Xiphoid Bone: Also called xiphoid process, it is the smallest and most inferior triangular protrusion of the STERNUM or breastbone that extends into the center of the ribcage.Pubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Exostoses: Benign hypertrophy that projects outward from the surface of bone, often containing a cartilaginous component.Pubic Symphysis: A slightly movable cartilaginous joint which occurs between the pubic bones.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Osteitis: Inflammation of the bone.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Sarcoma, Small Cell: A sarcoma characterized by the presence of small cells, cells measuring 9-14 micrometers with a faint or indistinct rim of cytoplasm and an oval-to-elongated nucleus with relatively dense chromatin. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor: A rare, aggressive soft tissue sarcoma that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. It is most commonly found in the abdomen.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Fascia Lata: CONNECTIVE TISSUE of the anterior compartment of the THIGH that has its origins on the anterior aspect of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine, and its insertion point on the iliotibial tract. It plays a role in medial rotation of the THIGH, steadying the trunk, and in KNEE extension.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Menu PlanningMuscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Nipples: The conic organs which usually give outlet to milk from the mammary glands.Bile Ducts: The channels that collect and transport the bile secretion from the BILE CANALICULI, the smallest branch of the BILIARY TRACT in the LIVER, through the bile ductules, the bile ducts out the liver, and to the GALLBLADDER for storage.Mammary Glands, Animal: MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.Cystic Duct: The duct that is connected to the GALLBLADDER and allows the emptying of bile into the COMMON BILE DUCT.Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Salivary Ducts: Any of the ducts which transport saliva. Salivary ducts include the parotid duct, the major and minor sublingual ducts, and the submandibular duct.Thoracic Duct: The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Sea Bream: A species of PERCIFORMES commonly used in saline aquaculture.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Pubic Symphysis Diastasis: Separation of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS. It is an uncommon complication of CHILDBIRTH causing postpartum PAIN, but it can also arise from other causes.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Seroma: Tumor-like sterile accumulation of serum in a tissue, organ, or cavity. It results from a tissue insult and is the product of tissue inflammation. It most commonly occurs following MASTECTOMY.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.
It is located in the lower abdomen in front of the rectus abdominis. It originates at the pubic bone and is inserted into the ... Surface landmarks are important in the examination of the abdomen. In the mid-line a slight furrow extends from the xiphoid ... They originate at the pubis bone, run up the abdomen on either side of the linea alba, and insert into the cartilages of the ... The 2 bottom sections are just above the pubic bone and usually not visible, hence, the 6 pack abs. The rectus abdominals' ...
Perichondrium Axial skeleton Appendicular skeleton Long bone Short bone Flat bone Irregular bone Pneumatized bone Sesamoid bone ... Ischium Lesser sciatic notch MN Pubis Body Pubic tubercle Superior pubic ramus Pecten pubis Pelvis (category contains general ... Parts of human body Head Ear Face Eye Cheek Nose Mouth Chin Neck Trunk Thorax Abdomen Pelvis Back Upper limb Pectoral girdle ... rib First rib Scalene tubercle Lumbar rib Sternum Manubrium of sternum Clavicular notch Jugular notch Sternal angle Xiphoid ...
Sometimes a single incision extending from xiphoid process to pubic symphysis is employed, especially in trauma surgery. ... abdomen and continues all the way across the abdomen to the opposite mid-axillary line thereby the whole width of the abdomen ... the rectus tendons are transected transversely 1-2 cm distal to the superior edge of the pubic bone. Rectus muscle should never ... Chevron incision - This incision a cut is made on the abdomen below the rib cage. The cut starts under the mid-axillary line ...
... xiphoid process zona incerta zona pellucida zootomy zygapophysis zygoma Zygomatic arch Zygomatic bone Zygomatic branches of the ... abdomen abdominal aorta abducens nerve abducens nucleus abducent abducent nerve abduction accessory bone accessory cuneate ... ligament pterygopalatine foramen pterygopalatine fossa pterygopalatine ganglion ptosis puberty pubic hair pubic symphysis pubis ... symmetry bile duct biology bipolar cells of the retina bitemporal heminopia blastomere blood blood brain barrier body bone bone ...
Pressure on the xiphoid process should be avoided when administering chest compressions in CPR, as this can cause the xiphoid process to break off, resulting in punctures or lacerations of the diaphragm. Additionally, the liver may be punctured, resulting in lethal hemorrhaging. Xiphoidalgia (Xiphodynia) is a syndrome distinguishable by pain and tenderness to the sternum. While some sources describe this disorder as rare, others suggest it is relatively common but overlooked by physicians. This is a musculoskeletal disorder that has the ability to produce a constellation of symptoms that can mimic a number of common abdominal and thoracic disorders and diseases.[3] Symptoms can include abdominal pain, chest pain, nausea and radiating pain to the back, neck, and shoulders. Lifting heavy objects or trauma to the chest may be the cause of this musculoskeletal disorder and pain may be heightened by bending or twisting. Anesthetic and steroid injections are ...
The rectus abdominis muscle, also known as the "abdominal muscle", is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the human abdomen, as well as that of some other mammals. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba. It extends from the pubic symphysis, pubic crest and pubic tubercle inferiorly, to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs V to VII superiorly.[1] The proximal attachments are the pubic crest and the pubic symphysis. It attaches distally at the costal cartilages of ribs 5-7 and the xiphoid process of the sternum.[2] The rectus abdominis muscle is contained in the rectus sheath, which consists of the aponeuroses of the lateral abdominal muscles. Bands of connective tissue called the tendinous intersections traverse the rectus abdominis, which separates this parallel ...
The transversus thoracis muscle (/trænzˈvɜːrsəs θəˈreɪsɪs/) lies internal to the thoracic cage, anteriorly. It is a thin plane of muscular and tendinous fibers, situated upon the inner surface of the front wall of the chest. It is in the same layer as the subcostal muscles and the innermost intercostal muscles. It arises on either side from the lower third of the posterior surface of the body of the sternum, from the posterior surface of the xiphoid process, and from the sternal ends of the costal cartilages of the lower three or four true ribs. Its fibers diverge upward and lateralward, to be inserted by slips into the lower borders and inner surfaces of the costal cartilages of the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth ribs. The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are continuous with those of the transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are oblique, while the highest are almost vertical. This muscle varies in its attachments, not only in ...
The levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior pubic ramus lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of the spine of the ischium; and between these two points, from the obturator fascia.. Posteriorly, this fascial origin corresponds, more or less closely, with the tendinous arch of the pelvic fascia, but in front, the muscle arises from the fascia at a varying distance above the arch, in some cases reaching nearly as high as the canal for the obturator vessels and nerve.. The fibers pass downward and backward to the middle line of the floor of the pelvis; the most posterior are inserted into the side of the last two segments of the coccyx; those placed more anteriorly unite with the muscle of the opposite side, in a median fibrous ridge called the anococcygeal body or raphe, which extends between the coccyx and the margin of the anus.. The middle fibers are inserted into the side of the rectum, blending with the fibers of the Sphincter muscles; ...
The levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior pubic ramus lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of the spine of the ischium; and between these two points, from the obturator fascia. Posteriorly, this fascial origin corresponds, more or less closely, with the tendinous arch of the pelvic fascia, but in front, the muscle arises from the fascia at a varying distance above the arch, in some cases reaching nearly as high as the canal for the obturator vessels and nerve. The fibers pass downward and backward to the middle line of the floor of the pelvis; the most posterior are inserted into the side of the last two segments of the coccyx; those placed more anteriorly unite with the muscle of the opposite side, in a median fibrous ridge called the anococcygeal body or raphe, which extends between the coccyx and the margin of the anus. The middle fibers are inserted into the side of the rectum, blending with the fibers of the sphincter muscles; ...
A condyle is the round prominence at the end of a bone, most often part of a joint - an articulation with another bone.[2] The epicondyle refers to a projection near a condyle, particularly the medial epicondyle of the humerus.[3] These terms derive from Greek.[4] [a]. An eminence refers to a relatively small projection or bump, particularly of bone, such as the medial eminence.[5]. A process refers to a relatively large projection or prominent bump,[6] as does a promontory such as the sacral promontory.[7]. Both tubercle and tuberosity refer to a projection or bump with a roughened surface, with a "tubercle" generally smaller than a "tuberosity". These terms are derived from Tuber (Latin: swelling).[8]. A ramus (Latin: branch) refers to an extension of bone,[9] such as the ramus of the mandible in the jaw or Superior pubic ramus. Ramus may also be used to ...
In human anatomy of the leg, the femoral sheath has three compartments. The lateral compartment contains the femoral artery, the intermediate compartment contains the femoral vein, and the medial and smallest compartment is called the femoral canal. The femoral canal contains efferent lymphatic vessels and a lymph node embedded in a small amount of areolar tissue. It is conical in shape and is about 2 cm long. ...
The femoral sheath (crural sheath) is formed by a prolongation downward, behind the inguinal ligament, of the abdominal fascia, the transverse fascia being continued down in front of the femoral vessels and the iliac fascia behind them. The femoral sheath is contained within the femoral triangle. The sheath assumes the form of a short funnel, the wide end of which is directed upward, while the lower, narrow end fuses with the fascial investment of the vessels, about 4 cm. below the inguinal ligament. It is strengthened in front by a band termed the iliopubic tract. The lateral wall of the sheath is vertical and is perforated by the lumboinguinal nerve; the medial wall is directed obliquely downward and lateralward, and is pierced by the great saphenous vein and by some lymphatic vessels. The sheath is divided by two vertical partitions which stretch between its anterior and posterior walls. The lateral compartment contains the femoral artery and femoral branch of genitofemoral nerve, and the ...
There is no need for any incision to be made, which will be visible after completion of the examination when the deceased is dressed in a shroud. In all of the above cases the incision then extends all the way down to the pubic bone (making a deviation to either side of the navel) and avoiding, where possible; transsecting any scars which may be present. Bleeding from the cuts is minimal, or non-existent, because the pull of gravity is producing the only blood pressure at this point, related directly to the complete lack of cardiac functionality. However, in certain cases there is anecdotal evidence that bleeding can be quite profuse, especially in cases of drowning. At this point, shears are used to open the chest cavity. The prosector uses the tool to cut through the ribs on the costal cartilage, to allow the sternum to be removed; this is done so that the heart and lungs can be seen in situ and that the heart, in particular the pericardial sac is not ...
There is no need for any incision to be made, which will be visible after completion of the examination when the deceased is dressed in a shroud. In all of the above cases the incision then extends all the way down to the pubic bone (making a deviation to either side of the navel) and avoiding, where possible; transsecting any scars which may be present. Bleeding from the cuts is minimal, or non-existent, because the pull of gravity is producing the only blood pressure at this point, related directly to the complete lack of cardiac functionality. However, in certain cases there is anecdotal evidence that bleeding can be quite profuse, especially in cases of drowning. At this point, shears are used to open the chest cavity. The prosector uses the tool to cut through the ribs on the costal cartilage, to allow the sternum to be removed; this is done so that the heart and lungs can be seen in situ and that the heart, in particular the pericardial sac is not ...
... , also called uterine massage, is a technique used to reduce bleeding and cramping of the uterus after childbirth or after an abortion. As the uterus returns to its nonpregnant size, its muscles contract strongly, which can cause pain. Fundal massage can be performed with one hand over the pubic bone, firmly massaging the uterine fundus (the top of the uterus), or with the addition of one hand in the vagina compressing the two uterine arteries. Routine use of fundal massage can prevent postpartum or post-abortion hemorrhage and can reduce pain; it may also reduce the need for uterotonics, medications that cause the uterus to contract. It is used to treat uterine atony, a condition where the uterus lacks muscle tone and is soft to the touch instead of firm.[1][2][3][4][5] ...
The adductor magnus is a large triangular muscle, situated on the medial side of the thigh. It consists of two parts. The portion which arises from the ischiopubic ramus (a small part of the inferior ramus of the pubis, and the inferior ramus of the ischium) is called the pubofemoral portion, adductor portion, or adductor minimus, and the portion arising from the tuberosity of the ischium is called the ischiocondylar portion, extensor portion, or "hamstring portion". Due to its common embryonic origin, innervation, and action the ischiocondylar portion (or hamstring portion) is often considered part of the hamstring group of muscles. The ischiocondylar portion of the adductor magnus is considered a muscle of the posterior compartment of the thigh while the pubofemoral portion of the adductor magnus is considered a muscle of the medial compartment. Those fibers which arise from the ramus of the pubis are short, horizontal in direction, and are inserted into the rough line of the femur leading ...
... (referred to in other sources as Mareades or Mariades or Mariadnes) was a Roman rebel who betrayed the city of Antioch to Shapur I sometime during the 250s. His chief claim to fame is that he is enumerated as one of the Thirty Tyrants who supposedly tried to overthrow the emperor Gallienus. Cyriades is listed first in the catalogue of usurpers that comprise the chapter on the Thirty Tyrants within the notoriously unreliable Historia Augusta (and writing under the fictitious name of Trebellius Pollio), whose narrative is brief, indistinct, and largely inaccurate. According to this source, Cyriades was the son of a rich man, also named Cyriades, and whose debauched lifestyle offended his father. After stealing from his father, he fled to the Persians, stimulated Shapur I to invade the eastern Roman provinces and helped in the capture of Antioch and Caesarea. At this point he assumed the purple together with the title of Augustus, possibly killing his father before being slain by his own ...
The abdomen has been bisected, trisected, and even divided into as many as 9 separate regions. ... The anatomy of the regions and planes of the abdomen is composed of many layers with varying blood supply and innervation. ... by the anterior ilium and the pubic bone of the pelvis; anteriorly, by the abdominal wall musculature; and posteriorly, by the ... alba in a vertical direction from the xiphoid process of the sternum and costal cartilage of the 5th-7th ribs to the pubic ...
Passes from Xiphoid Process inferiorly to pubic symphysis (inferior center of pubic bone). ... Pubic Tubercle: Lateral edge of pubic bone.. *Inguinal Ligament: Found between the ASIS and the pubic tubercle, running in the ... Each coxal bone is made up of an ilium, ischium, and pubic bone. ... It is halfway between the jugular notch and the pubic bone.. * ... THE ABDOMEN. Download a copy of this study guide *Clinical Examination of the Abdomen *Anterior Abdominal Wall *Inguinal Region ...
Origin: Pubic bone (crest & symphysis) Insertion: Sternum (xiphoid process); Ribs (costal cartilages of ribs 5-7) Action: ... Origin: Ilium (iliac crest) Insertion: Pubic bone & lower ribs; Linea alba Action: Flexes vertebrae & compresses abdomen; ... Origin: Ilium (iliac crest); Ribs (lower 6) Insertion: Pubic bone; Linea alba Action: Compresses abdomen. ... Origin: Ribs (lower 8) Insertion: Ilium (iliac crest); Linea alba Action: Flexes vertebrae & compresses abdomen; Lateral trunk ...
Lab 13.8 Rectus abdominis Pubic crest and symphysis Xiphoid process & costal cartilages of ribs 5-7 Flexes vertebral column. ... compresses abdomen Lab 13.8 Internal oblique Inguinal ligament, iliac crest and lumbar fascia Linea alba, pubic crest & costal ... cartilage of last 6 ribs Linea alba and pubic crest Compresses abdomen to support abdominal viscera. Posterior Muscles of the ... Lab 13.8 External oblique Anterior surface of last 8 ribs Linea alba, pubic crest and tubercles, and iliac crest Flexes and ...
Rectus Abdominis - running from the pubic bone (pubic symphysis and pubic crest) and inserting into the breast bone (xiphoid ... External Oblique - running from the external surfaces of the 5th - 12th ribs and inserting into the midline of the abdomen ( ... Its fibres run horizontally and laterally to insert into the pubic bone (pubic crest) and connective tissue (aponeurosis) of ... linea alba), pubic tubercle and anterior half of the iliac crest (parts of the pelvic bone), this muscle flexes and rotates the ...
Xiphoid process: Level of 10th cartilage = L3 Inferior: Pubic bone and iliac crest: Level of L4. … Doc Retrieval ... ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL Borders of the Abdomen Superior: Costal cartilages 7-12. ... pubic bone, quadrant pain, radicular pain, rectus abdominus, reducible hernia, retrievalacute abdominal, retrievalacute ...
NAME: Rectus abdominis ORIGIN: Pubic bone (crest & symphysis) INSERTION: • Sternum (xiphoid process) • Ribs 5-7 (costal ... pubic bone NEXT ACTION: BACK INFO Compresses abdomen MENU ESCAPE ... pubic bone & lower ribs NEXT ACTION: BACK INFO • Aid rectus ... Skeletal System: Bones & Skeletal Tissues - . classification of bones. axial skeleton skull, vertebral column, ... Skeletal System: Day Two - . long bone anatomy, microscopic anatomy, bone composition, and joint anatomy. structure of ...
The rectus abdominis has its origins along the superior edge of the pubis bone and the pubic symphysis in the pelvis. Its ... and the xiphoid process. The shape of the sternum looks somewhat like a sword pointing downwards, with the manubrium forming ... flat muscles that extend vertically along the entire length of the abdomen adjacent to the umbilicus. Each muscle consists of a ... It is a flat bone about six inches in length, around an inch wide, and only a fraction of an inch thick.. The sternum develops ...
The incision looks very decisive, from pubis down to xiphoid. Its what a hunter would do to a deer or a boar. Hang it, gut it ... The flies were so thick she could feel their hum in her bones as they swarmed around the ripe feast that had been flayed open ... Like a pig carcass hanging in a slaughterhouse, his abdomen had been sliced open, the cavity stripped of all organs. Both arms ... judging by the silvery pubic hair. ... Jane stared at the boning knife. Imagined that razor edge ...
This will create more open space between the sternum and the bottom of the pubic bone in the abdomen. Implementing jalandhara ... closer to the pubic bone than the bottom of the sternum at the xiphoid process in front). Instead of sinking the chest, ... as the pubic bone moves toward the tailbone, the tailbone and sacrum moves toward the pubic bone attempting to meet it) at the ... and pubic bones. When this is explored and learned there is no imbalance at the sacrum top or bottom, between the pubic bones, ...
It is located in the lower abdomen in front of the rectus abdominis. It originates at the pubic bone and is inserted into the ... Surface landmarks are important in the examination of the abdomen. In the mid-line a slight furrow extends from the xiphoid ... They originate at the pubis bone, run up the abdomen on either side of the linea alba, and insert into the cartilages of the ... The 2 bottom sections are just above the pubic bone and usually not visible, hence, the 6 pack abs. The rectus abdominals ...
... and this extra pigmentation shows up as a dark line stretching from the belly button to the top of the pubic hair. ... Most women have the dark line on their stomach, and it usually runs from the belly button down to the pubic bone. ... In humans linea alba runs from the xiphoid process to the pubic symphysis. ... Stretch marks are small, depressed streaks in the skin that appear most often on the abdomen in the later stages of pregnancy ...
Xiphoid process of sternum, anterior fascia, and pubis. Compresses abdomen. Erector spinae. Posterior iliac crest and sacrum. ... Rectus abdominis muscle is the straight abdominal muscle that is connected to the upper part of the pubic bone and apex of the ... Pubic crest. Cartilage of fifth through seventh ribs and xiphoid process. Flexion and lateral flexion of trunk. ... They primarily are involved in pulling the abdomen inward. As such, this muscle is said to affect the figure or taper of the ...
pubic crest and symphysis. cartilage of 5th and 7th ribs, xiphoid process. ... occipital bone, spines of 7th cervical and athoracic vertebrae. clavicle and acromion. ... flexes and rotates vertebral column, compresses abdomen. inferior 8 ribs. iliac crest and linea alba. ...
A hernia is the protrusion of tissue or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is ... The abdominal wall is situated between the xiphoid process cephalad and the pubic bone caudally. Laterally, it extends from one ... 7] The procedure involves the placement of a mesh inside the abdomen without abdominal wall reconstruction. The mesh is fixed ... A hernia is the protrusion of tissue or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is ...
cremaster muscle origin, inferior margin of internal oblique muscle of abdomen; insertion, pubic tubercle; innervation, genital ... puborectal muscle a portion of the levator ani muscle having a more lateral origin from the pubic bone, and continuous ... Insertion: xiphoid process, costal cartilages 5-7. Nerve: spinal T7-T12. Action: tenses abdomen, flexes vertebral column. ... Origin: capitate bone of wrist and metacarpals 2-3. Insertion: proximal phalanx of thumb and medial sesamoid bone. Nerve: ulnar ...
Perichondrium Axial skeleton Appendicular skeleton Long bone Short bone Flat bone Irregular bone Pneumatized bone Sesamoid bone ... Ischium Lesser sciatic notch MN Pubis Body Pubic tubercle Superior pubic ramus Pecten pubis Pelvis (category contains general ... Parts of human body Head Ear Face Eye Cheek Nose Mouth Chin Neck Trunk Thorax Abdomen Pelvis Back Upper limb Pectoral girdle ... rib First rib Scalene tubercle Lumbar rib Sternum Manubrium of sternum Clavicular notch Jugular notch Sternal angle Xiphoid ...
Diaphragm separates abdomen from thorax. Inferior is pelvis which is separated by an imaginary plane that extends from pubic ... Ligament (connects bone to bone). Tendon (connect muscle to bone). Cartilage (cushion between bones) ... Formed by 12 thoracic vertebrae and 12 pairs of ribs, sternum (manubrium, body and xiphoid process).. Inferior boundry is ... framed by frontal bone, temporal bones, nasal bones, zygomatic bones, and maxilla ...
They are commonly known as abdominals or abs muscles and are present in the pair at the front wall of the abdomen. Rectus ... Rectus abdominis is the muscle that runs vertically adjacent to the umbilicus along the whole abdomen from the sternum up to ... is the muscle that runs vertically adjacent to the umbilicus along the whole abdomen from the sternum up to the pubic bone. ... From the inferomedial costal edge and back part of the xiphoid procedure of the sternum and fifth to seventh costal ligaments. ...
In humans the wall of the abdomen is a muscular structure... Explanation of abdomen ... Find out information about abdomen. in humans and other vertebrates, portion of the trunk between the diaphragm and lower ... The linea alba, a band 2-3 mm wide (sometimes wider), extending from the xiphoid process of the sternum to the pubic symphysis ... the upper connecting the lower points of the tenth ribs and the lower connecting the anterosuperior spines of the pelvic bones ...
Abdomen,ʢ?? Aorta, abdominal,ʢ??ư̮ Aorta, hiatus of,??ư̮?? Arch(es), tendinous, of psoas major muscle,?? ڤε ?? Bone(s), ilium, ... Xiphoid process, of sternum, η????͵ Fig. 317: The Abdominal Cavity(12): The Retroperitoneal Organs(Male) Abdomen,ʢ?? Abdominal ... pubic,?? ??? Tuberosity, ischial, ?? ??? Vena caval foramen,????̮ Vertebra(e), lumbar, process of, transverse, ?? Fig. 335: The ... ̮ Bone(s), sternum, process of, xiphoid, ????͵ Canal(s), vertebral, spinal cord within, lateral, dorsal view,???? Crus (Crura ...
It extends from the xiphoid process till the pubic symphysis. The inguinal ligament is formed from the reinforced thick lower ... Abdomen and Pelvis Abdomen - axial MRI T2 Abdomen - axial CT Female pelvis - axial CT ... Its fibers run posterolaterally to attach to the superior ramus of the pubic bone, the pectin pubis. From this ligament, ... Abdomen & Pelvis Peritoneal cavity Stomach Spleen Liver Pancreas Small intestine Large intestine Kidneys Ureter Pelvis Urinary ...
The tail of the Y extends from the xiphoid process to the pubic bone and typically makes a slight deviation to avoid the ... The abdomen is further opened by dissecting the abdominal muscle away from the bottom of the rib cage and diaphragm. The flaps ... The arms of the Y extend from the front of each shoulder to the bottom end of the breast bone (called the xiphoid process of ... An electric saw or bone cutter (which looks a lot like curved pruning shears) is used to open the rib cage. One cut is made up ...
... extending vertically from the xiphoid process to the pubic symphysis. The division into anterior and posterior layers is absent ... It is continuous with the general fascia of the abdomen to the extent that it is regarded by some as a part of the ... iliac bone, and diaphragm (fig. 25-13). Against this background lie the aorta, inferior vena cava, kidneys, suprarenal glands, ... The xiphoid process extends into the angle, and the slight depression of the anterior abdominal wall in front of it is the ...
Living Anatomy of the Abdomen. *Superior margin of abdo wall- from xiphoid process, along costal margin to rib 12 ... levator ani (attached to pubic bone, tendinous arch and ischial spine)- incl puborectalis ... The pubic tubercle is just lateral to the pubic symphysis. *Superficial inguinal ring- lateral to the tubercle, has an opening ... Boundaries- med= pubic symphysis, lat= pubic tubercle, post= conjoint tendon, ant= EO apo ...
  • Anatomy And Physiology Pages 7-10 A. Mouth - Structures And Functions B. Esophagus C. Diaphragm D. Abdomen E. Stomach F. Small Intestine G. Large Intestine H. Peristalsis I. Accessory Organs - Picture Of The Anatomy Of The Gastrointestinal Tract Page 10 J. Autonomic Nerves Of The Abdomen K. Blood Supply To The Abdomen L. Peritoneum M. Abdominal Musculature 3. (textlab.io)
  • Each lumbar vertebra also has various bony prominences, such as the spinous processes (located at the back of the bone) and transverse processes (located at each side of the vertebra). (physioadvisor.com.au)
  • The alimentary tract in the abdomen consists of the lower esophagus, the stomach, the duodenum, the jejunum, ileum, the cecum and the appendix, the ascending, transverse and descending colons, the sigmoid colon and the rectum. (meddic.jp)
  • CT images are available in 3 different planes (transverse, sagittal and dorsal) with two kinds of contrast (soft tissues/vessels and bones). (imaios.com)
  • The anatomy of the regions and planes of the abdomen is composed of many layers with varying blood supply and innervation. (medscape.com)
  • In obese patients, the authors recommend computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen with contrast to better outline the anatomy. (medscape.com)
  • The globose abdomen is rounded with generalized distention and a variable quantity of fat, with or without flaccidity of the aponeurosis and muscle system (Figs. 2a - 2c). (rbcp.org.br)