Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors occurring within the abdominal cavity, which can be benign or malignant, and affect various organs such as the pancreas, liver, kidneys, or intestines.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.
An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.
Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.
Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.
Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.
A true cyst of the PANCREAS, distinguished from the much more common PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYST by possessing a lining of mucous EPITHELIUM. Pancreatic cysts are categorized as congenital, retention, neoplastic, parasitic, enterogenous, or dermoid. Congenital cysts occur more frequently as solitary cysts but may be multiple. Retention cysts are gross enlargements of PANCREATIC DUCTS secondary to ductal obstruction. (From Bockus Gastroenterology, 4th ed, p4145)
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Role of dexamethasone dosage in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists for prophylaxis of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. (1/459)

Dexamethasone (20 mg) or its equivalent in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists appears to be the gold-standard dose for antiemetic prophylaxis. Additional to concerns about the use of corticosteroids with respect to enhanced tumour growth or impaired killing of the tumour cells, there is evidence that high-dosage dexamethasone impairs the control of delayed nausea and emesis, whereas lower doses appear more beneficial. To come closer to the most adequate dose, we started a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial investigating additional dosage of 8 or 20 mg dexamethasone to tropisetron (Navoban), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in cis-platinum-containing chemotherapy. After an interim analysis of 121 courses of chemotherapy in 69 patients, we have been unable to detect major differences between both treatment alternatives. High-dose dexamethasone (20 mg) had no advantage over medium-dose dexamethasone with respect to objective and subjective parameters of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting. In relation to concerns about the use of corticosteroids in non-haematological cancer chemotherapy, we suggest that 8 mg or its equivalent should be used in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists until further research proves otherwise.  (+info)

Morphological variations in transplanted tumors developed by inoculation of spontaneous mesothelioma cell lines derived from F344 rats. (2/459)

Morphological and immunohistochemical features of the abdominal mesotheliomas that were developed by inoculation of 3 cell lines (MeET-4, -5 and -6) established from spontaneous abdominal mesotheliomas in male F344 rats. Although the original tumors of three cell lines showed signs of epithelioid growth with a predominantly simple papillary pattern, transplanted tumors revealed a variety of morphologic features including epithelioid with glandular structures, sarcomatous, and a mixture of these components. All tumor cells of transplanted tumors were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) but almost negative for desmin as were epithelioid cells of the original tumors, and the cell lines were positive for desmin but not for ASMA. These results suggested that mesothelioma in the F344 rat had the potential for wide spectrum differentiation under in vitro conditions. The microenvironmental factors obtained in vivo can modify their potential ability and their morphological aspects. These factors may be related to tumor cell reexpression of ASMA of tumor cells that were masked under in vitro culture conditions.  (+info)

Additional value of whole-body positron emission tomography with fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in recurrent colorectal cancer. (3/459)

PURPOSE: To assess the additional value of the whole-body [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan as a staging modality complementing conventional diagnostic methods (CDM) in patients suspected of having recurrent colorectal adenocarcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 103 patients, the discordances between FDG-PET and CDM results were identified and related to the final diagnosis obtained by histopathology or clinical follow-up (> 1 year). All FDG-PET studies were reviewed with full knowledge of the CDM findings. RESULTS: In a region-based analysis, discordances between CDM and FDG-PET findings were found in 40 of 412 regions (10%). In these, FDG-PET had additional diagnostic value in 14 of 16 locoregional, six of seven hepatic, seven of eight abdominal, and eight of nine extra-abdominal regions. In a patient-based analysis, CDM categorized a subgroup of 60 patients as having resectable recurrent disease limited to the liver (n = 37) or locoregional region (n = 23). In 13 of these patients, there were discordant FDG-PET findings, detecting additional tumor sites in nine patients and excluding disease in three patients and yielding an additional diagnostic value in 20% of the patients. A second subgroup consisted of 13 patients with inconclusive CDM findings (n = 5) or with elevated plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels and an otherwise negative conventional work-up (n = 8). In these patients, FDG-PET results were correct in eight of nine discordances, yielding a positive additional diagnostic value in 62% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Whole-body FDG-PET can have a clear impact on the therapeutic management in the follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer.  (+info)

Treatment of upper abdominal malignancies with organ cluster procedures. (4/459)

Upper abdominal exenteration for upper abdominal malignancies was carried out in 15 patients with removal of the liver, spleen, pancreas, duodendum, all or part of the stomach, proximal jejunum and ascending and transverse colon. Organ replacement was with the liver, pancreas and duodenum plus, in some cases, a short segment of jejunum. Eleven of the 15 patients survived for more than 4 months; 2 died, after 61/2 and 10 months, of recurrent tumor. Of the 9 patients who are surviving after 61/2 to 14 months, recurrent tumor is suspected in only 1 and proven in none. Four patients with sarcomas and carcinoid tumors (2 each) have had no recurrences. The other 5 survivors had duct cell cancers (3 examples), a cholangiocarcinoma (1 example), and a hepatoma (1 example). The experience so far supports further cautious trials with this drastic cancer operation.  (+info)

Sonographically guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of abdominal lymph nodes: experience in 102 patients. (5/459)

We present our experience with sonographically guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of abdominal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes in 102 patients. The biopsied lymph nodes measured 1 to 6 cm (mean, 2.3 cm) and were located at the porta hepatis (n = 23), in the peripancreatic (n = 31), paraaortic (n = 22), aortocaval (n = 1), common iliac (n = 3), or external iliac (n = 6) regions, or in the mesentery (n = 16). Material sufficient for cytologic analysis was obtained in 87 (85.2%) of the 102 patients. The cytologic diagnosis in these patients included malignancy in 47 patients, tuberculosis in 28 patients, reactive lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 patients, and aspergillosis in two patients. In the other 15 patients, fine needle aspiration biopsy could not provide a definitive diagnosis. No major or minor complications occurred in our study. Thus, sonographic guidance is an effective alternative to computed tomography for biopsy of abdominal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes.  (+info)

Biological effects of vinyl chloride: an experimental study. (6/459)

Plasma activities of alkaline phosphatase, (AP), transaminases and total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with isoenzymes were determined in mice inhaling 50 and 550 ppm vinyl chloride (VC). The animals were also autopsied and the tissue pathology was studies. The total LDH activity was elevanted in both dose groups along with a shift to cathodic enzymes. AP was increased in animals exposed to 500 ppm and transaminases were not at all changed. Enzyme changes occurred after the appearance of tumors. Alveologenic adenomas occurred in all animals at the higher dosage and in about half of the animals inhaling the lower dose. Subperitoneal and subcutaneous hemangiosarcomas were frequent in both dose groups; but especially among 50 ppm animals. Only one animal had a hemangiosarcoma of the liver. No liver fibrosis was seen. All primary subperitoneal and subcutaneous tumors were located in fat tissue. Telangiectasis was observed in two animals in the 500 ppm series. The importance of blood vessel changes in the toxicology of vinyl chloride is discussed.  (+info)

A pathologic study of abdominal lymphangiomas. (7/459)

Abdominal lymphangiomas are uncommon angiomatous tumor occurring mainly in childhood. This is a retrospective clinicopathologic study of 17 cases of abdominal lymphangioma. The patients included are five children and 12 adults, with a mean age at initial presentation of 30.7 years (age ranges 3-63). The locations of the tumors were mesentery (5), retroperitoneum (4), colon (3), omentum (3), mesocolon (1) and gallbladder (1). Infiltrative growth was more common pattern than entirely circumscribed pattern. Masses were mostly multilocular cysts and contained chyle or serous fluid. On immunohistochemical staining, 16 cases were reactive for either CD31 or factor VIII-related antigen. These fact would suggest that intra-abdominal lymphangiomas simulate the immunohistochemical features of collecting lymphatics. Follow up was possible in 12 cases for 3-50 months (mean 19 months) and only one patient showed local recurrence. Although abdominal lymphangiomas are rare in adulthood and correct preoperative diagnosis is difficult, awareness of such a possibility in adulthood will contribute to make a correct preoperative diagnosis.  (+info)

The potential of gene therapy in the peritoneal cavity. (8/459)

Gene therapy is a promising new treatment modality based on molecular genetic modification to achieve a therapeutic benefit. We believe that gene therapy in the peritoneal cavity holds considerable promise, and we describe strategies by which genetic modification can be used to treat a variety of disease states or conditions. First, we can envision a strategy, based on genetic modification of the peritoneal membrane, to improve the practice of peritoneal dialysis through the production of proteins that would be of therapeutic value in preventing membrane damage and in preserving or enhancing its function as a dialyzing membrane. Second, the membrane could be genetically modified for either local or systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. This approach could be applied to a variety of pathologies or conditions that require either sustained or transient delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as enzymes or growth factors. Third, gene transfer has already been incorporated into several strategies for the treatment of intra-abdominal carcinomas, and it has been effective in animal models of ovarian and bladder cancer and of peritoneal mesothelioma. Finally, gene transfer can be a valuable tool in increasing our understanding of the biology of the peritoneal membrane. By being able to manipulate the expression of specific genes through gene transfer, their role in various (patho)physiological processes can be identified. In summary, gene therapy in the peritoneal cavity has significant potential to address a variety of diseases or pathophysiological conditions, and to further our knowledge of peritoneal cavity biology.  (+info)

Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the abdomen that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can occur in any of the organs within the abdominal cavity, including the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, spleen, and kidneys.

Abdominal neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Some common symptoms include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel habits, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. In some cases, abdominal neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they have grown quite large or spread to other parts of the body.

The diagnosis of abdominal neoplasms typically involves a combination of physical exam, medical history, imaging studies such as CT scans or MRIs, and sometimes biopsy to confirm the type of tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal growths of tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They occur when the normal control mechanisms that regulate cell growth and division are disrupted, leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Cystic Neoplasms: Cystic neoplasms are tumors that contain fluid-filled sacs or cysts. These tumors can be benign or malignant and can occur in various organs of the body, including the pancreas, ovary, and liver.

Mucinous Neoplasms: Mucinous neoplasms are a type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of mucin, a gel-like substance produced by certain types of cells. These tumors can occur in various organs, including the ovary, pancreas, and colon. Mucinous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, and malignant forms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

Serous Neoplasms: Serous neoplasms are another type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of serous fluid, which is a thin, watery fluid. These tumors commonly occur in the ovary and can be benign or malignant. Malignant serous neoplasms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

In summary, neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths that can be benign or malignant. Cystic neoplasms contain fluid-filled sacs and can occur in various organs of the body. Mucinous neoplasms produce a gel-like substance called mucin and can also occur in various organs, while serous neoplasms produce thin, watery fluid and commonly occur in the ovary. Both mucinous and serous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, with malignant forms often being aggressive and having a poor prognosis.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

A "second primary neoplasm" is a distinct, new cancer or malignancy that develops in a person who has already had a previous cancer. It is not a recurrence or metastasis of the original tumor, but rather an independent cancer that arises in a different location or organ system. The development of second primary neoplasms can be influenced by various factors such as genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and previous treatments like chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

It is important to note that the definition of "second primary neoplasm" may vary slightly depending on the specific source or context. In general medical usage, it refers to a new, separate cancer; however, in some research or clinical settings, there might be more precise criteria for defining and diagnosing second primary neoplasms.

Adenocarcinoma, mucinous is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells that line certain organs and produce mucin, a substance that lubricates and protects tissues. This type of cancer is characterized by the presence of abundant pools of mucin within the tumor. It typically develops in organs such as the colon, rectum, lungs, pancreas, and ovaries.

Mucinous adenocarcinomas tend to have a distinct appearance under the microscope, with large pools of mucin pushing aside the cancer cells. They may also have a different clinical behavior compared to other types of adenocarcinomas, such as being more aggressive or having a worse prognosis in some cases.

It is important to note that while a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, mucinous can be serious, the prognosis and treatment options may vary depending on several factors, including the location of the cancer, the stage at which it was diagnosed, and the individual's overall health.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers that originate from the abnormal proliferation or growth of one or more types of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These disorders result in an overproduction of mature but dysfunctional blood cells, which can lead to serious complications such as blood clots, bleeding, and organ damage.

There are several subtypes of MPDs, including:

1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of mature granulocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CML is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion protein, which drives uncontrolled cell growth and division.
2. Polycythemia Vera (PV): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of all three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets - in the bone marrow. This can lead to an increased risk of blood clots, bleeding, and enlargement of the spleen.
3. Essential Thrombocythemia (ET): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of platelets in the bone marrow, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and bleeding.
4. Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF): A disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with scar tissue, leading to impaired blood cell production and anemia, enlargement of the spleen, and increased risk of infections and bleeding.
5. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL): A rare disorder characterized by the overproduction of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CNL can lead to an increased risk of infections and organ damage.

MPDs are typically treated with a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the subtype of MPD, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence of any comorbidities.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor (not cancerous), which arises from glandular epithelial cells and is covered by a thin layer of connective tissue. These tumors can develop in various locations within the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and other organs that contain glands.

There are two main types of cystadenomas: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenomas are filled with a clear or watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenomas contain a thick, gelatinous material. Although they are generally not harmful, these tumors can grow quite large and cause discomfort or other symptoms due to their size or location. In some cases, cystadenomas may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors, known as cystadenocarcinomas. Regular medical follow-up and monitoring are essential for individuals diagnosed with cystadenomas to ensure early detection and treatment of any potential complications.

Neoplasms of connective and soft tissue are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the body's supportive tissues, such as cartilage, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and fat. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign connective and soft tissue neoplasms include:
- Lipomas: slow-growing, fatty tumors that develop under the skin.
- Fibromas: firm, benign tumors that develop in connective tissue such as tendons or ligaments.
- Nevi (plural of nevus): benign growths made up of cells called melanocytes, which produce pigment.

Malignant connective and soft tissue neoplasms include:
- Sarcomas: a type of cancer that develops in the body's supportive tissues such as muscle, bone, fat, cartilage, or blood vessels. There are many different types of sarcomas, including liposarcoma (fatty tissue), rhabdomyosarcoma (muscle), and osteosarcoma (bone).
- Desmoid tumors: a rare type of benign tumor that can become aggressive and invade surrounding tissues. While not considered cancerous, desmoid tumors can cause significant morbidity due to their tendency to grow and infiltrate nearby structures.

Connective and soft tissue neoplasms can present with various symptoms depending on their location and size. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis (spread) of the tumor.

Plasma cell neoplasms are a type of cancer that originates from plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow. These cells are responsible for producing antibodies to help fight off infections. When plasma cells become cancerous and multiply out of control, they can form a tumor called a plasmacytoma.

There are two main types of plasma cell neoplasms: solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma. Solitary plasmacytoma is a localized tumor that typically forms in the bone, while multiple myeloma is a systemic disease that affects multiple bones and can cause a variety of symptoms such as bone pain, fatigue, and anemia.

Plasma cell neoplasms are diagnosed through a combination of tests, including blood tests, imaging studies, and bone marrow biopsy. Treatment options depend on the stage and extent of the disease, but may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Appendiceal neoplasms refer to various types of tumors that can develop in the appendix, a small tube-like structure attached to the large intestine. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant and can include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are usually slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms.
2. Carcinoids: These are neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the hormone-producing cells in the appendix. They are typically small and slow-growing, but some can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Mucinous neoplasms: These are tumors that produce mucin, a slippery substance that can cause the appendix to become distended and filled with mucus. They can be low-grade (less aggressive) or high-grade (more aggressive) and may spread to other parts of the abdomen.
4. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
5. Pseudomyxoma peritonei: This is a condition in which mucin produced by an appendiceal neoplasm leaks into the abdominal cavity, causing a jelly-like accumulation of fluid and tissue. It can be caused by both benign and malignant tumors.

Treatment for appendiceal neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

Mucinous cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor that arises from the epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes of the body. It is most commonly found in the ovary, but can also occur in other locations such as the pancreas or appendix.

Mucinous cystadenomas are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a slippery, gel-like substance that accumulates inside the tumor and causes it to grow into a cystic mass. These tumors can vary in size, ranging from a few centimeters to over 20 centimeters in diameter.

While mucinous cystadenomas are generally benign, they have the potential to become cancerous (mucinous cystadenocarcinoma) if left untreated. Symptoms of mucinous cystadenoma may include abdominal pain or swelling, bloating, and changes in bowel movements or urinary habits. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) is a specific type of cancer that forms in the ducts that carry digestive enzymes out of the pancreas. It's the most common form of exocrine pancreatic cancer, making up about 90% of all cases.

The symptoms of PDC are often vague and can include abdominal pain, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), unexplained weight loss, and changes in bowel movements. These symptoms can be similar to those caused by other less serious conditions, which can make diagnosis difficult.

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is often aggressive and difficult to treat. The prognosis for PDC is generally poor, with a five-year survival rate of only about 9%. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches. However, because PDC is often not detected until it has advanced, treatment is frequently focused on palliative care to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

A pancreatic cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms in the pancreas, a gland located behind the stomach that produces enzymes to help with digestion and hormones to regulate blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cysts can be classified into several types, including congenital (present at birth), retention (formed due to blockage of pancreatic ducts), and pseudocysts (formed as a result of injury or inflammation).

While some pancreatic cysts may not cause any symptoms, others can lead to abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, or jaundice. Some cysts may also have the potential to become cancerous over time. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and evaluate pancreatic cysts through imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and in some cases, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) may be necessary for further evaluation.

Treatment options for pancreatic cysts depend on the type, size, location, and symptoms of the cyst, as well as the patient's overall health condition. Some cysts may require surgical removal, while others can be managed with regular monitoring and follow-up care. It is essential to consult a healthcare provider for proper evaluation and management of pancreatic cysts.

Carcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the cells that line the glandular structures or the lining of organs. In a papillary carcinoma, the cancerous cells grow and form small finger-like projections, called papillae, within the tumor. This type of cancer most commonly occurs in the thyroid gland, but can also be found in other organs such as the lung, breast, and kidney. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is usually slow-growing and has a good prognosis, especially when it is diagnosed at an early stage.

Adenocarcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells and grows in a finger-like projection (called a papilla). This type of cancer can occur in various organs, including the lungs, pancreas, thyroid, and female reproductive system. The prognosis and treatment options for papillary adenocarcinoma depend on several factors, such as the location and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment plan.

Abdominal Imaging. 40 (3): 663-77. doi:10.1007/s00261-014-0236-4. PMID 25219664. S2CID 10097983. "Precancerous conditions of ... Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm "Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas". Johns ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a type of tumor that can occur within the cells of the pancreatic duct. IPMN ... Campbell, NM; Katz, SS; Escalon, JG; Do, RK (March 2015). "Imaging patterns of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the ...
Kim, Mi Suk; Park, Soyoon; Lee, Tae Sung (April 2002). "Old abdominal pregnancy presenting as an ovarian neoplasm". Journal of ... While the chance of abdominal pregnancy is one in 11,000 pregnancies, only between 1.5 and 1.8 percent of these abdominal ... Frayer CA, Hibbert ML; Hibbert (July 1999). "Abdominal pregnancy in a 67-year-old woman undetected for 37 years. A case report ... Ede, J; Sobnach, S; Castillo, F; Bhyat, A; Corbett, JH (August 2011). "The lithopedion - an unusual cause of an abdominal mass ...
If symptoms are present, the most common one is abdominal pain. On gross pathology, they are firm and white or tan. On ... Ovarian fibromas represent 4% of all ovarian neoplasms. They tend to occur mostly during perimenopause and postmenopause, the ...
Bleeding due to rupture of an intra-abdominal neoplasm, (e.g., Hepatoblastoma) Disseminated intravascular coagulation People on ... The blood accumulates in the space between the inner lining of the abdominal wall and the internal abdominal organs. ... The abdominal cavity is highly distensible and may easily hold greater than five liters of blood, or more than the entire ... Vascular accidents, such as rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, iliac aneurysm, or splenic aneurysm. Bleeding due to a ...
"Treatable abdominal pathologic conditions and unsuspected malignant neoplasms at autopsy in veterans who received mechanical ... While patients with abdominal pathologic conditions generally complained of abdominal pain, results of an examination of the ... The abdominal organs can be removed one by one after first examining their relationships and vessels. Most pathologists, ... "abdominal pathologic conditions - abscesses, bowel perforations, or infarction - were as frequent as pulmonary emboli as a ...
"Hypersplenism caused by an accessory spleen mimicking an intra-abdominal neoplasm: report of a case". Surg. Today. 39 (9): 818- ... Displaced tissue fragments can implant on well vascularized surfaces in the abdominal cavity, or, if the diaphragmatic barrier ...
Possible signs and symptoms of a renal oncocytoma include blood in the urine, flank pain, and an abdominal mass. Renal ... It represent 5% to 15% of surgically resected renal neoplasms. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophilic cells have numerous ... Renal Neoplasms: An Update on Immunohistochemical and Histochemical Features http://www.dako.com/08066_12may10_webchapter26.pdf ...
... within the abdomen after abdominal surgery. Desmoplasia is usually only associated with malignant neoplasms, which can evoke a ... Desmoplasia may occur around a neoplasm, causing dense fibrosis around the tumor, or scar tissue (adhesions) ... not all scars are associated with malignant neoplasms. Mature scars are usually thick, collagenous bundles arranged ...
The extra-abdominal form is rare and desmoids of the breast may arise in the mammary gland or may occur as an extension of a ... The incidence of mammary desmoid tumors is less than 0.2% of primary breast neoplasms. In Gardner's syndrome, the incidence ... Baranov E, Hornick JL (March 2020). "Soft Tissue Special Issue: Fibroblastic and Myofibroblastic Neoplasms of the Head and Neck ... Desmoid tumors arise most frequently from the aponeurosis of the rectus abdominal muscle of multiparous women. ...
Serial abdominal imaging should be performed to assess AML size at 6- to 12-month intervals, at least until trends in growth ... Other neoplasms (or sources of inflammation) should therefore be considered in known or suspected LAM cases in which FDG-PET ... Abnormalities on abdominal imaging, such as renal AML and enlarged lymphatic structures, are also common in LAM. Fat density ... Abdominal lymphangiomatosis, often containing both cystic and solid components, were seen in 29% of patients with S-LAM and 9% ...
The most common malignancy that can present as a pancreatic cyst is a mucinous cystic neoplasm. Cysts from 1-5 mm on CT or ... Abdominal Imaging. 40 (3): 663-77. doi:10.1007/s00261-014-0236-4. PMID 25219664. S2CID 10097983. Scholten L, van Huijgevoort N ... Campbell, NM; Katz, SS; Escalon, JG; Do, RK (March 2015). "Imaging patterns of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the ... Main branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are associated with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, while ...
In rare instances, excessive abdominal noise may be a sign of digestive disease, especially when accompanied by abdominal ... Some examples of diseases that may be associated with this symptom include carcinoid neoplasm and coeliac sprue. Louder rumbles ... Symptoms may include abdominal pain, nausea, and bulky or foul smelling stools. Colitis is swelling of the large intestine. The ... A stomach rumble, also known as a bowel sound, peristaltic sound, abdominal sound, bubble gut or borborygmus (pronounced / ...
Less often, they may cause abdominal pain. Solid pseudopapillary tumours tend to occur in women, and most often present in the ... A solid pseudopapillary tumour is a low-grade malignant neoplasm of the pancreas of papillary architecture that typically ... Shuja, Asim (May 2014). "Solid pseudopapillary tumor: a rare neoplasm of the pancreas". Gastroenterol Rep (Oxf). 2 (2): 145-149 ... "Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: a single institution experience of 14 cases". HPB. 8 (2): 148-50. doi:10.1080/ ...
One of the most noted features of OGS is the increased risk of neoplasms in certain OGSs. SGBS in particular has been found to ... 90 percent of currently manifested tumors have been found to be localized to the abdominal regions with the majority of those ... There are five different types of tumors that patients with SGBS might develop, all intra-abdominal: Wilms tumor, ... In order to detect the presence of tumors, screening in SGBS patients should include abdominal ultrasound, urinalysis, and ...
Gallbladder cancer (Malignant neoplasm of the gallbladder) is rare, and most of the time is adenocarcinoma. As most early-stage ... Abdominal pain can be confused with other gut disorders and will not relieve the pain in these instances. Cholecystitis, ... Gallbladder disease presents chiefly with abdominal pain located in the right upper abdomen. This pain is described as biliary ... In these cases, physicians will need to rule out peritonitis, inflammation of the abdominal cavity. A negative Murphy's sign ...
Neoplasms are the most common underlying pathology in up to 60% of cases and include renal angiomyolipoma and renal cell ... Patients may present with various symptoms ranging from abdominal pain to more severe manifestations such as hypovolemic shock ...
Other differential diagnoses in children include constipation, abdominal colic, iron deficiency, subdural hematoma, neoplasms ... In adults, abdominal colic, involving paroxysms of pain, may appear at blood lead levels greater than 80 μg/dL. Signs that ... Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation are other acute symptoms. Lead's effects on the mouth include ... Symptoms may include abdominal pain, constipation, headaches, irritability, memory problems, infertility, and tingling in the ...
Pancreatitis or abdominal trauma can cause its formation. Treatment usually depends on the mechanism that brought about the ... pancreatic neoplasm and/or pancreatic trauma. Pancreatic pseudocysts are sometimes called false cysts because they do not have ... Signs and symptoms of pancreatic pseudocyst include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting and lack of appetite. ... although in children they frequently occur following abdominal trauma. Pancreatic pseudocysts account for approximately 75% of ...
Abdominal disease is another manifestation of actinomycosis. This can lead to a sinus tract that drains to the abdominal wall ... Another form of actinomycosis is thoracic disease, which is often misdiagnosed as a neoplasm, as it forms a mass that extends ... Symptoms include fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Actinomyces species have also been shown to infect the central nervous ...
... of all childhood renal neoplasms. This neoplasm is generally non-aggressive and amenable to surgical removal. However, a ... Congenital mesoblastic nephroma typically (76% of cases) presents as an abdominal mass which is detected prenatally (16% of ... It shows a mixture of the classic and cellular types in different areas of the neoplasm. A study conducted in 1998 found that ... Congenital mesoblastic nephroma, while rare, is the most common kidney neoplasm diagnosed in the first three months of life and ...
... skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.828 - spinal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.180.260 - breast neoplasms, male MeSH C04.588.180.390 ... abdominal MeSH C04.557.450.565.590.340.410 - fibromatosis, aggressive MeSH C04.557.450.565.590.350 - fibrosarcoma MeSH C04.557. ... bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.250.250 - common bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.401 - gallbladder neoplasms ... femoral neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721 - skull neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450 - jaw neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450.583 ...
Depending on the level of obstruction, bowel obstruction can present with abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and ... Neoplasms / cancer Diverticulitis / Diverticulosis Hernias Inflammatory bowel disease Colonic volvulus (sigmoid, caecal, ... All cases of abdominal surgical intervention are associated with increased risk of future small-bowel obstructions. Statistics ... The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the cecum on an abdominal radiograph within 24 hours of it being given by mouth ...
Abscess formation in the abdominal wall Fibrous cord increases the risk of volvulus formation and internal herniation Neoplasms ... Computed tomography (CT scan) might be a useful tool to demonstrate a blind ended and inflamed structure in the mid-abdominal ... Symptoms may include bright red blood in stools (hematochezia), weakness, abdominal tenderness or pain, and even anaemia in ... Association with acute appendicitis Symptoms: Vomiting, abdominal pain and severe or complete constipation. The vitelline ...
... when resident immune cells originate a neoplasm (e.g., lymphoma). Abdominal CT is the most accurate. The spleen needs to be 2-3 ... Symptoms may include abdominal pain, chest pain, chest pain similar to pleuritic pain when stomach, bladder or bowels are full ... Signs of splenomegaly may include a palpable left upper quadrant abdominal mass or splenic rub. It can be detected on physical ... In cases of infectious mononucleosis splenomegaly is a common symptom and health care providers may consider using abdominal ...
Sinusitis Diarrhea High heart rate Fatigue Abdominal pain Neoplasms (cancers) Rare (. ...
The usual signs and symptoms for this disease are an abnormal abdominal mass, along with abdominal pain or obstructive jaundice ... About 0.5% to 1% of all primary malignant lung tumors are childhood tumors of the lung, making it a rare form of neoplasm. ... Retinoblastoma is a rare form of eye neoplasm (found in the retina) that is mostly found in children, being the most common ... This type of malignant neoplasm mimics pancreatic development at 7 weeks of gestation and tends to affect, most commonly, young ...
... hemiazygos system displayed by chest or abdominal X-ray films can be misdiagnosed as a mediastinal or retroperitoneal neoplasm ...
The signs/symptoms of protein losing enteropathy are consistent with diarrhea, fever, and general abdominal discomfort. ... Infection (secondary obstruction) Neoplasm (secondary obstruction) Sarcoidosis (secondary obstruction). Amyloidosis. Systemic ...
... intra-abdominal bleeding, vaginal bleeding, neoplasm located in either bladder or kidneys pathways. If urine looks dark yellow ...
... in locating stomach position by digital indentation of stomach and transillumination Gastric wall neoplasm Abdominal wall ... An angiocath is used to puncture the abdominal wall through a small incision, and a soft guidewire is inserted through this and ... The tube (or multiple tubes) is used for gastropexy, or adhering the stomach to the abdominal wall, preventing twisting of the ... Walters G, Ramesh P, Memon MI (2005). "Buried Bumper Syndrome complicated by intra-abdominal sepsis". Age and Ageing. 34 (6): ...
Renal Neoplasms John N. Eble David J. Grignon A diverse array of tumors can arise in the human kidney. In this chapter, these ... Congenital mesoblastic nephroma makes up less than 3% of renal neoplasms in children; it is the predominant renal neoplasm in ... The rare tumor known as metanephric adenoma has now been described in detail (47,48,49,50,51,52). Epithelial neoplasms of the ... an abdominal mass. Congenital mesoblastic nephroma was first recognized in 1966 (25), and subsequent studies have shown it to ...
Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas are uncommon, and their diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis have yet to be ... Hypervascularity may be demonstrated on angiograms, and some tumors occur with intra-abdominal hemorrhage. ... A foregut cystic neoplasm with diagnostic and therapeutic similarities to mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. JOP. 2013 ... Mucinous cystic neoplasms. Nonenhanced CT scans of mucinous cystic neoplasms show a well-defined, unilocular or multilocular, ...
A chest radiograph and computed tomography scan and an abdominal ultrasound did not reveal pertinent abnormalities. Recurrence ... Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis Infection in Patient with Antecedent Hematologic Neoplasm, Spain1 On This Page ... Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis Infection in Patient with Antecedent Hematologic Neoplasm, Spain. Emerging Infectious ... Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis Infection in Patient with Antecedent Hematologic Neoplasm, Spain. Volume 29, Number 8-August ...
Abdominal Imaging. 40 (3): 663-77. doi:10.1007/s00261-014-0236-4. PMID 25219664. S2CID 10097983. "Precancerous conditions of ... Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm "Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas". Johns ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a type of tumor that can occur within the cells of the pancreatic duct. IPMN ... Campbell, NM; Katz, SS; Escalon, JG; Do, RK (March 2015). "Imaging patterns of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the ...
Gastrointestinal stromal neoplasm, see Gastrointestinal stromal tumor. *Gastrointestinal stromal sarcoma, see Gastrointestinal ... Gastroschisis, see Abdominal wall defect. *GATA-1-related thrombocytopenia with dyserythropoiesis, see Dyserythropoietic anemia ...
Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm of pancreas presenting as an abdominal lump: a case report Authors. * Niraj Gupta ... Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas in a Young Pediatric Patient: A Case Report and Systematic Review of the ... Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm (SPEN) of the pancreas is a rare cystic exocrine tumour of the pancreas that ... Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm, Distal pancreatectomy, Transverse colon, Case report Abstract. ...
18] In a separate study, Boraschi et al found MDCT to be a reliable diagnostic technique for early abdominal complications of ... 38] Of the neoplasms that also occur in immunocompetent individuals, skin and cervical carcinomas are more likely to occur in ... Boraschi P, Donati F, Rossi M, Ghinolfi D, Filipponi F, Falaschi F. Role of MDCT in the detection of early abdominal ... US, CT scanning, and MRI can be used to detect posttransplantation neoplasms. In patients with suspected hepatic involvement, ...
Abdominal Neoplasms / chemistry * Abdominal Neoplasms / pathology* * Abdominal Neoplasms / surgery * Actins / analysis * ...
In: Abdominal Radiology, Vol. 46, No. 4, 04.2021, p. 1586-1606.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer- ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas: recommendations for Standardized Imaging and Reporting from the ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas: recommendations for Standardized Imaging and Reporting from the ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas: recommendations for Standardized Imaging and Reporting from the ...
Intra Abdominal Cancer. *Intraabdominal Cyst. *Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm. *Intussusception. *Islet Cell ...
MBT present similarly to other ovarian neoplasms with abdominal pain and bulk symptoms. On imaging, these tumors demonstrate ... MBT present similarly to other ovarian neoplasms with abdominal pain and bulk symptoms. On imaging, these tumors demonstrate ... MBT present similarly to other ovarian neoplasms with abdominal pain and bulk symptoms. On imaging, these tumors demonstrate ... ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC: 26-31.,detail:{html:,h4>Abstract,/h4>\n ,p class=\abstract\>Ovarian neoplasms are a heterogeneous ...
Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms Rarely Turn Cancerous, Study Shows * Semaglutide Reduces Cardiovascular Risk in Obesity Without ... Consider the possibility of bleeding in any patient who has a sudden increase in abdominal pain coupled with a drop in ... For patient education resources, see the Digestive Disorders Center, as well as Pancreatitis and Abdominal Pain in Adults. ... Acute or, rarely, chronic pancreatitis or abdominal trauma causes pseudocysts. If no history of pancreatitis or trauma exists, ...
Information about the SNOMED CT code 126859007 representing Neoplasm of pancreas. ... Abdominal organ finding 249561001. Neoplasm of intra-abdominal organs 126643005. Neoplasm of pancreas 126859007. SNOMED CT ... Neoplasm of trunk 126637008. Neoplasm of abdomen 128050000. Neoplasm of retroperitoneum 126872008. Neoplasm of pancreas ... Neoplasm of digestive system 128348002. Tumor of digestive organs 254532005. Neoplasm of pancreas 126859007. SNOMED CT Concept ...
A 45-year-old woman presented with an abdominal mass for 1 month. Exploratory laparotomy was performed. A 35 cm right ... Angiosarcoma of the ovary is rare but represents an aggressive type of malignant ovarian neoplasms. The purpose of this report ... Angiosarcoma of the ovary is rare but represents an aggressive type of malignant ovarian neoplasms. The purpose of this report ... A 45-year-old woman presented with an abdominal mass for 1 month. Exploratory laparotomy was performed. A 35 cm right ovarian ...
Lymph Node Neoplasm x. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) ...
Clinical signs similar to pancreatitis may occur in cases of benign or malignant pancreatic neoplasms. An abdominal ultrasound ... Laboratory blood tests can show elevated amylase or lipase levels and an abdominal ultrasound may show an enlarged pancreas in ...
The extra-abdominal form is rare and desmoids of the breast may arise in the mammary gland or may occur as an extension of a ... List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic syndromes. References[edit]. .mw-parser-output .reflist{font-size:90%; ... The incidence of mammary desmoid tumors is less than 0.2% of primary breast neoplasms. In Gardners syndrome, the incidence ... Desmoid tumors arise most frequently from the aponeurosis of the rectus abdominal muscle of multiparous women. ...
CONCLUSION: The ovarian mass was revealed by abdominal distension, and … OBJECTIVE: Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are extremely ... OBJECTIVE: Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are extremely uncommon in children. Ovarian mucinous cystadenoma is benign and an ... Ovarian carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, the four most common subtypes being serous, endometrioid, clear ... Ovarian carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, the four most common subtypes being serous, endometrioid, clear ...
Thymomas are localized neoplasms caused by dysfunction of the thymus gland.30 Although they are not often found in birds, ... They can appear anywhere, but the liver and spleen are the two common locations in the abdominal cavity. Lymphomas have also ... This is one of the more common malignant neoplasms diagnosed in pet birds. The subcutis of the wing, leg, commissure, neck, and ... Canaries usually present with abdominal enlargement, lack of singing, and dyspnea.29 ...
Retroperitoneal neoplasm: treatments, associated drugs and conditions (145 reports). ... Retroperitoneal neoplasm: tumour between peritoneum and the posterior abdominal wall. We study 145 people who have ... Retroperitoneal neoplasm in Johnson and Johnson Covid Vaccine Browse all Retroperitoneal neoplasm symptoms:. a b c d e f g h i ... 190 drugs that are associated with Retroperitoneal neoplasm. - 43 conditions that are associated with Retroperitoneal neoplasm ...
Neoplasms, Pediatrics, Closing Volume, Peripheral Vascular Diseases, Aortic Aneurysm, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Aneurysm, ... Kidney Neoplasms, Lung Neoplasms, Bone Diseases, Diagnostic Imaging, Drainage, Carotid Arteries, Medical Oncology, ... Public Health, Delivery of Health Care, 50230, Health Promotion, Health Services, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Caregivers, ... Bone Neoplasms, Pulmonary Embolism, Vena Cava Filters, Myoma, Vertebroplasty, Prostatic Hyperplasia, Arteriovenous ...
May 1: 44140 Colectomy, partial; with anastomosis with 153.3 Malignant neoplasm of colon; sigmoid colon.. May 14: 49900-78 ... the patient is returned to the OR for treatment of partial dehiscence of the incision with secondary suturing of the abdominal ... The diagnosis is 239.3 Neoplasms of unspecified nature; breast.. May 9: 19307-58-RT Mastectomy, modified radical, including ... but excluding pectoralis major muscle with 174.1 Malignant neoplasm of female breast; central portion. ...
A histologic examination of this neoplasms tissue type, determined it to be fibrosarcomatous in nature. See PHIL 20264, for a ... revealed the presence of a large tumor protruding from his lower abdominal region, which displayed signs of erosion of the ...
... and neoplasms. Females over 65 years of age with 20 or more years of agricultural exposure exhibited the largest number of ... hernia of the abdominal cavity; diseases of the veins, lymphatics, and other circulatory diseases; and diseases of the eye. ...
Many abdominal cysts can be treated by injection of protoscolicidal chemical solutions into the cyst, followed by evacuation, ... and benign or malignant neoplasms. Noninvasive imaging techniques such as CT scans, MRI, and ultrasound imaging are all used ... and monitoring of treatment of liver and intra-abdominal cysts. Cyst viability cannot be reliably determined with radiography ...
Of this uncommon group of highly malignant neoplasms, the leiomyosarcoma is the most common histiotype. ... They occur mainly in the fifth and sixth decades of life, and abdominal pain and GI bleeding have been reported to be the most ... Of this uncommon group of highly malignant neoplasms, the leiomyosarcoma is the most common histiotype. [1] Intestinal ...
Large caudal abdominal mass, most consistent with a cryptorchid neoplastic testicle. Given history, a Sertoli cell tumor is the ... sign has been reported in a dog with torsion of a cryptorchid testicular neoplasm on computed tomography previously. This case ... Specchi, S. and M.A. DAnjou, Diagnostic imaging for the assessment of acquired abdominal vascular diseases in small animals: A ... Hecht, S., et al., Ultrasound diagnosis: intra-abdominal torsion of a non-neoplastic testicle in a cryptorchid dog. Veterinary ...
Schwannomas are slow growing and usually asymptomatic but can present with a variety of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, ... Gastric schwannoma represent only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. Colonic and ... Introduction: Gastrointestinal schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms that are distinctively unique when compared to soft-tissue ... The outcome after surgery is excellent as these neoplasms are generally benign in nature. ...
... of the disease by plain radiography is difficult because of the similar opacity of ovarian cysts and abdominal neoplasms. ... Diagnosis is by abdominal radiology. The calculi are radiopaque and usually composed of calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate ... Abdominal ultrasound allows differentiation by imaging the inner structure of the ovarian cyst. Treatment is laparotomy and ... For a discussion of papillomas (viral warts), the most common, viral-induced neoplasms of the skin, see Papillomas . Benign... ...

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