peritoneal diseases are caused by bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections that spread to the peritoneum from other parts of the body or through contaminated food, water, or medical devices. Non-infectious peritoneal diseases, on the other hand, are not caused by infections but rather by other factors such as autoimmune disorders, cancer, or chemical irritants.

Some examples of peritoneal diseases include:

1. Peritonitis: Inflammation of the peritoneum due to bacterial or fungal infections, often caused by a ruptured appendix, perforated ulcer, or other abdominal injuries or conditions.
2. Tuberculous peritonitis: A form of peritonitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB).
3. Peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis: Infection of the peritoneum in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a type of kidney replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease.
4. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: A rare and aggressive form of cancer that affects the mesothelial cells lining the peritoneum, often caused by exposure to asbestos.
5. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): An autoimmune disorder that can cause inflammation and scarring of the peritoneum.
6. Peritoneal carcinomatosis: The spread of cancer cells from other parts of the body to the peritoneum, often seen in patients with advanced ovarian or colorectal cancer.
7. Cirrhotic ascites: Fluid accumulation in the peritoneal cavity due to liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.
8. Meigs' syndrome: A rare condition characterized by the presence of a benign ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion.

Fasciitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation or irritation of the fascia, which are the bands of connective tissue that surround muscles, tendons, and bones in the body. The most common type of fasciitis is plantar fasciitis, which affects the fascia on the bottom of the foot and can cause heel pain. Other types of fasciitis include:

* Achilles tendonitis or Achilles tendinopathy, which affects the fascia that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone
* Shin splints, which affect the fascia that covers the front of the lower leg
* Necrotizing fasciitis, a rare and serious bacterial infection that can cause extensive tissue damage and is potentially life-threatening.

The symptoms of fasciitis may include pain, stiffness, or tenderness in the affected area, especially after prolonged periods of rest or physical activity. Treatment for fasciitis typically involves rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) of the affected area, as well as physical therapy exercises to stretch and strengthen the fascia and surrounding muscles. In some cases, medication or surgery may be necessary to relieve symptoms and promote healing.

Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of a laparoscope, which is a thin tube with a light and camera attached to it, through small incisions in the abdomen. This allows the surgeon to view the internal organs without making large incisions. It's commonly used to diagnose and treat various conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, infertility, and appendicitis. The advantages of laparoscopy over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, less pain, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recovery times.

In medical terms, the "groin" refers to the area where the lower abdomen meets the thigh. It is located on both sides of the body, in front of the upper part of each leg. The groin contains several important structures such as the inguinal canal, which contains blood vessels and nerves, and the femoral artery and vein, which supply blood to and from the lower extremities. Issues in this region, such as pain or swelling, may indicate a variety of medical conditions, including muscle strains, hernias, or infections.

The abdomen refers to the portion of the body that lies between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis. It is a musculo-fascial cavity containing the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The abdominal cavity is divided into several regions and quadrants for medical description and examination purposes. These include the upper and lower abdomen, as well as nine quadrants formed by the intersection of the midline and a horizontal line drawn at the level of the umbilicus (navel).

The major organs located within the abdominal cavity include:

1. Stomach - muscular organ responsible for initial digestion of food
2. Small intestine - long, coiled tube where most nutrient absorption occurs
3. Large intestine - consists of the colon and rectum; absorbs water and stores waste products
4. Liver - largest internal organ, involved in protein synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism
5. Pancreas - secretes digestive enzymes and hormones such as insulin
6. Spleen - filters blood and removes old red blood cells
7. Kidneys - pair of organs responsible for filtering waste products from the blood and producing urine
8. Adrenal glands - sit atop each kidney, produce hormones that regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response

The abdomen is an essential part of the human body, playing a crucial role in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food and waste materials, as well as various metabolic processes.

An intestinal fistula is an abnormal communication or connection between the intestines (or a portion of the intestine) and another organ or the skin surface. This connection forms a tract or passage, allowing the contents of the intestines, such as digestive enzymes, bacteria, and waste materials, to leak into other body areas or outside the body. Intestinal fistulas can develop due to various reasons, including inflammatory bowel diseases (like Crohn's disease), infections, complications from surgery, radiation therapy, or trauma. They can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, skin irritation, and infection. Treatment of intestinal fistulas often involves a combination of medical management, nutritional support, and surgical intervention.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

A cicatrix is a medical term that refers to a scar or the process of scar formation. It is the result of the healing process following damage to body tissues, such as from an injury, wound, or surgery. During the healing process, specialized cells called fibroblasts produce collagen, which helps to reconnect and strengthen the damaged tissue. The resulting scar tissue may have a different texture, color, or appearance compared to the surrounding healthy tissue.

Cicatrix formation is a natural part of the body's healing response, but excessive scarring can sometimes cause functional impairment, pain, or cosmetic concerns. In such cases, various treatments may be used to minimize or improve the appearance of scars, including topical creams, steroid injections, laser therapy, and surgical revision.

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Inguinal hernia, also known as an inguinal rupture or groin hernia, is a protrusion of abdominal-cavity contents through the inguinal canal. The inguinal canal is a passage in the lower abdominal wall that carries the spermatic cord in males and a round ligament in females. Inguinal hernias are more common in men than women.

There are two types of inguinal hernias: direct and indirect. Direct inguinal hernias occur when the abdominal lining and/or fat push through a weakened area in the lower abdominal wall, while indirect inguinal hernias result from a congenital condition where the abdominal lining and/or fat protrude through the internal inguinal ring, a normal opening in the abdominal wall.

Inguinal hernias can cause discomfort or pain, especially during physical activities, coughing, sneezing, or straining. In some cases, incarceration or strangulation of the hernia may occur, leading to serious complications such as bowel obstruction or tissue necrosis, which require immediate medical attention.

Surgical repair is the standard treatment for inguinal hernias, and it can be performed through open or laparoscopic techniques. The goal of surgery is to return the protruding tissues to their proper position and strengthen the weakened abdominal wall with sutures or mesh reinforcement.

The thoracic wall refers to the anatomical structure that surrounds and protects the chest cavity or thorax, which contains the lungs, heart, and other vital organs. It is composed of several components:

1. Skeletal framework: This includes the 12 pairs of ribs, the sternum (breastbone) in the front, and the thoracic vertebrae in the back. The upper seven pairs of ribs are directly attached to the sternum in the front through costal cartilages. The lower five pairs of ribs are not directly connected to the sternum but are joined to the ribs above them.
2. Muscles: The thoracic wall contains several muscles, including the intercostal muscles (located between the ribs), the scalene muscles (at the side and back of the neck), and the serratus anterior muscle (on the sides of the chest). These muscles help in breathing by expanding and contracting the ribcage.
3. Soft tissues: The thoracic wall also contains various soft tissues, such as fascia, nerves, blood vessels, and fat. These structures support the functioning of the thoracic organs and contribute to the overall stability and protection of the chest cavity.

The primary function of the thoracic wall is to protect the vital organs within the chest cavity while allowing for adequate movement during respiration. Additionally, it provides a stable base for the attachment of various muscles involved in upper limb movement and posture.

A cutaneous fistula is a type of fistula that occurs when a tract or tunnel forms between the skin (cutaneous) and another organ or structure, such as the gastrointestinal tract, vagina, or urinary system. Cutaneous fistulas can result from various medical conditions, including infections, inflammatory diseases, surgical complications, trauma, or malignancies.

Cutaneous fistulas may present with symptoms such as drainage of fluid or pus from the skin, pain, redness, swelling, or irritation around the affected area. The treatment for cutaneous fistulas depends on their underlying cause and can range from conservative management with antibiotics and wound care to surgical intervention.

It is essential to seek medical attention if you suspect a cutaneous fistula, as untreated fistulas can lead to complications such as infection, sepsis, or tissue damage. A healthcare professional can provide an accurate diagnosis and develop an appropriate treatment plan based on the individual's needs.

A surgical wound infection, also known as a surgical site infection (SSI), is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an infection that occurs within 30 days after surgery (or within one year if an implant is left in place) and involves either:

1. Purulent drainage from the incision;
2. Organisms isolated from an aseptically obtained culture of fluid or tissue from the incision;
3. At least one of the following signs or symptoms of infection: pain or tenderness, localized swelling, redness, or heat; and
4. Diagnosis of surgical site infection by the surgeon or attending physician.

SSIs can be classified as superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections, depending on the depth and extent of tissue involvement. They are a common healthcare-associated infection and can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

The peritoneum is the serous membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. It is composed of a mesothelial cell monolayer supported by a thin, loose connective tissue. The peritoneum has two layers: the parietal peritoneum, which lines the abdominal wall, and the visceral peritoneum, which covers the organs.

The potential space between these two layers is called the peritoneal cavity, which contains a small amount of serous fluid that allows for the smooth movement of the organs within the cavity. The peritoneum plays an important role in the absorption and secretion of fluids and electrolytes, as well as providing a surface for the circulation of immune cells.

In addition, it also provides a route for the spread of infection or malignant cells throughout the abdominal cavity, known as peritonitis. The peritoneum is highly vascularized and innervated, making it sensitive to pain and distention.

Abdominal pain is defined as discomfort or painful sensation in the abdomen. The abdomen is the region of the body between the chest and the pelvis, and contains many important organs such as the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. Abdominal pain can vary in intensity from mild to severe, and can be acute or chronic depending on the underlying cause.

Abdominal pain can have many different causes, ranging from benign conditions such as gastritis, indigestion, or constipation, to more serious conditions such as appendicitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or abdominal aortic aneurysm. The location, quality, and duration of the pain can provide important clues about its cause. For example, sharp, localized pain in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen may indicate appendicitis, while crampy, diffuse pain in the lower abdomen may suggest irritable bowel syndrome.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience severe or persistent abdominal pain, especially if it is accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, vomiting, or bloody stools. A thorough physical examination, including a careful history and a focused abdominal exam, can help diagnose the underlying cause of the pain and guide appropriate treatment.

Neoplasm seeding, also known as tumor seeding or iatrogenic implantation, is a rare complication that can occur during surgical procedures. It refers to the accidental spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor site to other locations in the body, usually along the path of a surgical incision or via bodily fluids. This can result in new tumor growths (metastases) at these sites, which may complicate treatment and worsen the patient's prognosis.

Neoplasm seeding is more commonly associated with certain types of surgeries, such as those involving the liver, pancreas, or other organs with highly vascular tumors. It can also occur during biopsy procedures, where a needle is used to remove tissue samples for diagnostic purposes. While neoplasm seeding is a known risk of these procedures, it is relatively uncommon and often outweighed by the benefits of timely and effective treatment.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Polydioxanone (PDO) is a synthetic, absorbable monofilament suture material that is commonly used in surgical procedures. It is made from a polymer of polydioxanone and has a variety of medical uses, including soft tissue approximation and ligation. PDO sutures are known for their high tensile strength and slow absorption rate, which can make them ideal for use in surgeries where long-term support is needed before the suture is fully absorbed by the body. The absorbable nature of PDO sutures also eliminates the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

In summary, Polydioxanone (PDO) is a synthetic, absorbable monofilament suture material that is commonly used in surgical procedures due to its high tensile strength and slow absorption rate.

An abdominal abscess is a localized collection of pus in the abdominal cavity, caused by an infection. It can occur as a result of complications from surgery, trauma, or inflammatory conditions such as appendicitis or diverticulitis. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, fever, and tenderness at the site of the abscess. Abdominal abscesses can be serious and require medical treatment, which may include antibiotics, drainage of the abscess, or surgery.

Bladder exstrophy is a congenital birth defect that affects the urinary and reproductive systems, as well as the abdominal wall. In this condition, the bladder is not fully formed and is turned inside out and exposed on the outside of the body at birth. This results in the inability to control urination and can also lead to other complications such as infection and kidney damage if left untreated.

Bladder exstrophy occurs due to a problem with the development of the fetus during pregnancy, specifically during the formation of the lower abdominal wall. It is more common in boys than girls, and can occur on its own or as part of a spectrum of defects known as the exstrophy-epispadias complex.

Treatment for bladder exstrophy typically involves surgical reconstruction to repair the bladder and lower abdominal wall. This may be done in stages, starting with the closure of the abdominal wall and then followed by bladder reconstruction at a later time. In some cases, additional surgeries may be necessary to address other associated defects or complications. With proper treatment, most children with bladder exstrophy can lead normal lives, although they may require ongoing medical management and monitoring throughout their lives.

Tissue expansion is a surgical procedure that involves the gradual stretching and expansion of surrounding skin to repair or reconstruct defects, typically caused by trauma, burns, birth defects, or cancer removal. In this process, a silicone balloon expander is inserted under the skin near the area to be repaired and then gradually filled with saline solution over time, causing the skin to stretch and grow. This allows new, healthy tissue to grow, which can then be used to reconstruct the defective area. The expanded skin has a similar texture, color, and sensation to the surrounding skin, resulting in a more natural-looking repair.

Epispadias is a rare congenital abnormality of the urinary tract in which the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body) does not develop properly. In epispadias, the urethral opening is located on the dorsal (top) surface of the penis instead of at the tip. This condition usually affects boys, but it can also occur in girls, although this is much less common.

Epispadias can vary in severity and may be associated with other genitourinary abnormalities, such as bladder exstrophy, in which the bladder is located outside the body. Treatment for epispadias typically involves surgical reconstruction to create a functional urethra and improve urinary continence. The timing of surgery depends on the severity of the condition and whether it is associated with other abnormalities.

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is not inherently a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with significant uses in the medical field. Medically, PTFE is often referred to by its brand name, Teflon. It is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in various medical applications due to its unique properties such as high resistance to heat, electrical and chemical interaction, and exceptional non-reactivity with body tissues.

PTFE can be found in medical devices like catheters, where it reduces friction, making insertion easier and minimizing trauma. It is also used in orthopedic and dental implants, drug delivery systems, and sutures due to its biocompatibility and non-adhesive nature.

Endometriosis is a medical condition in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus (endometrium) grows outside the uterine cavity, most commonly on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the pelvic peritoneum. This misplaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it would inside the uterus, thickening, breaking down, and bleeding with each menstrual cycle. However, because it is outside the uterus, this blood and tissue have no way to exit the body and can lead to inflammation, scarring, and the formation of adhesions (tissue bands that bind organs together).

The symptoms of endometriosis may include pelvic pain, heavy menstrual periods, painful intercourse, and infertility. The exact cause of endometriosis is not known, but several theories have been proposed, including retrograde menstruation (the backflow of menstrual blood through the fallopian tubes into the pelvic cavity), genetic factors, and immune system dysfunction.

Endometriosis can be diagnosed through a combination of methods, such as medical history, physical examination, imaging tests like ultrasound or MRI, and laparoscopic surgery with tissue biopsy. Treatment options for endometriosis include pain management, hormonal therapies, and surgical intervention to remove the misplaced endometrial tissue. In severe cases, a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) may be recommended, but this is typically considered a last resort due to its impact on fertility and quality of life.

A laparoscope is a type of medical instrument called an endoscope, which is used to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. Specifically, a laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera attached to it. This device allows surgeons to view the abdominal cavity through small incisions, without having to make large, invasive cuts.

During a laparoscopic procedure, the surgeon will insert the laparoscope through a small incision in the abdomen, typically near the navel. The camera sends images back to a monitor, giving the surgeon a clear view of the organs and tissues inside the body. This allows for more precise and less invasive surgical procedures, often resulting in faster recovery times and fewer complications compared to traditional open surgery.

Laparoscopes are commonly used in a variety of surgical procedures, including:

1. Gynecological surgeries (e.g., hysterectomies, ovarian cyst removals)
2. Gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy)
3. Gastrointestinal surgeries (e.g., removing benign or malignant tumors)
4. Hernia repairs
5. Bariatric surgeries for weight loss (e.g., gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy)

While laparoscopes provide numerous benefits over open surgery, they still require specialized training and expertise to use effectively and safely.

Nonpenetrating wounds are a type of trauma or injury to the body that do not involve a break in the skin or underlying tissues. These wounds can result from blunt force trauma, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. They can also result from crushing injuries, where significant force is applied to a body part, causing damage to internal structures without breaking the skin.

Nonpenetrating wounds can cause a range of injuries, including bruising, swelling, and damage to internal organs, muscles, bones, and other tissues. The severity of the injury depends on the force of the trauma, the location of the impact, and the individual's overall health and age.

While nonpenetrating wounds may not involve a break in the skin, they can still be serious and require medical attention. If you have experienced blunt force trauma or suspect a nonpenetrating wound, it is important to seek medical care to assess the extent of the injury and receive appropriate treatment.

Compartment syndromes refer to a group of conditions characterized by increased pressure within a confined anatomical space (compartment), leading to impaired circulation and nerve function. These compartments are composed of bones, muscles, tendons, blood vessels, and nerves, surrounded by a tough fibrous fascial covering that does not expand easily.

There are two main types of compartment syndromes: acute and chronic.

1. Acute Compartment Syndrome (ACS): This is a medical emergency that typically occurs after trauma, fractures, or prolonged compression of the affected limb. The increased pressure within the compartment reduces blood flow to the muscles and nerves, causing ischemia, pain, and potential muscle and nerve damage if not promptly treated with fasciotomy (surgical release of the fascial covering). Symptoms include severe pain disproportionate to the injury, pallor, paresthesia (abnormal sensation), pulselessness, and paralysis.
2. Chronic Compartment Syndrome (CCS) or Exertional Compartment Syndrome: This condition is caused by repetitive physical activities that lead to increased compartment pressure over time. The symptoms are usually reversible with rest and may include aching, cramping, tightness, or swelling in the affected limb during exercise. CCS rarely leads to permanent muscle or nerve damage if managed appropriately with activity modification, physical therapy, and occasionally surgical intervention (fasciotomy or fasciectomy).

Early recognition and appropriate management of compartment syndromes are crucial for preventing long-term complications such as muscle necrosis, contractures, and nerve damage.

Flank pain is defined as discomfort or pain located in the area of the body between the lower ribcage and the pelvis, specifically in the region of the abdomen that lies posterior to the axillary line (the line drawn from the underarm down the side of the body). This region contains several vital organs such as the kidneys, ureters, pancreas, colon, and parts of the reproductive system. Flank pain can be a symptom of various medical conditions affecting these organs, including but not limited to kidney stones, pyelonephritis (kidney infection), musculoskeletal issues, or irritable bowel syndrome. The intensity and character of flank pain may vary depending on the underlying cause, ranging from a dull ache to sharp stabbing sensations.

In anatomy, the abdominal wall represents the boundaries of the abdominal cavity. The abdominal wall is split into the ... abdominal wall' most commonly refers to the layers composing the anterior abdominal wall which, in addition to the layers ... DSc Abdominal+Wall at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Anterolateral Abdominal Wall ... ISBN 978-0-7020-5131-9. "Duke Anatomy - Lab 5: Anterior Abdominal Body Wall & Abdominal Viscera". web.duke.edu. Retrieved 2019- ...
Abdominal wall "Abdominal Wall Defects". Encyclopedia of Children's Health. Retrieved November 28, 2012. "Abdominal wall defect ... Abdominal wall defects are a type of congenital defect that allows the stomach, the intestines, or other organs to protrude ... Abdominal Wall Defects by Sajani Shah MD, at M&M Conference at SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Feb 24, 2006. (Articles with ... The silo is spring-loaded so that the device can be attached to the inside of the abdominal wall without sutures. The top of ...
Lumbar triangle External abdominal oblique muscle. Anterior abdominal wall. Deep dissection. Anterior view. This article ... The abdominal external oblique muscle (also external oblique muscle, or exterior oblique) is the largest and outermost of the ... Posterior part of abdominal external oblique muscle labeled. The subcutaneous inguinal ring. Transverse section through the ... It is broad, thin, and irregularly quadrilateral, its muscular portion occupying the side, its aponeurosis the anterior wall of ...
ISBN 978-0-7020-5131-9. Neumayer L, Dangleben DA, Fraser S, Gefen J, Maa J, Mann BD (2013). "11: Abdominal Wall, Including ... Using Carnett's sign to differentiate between visceral pain and pain originating in the muscles of the abdominal wall. After ... threatened abortion Abdominal wall muscle strain or trauma muscular infection neurogenic pain: herpes zoster, radiculitis in ... Below is a brief overview of abdominal pain emergencies. Abdominal pain is the reason about 3% of adults see their family ...
... is the tensing of the abdominal wall muscles to guard inflamed organs within the abdomen from the pain of ... The tensing is detected when the abdominal wall is pressed. Abdominal guarding is also known as 'défense musculaire'. Guarding ... The tensed muscles of the abdominal wall automatically go into spasm to keep the tender underlying tissues from being disturbed ... Abdominal Guarding - Abdominal Rigidity on Medicine Online Medical Articles Archived April 24, 2011, at the Wayback Machine ( ...
... no uterine wall surrounding the fetus, fetal parts are close to the abdominal wall, the fetus has an abnormal lie, the placenta ... and the peritoneum of the pelvic wall and the abdominal wall. The growing placenta may be attached to several organs including ... Babies of abdominal pregnancies are prone to birth defects due to compression in the absence of the uterine wall and the often ... Women with an abdominal pregnancy will not go into labor. Delivery in a case of an advanced abdominal pregnancy will have to be ...
Surgical decompression can be achieved by opening the abdominal wall and abdominal fascia anterior in order to physically ... abdominal wall, and ophthalmic systems. The gut is the most sensitive to intra-abdominal hypertension, and it develops evidence ... Once the abdominal wall can no longer expand, any further fluid leaking into the tissue results in fairly rapid rises in the ... Specific cause of abdominal compartment syndrome is not known, although some causes can be sepsis and severe abdominal trauma. ...
Abdominal guarding is a tensing of the abdominal wall muscles to guard inflamed organs within the abdomen. Pneumoperitoneum, ... and injuries to the abdominal wall. Motor vehicle collisions are a common source of blunt abdominal trauma. Seat belts reduce ... Gas within the abdominal cavity seen on CT is understood to be a diagnostic sign of bowel perforation; however intra-abdominal ... Abdominal trauma is an injury to the abdomen. Signs and symptoms include abdominal pain, tenderness, rigidity, and bruising of ...
... exceeds the local wall strength; consequently, peak wall stress (PWS), mean wall stress (MWS), and peak wall rupture risk (PWRR ... The mechanical tension in the abdominal aortic wall is therefore higher than in the thoracic aortic wall. The elasticity and ... An abdominal aortic aneurysm is usually diagnosed by physical exam, abdominal ultrasound, or CT scan. Plain abdominal ... "Effects of wall calcifications in patient-specific wall stress analyses of abdominal aortic aneurysms". Journal of ...
Diagram of a transverse section of the posterior abdominal wall, to show the disposition of the lumbodorsal fascia. Posterior ... Diagram of a transverse section through the anterior abdomina wall, below the linea semicircularis. The abdominal inguinal ring ... Thus, to the extent that traditional abdominal exercises (e.g. crunches) or more advanced abdominal exercises tend to "flatten ... abdominal wall , deep to (layered below) the internal oblique muscle. It is thought by most fitness instructors to be a ...
Lumbar triangle Internal abdominal oblique muscle.Anterior abdominal wall.Deep dissection.Anterior view Abdominal exercise ... an abdominal muscle in the abdominal wall that lies below the external oblique muscle and just above the transverse abdominal ... Diagram of a transverse section of the posterior abdominal wall, to show the disposition of the lumbodorsal fascia. Diagram of ... When the diaphragm contracts, it pulls the lower wall of the chest cavity down, increasing the volume of the lungs which then ...
The navel (specifically abdominal wall) would be considered an umbilical hernia if the protrusion were 5 centimeters or more. ... ISBN 1-4051-3804-1.[page needed] O'Rahilly, Ronan; Müller, Fabiola; Carpenter, Stanley; Swenson, Rand (2004). "Abdominal walls ...
... , abdominal wall Micrograph showing endometriosis (right) and ovarian stroma (left) Micrograph of the wall of an ... Laparoscopy is not an applicable test for extrapelvic sites such as umbilicus, hernia sacs, abdominal wall, lung, or kidneys. ... Dwivedi AJ, Agrawal SN, Silva YJ (February 2002). "Abdominal wall endometriomas". Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 47 (2): 456- ... "Scar endometriosis" can occur in surgical abdominal incisions. Risk factors for scar endometriosis include previous abdominal ...
Anterior abdominal wall. Intermediate dissection. Anterior view Medical ultrasonography of a normal penis. Anatomy photo:42:06- ...
"Abdominal Wall Hernias , Michigan Medicine". www.uofmhealth.org. Retrieved 2019-05-14. Sallam, Raouf Mahmoud; El-sayed, Ahmed ... "Illustrated review of new imaging techniques in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias". The British Journal of Surgery. 86 ( ... An epigastric hernia is a type of hernia that causes fat to push through a weakened area in the walls of the abdomen. It may ... It is usually present at birth and may appear and disappear only when the patient is doing an activity that creates abdominal ...
Lyons, M.; Mohan, H.; Winter, D.C.; Simms, C.K. (2015). "Biomechanical abdominal wall model applied to hernia repair". Br J ... The weakened tissue of the abdominal wall is re-incised and a repair is reinforced using a prosthetic mesh. Complications, ... Park, E.; Roth, J.S. (2006). "Abdominal wall hernia". Curr Probl Surg. 43 (5): 326-375. doi:10.1067/j.cpsurg.2006.02.004. PMID ... Matapurkar, B.G.; Bhargave, A.; Dawson, L.; Sonal, B. (1999). "Regeneration of Abdominal Wall Aponeurosis: New Dimension in ...
Anterior abdominal wall. Superficial dissection. Anterior view. Anterior abdominal wall. Intermediate dissection. Anterior view ...
Anterior abdominal wall. Intermediate dissection. Anterior view. Suspensory ligament of penis. Suspensory ligament of clitoris ...
Anterior thoracic wall. External abdominal oblique muscle. Deep dissection, anterior view. Clearly visible serratus anterior ... "Superficial muscles of the anterior chest wall." Anatomy figure: 05:02-07 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical ...
Through the abdominal wall, organs inside the pelvis can be seen, such as the urinary bladder or the ovaries and uterus in ... Abdominal ultrasound is commonly used in the setting of abdominal pain or an acute abdomen (sudden and/or severe abdominal pain ... Abdominal ultrasonography (also called abdominal ultrasound imaging or abdominal sonography) is a form of medical ... For this purpose, the standard aortic measurement for abdominal aortic aneurysm is between the outer margins of the aortic wall ...
The anterior abdominal wall is made up of four muscles-the rectus abdominis muscle, the internal and external obliques, and the ... Abdominal exercises are a type of strength exercise that affect the abdominal muscles (colloquially known as the stomach ... Abdominal exercises are useful for building abdominal muscles. This is useful for improving performance with certain sports, ... One of the most popular exercise is what is known as the abdominal crunch. It activates the four abdominal muscles because it ...
It can be caused by damage to an organ, or from a contusion to the abdominal wall from the outside or by surgery. It may be ... The abdominal cavity is lined with a protective membrane termed the peritoneum. The inside wall is covered by the parietal ... which attaches the back portion of the colon to the abdominal wall, and the sigmoid mesocolon which enfolds the sigmoid colon. ... The abdominal cavity is a large body cavity in humans and many other animals that contains many organs. It is a part of the ...
Nigam, Vinod Kumar; Nigam, Siddarth (2008). Essentials of Abdominal Wall Hernias. New Delhi. ISBN 9788189866938. Retrieved 12 ...
MDCT also offers clear detail of the abdominal wall allowing wall hernias to be identified accurately. Complications may arise ... Abdominal wall hernia may occur due to trauma. If this type of hernia is due to blunt trauma it is an emergency condition and ... By far the most common hernias develop in the abdomen when a weakness in the abdominal wall evolves into a localized hole, or " ... Hernias are caused by a disruption or opening in the fascia, or fibrous tissue, which forms the abdominal wall. It is possible ...
Nduka, C. C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Menzies-Gow, N.; Darzi, A. (1994). "Abdominal wall metastases following laparoscopy". British ...
Bendavid, Robert; Abrahamson, Jack; Arregui, Maurice E. (2001). Abdominal Wall Hernias: Principle and Management. Springer. ...
In: R. Latifi (Hrsg.): Surgery of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects. Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013, S. 167-172. S ... Affiliated First People's Hospital with Hans-Jörg Oestern, Otmar Trentz: Head, thoracic, abdominal and vascular injuries. Band ... Early experience with telemanipulative abdominal and cardiac surgery with the Zeus robotic system. In: European Surgery (ACA). ...
p. 1. Sources Bendavid, Robert (2001). Abdominal Wall Hernias: Principles and Management. Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-95004-4. ...
Anatomy photo:35:04-0100 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Anterior Abdominal Wall: Thoracoabdominal Nerves" Anatomy ... and eleventh thoracic intercostal nerves are continued anteriorly from the intercostal spaces into the abdominal wall; hence ... The lower intercostal nerves supply the Intercostales and abdominal muscles; the last three send branches to the Serratus ... they are named thoraco-abdominal nerves (or thoracicoabdominal intercostal nerves). They have the same arrangement as the upper ...
"Sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma local relapse on abdominal wall. Oncological resection and complex abdominal wall reconstruction ...
In anatomy, the abdominal wall represents the boundaries of the abdominal cavity. The abdominal wall is split into the ... abdominal wall most commonly refers to the layers composing the anterior abdominal wall which, in addition to the layers ... DSc Abdominal+Wall at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Anterolateral Abdominal Wall ... ISBN 978-0-7020-5131-9. "Duke Anatomy - Lab 5: Anterior Abdominal Body Wall & Abdominal Viscera". web.duke.edu. Retrieved 2019- ...
An abdominal wall defect is an opening in the abdomen through which various abdominal organs can protrude. Explore symptoms, ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/abdominal-wall-defect/ Abdominal wall defect. ... An abdominal wall defect is an opening in the abdomen through which various abdominal organs can protrude. This opening varies ... Most cases of abdominal wall defect are sporadic, which means they occur in people with no history of the disorder in their ...
Ventral body wall defects comprise a group of congenital malformations that includes gastroschisis and omphalocele, which are ... Pediatric omphalocele and gastroschisis (abdominal wall defects). Note the laxity of the abdominal wall in this infant with ... Pediatric omphalocele and gastroschisis (abdominal wall defects). The sac is removed, and the abdominal wall defect is closed ... Abdominal Wall Defects)) and Pediatric Omphalocele and Gastroschisis (Abdominal Wall Defects) What to Read Next on Medscape ...
... and abdominal wall hernia repair. The program includes didactics, video case review, and interactive group discussions, led by ...
Find Abdominal wall surgery information, treatments for Abdominal wall surgery and Abdominal wall surgery symptoms. ... MedHelps Abdominal wall surgery Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for Abdominal wall surgery. ... Hi All! To cut a long story short, I have been suffering upper abdominal pain for the pa... ... Posts on Abdominal wall surgery (125368). Abdominal Wall Pain - Pain Management Community ...
A man receives the first abdominal wall transplant recipient in North Carolina ... Today, thanks to an abdominal wall and intestine transplant, Nauta is getting back to normal life at home with his wife and ... In October 2018, Nauta simultaneously underwent an abdominal wall and intestine transplant. The surgical team even pioneered a ... Nautas previous surgeries had damaged his abdominal wall to the point that additional surgeries were impossible. ...
Discover a rare case of abdominal incisional site endometriosis in a 33-year-old female following a Caesarean Section. Learn ... A Case of Endometriosis in the Abdominal Wall Post Caesarean Section () Emerson Budhoo, Dale Maharaj Department of General and ... E. Budhoo and D. Maharaj, "A Case of Endometriosis in the Abdominal Wall Post Caesarean Section," Surgical Science, Vol. 4 No. ... We report the case of a 33 year old female who presented with endometriosis of the anterior abdominal wall following Caesarean ...
This may lead to increased, localized mural neovascularization and inflammation, as well as regional wall weakening. We ... Association of intraluminal thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysm with local hypoxia and wall weakening J Vasc Surg. 2001 Aug; ... attenuates oxygen diffusion to the AAA wall, possibly causing localized hypoxia and contributing to wall weakening. The purpose ... In the second arm of this study, two AAA wall specimens were obtained from two different sites of the same aneurysm at the time ...
Type of abdominal wall defect. Primary hernia. Abdominal wall hernias can be divided into primary hernias, that are not related ... Abdominal wall abscess Mesh infection. A common complication of abdominal wall surgery is the development of a fluid collection ... Because abdominal wall hernias are defects of the fascia of the abdominal wall, these fascia layers need to be brought together ... Due to increased complex abdominal wall surgery, pre-operative CT planning with abdominal wall mapping has gained increasing ...
A canine hernia is a tear in the wall of a muscle that allows the internal organs or fatty tissue normally found behind the ... A hernia is a tear in the wall of a muscle that allows the internal organs or fatty tissue normally found behind the muscles in ... Inguinal: These hernias occur in the "groin" area, where the inner fold of the rear leg attaches to the body wall. These can ... Diaphragmatic: The muscle that separates the abdominal organs from your dogs heart and lungs is called the diaphragm.. A hole ...
Abdominal wall defects - Als PDF herunterladen oder kostenlos online ansehen ... Abdominal wall defects. *2. Abdominal Wall Defects Dr. Faheem ul Hassan Andrabi M Ch Resident Prof Nisar A Bhat Head & ... Similar a Abdominal wall defects(. 20. ). Abdominal wall defect von Nimishs Chacko. ... 1 approaches inguinoscrotal abdominal wall disorders von DrAbdifatahAbdiAli. 1 approaches inguinoscrotal abdominal wall ...
Abdominal Wall Defects - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer ... What is an abdominal wall defect? An abdominal wall defect is a gap in the skin and muscles of the belly. The intestines come ... How do doctors treat abdominal wall defects? Doctors will treat your babys abdominal wall defect as soon as your baby is born ... How can doctors tell if my baby has an abdominal wall defect? Doctors usually find an abdominal wall defect during routine ...
Definition Abdominal wall defects are birth (congenital) defects that allow the stomach or intestines to protrude. Description ... Abdominal wall defects are birth (congenital) defects that allow the stomach or intestines to protrude.. Description. Many ... Referring to the opening in the abdominal wall where the blood vessels from the placenta enter.. Viscera. Any of the bodys ... Abdominal Wall Defects. Discussion in Gastroenterology started by Dr.Night, Dec 1, 2011. ...
... with abdominal wall desmoid tumor underwent primary radical resection and autologous reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect ... This reconstructive method is considered to be a versatile option for the management of abdominal wall tumor in women with ... Magnetic resonance imaging and a clinical examination after the delivery revealed no signs of abdominal wall hernia or bulging ... Successful Pregnancy and Delivery after Autologous Abdominal Wall Reconstruction using Anterolateral-Thigh and Iliotibial-Tract ...
... bloating from too much water in your stomach or an abdominal wall hernia. ... Abdominal swelling after exercise may be caused by inflammation of your core muscles, ... Abdominal Wall Hernia In some cases swelling in your abdomen after a workout may be caused by a hernia. An abdominal hernia ... Merck Manual, Professional Version: Hernias of the Abdominal Wall * Harvard Health Publishing: Rhabdo: A Rare but Serious ...
Wall Shear Stress and Intraluminal Thrombus Changes in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Study With Longitudinal Patients B. Zambrano ... Zambrano, B, Jaberi, F, Lee, W, & Baek, S. "Wall Shear Stress and Intraluminal Thrombus Changes in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a focal enlargement of the abdominal aorta is an ongoing process that can be affected by many ... Assessing Near-Wall Hemodynamics of Blood Flow in the Left Anterior Descending Segment of the Left Coronary Artery Using ...
What is an Abdominal Wall Hernia? What is an Abdominal Wall Hernia?. Abdominal wall hernias are commonly seen by general ... The abdominal contents (frequently fat or bowels) can push through the abdominal wall and then fall back inside the abdomen ( ... The abdominal wall is made up of muscles and the tissues, which attach the muscles together or attach the muscles to bone. In ... What are some common types of abdominal wall hernias?. The umbilical cord was once attached to the umbilicus (a.k.a. the belly ...
Abdominal Wall and Peritoneum. The abdominal wall is made up of the skin, muscles, fascia and other tissue that lie on the ... The peritoneum is a double layer membrane that lines some of the abdominal organs and inner surface of the abdominal wall. ... Causes of Lower Abdominal (Stomach) Pain. The causes of lower abdominal pain may be due to diseases and disorders of the organs ... Read more on right lower abdominal pain and left lower abdominal pain. ...
... abdominal wall. RESUMEN: El patrón de formación de la vaina del músculo recto abdominal humano muestra variaciones, no está ... Anterior wall of the rectus sheath (AWRS). All the cases, the anterior wall of the rectus sheath was aponeurotic and firmly ... When the arcuate line was present (64 cases), all the anterolateral abdominal wall muscles passed anterior to rectus abdominis ... As evidenced by physiological studies, these fascicles of TA are recruited before other muscles of anterior abdominal wall ...
Formerly the domain of the general surgeon, the increasing complexity of the abdominal wall defects and the development of ... The management of complex abdominal wall defects has challenged both general surgeons and reconstructive surgeons since the ... Anterior abdominal wall anatomy. The anatomical layers of the abdominal wall include skin, subcutaneous tissue, superficial ... Ferzoco S. Abdominal Wall Defects: The Magnitude of the Problem. Presentation to the Abdominal Wall Reconstruction 2011 ...
The posterior abdominal wall is formed by the lumbar vertebrae, parts of the ilia of the hip bones, psoas major and iliacus ... Axial Muscles of the Abdominal Wall and Thorax. Learning Objectives. *Identify the intrinsic skeletal muscles of the back and ... On the flanks of the body, medial to the rectus femoris, the abdominal wall is composed of three layers. The external oblique ... The muscles of the vertebral column, thorax, and abdominal wall extend, flex, and stabilize different parts of the bodys trunk ...
Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair. In: Circulation. ... Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair. Circulation. 2017 ... Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair. / The MA3RS Study ... Aortic Wall Inflammation Predicts Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion, Rupture, and Need for Surgical Repair.. ...
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The abdominal wall forms a firm, yet flexible boundary which: *Keeps the abdominal viscera in the abdominal cavity and assists ... Posterior Abdominal Wall Muscles The muscles that compose the posterior abdominal wall are powerful stabilizers of the lumbar ... The muscles of the abdominal wall are divided anatomically in two regions: *Anterior - Anterolateral Abdominal Wall Muscles ... The abdominal wall encloses the abdominal cavity and can be divided into anterolateral and posterior sections.. ...
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... focal areas of hyperechogenicities within the anterior abdominal wall fat correlating with contusions of the abdominal wall. ... "High resolution ultrasonography of the anterior abdominal wall." Indian Journal of Radiology and Imaging 17.4 (2007): 290. ... frequency linear probes will help elicit subtle injuries confined to the abdominal wall that presents as localized abdominal ... Young lady presented with history of assault and abdominal pain with difficulty to pass urine. ...
Abdominal Wall, Crohn Disease, Graft vs Host Disease, Humans, Intestine, Small, Male, Short Bowel Syndrome, Young Adult ...
A couple of my doctors felt I should fix the abdominal wall area but then felt it would be too risky for to do so and the ... EDS Hypermobility and thinning abdominal wall. NEW STUDY! Parasym Plus™ for Multiple Sclerosis › Forums › PrettyIll.com ... What is happening is the laminectomy I had 2 years ago has apparently caused the thinning abdominal wall with what they are ... I have a hard area where the incision was that softenens when I wear an abdominal brace but I cant wear that all the time as ...
They occur when the inside layers of the abdominal wall weaken then bulge or tear allowing the inner lining of the abdomen to ... A hernia becomes complex when repeated surgical attempts to close the hole in the abdominal wall fail. The chances of surgery ... The primary outcome of an abdominal wall reconstruction is to restore the structural and functional continuity of the ... The complexity associated with abdominal wall defects, coupled with the development of specialised techniques mean this ...
Fetal abdomen and abdominal wall anomalies. Published on 14/04/2017 by admin ... Gastroschisis can be defined as herniation of the abdominal wall contents medial to the umbilical cord with no surrounding ... Amniotic band syndrome, due to early amnion rupture, may cause disruption of the anterior abdominal wall and a gastroschisis. ... As the abdominal anatomy is distorted it is often difficult to obtain a true abdominal circumference, which may lead to ...
  • In anatomy, the abdominal wall represents the boundaries of the abdominal cavity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malrotation occurs in the setting of developmental anomalies, in which the intestine fails to return to the nascent abdominal cavity, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia as well as abdominal wall defects. (medscape.com)
  • Volume of the hernia sac in relation to the total peritoneal volume, also called "loss of domain", in order to determine whether there is enough space to reduce all herniated contents into the abdominal cavity without risk of recurrence or ventilatory restriction. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • However, if the defect is large, it may be difficult to fit all the viscera into the small abdominal cavity. (facmedicine.com)
  • For example, if the blood supply is cut off to the organ, that is called a strangulated hernia and may result in a tear in the GI track or a serious infection and inflammation of the abdominal cavity. (livestrong.com)
  • The abdominal wall encloses the abdominal cavity and can be divided into anterolateral and posterior sections. (knowlative.com)
  • Keeps the abdominal viscera in the abdominal cavity and assists the viscera in maintaining their anatomical position against gravity. (knowlative.com)
  • If the exomphalos is large, then a silastic pouch may be used to reduce the viscera into the abdominal cavity and closure performed when the sac is smaller. (clinicalgate.com)
  • A laparotomy is a surgical incision in the abdominal cavity. (whatsnew2day.com)
  • The patient suffered green drainage of 450 ml in the abdominal cavity and intestinal anastomotic fistula, for which she readmitted and recovered afterward. (biomedcentral.com)
  • One year before admission, the pain occurred without obvious triggers, and the laparoscopy showed a cystic mass in the right lower quadrant of the abdominal cavity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although tumor markers were within normal limits, the metastasis to the abdominal wall and abdominal cavity from the previous cecal cancer was suspected. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This ureteropelvic junction ment of the liver in terms of location, abdominal cavity (Figure 1). (who.int)
  • The abdominal cavity is the largest hollow space in the body. (medscape.com)
  • An abdominal wall defect is an opening in the abdomen through which various abdominal organs can protrude. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Omphalocele is an opening in the center of the abdominal wall where the umbilical cord meets the abdomen. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A hernia is a tear in the wall of a muscle that allows the internal organs or fatty tissue normally found behind the muscles in the abdomen to push through. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • The stomach and intestines begin development outside the baby's abdomen and only later does the abdominal wall enclose them. (facmedicine.com)
  • An abdominal hernia occurs when the organs and contents of the abdomen protrude out due to a weakness or tear in the abdominal wall, advises Harvard Health Publishing . (livestrong.com)
  • The abdominal contents (frequently fat or bowels) can push through the abdominal wall and then fall back inside the abdomen (reducible hernia) or sometimes they can get stuck (incarcerated hernia). (phhealthcare.org)
  • The goal of hernia surgery is to remove any trapped abdominal contents from the hernia, to place those structures back into the abdomen and then to close the abdominal wall hernia opening. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Depending on factors like abdominal obesity, sometimes a person may also mistaken upper abdominal pain as pain in the lower abdomen. (healthhype.com)
  • The abdominal wall is made up of the skin, muscles, fascia and other tissue that lie on the surface of the abdomen. (healthhype.com)
  • Este estudio tiene como objetivo describir el patrón de formación de la vaina del músculo recto del abdomen en una población seleccionada de Kenia. (scielo.cl)
  • La formación de la vaina del músculo recto del abdomen se analizó en 80 sujetos (47 hombres, 33 mujeres) durante autopsias y disección de cadáveres. (scielo.cl)
  • En todos los casos, la aponeurosis del músculo oblicuo interno del abdomen se dividió en dos láminas, una lámina profunda que se fusionaba con la aponeurosis del músculo transverso del abdomen en el borde lateral del músculo recto del abdomen y una lámina superficial que se fusionaba con la aponeurosis del músculo oblicuo externo del abdomen a mitad del recorrido entre los bordes medial y lateral del músculo recto del abdomen. (scielo.cl)
  • El patrón de formación de la vaina del músculo recto del abdomen, entre los kenianos muestra algunas variaciones que no han sido reportadas en trabajos anteriores. (scielo.cl)
  • There are three flat skeletal muscles in the antero-lateral wall of the abdomen. (lumenlearning.com)
  • It presents with a ridge-like protrusion down the centre of the abdomen and may be associated with lower back and abdominal pain. (iriserdene.com)
  • They occur when the inside layers of the abdominal wall weaken then bulge or tear allowing the inner lining of the abdomen to push through. (iriserdene.com)
  • Wall hernias can be located anywhere in the abdomen, although the most frequent locations are: the navel, the inguinal region or at the site of a previous incision for abdominal surgery. (hhchospital.com)
  • There are other types of abdominal hernias as well, which include umbilical hernias that appear near the belly button, incisional hernias that occur near the previous surgical incision and hiatal hernias that occur in the upper abdomen. (drvpareek.com)
  • Several conditions that weaken the abdominal muscles and increase of pressure inside the abdomen together result in abdominal hernias. (drvpareek.com)
  • Gastroschisis is a defect in the abdominal wall, usually to the right of the umbilical cord, through which the large and small intestines protrude (although other organs may sometimes bulge out). (medlineplus.gov)
  • When the abdominal wall defect is repaired and normal intestinal function is recovered, the vast majority of affected individuals have no health problems related to the repaired defect later in life. (medlineplus.gov)
  • [ 6 ] Or, potentially or a small abdominal wall defect may constrict the mesentery, causing ischemic injury or actual necrosis. (medscape.com)
  • Condition of the abdominal wall musculature and the ratio between the defect and the width of the rectus muscles (RDR). (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • What is an abdominal wall defect? (msdmanuals.com)
  • An abdominal wall defect is a gap in the skin and muscles of the belly. (msdmanuals.com)
  • How can doctors tell if my baby has an abdominal wall defect? (msdmanuals.com)
  • Doctors usually find an abdominal wall defect during routine ultrasounds done during your pregnancy. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Doctors will treat your baby's abdominal wall defect as soon as your baby is born. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In the present 2 cases, 2 female patients (age 17 years and 35 years) with abdominal wall desmoid tumor underwent primary radical resection and autologous reconstruction of an abdominal wall defect in the lateral oblique muscle area (defect size, 13?Ã-?5?cm and 8?Ã-?6?cm) using an anterolateral thigh and iliotibial tract flap. (dtrf.org)
  • That said, while large abdominal wall defects can be plagued by significant herniation of intra-abdominal contents, the size of the fascial defect puts them at low risk for incarceration. (medscape.com)
  • An elastic defect in this raphe may allow the fascia to stretch and abdominal contents to bulge forward through the resulting divarication of the recti. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • It is a big challenge to repair a large abdominal wall defect after tumor resection, and en bloc resection with vascularized tissue reconstruction might be an alternative to achieve an improved survival for abdominal wall tumors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thereafter, we removed the tumor and involved tissues and organs and repaired the sizeable abdominal wall defect used by biological meshes and vascularized anterolateral thigh flaps. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Biological mesh combined with vascularized anterolateral thigh flaps could effectively repair the large abdominal wall defect and restore the biological function of the abdominal wall. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Subsequently, we resected the tumor and adjacent tissues and repaired the large abdominal wall defect(Fig. 1 d). (biomedcentral.com)
  • She was left with only 30% of her anterior abdominal wall intact, creating a large defect requiring composite reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, underdevelopment of the lungs is often associated with omphalocele because the abdominal organs normally provide a framework for chest wall growth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • When those organs are misplaced, the chest wall does not form properly, providing a smaller than normal space for the lungs to develop. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Constriction around exposed organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Important muscular structures that surround the abdominal organs are shown in this figure. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • The muscle that separates the abdominal organs from your dog's heart and lungs is called the diaphragm. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Many of the causes of lower abdominal pain involve the bowels (small intestine and large intestine) with the pelvic organs (like the uterus in women and prostrate in men) sometimes contributing to pain in this area. (healthhype.com)
  • The causes of lower abdominal pain may be due to diseases and disorders of the organs that lie in this area. (healthhype.com)
  • It contains and protects the delicate abdominal organs. (healthhype.com)
  • The peritoneum is a double layer membrane that lines some of the abdominal organs and inner surface of the abdominal wall. (healthhype.com)
  • The abdominal wall serves to protect the abdominal organs, maintain upright posture and support the spine, and assist in bodily functions that require generation of Valsalva, such as coughing, urination, or defecation. (medscape.com)
  • The three layers of muscle also help to protect the internal abdominal organs in an area where there is no bone. (lumenlearning.com)
  • The anatomic planes of the abdominal wall are made up of multiple muscular and fascial layers that interdigitate and unite to form a sturdy, protective musculofascial layer that protects the visceral organs and provides strength and stability to the body's trunk. (medscape.com)
  • We report the case of a 33 year old female who presented with endometriosis of the anterior abdominal wall following Caesarean Section at the surgical incision site. (scirp.org)
  • From a mechanical standpoint, greater understanding of the abdominal wall as a dynamic musculotendinous structure has led to characterization of a laparotomy incision within the linea alba as a tendon injury, akin to laceration of an upper extremity tendon. (medscape.com)
  • I have a hard area where the incision was that softenens when I wear an abdominal brace but I can't wear that all the time as it gets rather painful. (prettyill.com)
  • The choice of abdominal incision is mainly dependent on the area that needs to be exposed, the elective or emergency nature of the operation and the surgeon's personal preference. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • However, type of abdominal incision may have a profound influence on the occurrence of postoperative wound complications. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • Considering the number of laparotomies performed (e.g. 4.000.000 in the USA annually), consequences of the use of a specific type of abdominal incision may be substantial. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • During open abdominal hernia surgery, the surgeon makes an incision over the hernia itself. (hhchospital.com)
  • Previous abdominal surgeries involve cuts through the abdominal muscles which can make them weak over time and increase the risk of incisional hernias at the site of the incision. (drvpareek.com)
  • A cranial ventral abdominal midline incision can be used to gain access to the omentum and its attachments in order to create a pedicle. (vin.com)
  • Overall, strengthening the muscles of the abdominal wall after hernia surgery is 100% possible, but you have to work closely with your hernia surgeon in order to develop a safe and effective strategy for post-operative care. (drvpareek.com)
  • however, further evidence should be accumulated on the reconstruction of wider and central abdominal wall defects. (dtrf.org)
  • The primary outcome of an abdominal wall reconstruction is to restore the structural and functional continuity of the underlying muscular system, often in combination with an improved aesthetic outcome. (iriserdene.com)
  • The reconstruction of the abdominal wall would protect the integrity of abdominal structures, keep the intraabdominal pressure, and retain the abdominal function. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 3. What are surgical options for composite abdominal wall reconstruction? (medscape.com)
  • Protects the abdominal viscera from injury. (knowlative.com)
  • Assists in forceful expiration by pushing the abdominal viscera upwards. (knowlative.com)
  • It protects the abdominal viscera and aids in the localization and resolution of peritonitis. (vin.com)
  • Abdominal hernias are usually a clinical diagnosis and have been considered a simple problem to be repaired. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • In this article we will adress the key imaging features of complex abdominal wall hernias. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Because abdominal wall hernias are defects of the fascia of the abdominal wall, these fascia layers need to be brought together during surgery. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Abdominal wall hernias can be divided into primary hernias, that are not related to incisions and incisional hernias. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Primary abdominal hernias are hernias, that are located at certain weak spots in the abdominal wall. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • These hernias occur in the "groin" area, where the inner fold of the rear leg attaches to the body wall. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Abdominal wall hernias are commonly seen by general surgeons. (phhealthcare.org)
  • What are some common types of abdominal wall hernias? (phhealthcare.org)
  • Sites of prior surgery on the abdominal wall have scar tissue which is weaker than the healthy muscles around it, and hernias through this scar tissue are called incisional hernias. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Hernias are frequently visible as a bulge in the abdominal wall. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Hernias which are severely painful may be a sign that the abdominal contents in the hernia have twisted and are dying due to the obstructed the blood supply. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Many hernias are repaired by implanting a piece of synthetic mesh at the site of the hernia, which provides added strength to the abdominal wall and helps prevent the hernia from returning. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Prior to discussing an approach to repair, it is helpful to appreciate the magnitude of the problem posed by incisional hernias and other abdominal wall defects. (medscape.com)
  • Advances in Laparoscopy of the Abdominal Wall Hernia is fully illustrated, comprehensive guide which describes in detail the most up-to-date techniques used in the laparoscopic repair of hernias. (medicalebooks.org)
  • Methods to deal with rarer hernias and those of atypical location Advances in Laparoscopy of the Abdominal Wall Hernia is a valuable reference tool that would be of great benefit to surgeons and medical practitioners working in this field. (medicalebooks.org)
  • As age increases, our abdominal muscles might become weak, making us more sensitive to hernias. (drvpareek.com)
  • Obesity increases the risk of hernias as the excess weight puts more pressure on the abdominal muscles. (drvpareek.com)
  • Hernias are more likely to occur when lifting heavy objects because the abdominal muscles are put under more pressure. (drvpareek.com)
  • Treatment for abdominal hernias may not be the same for everyone because the type, size, and location of the hernia will be different. (drvpareek.com)
  • In human anatomy, the layers of the anterolateral abdominal wall are (from superficial to deep): Skin Subcutaneous tissue Fascia Camper's fascia - fatty superficial layer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Superficial Abdominal fascia Muscle External oblique abdominal muscle Internal oblique abdominal muscle Rectus abdominis Transverse abdominal muscle Pyramidalis muscle Transversalis fascia Extraperitoneal fat Peritoneum The surface contains several ligaments separated by fossae: Abdominal exercise Abdominal wall defect Human abdomen Peritoneum Terms for anatomical location Moore, Keith L. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the sac is small enough, then primary repair can be performed with excision of the sac and closure of the fascia and the abdominal wall. (clinicalgate.com)
  • Aunque en su mayor parte es muscular, la pared abdominal está constituida por al menos siete capas: PIEL, grasa subcutánea, FASCIA profunda, MÚSCULOS ABDOMINALES, fascia transversal, grasa extraperitoneal y PERITONEO parietal. (bvsalud.org)
  • The layers of the abdominal wall consist of the skin, superficial fascia, and muscles. (medscape.com)
  • The superficial fascia of the abdominal wall is the next layer encountered just deep to the skin. (medscape.com)
  • Ventral abdominal body wall defects comprise a group of congenital malformations that includes gastroschisis and omphalocele, which are relatively common, and ectopia cordis, bladder exstrophy, and cloacal exstrophy, which are extremely rare. (medscape.com)
  • This comprehensive one day program focuses on advanced surgical techniques for surgeons wanting to increase their surgical knowledge of laparoscopic ventral, inguinal, and abdominal wall hernia repair. (medtronic.com)
  • There are two main types of abdominal wall defects: omphalocele and gastroschisis . (medlineplus.gov)
  • In medical vernacular, the term 'abdominal wall' most commonly refers to the layers composing the anterior abdominal wall which, in addition to the layers mentioned above, includes the three layers of muscle: the transversus abdominis (transverse abdominal muscle), the internal (obliquus internus) and the external oblique (obliquus externus). (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths connect with the three lateral abdominal wall muscles: the external oblique, the internal oblique and the transverse abdominal. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • This illustration demonstrates how the anterior and posterior rectus sheath are formed by the aponeuroses of the external oblique, internal oblique and transverse abdominal muscles. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Across the superior half of the anterior abdominal skin, these lines are oriented in a transverse direction. (medscape.com)
  • The posterior wall of the rectus sheath was aponeurotic in 71 (88.5%) cases, the rest were musculoaponeurotic and only seen in males. (scielo.cl)
  • According to these authors, the posterior wall only extends to the arcuate line and is made up of the aponeuroses of IOA and TA. (scielo.cl)
  • When considering lower abdominal pain, which may be referred to as lower stomach pain, problems in the stomach are usually not one of the causes of pain in this region. (healthhype.com)
  • This is a rather simplistic anatomical description but serves the purpose of differentiating between lower abdominal pain and pelvic pain. (healthhype.com)
  • Read more on right lower abdominal pain and left lower abdominal pain . (healthhype.com)
  • A hernia that occurs near the inguinal canal i.e., in the lower abdominal and groin area is called an inguinal hernia and a hernia that occurs near the femoral canal or in the groin area is called a femoral hernia. (drvpareek.com)
  • The lower abdominal belly bulge is common amongst all persons regardless of gender or age, and is a sign of muscle coordination issues in the abdominal wall. (thrivept.com)
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a focal enlargement of the abdominal aorta is an ongoing process that can be affected by many parameters. (asme.org)
  • If you are palpating a swelling like an abdominal swelling infront of the aorta, You have to decide whether the mass you feel is pulsatile/e. (blogspot.com)
  • 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) was therefore performed, which demonstrated increased 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (maximum standardized uptake value: 3.1) in the small abdominal wall nodule alone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Gastroschisis can be defined as herniation of the abdominal wall contents medial to the umbilical cord with no surrounding membrane. (clinicalgate.com)
  • The exact cause of gastroschisis is unknown but is believed to be caused by a disruption of the blood supply to the developing abdominal wall from the omphalomesenteric duct artery by the 8th week of gestation. (clinicalgate.com)
  • We also found suggestive associations for mothers working as hairdressers and having infants born with defects of the ear (anotia and microtia) and abdominal wall (gastroschisis). (cdc.gov)
  • Anterior abdominal wall. (scielo.cl)
  • The anterior abdominal muscles include the medially located rectus femoris, which is covered by a sheet of connective tissue called the linea alba. (lumenlearning.com)
  • Corresponding to sites of clinical pain and tenderness, were focal areas of hyperechogenicities within the anterior abdominal wall fat correlating with contusions of the abdominal wall. (elearnrad.com)
  • High resolution ultrasonography of the anterior abdominal wall. (elearnrad.com)
  • In places where the triple or quadruple blood test is offered for screening, a raised alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) should prompt a search for an anterior abdominal wall abnormality. (clinicalgate.com)
  • She had an endometrioma of the anterior abdominal wall removed 2 years ago. (bvsalud.org)
  • Abdominal ultrasound demon- strated a 6 × 4 cm cystic mass between the anterior abdominal wall and ante- rior surface of the left hepatic lobe. (who.int)
  • There was also a round, subcutaneous hemorrhage that had developed in the anterior abdominal wall, as well. (cdc.gov)
  • A 26-year-old woman presented with symptomatic recurrent desmoid tumor to her anterior abdominal wall. (medscape.com)
  • During surgery, the terminal ileum, ileocecal junction, and proximal ascending colon were found tightly adhered to the abdominal wall and the tumor. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The description of tumors that depend on the intestinal wall is exceptional in the literature based on an exhaustive search in Pubmed and Cochrane with the key word "desmoid tumor small bowell" evidencing sporadic cases 2 . (revistaabcd.org.br)
  • The abdominal wall is split into the anterolateral and posterior walls. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the purposes of this blog, we are going to use toileting mechanics to illuminate common and treatable abdominal muscle dysfunction that contributes to this belly bulge. (thrivept.com)
  • From an abdominal perspective, this downward pressure contributes to the appearance of a lower belly bulge. (thrivept.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: USPIO-enhanced MRI is a novel approach to the identification of aortic wall cellular inflammation in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms and predicts the rate of aneurysm growth and clinical outcome. (ed.ac.uk)
  • When the muscles of the pelvis tear, abdominal contents enter the area adjacent to the anus. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • The primary mass originated from the right part of the pelvis and invaded the uterus, bowels, right adnexa, and whole abdominal wall layers (Fig. 1 c). (biomedcentral.com)
  • You can also exercise regularly to strengthen your abdominal wall muscles. (phhealthcare.org)
  • Can you strengthen your abdominal wall after hernia surgery? (drvpareek.com)
  • As the abdominal anatomy is distorted it is often difficult to obtain a true abdominal circumference, which may lead to inaccuracies in estimation of fetal weight or the misdiagnosis of fetal growth restriction. (clinicalgate.com)
  • Appreciation of the function and anatomy of the abdominal wall, and reconstructive principles, is critical. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The anterior wall of the rectus sheath in all cases was aponeurotic and firmly attached to rectus abdominis muscle. (scielo.cl)
  • 1998). This sheath has two walls, anterior and posterior, that enclose rectus abdominis muscle and its neurovascular bundle. (scielo.cl)
  • Formerly the domain of the general surgeon, the increasing complexity of the abdominal wall defects and the development of techniques involving manipulation and mobilization of muscle and myocutaneous flaps have drawn on the expertise of the plastic surgeon. (medscape.com)
  • The posterior abdominal wall is formed by the lumbar vertebrae, parts of the ilia of the hip bones, psoas major and iliacus muscles, and quadratus lumborum muscle. (lumenlearning.com)
  • The aponeuroses of these three muscles form the sturdy rectus sheaths , which enclose the fourth abdominal wall muscle, the rectus abdominis, which inserts on the 5th, 6th and 7th ribs superiorly and on the pubic bone inferiorly. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • Due to increased complex abdominal wall surgery, pre-operative CT planning with abdominal wall mapping has gained increasing attention. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • As the linea alba is an avascular area, it is frequently used as point of entrance for open abdominal surgery. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • Abdominal wall surgery is a common surgery and carries a small risk of complications. (hhchospital.com)
  • Abdominal hernia surgery can be performed under general, spinal, or local anesthesia. (hhchospital.com)
  • Is strengthening the abdominal wall possible after hernia surgery? (drvpareek.com)
  • Patients frequently experience considerable abdominal muscular weakness following hernia surgery. (drvpareek.com)
  • In the early afternoon, he will undergo a laparotomy and abdominal wall surgery… under general anesthesia," Bruni said. (whatsnew2day.com)
  • Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion of the disease in reproductive women with circular pain , palpable abdominal mass and history of uterine-relating surgery . (bvsalud.org)
  • Metastasis to the abdominal wall including port sites after laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is rare. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A Case of Endometrioma at the Abdominal Scar," Journal of the Korean Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons, Vol. 37, 2010, pp. 843-846. (scirp.org)
  • I. E. Sasson and H. S. Taylor, "Aromatase Inhibitor for Treatment of a Recurrent Abdominal Wall Endometrioma in a Postmenopausal Woman," Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 92, No. 3, 2009, p. 1170. (scirp.org)
  • Careful examination of sites of tenderness using high frequency linear probes will help elicit subtle injuries confined to the abdominal wall that presents as localized abdominal pain. (elearnrad.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain is less likely to reveal underlying organic pathology than acute abdominal pain. (bmj.com)
  • Acute abdominal pain often indicates a sudden physiologic change such as an obstructed or perforated hollow organ, infection, inflammation, or a sudden ischemic event. (bmj.com)
  • This article is intended for primary care clinicians, emergency medicine specialists, and other specialists who provide care to adults with acute abdominal pain. (medscape.com)
  • Identify key components of the history and physical examination in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in adults. (medscape.com)
  • Report recommendations for studies in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in adults. (medscape.com)
  • An enhanced computed tomography scan and biopsy of the mass were performed to achieve the definite diagnosis of abdominal mucinous adenocarcinoma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Then it was diagnosed as abdominal low-grade mucinous adenocarcinoma(cT4N0M0 stage IIB, ypT4N0M0), proved by pathological puncture biopsy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, it can be difficult to diagnose a lesion in the abdominal wall as recurrence of disease on the basis of clinical characteristics alone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Abdominal wall defects are birth (congenital) defects that allow the stomach or intestines to protrude. (facmedicine.com)
  • An abdominal computed tomography scan did not provide detective evidence of metastasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In November 2008, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a small nodule in the abdominal wall, which was difficult to interpret as metastasis of the cecal cancer (Figure 1 ). (biomedcentral.com)
  • These muscles of the anterolateral abdominal wall can be divided into four groups: the external obliques, the internal obliques, the transversus abdominis, and the rectus abdominis (Figure 1, Figure 2, and Table 1). (lumenlearning.com)
  • The abdominal wall is composed of 5 paired muscles: 2 vertical muscles (the rectus abdominis and the pyramidalis) and 3 layered, flat muscles (the external abdominal oblique, the internal abdominal oblique, and the transversus abdominis muscles). (medscape.com)
  • As your critically ill patient takes a turn for the worst with worsening hypotension, encephalopathy, and diminishing urine output, it is important to consider abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in your differential diagnosis. (acep.org)
  • Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are conditions that exist on a spectrum. (acep.org)
  • By contributing to multi-system organ dysfunction, IAH may be insidiously working against the recovery of some of our most critically ill patients and, at its most severe, can develop into abdominal compartment syndrome. (acep.org)
  • If your patient is critically ill and has at least one risk factor for developing IAH, the World Society of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS) recommends screening for elevated intra-abdominal pressure as frequently as every four-six hours, or at least once daily. (acep.org)
  • Ultimately, bowel and bladder habits tell us a lot about pelvic floor muscles, the abdominal wall, and diaphragm function. (thrivept.com)
  • Today, thanks to an abdominal wall and intestine transplant, Nauta is getting back to normal life at home with his wife and kids. (dukehealth.org)
  • In October 2018, Nauta simultaneously underwent an abdominal wall and intestine transplant . (dukehealth.org)
  • An abdominal wall hernia occurs when a part of the intestine or fat protrudes through the opening of the. (hhchospital.com)
  • https://karger.com/ddi/article/39/6/606/822861/Chronic-Abdominal-Pain-in-General-Practice http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33631744?tool=bestpractice.com The incidence of unspecified abdominal pain is 22.3 per 1000 person-years. (bmj.com)
  • Abdominal wall endometriosis has an incidence of 0.3-1% of extrapelvic disease . (bvsalud.org)
  • A two-year study was conducted to investigate incidence of seromas in liposuction and abdominal dermolipectomy and when both procedures was performed in the abdominal flap. (isciii.es)
  • Nauta's previous surgeries had damaged his abdominal wall to the point that additional surgeries were impossible. (dukehealth.org)
  • Most abdominal surgeries last between several hours. (medstarhealth.org)
  • Symptoms specific to these conditions may include pain with movement, abdominal tenderness and guarding. (healthhype.com)
  • Toward the inferior half of the abdominal skin, these lines begin to assume a slightly more oblique course in an inferior medial direction toward the groin, paralleling the inguinal crease. (medscape.com)
  • Abdominal Incisional Site Endometriosis can pose a diagnostic dilema owing to its relative rarity and vagueosity of symptoms, vis-a-vis, cyclical abdominal pain and occasional palpable mass associated with menstruation. (scirp.org)
  • Presently, the cause(s) of abdominal wall defects is unknown, and any symptoms the mother may have to indicate that the defects are present in the fetus are nondescript. (facmedicine.com)
  • Symptoms specific to these conditions include constipation or diarrhea, abdominal cramping, nausea and vomiting (sometimes), loss of appetite and malnutrition. (healthhype.com)
  • Pain and abdominal mass associating with menses were the two most typical symptoms. (bvsalud.org)
  • If you don't have any symptoms, but think you might have abdominal control issues, prevention is the best medicine! (thrivept.com)
  • [ 1 ] This increase has been attributed to the growing age of the population, increasing rates of obesity and diabetes, improved survival from intra-abdominal cancers, and improvements in care of the critically injured patient, yielding greater survival of patients following abdominal catastrophe. (medscape.com)
  • The Spigelian hernia is an uncommon hernia at a weak spot between the oblique abdominal muscles and the rectus abdominis. (radiologyassistant.nl)
  • The management of complex abdominal wall defects has challenged both general surgeons and reconstructive surgeons since the turn of the last century. (medscape.com)
  • Regardless of the surgeon's background, the goals of the reconstructive surgeon in managing complex abdominal wall defects are to restore the structural and functional continuity of the musculofascial system and to provide stable and durable wound coverage. (medscape.com)
  • These factors have produced a large subset of medically complicated patients with structurally complex abdominal wall defects. (medscape.com)
  • The complexity associated with abdominal wall defects, coupled with the development of specialised techniques mean this procedure falls largely within the domain of expert reconstructive surgeons. (iriserdene.com)
  • Getting the care you need starts with seeing one of our abdominal surgeons. (medstarhealth.org)
  • This produces a distinct ridge in the midline on increasing intra-abdominal pressure that is often mistaken for an epigastric hernia. (gynecoloncol.com)
  • Physical examination of the patient revealed a semifixed 6 cm mass on the abdominal epigastric area adjacent to the right inferior ribs. (who.int)
  • Laterally, the mesoderm undergoes differentiation: para-axial (peripheral nervous system), intermediate (gonads and kidneys), and lateral, which further divides into splanchnic (gastrointestinal [GI] tract) and somatic (body wall). (medscape.com)
  • There are four pairs of abdominal muscles that cover the anterior and lateral abdominal region and meet at the anterior midline. (lumenlearning.com)
  • During surgical resection but before aortic cross-clamping, a needle-type polarographic partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) electrode was inserted into the wall of the exposed AAA, and the PO2 was measured. (nih.gov)
  • In the second arm of this study, two AAA wall specimens were obtained from two different sites of the same aneurysm at the time of surgical resection: group I specimens had thick adherent ILT, and group II specimens had thinner or no adherent ILT. (nih.gov)
  • Resection of metastatic lesions may lead to greater survival benefit if the abdominal wall metastasis is the only manifestation of recurrent disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To cut a long story short, I have been suffering upper abdominal pain for the pa. (medhelp.org)
  • Young lady presented with history of assault and abdominal pain with difficulty to pass urine. (elearnrad.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain is defined as continuous or intermittent abdominal discomfort lasting for at least 3 months. (bmj.com)
  • The etiology of chronic abdominal pain is so wide that only the more common causes can be covered here. (bmj.com)
  • Diagnosis and management of patients with chronic abdominal pain is often challenging and can be a frustrating experience for both physicians and patients. (bmj.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain is divided into organic and functional etiologies. (bmj.com)
  • [2] Yarger E, Sandberg K. Updates in diagnosis and management of chronic abdominal pain. (bmj.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain without clear source, in spite of a thorough diagnostic evaluation, is usually termed a functional disorder. (bmj.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain in general practice. (bmj.com)
  • https://karger.com/ddi/article/39/6/606/822861/Chronic-Abdominal-Pain-in-General-Practice http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33631744?tool=bestpractice.com ​ Functional abdominal pain is thought to arise from multifactorial visceral hypersensitivity and dysmotility and altered function of the brain-gut axis. (bmj.com)
  • Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management. (bmj.com)
  • Chronic abdominal pain is a common complaint in primary care and subspecialty clinics. (bmj.com)
  • Unspecified abdominal pain in primary care: the role of gastrointestinal morbidity. (bmj.com)
  • Studies of the symptom abdominal pain--a systematic review and meta-analysis. (bmj.com)
  • https://academic.oup.com/fampra/article/31/5/517/537129?login=false http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24987023?tool=bestpractice.com ​ More than half of all patients presenting with the symptom of abdominal pain do not have a causative diagnosis. (bmj.com)
  • Natural history of abdominal pain in family practice: longitudinal study of electronic medical record data in southwestern Ontario. (bmj.com)
  • Diagnoses after newly recorded abdominal pain in primary care: observational cohort study. (bmj.com)
  • A 45-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of persistent abdominal pain of the right lower quadrant and a mass with dermal ulceration. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After four courses of regular "FOLFOX" chemotherapy, the abdominal pain persisted in the right lower quadrant, and swelling pain occurred on the right back with a mass protruding from the epidermis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Abdominal com- There he stated that he had recently in which the liver is the organ most fre- puterized tomography showed a 7 × 4 started to experience left lumbar pain. (who.int)
  • He complained of abdominal fullness and vague pain. (who.int)
  • Occasionally, either the umbilical opening is too large, or it develops improperly, allowing the bowels or stomach to remain outside or squeeze through the abdominal wall. (facmedicine.com)