Abdominal Muscles: Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Ophthalmoplegia: Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Trochlear Nerve: The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Exotropia: A form of ocular misalignment where the visual axes diverge inappropriately. For example, medial rectus muscle weakness may produce this condition as the affected eye will deviate laterally upon attempted forward gaze. An exotropia occurs due to the relatively unopposed force exerted on the eye by the lateral rectus muscle, which pulls the eye in an outward direction.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Muscle Fibers, Skeletal: Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Muscle Development: Developmental events leading to the formation of adult muscular system, which includes differentiation of the various types of muscle cell precursors, migration of myoblasts, activation of myogenesis and development of muscle anchorage.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Muscle Fatigue: A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.Intercostal Muscles: Respiratory muscles that arise from the lower border of one rib and insert into the upper border of the adjoining rib, and contract during inspiration or respiration. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Esotropia: A form of ocular misalignment characterized by an excessive convergence of the visual axes, resulting in a "cross-eye" appearance. An example of this condition occurs when paralysis of the lateral rectus muscle causes an abnormal inward deviation of one eye on attempted gaze.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Intercostal Nerves: The ventral rami of the thoracic nerves from segments T1 through T11. The intercostal nerves supply motor and sensory innervation to the thorax and abdomen. The skin and muscles supplied by a given pair are called, respectively, a dermatome and a myotome.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type II MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have high ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment. Several fast types have been identified.Muscle Denervation: The resection or removal of the innervation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type I MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have low ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Mitochondria, Muscle: Mitochondria of skeletal and smooth muscle. It does not include myocardial mitochondria for which MITOCHONDRIA, HEART is available.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Isometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Nephropidae: Family of large marine CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA. These are called clawed lobsters because they bear pincers on the first three pairs of legs. The American lobster and Cape lobster in the genus Homarus are commonly used for food.Positive-Pressure Respiration, Intrinsic: Non-therapeutic positive end-expiratory pressure occurring frequently in patients with severe airway obstruction. It can appear with or without the administration of external positive end-expiratory pressure (POSITIVE-PRESSURE RESPIRATION). It presents an important load on the inspiratory muscles which are operating at a mechanical disadvantage due to hyperinflation. Auto-PEEP may cause profound hypotension that should be treated by intravascular volume expansion, increasing the time for expiration, and/or changing from assist mode to intermittent mandatory ventilation mode. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1127)Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Muscle, Striated: One of two types of muscle in the body, characterized by the array of bands observed under microscope. Striated muscles can be divided into two subtypes: the CARDIAC MUSCLE and the SKELETAL MUSCLE.
Abdominal muscles The abdominal external oblique muscle attaches to the iliac crest. The abdominal internal oblique muscle ... abdominal muscles, back muscles, all the gluteal muscles, muscles of the lateral rotator group, hamstring muscles, two muscles ... Gluteal muscles The gluteus maximus muscle arises from the posterior gluteal line of the inner upper ilium, and the rough ... The transversus abdominis muscle attaches to the pubic crest and pecten pubis via a conjoint tendon Back muscles The multifidus ...
Muscles[edit]. Diagram of the muscular system of a cat. Internal abdominal oblique[edit]. This muscle's origin is the ... This muscle is the innermost abdominal muscle. Its origin is the second sheet of the lumbodorsal fascia and the pelvic girdle ... Pectoantebrachialis muscle is just one-half inch wide and is the most superficial in the pectoral muscles. Its origin is the ... The Splenius is the most superficial of all the deep muscles. It is a thin, broad sheet of muscle underneath the clavotrapezius ...
Pennate muscles, in which the muscle fibers are oriented at an angle to the line of action, typically have two aponeuroses. ... The anterior abdominal aponeuroses are located just superficial to the rectus abdominis muscle. It has for its borders the ... external oblique, pectoralis muscles, and the latissimus dorsi. The posterior lumbar aponeuroses are situated just on top of ... Their primary function is to join muscles and the body parts they act upon, whether it be bone or other muscles. They have a ...
... and external abdominal oblique (anteriorly). The floor of the inferior lumbar triangle is the internal abdominal oblique muscle ... triangle are composed of the iliac crest inferiorly and the margins of two muscles - latissimus dorsi (posteriorly) ... The floor of the superior lumbar triangle is the transversalis fascia and its roof is the external abdominal oblique muscle. ... laterally by the internal abdominal oblique muscle, and superiorly by the 12th rib. ...
Notably, the cremasteric muscle arises from the internal oblique muscle. Large molecules cannot pass from the blood into the ... The testicles can also be lifted voluntarily using the pubococcygeus muscle, which partially activates related muscles. The ... 3) Protection from abdominal cavity pressure changes. One argument for the evolution of external testes is that it protects the ... The cremasteric muscle is part of the spermatic cord. When this muscle contracts, the cord is shortened and the testicle is ...
... continues onward between the abdominal internal oblique and transverse muscles. It then pierces the internal oblique, becomes ... and divides between that muscle and the internal oblique muscle into a lateral and an anterior cutaneous branch. The ... has two branches: The lateral cutaneous branch ("iliac branch") pierces the internal and external oblique muscles immediately ... that supplies sensation to skin over the lateral gluteal region and motor to the internal and transverse abdominal muscles. The ...
The rectus sheath is formed by the aponeuroses of the transverse abdominal and the external and internal oblique muscles. It ... "Anterior Abdominal Wall: The Rectus Abdominis Muscle" Anatomy image:7180 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - anterior layer ... Since the tendons of the internal oblique and transversus abdominus only reach as high as the costal margin, it follows that ... where part of the internal oblique also runs beneath the rectus. Because of the thinner layers below, this region is more ...
... it pierces the transversus abdominis to run above the iliac crest between that muscle and abdominal internal oblique. It gives ... In the pelvic area, it runs in a groove between psoas major and iliacus giving off branches to both muscles, and exits the ... Its terminal branch then runs parallel to the inguinal ligament to exit the aponeurosis of the abdominal external oblique above ... It pierces the lateral abdominal wall and runs medially at the level of the inguinal ligament where it supplies motor branches ...
... the internal oblique upward and forward, and the transverse abdominal horizontally forward. The transverse abdominal muscle is ... Also, when strengthened, the abdominal muscles provide flexibility as well. The abdominal muscles can be worked out by ... The rectus abdominals' function is to bend one's back forward (flexion). The main work of the abdominal muscles is to bend the ... The abdominal wall is split into the posterior (back), lateral (sides), and anterior (front) walls. The abdominal muscles have ...
The lateral superficial muscles, the transversus and external and internal oblique muscles, originate on the rib cage and on ... it is topographically classified as a posterior abdominal muscle but functionally as a hip muscle. Iliopsoas flexes and ... The muscles of the abdominal wall are subdivided into a superficial and a deep group. The superficial group is subdivided into ... The muscles of the hip are divided into a dorsal and a ventral group. The dorsal hip muscles are either inserted into the ...
... the oblique muscles, and the throat. Local pain in the prostate can radiate referred pain to the abdomen, lower back, and calf ... 1999). "Ketamine reduces muscle pain, temporal summation, and referred pain in fibromyalgia patients". Pain. 85 (3): 483-491. ... This can cause immense referred pain in the lower abdominal wall. Further, recent research has found that ketamine, a sedative ... For example, stimulated local pain in the anterior tibial muscle causes referred pain in the ventral portion of the ankle; ...
... distributing branches to the gluteal and abdominal muscles, and anastomosing in their course with the superior gluteal artery, ... The iliac branch of the iliolumbar artery (ramus iliacus) descends to supply the iliacus muscle; some offsets, running between ... the muscle and the bone, anastomose with the iliac branches of the obturator artery; one of these enters an oblique canal to ...
Abdominal external oblique muscle Abdominal internal oblique muscle Back Iliocostalis Intertransversarii laterales lumborum ... Contracting the glutes as well as the abdominal muscles is critical for low back health and safety. Lowering the weight: ... Arms Biceps brachii muscle long head short head Hips Gluteal muscles Gluteus maximus Gluteus minimus Piriformis Superior ... As the muscles of the back and core must remain tight throughout the motion, one should simply hinge at the hips and knees to ...
... the abdominal external oblique muscle, the gracilis muscle, and by muscles of the hip. The superior pubic ligament connects ... The strong and thicker superior ligament is reinforced by the tendons of the rectus abdominis muscle, ...
The two muscles unite to form the iliopsoas muscle which is inserted on the lesser trochanter of the femur. The psoas minor, ... and its terminal branch finally pierces the aponeurosis of the abdominal external oblique above the inguinal ring to supply ... The leg muscles acting on the foot are called the extrinsic foot muscles whilst the foot muscles located in the foot are called ... Muscle inflammation, strain, tenderness, swelling and muscle tear from muscle overuse or incorrect movement are several ...
... in the fascia transversalis abnormal insertion of the rectus abdominis muscle tear of the abdominal internal oblique muscle ... When the adductor muscles are tight post injury, that can be enough to trigger symptoms. The first conservative treatment ... This pain usually radiates to the adductor muscle region and even the testicles, although it is often difficult for the patient ... Any exertion that increases intra-abdominal pressure, such as coughing, sneezing, or sporting activity can cause pain. In the ...
... see abdominal external oblique muscle and abdominal internal oblique muscle) if one twists the torso during the exercise. This ... for its effectiveness as working the abdominal muscles. Previous research has shown that a captain's chair knee raise will ... is a piece of exercise equipment that allows one to build upper body and abdominal muscle strength. When only the forearm pads ... Keeping the torso vertical can increase the amount of use of many of the involved muscles. Deep or Atlas pushups use the ...
Abdominal external oblique muscle Abdominal internal oblique muscle Transversus abdominis muscle Quadratus lumborum muscle ... Muscles connecting the upper extremity to the vertebral column. Left iliac crest is labeled in red. Plan of ossification of the ... Muscles of the iliac and anterior femoral regions. The relations of the kidneys from behind. Iliac crest labeled at center ... ISBN 3-13-533305-1. Anatomy figure: 13:02-01 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Superficial muscles of ...
In order to prevent future lower back injuries strength training to the abdominal muscles is necessary because with a stronger ... The straight crunch, the Oblique crunch, and balance exercises with the gym ball are some of the workouts for abdominal ... Muscle strain is one of the most common injuries in tennis. When an isolated large-energy appears during the muscle contraction ... Muscle, cartilage, nerves, bursae, ligaments and tendons may be damaged from overuse. The repetitive use of a particular muscle ...
... or hip bone and a bruise of the abdominal muscles (transverse and oblique abdominal muscles). Surrounding structures such as ... The direct impact can cause an avulsion fracture where a portion of bone is removed by a muscle. The pain is due to the cluneal ... This bleeding into muscle tissue creates swelling and makes leg movement painful. The hematoma that occurs can potentially ... A hip pointer bruise usually causes bleeding into the hip abductor muscles, which move legs sideways, away from the midline of ...
... leg raises are also often used to strengthen the rectus abdominis muscle and the internal and external oblique muscles. The ... It is generally the more difficult variation for the abdominal muscles due to having to support the pelvic weight as opposed to ... Because the abdominal muscles are used isometrically to stabilize the body during the motion, ... Both ab muscles (rectus and transversus abdominis) are used to isometrically stabilize the spine to resist extension and ...
It is kept in line by the transverse abdominal and oblique abdominal muscles. During pregnancy, the growth of the fetus exerts ... It affects the rectus abdominis muscle. The rectus abdominis muscle is divided down the middle by the tendinous line called the ... Diastasis recti or abdominal separation[edit]. During pregnancy, many women experience a separation of their stomach muscles, ... In pregnancies that experience rapid fetus growth or women with particularly weak abdominal muscles, this pressure can ...
... the incision is parallel to the external oblique muscle of the abdomen which allows the muscle to be split in the direction of ... Rectus muscle should never be cut. The rectus muscles are retracted and the peritoneum opened.The inferior epigastric vessels ... Result is the most pleasing cosmetic result of any abdominal incision. Kocher's incision - An oblique incision made in the ... The lateral edges of the incisions remain medial to the internal oblique muscles. The sheath may be released off the ...
... abdominal muscle exercises are known to increase the strength and endurance of the abdominal muscles. It has been highly ... showed greater muscle activation in the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis, and external oblique when compared to ... Abdominal exercises are those that affect the abdominal muscles (colloquially known as the stomach muscles or "abs"). Abdominal ... The anterior abdominal wall is made up of four muscles-the rectus abdominis muscle, the internal and external obliques, and the ...
Muscle External oblique abdominal muscle Internal oblique abdominal muscle Rectus abdominis Transverse abdominal muscle ... Anterolateral Abdominal Wall - University of Edinburgh Faculty of Medicine Muscles of the Anterior Abdominal Wall - University ... In anatomy, the abdominal wall represents the boundaries of the abdominal cavity. The abdominal wall is split into the ... transverse abdominal muscle), the internal (obliquus internus) and the external oblique (obliquus externus). In human anatomy, ...
The rectus abdominis muscle, also known as the "abdominal muscle", is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the human abdomen, as well as that of some other mammals. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba. It extends from the pubic symphysis, pubic crest and pubic tubercle inferiorly, to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs V to VII superiorly.[1] The proximal attachments are the pubic crest and the pubic symphysis. It attaches distally at the costal cartilages of ribs 5-7 and the xiphoid process of the sternum.[2] The rectus abdominis muscle is contained in the rectus sheath, which consists of the aponeuroses of the lateral abdominal muscles. Bands of connective tissue called the tendinous intersections traverse the rectus ...
Patients with stiff-person syndrome (SPS) suffer progressive stiffness in their truncal muscles,[2] which become rigid and stiff because the lumbar and abdominal muscles engage in constant contractions.[3][4] Initially, stiffness occurs in the thoracolumbar paraspinal and abdominal muscles.[5] It later affects the proximal leg and abdominal wall muscles.[2] The stiffness leads to a change in posture,[6] and patients develop a rigid gait.[2] Persistent lumbar hyperlordosis often occurs as it progresses.[4] The muscle stiffness initially fluctuates, sometimes for days or weeks, but eventually begins to consistently impair mobility.[2] As the disease progresses, patients sometimes become unable to walk or bend.[5] Chronic pain is common and worsens over time but sometimes acute pain occurs as well.[7] Stress, cold weather, and ...
The iliohypogastric nerve runs posterior to the psoas major on its proximal lateral border to run laterally and obliquely on the anterior side of quadratus lumborum. Lateral to this muscle, it pierces the transversus abdominis to run above the iliac crest between that muscle and abdominal internal oblique. It gives off several motor branches to these muscles and a sensory branch to the skin of the lateral hip. Its terminal branch then runs parallel to the inguinal ligament to exit the aponeurosis of the abdominal external oblique above the external inguinal ring where it supplies the skin above the inguinal ligament (i.e. the hypogastric region) with the anterior cutaneous branch. [2] The ilioinguinal nerve closely follows the iliohypogastric nerve on the quadratus lumborum, but then passes below it to run at the level of the iliac crest. It ...
... is a rare, genetic birth defect affecting about 1 in 40,000 births. About 97% of those affected are male. Prune belly syndrome is a congenital disorder of the urinary system, characterized by a triad of symptoms. The syndrome is named for the mass of wrinkled skin that is often (but not always) present on the abdomen of those with the disorder. Prune-belly triad consists of: Cryptorchidism, abdominal wall defects and genitourinary defects: A partial or complete lack of abdominal wall muscles. There may be wrinkly folds of skin covering the abdomen. Cryptorchidism (undescended testicles) in males Urinary tract abnormality such as unusually large ureters, distended bladder, accumulation and backflow of urine from the bladder to the ureters and the kidneys (vesicoureteral reflux) Other Symptoms include: Frequent urinary tract infections due to the inability to properly expel urine. Ventricular septal defect Malrotation of ...
The transversus thoracis muscle (/trænzˈvɜːrsəs θəˈreɪsɪs/) lies internal to the thoracic cage, anteriorly. It is a thin plane of muscular and tendinous fibers, situated upon the inner surface of the front wall of the chest. It is in the same layer as the subcostal muscles and the innermost intercostal muscles. It arises on either side from the lower third of the posterior surface of the body of the sternum, from the posterior surface of the xiphoid process, and from the sternal ends of the costal cartilages of the lower three or four true ribs. Its fibers diverge upward and lateralward, to be inserted by slips into the lower borders and inner surfaces of the costal cartilages of the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth ribs. The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are continuous with those of the transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are oblique, while the highest are almost ...
... is the tensing of the abdominal wall muscles to guard inflamed organs within the abdomen from the pain of pressure upon them. The tensing is detected when the abdominal wall is pressed. Abdominal guarding is also known as 'défense musculaire'. Guarding is a characteristic finding in the physical examination for an abruptly painful abdomen (an acute abdomen) with inflammation of the inner abdominal (peritoneal) surface due, for example, to appendicitis or diverticulitis. The tensed muscles of the abdominal wall automatically go into spasm to keep the tender underlying tissues from being disturbed. Abdominal aortic aneurysm Appendicitis Bowel obstruction Diverticulitis Dyspepsia Ectopic pregnancy GERD Ileus Inflammatory bowel disease Intussusception Mesenteric ischemia ...
The spermatic cord is the cord-like structure in males formed by the vas deferens (ductus deferens) and surrounding tissue that runs from the deep inguinal ring down to each testicle. Its serosal covering, the tunica vaginalis, is an extension of the peritoneum that passes through the transversalis fascia. The spermatic cord is ensheathed in three layers of tissue: external spermatic fascia, an extension of the innominate fascia that overlies the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle cremasteric muscle and fascia, formed from a continuation of the internal oblique muscle and its fascia internal spermatic fascia, continuous with the transversalis fascia The normal diameter of the spermatic cord is about 16 mm (range 11 to 22 mm). Arteries: testicular artery, deferential artery, cremasteric artery Nerves: nerve to cremaster (genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve) and testicular nerves (sympathetic nerves). It is worth ...
The iliac branch of the iliolumbar artery (ramus iliacus) descends to supply the iliacus muscle; some offsets, running between the muscle and the bone, anastomose with the iliac branches of the obturator artery; one of these enters an oblique canal to supply the bone, while others run along the crest of the ilium, distributing branches to the gluteal and abdominal muscles, and anastomosing in their course with the superior gluteal artery, iliac circumflex artery, and the lateral circumflex femoral artery. This anastamosis occurs around the anterior superior iliac spine ...
The lacunar ligament (also named Gimbernat's ligament) is a ligament in the inguinal region that connects the inguinal ligament to the pectineal ligament near the point where they both insert on the pubic tubercle. It is the part of the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle that is reflected backward and laterally and is attached to the pectineal line of the pubis. It is about 1.25 cm. long, larger in the male than in the female, almost horizontal in direction in the erect posture, and of a triangular form with the base directed laterally. Its base is concave, thin, and sharp, and forms the medial boundary of the femoral ring. Its apex corresponds to the pubic tubercle. Its posterior margin is attached to the pectineal line, and is continuous with the pectineal ligament. Its anterior margin is attached to the inguinal ligament. Its surfaces are directed upward and downward. The lacunar ligament is the only boundary of the femoral canal that can be cut during surgery to ...
Due to the high metabolic rate required for flight, birds have a high oxygen demand. Their highly effective respiratory system helps them meet that demand. Although birds have lungs, theirs are fairly rigid structures that do not expand and contract as they do in mammals, reptiles and many amphibians. Instead, the structures that act as the bellows that ventilate the lungs are the air sacs, which are distributed throughout much of the birds' bodies.[37] The airsacs move air uniderectionally through the parabronchi of the rigid lungs.[38][39] Although bird lungs are smaller than those of mammals of comparable size, the air sacs account for 15% of the total body volume, whereas in mammals, the alveoli, which act as the bellows, constitute only 7% of the total body volume.[40] The walls of the air sacs do not have a good blood supply and so do not play a direct role in gas exchange. Birds lack a diaphragm, and therefore use their intercostal and abdominal ...
Due to the high metabolic rate required for flight, birds have a high oxygen demand. Their highly effective respiratory system helps them meet that demand.. Although birds have lungs, these are fairly rigid structures, which do not expand and contract as they do in mammals, reptiles and many amphibians. The structures that act as the bellows which ventilate the lungs, are the air sacs distributed throughout much of the birds' bodies. Although the bird lungs are smaller than those in mammals of comparable size, the air sacs account for 15% of the total body volume, compared to the 7% devoted to the alveoli which act as the bellows in mammals.[30]. The walls of these air sacs do not have a good blood supply and so do not play a direct role in gas exchange. They act like a set of bellows[31] which move air unidirectionally through the parabronchi of the rigid lungs.[32][33]. Birds lack a diaphragm, and therefore use their intercostal and abdominal muscles to ...
Due to the high metabolic rate required for flight, birds have a high oxygen demand. Their highly effective respiratory system helps them meet that demand.. Although birds have lungs, these are fairly rigid structures, which do not expand and contract as they do in mammals, reptiles and many amphibians. The structures that act as the bellows which ventilate the lungs, are the air sacs distributed throughout much of the birds' bodies. Although the bird lungs are smaller than those in mammals of comparable size, the air sacs account for 15% of the total body volume, compared to the 7% devoted to the alveoli which act as the bellows in mammals.[30]. The walls of these air sacs do not have a good blood supply and so do not play a direct role in gas exchange. They act like a set of bellows[31] which move air unidirectionally through the parabronchi of the rigid lungs.[32][33]. Birds lack a diaphragm, and therefore use their intercostal and abdominal muscles to ...
A sciaenid has a long dorsal fin reaching nearly to the tail, and a notch between the rays and spines of the dorsal, although the two parts are actually separate.[1] Drums are somberly coloured, usually in shades of brown, with a lateral line on each side that extends to the tip of the caudal fin. The anal fin usually has two spines, while the dorsal fins are deeply notched or separate. Most species have a rounded or pointed caudal fin. The mouth is set low and is usually inferior. Their croaking mechanism involves the beating of abdominal muscles against the swim bladder.[1] Sciaenids are found worldwide, in both fresh and salt water, and are typically benthic carnivores, feeding on invertebrates and smaller fish. They are small to medium-sized, bottom-dwelling fishes living primarily in estuaries, bays, and muddy river banks. Most of these fish types avoid clear waters, such as coral reefs and oceanic islands, with a few notable exceptions (e.g. reef ...
1. Muscles of the anterior abdominal wall. Rectus abdominis muscle: straight abdominal muscle invested by the rectus sheath ... posterior to the rib cartilages into the abdominal wall between the internal abdominal oblique and transverse abdominal muscles ... the abdominal internal oblique in both the anterior and posterior laminae, and the transverse abdominal muscle in the posterior ... the four oblique abdominal muscles act in unison and synergistically, thereby supporting the rectus abdominis muscles. ...
... patients exhibit asymmetric atrophy of the lumbar multiidus muscle. However, studies focusing on the abdominal muscles have not ... external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TrA) were measured by ultrasonography. We calculated ... patients exhibit asymmetric atrophy of the lumbar multiidus muscle. However, studies focusing on the abdominal muscles have not ... patients exhibit asymmetric atrophy of the lumbar multiidus muscle. However, studies focusing on the abdominal muscles have not ...
Just deep to the external oblique is the internal oblique muscle. These muscles are in the deepest layer of the abdominal wall ... The external oblique muscle (of the abdomen) (also external abdominal oblique muscle) is the largest and the most superficial ( ... Lumbar triangle External abdominal oblique muscle. Anterior abdominal wall. Deep dissection. Anterior view. This article ... Posterior part of abdominal external oblique muscle labeled. The subcutaneous inguinal ring. Transverse section through the ...
Both of the abdominal oblique muscles work to compress abdominal contents, assist in the digestive process and in forced ... The external abdominal oblique muscle is also irregularly four-sided in form and lies superficial to the internal oblique ... The internal abdominal oblique muscle lies on the sides and front of the abdomen and is the intermediate of the three flat ... muscles in this area, below the external oblique and above the transverse abdominal muscle. It is broad, thin and irregularly ...
This is the first report of external abdominal oblique muscle injury occurring in a professional soccer player. A 28-year-old ... The internal oblique muscle is more often injured than the external oblique muscle; the two muscles together form a complex ... Uncommon abdominal muscle injury in a tennis player: internal oblique strainBr J Sports MedYear: 20064046246310.1136/bjsm. ... Uncommon external abdominal oblique muscle strain in a professional soccer player: a case report ...
... external abdominal oblique muscle explanation free. What is external abdominal oblique muscle? Meaning of external abdominal ... oblique muscle medical term. What does external abdominal oblique muscle mean? ... Looking for online definition of external abdominal oblique muscle in the Medical Dictionary? ... external abdominal oblique muscle. one of a pair of muscles that are the largest and the most superficial of the five ...
"Positional relationship between the pectoralis major and external abdominal oblique muscles for consideration during dual‐plane ... Transaxillary muscle‐splitting breast augmentation: Experience with 160 cases. Lang Stumpfle, R; Figueras Pereira‐Lima, L; ... Positional relationship between the pectoralis major and external abdominal oblique muscles for... Gil, Young‐Chun; Lee, Kang‐ ... Positional relationship between the pectoralis major and external abdominal oblique muscles for consideration during dual‐plane ...
What is oblique muscle of head, superior? Meaning of oblique muscle of head, superior medical term. What does oblique muscle of ... Looking for online definition of oblique muscle of head, superior in the Medical Dictionary? oblique muscle of head, superior ... abdominal muscles. The abdominal muscles are made up of the cremaster, external abdominal oblique, iliacus, psoas major, ... tarsal muscles See Müllers palpebral muscles.. tensor tarsi muscle See Horners muscle.. yoke muscles Muscles of the two ...
Muscles[edit]. Diagram of the muscular system of a cat. Internal abdominal oblique[edit]. This muscles origin is the ... This muscle is the innermost abdominal muscle. Its origin is the second sheet of the lumbodorsal fascia and the pelvic girdle ... Pectoantebrachialis muscle is just one-half inch wide and is the most superficial in the pectoral muscles. Its origin is the ... The Splenius is the most superficial of all the deep muscles. It is a thin, broad sheet of muscle underneath the clavotrapezius ...
... my problem is that i have chronically over tight abdominal and oblique muscles. my physio has never encountered tightness like ... this before, and we have spent hours deep massaging my stomach to relieve the tightness/knots in these stomach muscles. my ... Other muscle and joint conditions. *chronically tight abdominal and oblique muscles. chronically tight abdominal and oblique ... chronically tight abdominal and oblique muscles Hi Esther,. i just bought 8 steps-- fantastic!. my problem is that i have ...
External abdominal oblique muscle aka Musculus obliquus externus abdominis in the latin terminology and part of structure of ... It maintains the abdominal tone and compresses its content. During simultaneous contraction of both muscles, the flexion of the ... AnatomyTrunk WallVentral trunkInguinal canalExternal abdominal oblique muscle External abdominal oblique muscle This feature is ... External abdominal oblique muscle This feature is available to Premium subscribers only. ...
Injuries to this muscle result in varying degrees of abdominal strain. ... The rectus abdominis is a large muscle in the center of your abdomen that extends from your ribs to the front of your pubic ... 6 Ways to Properly Recover Strained Abdominal Muscles 3 Oblique Muscle Strain Symptoms ... Injuries to this muscle result in varying degrees of abdominal strain. Minor strains result in stretching of the rectus ...
When abdominal muscles are strong they can help stabilize the pelvis and lumbar spine when the hips flex by preventing an ... Contracting the abdominals, especially the deep inner muscles, causes an… ... Although toned abdominal muscles may look attractive, they actually serve a very important role in helping to stabilize the ... The internal abdominal oblique helps to stabilize the trunk. This muscle lies under the external oblique, however the muscles ...
This rare injury results from a sudden intrinsic eccentric contraction of the internal oblique muscle while in a stretched ... Ultrasound examination revealed a collection of fluid under the 11th rib, suggesting injury of the left external oblique muscle ... This is the first report of external abdominal oblique muscle injury occurring in a professional soccer player. A 28-year-old ... The internal oblique muscle is more often injured than the external oblique muscle; the two muscles together form a complex ...
Exercises For Supreme Oblique Abdominal Development. 16th August 2010. The Oblique Abdominal muscles are made up of the ... Due to it being the biggest and most visible - the external Oblique becomes the muscle that the nations readers of Mens Health ... Mad Scientist Muscle Assessment - Nick Nilssons Muscles tissue Building Digital book. 26th October 2011 ... This article will help you figure out how to get into muscle building. If you are ready to start putting on some muscle, follow ...
Obliquus Internus (Internal Abdominal Oblique). Ronald A. Bergman, PhD. Adel K. Afifi, MD, MS. Ryosuke Miyauchi, MD Peer Review ... Gruber, W. (1873) Un cas de muscle oblique interne de labdomen, prive completement de sa portion inguinal. Bull. lAcad. Imp. ... A fibrous band or inscription frequently interrupts the internal oblique and the intercostal muscles. In rare instances a ... They apparently represent tendinous intersections between the internal oblique and the internal intercostal muscles. An ...
An interactive demonstration of the Internal Oblique Muscle (Insertion, Origin, Actions & Innervations) featuring the iconic ... a. Costal cartilages of ribs 8-12; abdominal aponeurosis to linea alba. ... External Oblique Muscle. An interactive demonstration of the External Oblique Muscle (Insertion, Origin, Actions & Innervations ... Attachments of Internal Oblique Muscle: Origin & Insertion. Origin: (proximal attachments). a. Anterior iliac crest, lateral ...
Oblique muscles are also often referred to as abdominal... ... discussed but increasingly common sports injury is the oblique ... Oblique muscles are also often referred to as abdominal muscles. The internal oblique muscles are attached to the ribs and ... Generally an oblique strain involves slight tears in the muscle, although the muscle can rupture in extreme cases.. ... Additionally, the oblique muscles are active in almost any movement by the human body, so they rarely can be sufficiently ...
... plural oblique muscles) 1. (anatomy) A muscle acting in a direction oblique to the mesial plane of the body, or to the ... plural oblique muscles) 1. (anatomy) A muscle acting in a direction oblique to the mesial plane of the body, or to the ... associated muscles, applied especially to two muscles of the eyeball.... ... associated muscles, applied especially to two muscles of the eyeball.... ...
Obliquus Externus (External Abdominal Oblique). Congenital absence of abdominal muscles (Prune Belly). from Guthrie, 1896 ... 5, Thyroid gland; 6, levator glandulae muscle; 7, trachea. from Eisler.. Orbicularis Oculi, Corrugator Supercilii (Henle), ...
External Oblique Abdominal Muscle - Origin, Function and All. August 24, 2020. September 15, 2020. 6 min read ... The external oblique is a pair of large, thin, superficial muscles that lie on the lateral sides of the abdominal region of the ...
... superficial muscles that rest on the lateral sides of the bodys abdominal region; the internal oblique is immediately below ... The external oblique refers to two broad, thin, ... What muscle is a flexor of the thigh?. * Q: What muscles are ... the internal oblique is immediately below the external oblique. The internal and external oblique muscles run from the rib to ... The external oblique refers to two broad, thin, superficial muscles that rest on the lateral sides of the bodys abdominal ...
External oblique (white dots) muscle anlagen in heterozygotes are either absent or severely truncated on their abdominal end. ... Subsequent loss of abdominal muscles is therefore not due to defects in specification, determination, or commitment of the ... Loss of abdominal muscle in Pitx2 mutants associated with altered axial specification of lateral plate mesoderm.. Eng D1, Ma HY ... Loss of Abdominal Muscle in Pitx2 Mutants Associated with Altered Axial Specification of Lateral Plate Mesoderm ...
Why do you need to stretch before starting to exercise your back muscles? How do you stretch the legs and hips? ... Are there any advanced exercises for lateral and oblique abdominal and lumbar muscles?. Exercise # 13 -- Side-bridge advanced. ... The right way to stretch involves having relaxed, sustained moves with your attention focused on the muscle being stretched. ... Abdominal muscles (the lateral obliques).. Exercise all these muscles in a special way - by sparing the back which means to ...
The Muscles of the Abdomen*Training the Abdominals*Spot Reduction*Ab-Specific Exercises*All Kinds of Crunches*Oblique Exercises ... The Muscles of the Back*Training the Back*The Upper Back*The Lats*Lower Lats*Middle Back Thickness*Lower Back*Back Muscle ... Stronger muscles, bones, and connective tissue reduce your risk of injury. Skeletal muscle serves as a kind of shock absorber ... Stronger muscles, bones, and connective tissue reduce your risk of injury. Skeletal muscle serves as a kind of shock absorber ...
  • Ota, M & Kaneoka, K 2011, ' Differences in abdominal muscle thicknesses between chronic low back pain patients and healthy subjects ', Journal of Physical Therapy Science , vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 855-858. (elsevier.com)
  • During this part of the movement, you should be exhaling your breath and focusing on all of the tension being on your abdominals, not your hip flexors! (myprotein.com)
  • The next section is strengthening the neck muscle (short neck flexors). (videofitness.com)
  • But really, the linea alba is not precisely "where the stomach muscles connect. (ideafit.com)
  • Yet the overload to the linea alba tissue comes not from these masses alone, but additionally from the way that various postures or movement habits create unnecessary forward displacement of the abdominal contents. (ideafit.com)
  • Both of these postural habits increase the abdominal contents' pressure against the linea alba and change the angle of the core's muscular attachments. (ideafit.com)
  • Thoracic spine examination, costal and abdominal visceral palpation, and pulmonary auscultation were within normal limits. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Goal is to articulate vertebra in spine by using deep abdominal oblique muscles. (shapefit.com)
  • Your head will roll a little from side to side, not because you are engaging the neck muscles, but because it is moved by the turning of the spine. (massagemag.com)
  • Of the three muscles that make up the erector spinae group, which lies closest to the spine? (slideserve.com)
  • The muscles on the back of your spine (i.e., erector spinae muscles) work in an elongating manner to fight this force of gravity so you do not fall forward on your face. (acefitness.org)
  • As it bends to the right, the oblique muscles on the left side of the trunk (in conjunction with other muscles such as the quadratus lomborum) lengthen to slow the spine down so you do not topple over to the right (and vice versa when your spine bends to the left) (Figure 2). (acefitness.org)
  • While your body does not have to fight gravity or ground reaction forces during rotational movements, your oblique muscles do have to work like bungee cords to slow down the rotational movements of your trunk and arms so compressive forces are not transferred to the spine (Figure 3) (Price and Bratcher, 2010). (acefitness.org)
  • helps you safely flex your spine and is the muscle that forms the six-pack "shape. (active.com)