Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Abdominal NeoplasmsLaparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Mesenteric Cyst: A rare intra-abdominal tumor in the MESENTERY. Mesenteric cysts are usually benign and can be very large fluid-filled (2000 mL) lesions.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Abdominal Muscles: Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Pelvic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Compartment Syndromes: Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Hemoperitoneum: Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.Lymphangioma, Cystic: A cystic growth originating from lymphatic tissue. It is usually found in the neck, axilla, or groin.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Tuberculosis, Splenic: Infection of the spleen with species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Buttocks: Either of two fleshy protuberances at the lower posterior section of the trunk or HIP in humans and primate on which a person or animal sits, consisting of gluteal MUSCLES and fat.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Intussusception: A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Thoracic NeoplasmsTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Wandering Spleen: A congenital or acquired condition in which the SPLEEN is not in its normal anatomical position but moves about in the ABDOMEN. This is due to laxity or absence of suspensory ligaments which normally provide peritoneal attachments to keep the SPLEEN in a fixed position. Clinical symptoms include ABDOMINAL PAIN, splenic torsion and ISCHEMIA.Splenic RupturePneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis: A condition characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall, the submucosa and/or subserosa of the INTESTINE. The majority of the cysts are found in the JEJUNUM and the ILEUM.Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the GALLBLADDER; generally caused by impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, or other diseases.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Splenic DiseasesUterine Perforation: A hole or break through the wall of the UTERUS, usually made by the placement of an instrument or INTRAUTERINE DEVICES.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Ascites: Accumulation or retention of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Lipectomy: Removal of localized SUBCUTANEOUS FAT deposits by SUCTION CURETTAGE or blunt CANNULATION in the cosmetic correction of OBESITY and other esthetic contour defects.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Retroperitoneal NeoplasmsAbdominal Abscess: An abscess located in the abdominal cavity, i.e., the cavity between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Diverticulitis: Inflammation of a DIVERTICULUM or diverticula.Back: The rear surface of an upright primate from the shoulders to the hip, or the dorsal surface of tetrapods.Jejunal Diseases: Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.Peritoneal Lavage: Washing out of the peritoneal cavity. The procedure is a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic technique following abdominal trauma or inflammation.Enterocolitis, Neutropenic: A syndrome characterized by inflammation in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the ASCENDING COLON. It is observed in cancer patients with CHEMOTHERAPY-induced NEUTROPENIA or in other immunocompromised individuals (IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST).Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Diverticulum: A pouch or sac developed from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Astacoidea: A superfamily of various freshwater CRUSTACEA, in the infraorder Astacidea, comprising the crayfish. Common genera include Astacus and Procambarus. Crayfish resemble lobsters, but are usually much smaller.Megacolon: Dilatation of the COLON, often to alarming dimensions. There are various types of megacolon including congenital megacolon in HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE, idiopathic megacolon in CONSTIPATION, and TOXIC MEGACOLON.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Dermoid Cyst: A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)Elephantiasis: Hypertrophy and thickening of tissues from causes other than filarial infection, the latter being described as ELEPHANTIASIS, FILARIAL.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Stomach Rupture: Bursting of the STOMACH.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal: TUBERCULOSIS that involves any region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, mostly in the distal ILEUM and the CECUM. In most cases, MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS is the pathogen. Clinical features include ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and palpable mass in the ileocecal area.Bezoars: Concretions of swallowed hair, fruit or vegetable fibers, or similar substances found in the alimentary canal.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Thigh: The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Colitis, Ischemic: Inflammation of the COLON due to colonic ISCHEMIA resulting from alterations in systemic circulation or local vasculature.Stomach Volvulus: Twisting of the STOMACH that may result in gastric ISCHEMIA and GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION. It is often associated with DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.Chylous Ascites: Presence of milky lymph (CHYLE) in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, with or without infection.Actinomycosis: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Skin Diseases, Papulosquamous: A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.Peritonitis, Tuberculous: A form of PERITONITIS seen in patients with TUBERCULOSIS, characterized by lesion either as a miliary form or as a pelvic mass on the peritoneal surfaces. Most patients have ASCITES, abdominal swelling, ABDOMINAL PAIN, and other systemic symptoms such as FEVER; WEIGHT LOSS; and ANEMIA.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Insufflation: The act of blowing a powder, vapor, or gas into any body cavity for experimental, diagnostic, or therapeutic purposes.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Hepatomegaly: Enlargement of the liver.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Jejunal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Meckel Diverticulum: A congenital abnormality characterized by the outpouching or sac formation in the ILEUM. It is a remnant of the embryonic YOLK SAC in which the VITELLINE DUCT failed to close.Cholecystitis, Acute: Acute inflammation of the GALLBLADDER wall. It is characterized by the presence of ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and LEUKOCYTOSIS. Gallstone obstruction of the CYSTIC DUCT is present in approximately 90% of the cases.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Ovarian Diseases: Pathological processes of the OVARY.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Hydronephrosis: Abnormal enlargement or swelling of a KIDNEY due to dilation of the KIDNEY CALICES and the KIDNEY PELVIS. It is often associated with obstruction of the URETER or chronic kidney diseases that prevents normal drainage of urine into the URINARY BLADDER.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Splenic Infarction: Insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply to the spleen due to emboli, thrombi, vascular torsion, or pressure that produces a macroscopic area of necrosis. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A type of ILEUS, a functional not mechanical obstruction of the INTESTINES. This syndrome is caused by a large number of disorders involving the smooth muscles (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) or the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Whole Body Imaging: The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.Ovarian Cysts: General term for CYSTS and cystic diseases of the OVARY.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Thermoluminescent Dosimetry: The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.Phlebitis: Inflammation of a vein, often a vein in the leg. Phlebitis associated with a blood clot is called (THROMBOPHLEBITIS).Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the breathing cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts. The images are used diagnostically and also interventionally to coordinate radiation treatment beam on/off cycles to protect healthy tissues when they move into the beam field during different times in the breathing cycle.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Abbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Pain, Referred: A type of pain that is perceived in an area away from the site where the pain arises, such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Subcutaneous Tissue: Loose connective tissue lying under the DERMIS, which binds SKIN loosely to subjacent tissues. It may contain a pad of ADIPOCYTES, which vary in number according to the area of the body and vary in size according to the nutritional state.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Choristoma: A mass of histologically normal tissue present in an abnormal location.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Infarction: Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Diverticulitis, Colonic: Inflammation of the COLONIC DIVERTICULA, generally with abscess formation and subsequent perforation.Situs Inversus: A congenital abnormality in which organs in the THORAX and the ABDOMEN are opposite to their normal positions (situs solitus) due to lateral transposition. Normally the STOMACH and SPLEEN are on the left, LIVER on the right, the three-lobed right lung is on the right, and the two-lobed left lung on the left. Situs inversus has a familial pattern and has been associated with a number of genes related to microtubule-associated proteins.Cryptorchidism: A developmental defect in which a TESTIS or both TESTES failed to descend from high in the ABDOMEN to the bottom of the SCROTUM. Testicular descent is essential to normal SPERMATOGENESIS which requires temperature lower than the BODY TEMPERATURE. Cryptorchidism can be subclassified by the location of the maldescended testis.Mesothelioma, Cystic: A peritoneal mesothelioma affecting mainly young females and producing cysts of variable size and number lined by a single layer of benign mesothelial cells. The disease follows a benign course and is compatible with a normal life expectancy, requiring occasionally partial excision or decompression for relief of pain or other symptoms. Malignant potential is exceptional. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1345)Grasshoppers: Plant-eating orthopterans having hindlegs adapted for jumping. There are two main families: Acrididae and Romaleidae. Some of the more common genera are: Melanoplus, the most common grasshopper; Conocephalus, the eastern meadow grasshopper; and Pterophylla, the true katydid.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Ileus: A condition caused by the lack of intestinal PERISTALSIS or INTESTINAL MOTILITY without any mechanical obstruction. This interference of the flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS often leads to INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION. Ileus may be classified into postoperative, inflammatory, metabolic, neurogenic, and drug-induced.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Urinary Bladder Calculi: Stones in the URINARY BLADDER; also known as vesical calculi, bladder stones, or cystoliths.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)

Primary repair of cornual rupture occurring at 21 weeks gestation and successful pregnancy outcome. (1/299)

The successful delivery in a 31 year old woman at 33 weeks gestation is reported, after repair to a cornual rupture which occurred at 21 weeks gestation. The patient exhibited acute abdominal pain and pending shock. Emergency laparotomy showed a cornual rupture and an intrauterine vital fetus having intact amnion membrane. On the patient's family's insistence, primary repair for a cornual rupture was performed and preservation of the fetus attempted. Postoperatively, tocolytic agent with ritodrine hydrochloride was administered and close follow-up of the patient was uneventful. The patient had a smooth obstetric course until 33 weeks gestation when premature rupture of the membranes occurred, soon followed by the onset of labour. She underwent an elective Caesarean section and delivered a normal male fetus weighing 2140 g with Apgar scores at 1, 5 and 10 min of 6, 8, and 9 respectively. Because of this successful outcome, we suggest that primary repair for such an unusual patient should be accepted.  (+info)

Pelvic abscess in the second half of pregnancy after oocyte retrieval for in-vitro fertilization: case report. (2/299)

We describe a very late manifestation of pelvic abscesses after oocyte retrieval for in-vitro fertilization (IVF). In a twin pregnancy achieved after intracytoplasmic sperm injection, rupture of bilateral ovarian abscesses occurred at the end of the second trimester. An emergency laparotomy was necessary because of an acute abdomen. This complication led to severe maternal and neonatal morbidity, preterm birth and neonatal death. The rare occurrence of acute abdomen in pregnancy due to pelvic infection and the non-specific symptoms of a pelvic abscess after oocyte retrieval for IVF are discussed.  (+info)

Neutrophil activation in sickle cell disease. (3/299)

Vascular occlusion is the main cause of the morbidity and mortality observed in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Increasing evidence indicates that (activated) neutrophils could play an important role in the initiation and propagation of vaso-occlusive processes in SCD. In this study, the activation state of neutrophils in sickle cell patients was analyzed by determining the level of expression of neutrophil antigens such as CD62L, CD11b, CD66b, CD63, and Fcgamma receptors. We also analyzed plasma levels of lactoferrin, elastase, soluble (s)CD16 (sFcgammaRIII), and serum levels of soluble (s)CD62L (sL-selectin) as neutrophil activation markers in these patients. Significant differences were observed in the activation state of neutrophils in non-symptomatic sickle cell patients compared to healthy HbAA controls as exemplified by significant decrease in L-selectin expression, enhanced expression of CD64, and increased levels of soluble markers like sL-selectin, elastase, and sCD16. During vaso-occlusive crisis the differences were even more pronounced. These results show neutrophils to be activated in sickle cell patients, suggesting a role of importance in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease.  (+info)

Non-traumatic acute abdomen: videolaparoscopic approach. (4/299)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although videolaparoscopy has been considered a safe method for many elective procedures, its use in traumatic and non-traumatic acute abdomen needs to be evaluated. The aim of this article is to evaluate the role of videolaparoscopy in non-traumatic acute abdomen as a method of diagnosis and treatment. METHODS: Between January 1992 and December 1996, 462 patients' charts were reviewed, retrospectively. Patients were admitted to the emergency room of Sao Rafael Hospital with symptoms of non-traumatic acute abdomen. Routine investigation of abdominal pain was performed in all patients, followed by videolaparoscopy. The laparoscopic procedures were done with four main purposes: diagnosis (ie, enteritis); diagnosis and treatment (ie, appendicitis); treatment only, when the diagnosis was known (ie, acute cholecystitis); and in cases where the conversion to conventional laparotomy was necessary, indicating the best incision. RESULTS: The vast majority of patients had inflammatory causes of acute abdomen (82.03%); others causes were hemoperitoneum (11.03%), bowel obstruction (3.25%), perforation of a hollow viscera (1.74%), vascular occlusion (1.3%), and negative laparoscopy (0.65%). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that laparotomy was necessary in only 7.14% of the patients. The videolaparoscopic approach was used for diagnosis (99.35%) and treatment (92.86%) of patients with acute abdomen.  (+info)

Measurement for breath concentration of hydrogen and methane in horses. (5/299)

This study concerns the establishment of a simple testing method for breath concentration of hydrogen and methane in horses. Twenty-eight healthy thoroughbreds and 24 Arabians were used. Breath samples were collected using one-minute closed circulatory respiration through an aluminum bag filled with 10 liters of pure oxygen, which was mounted on the subjects by means of a face mask. Breath samples obtained, were analyzed by gas chromatography. A significant correlation in both hydrogen and methane levels was observed for samples collected at separate times. These findings confirmed the usefulness of our approach for testing breath concentrations of hydrogen and methane in horses.  (+info)

Survey of surgical emergencies in a rural population in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. (6/299)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of specific surgical emergencies in a mountainous rural community in the Northern Areas of Pakistan and to assess use of existing health services, and outcomes related to acute surgical illness events. METHOD: A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted. Interviewers visited each of 118 villages in the study area (population 100000), selected a random sample from a total of 9900 households, and interviewed the oldest premenopausal female member (n = 836). Questions were focused on injury, acute abdomen, and/or maternal morbidity occurring in the past year. Cases were included as surgical emergencies when one or more index clinical features indicating a potential for surgical intervention were present. Mortality from a wider range of surgical emergencies was also elicited based on the respondent's lifetime knowledge of the household. RESULTS: The incidence rates were 1531/100000 persons per year for injuries; 1364/100000 for acute abdomen, and 16462/100000 for maternal morbidity. The rate of injuries was 2.7 times higher and that of acute abdomen twice as high in males as in females. The injury rate decreased with advancing age, being 13 times higher in children < 5 years than in adults > 40. By contrast, the rate for acute abdomen showed a rise with advancing age, being 8 times higher in the > 40 age group than in under-fives. Burns, falls and road accidents, in that order, were the commonest forms of injury accounting for 82% of 138 cases. Of 43 burn casualties, 46% were in the age group < 5 years; there was no gender bias. Of 71 casualties from falls and road accidents, 85% were aged 6-40 years; there was 6 : 1 male predominance. The maternal morbidity rate was highest in the age group 25-35 years and may be attributed to the high pregnancy rate in this age bracket. Of 408 patients with acute surgical illness, 85% were managed initially at home or close to home in a health centre, dispensary or civil hospital; 32% eventually sought specialist surgical care. The overall rate for minor and major surgical procedures was 411/100000 persons per year (lowest estimate), and appeared to be low. The rate of operative deliveries at 11.8/1000 deliveries (lowest estimate) was particularly low. The mortality rates were correspondingly high: 55/100000 persons per year for injuries and for acute abdomen (lowest estimates). The maternal mortality ratio was particularly high at 8.9/1000 deliveries (lowest estimate). Annual mortality rates derived from deaths recalled during the respondent's lifetime in the household (mean period = 26 years), tended to corroborate the results of the 1-year survey. CONCLUSION: The incidence rates for broad categories of serious acute surgical illness in the study population far exceeded the rates of acute surgical intervention. Mortality rates were correspondingly high. Such evidence points to a large unmet surgical need and ought to spur improvements in the health service.  (+info)

Hemoperitoneum is an initial presentation of recurrent granulosa cell tumors of the ovary. (7/299)

Ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors account for less than 5% of all ovarian carcinoma, of which granulosa cell tumors account for 70%. These tumors have a propensity for indolent growth and late recurrence; they may even occur 25 years after initial treatment. We report a 44-year-old woman with hemoperitoneum (acute abdomen) after initial treatment 10 years earlier for granulosa cell tumor of the ovary. This case re-emphasizes the need for long-term follow-up in patients with stromal cell tumors of the ovary and considers the possibility of recurrence when presented with acute abdomen after conservative treatment.  (+info)

A British family with herediatary pancreatitis. (8/299)

A family with hereditary pancreatitis is described. Nine family members definitely have had pancreatitis, whilst 15 more are suspected of having the disease. The condition presents as recurrent attacks of epigastric or central abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back, often associated with vomiting. The attacks of pain usually last three to four days. The inheritance fits well with an autosomal dominant pattern with limited penetrance, as it does in other families described in the literature. There is no aminoaciduria as has been described in some previously reported families. The attacks of pain start in childhood or young adult life (mean age of onset inthis family is 12-6 years) and appear to cease in this family by the age of 40 years. The diagnosis of pancreatitis in members of the family who have had confirmed pancreatitis was made by finding a raised serum amylase concentration in four cases, at laparotomy in four cases, and by pancreatic calcification seen on radiography in one case, The literature on the condition is reviewed, and it is speculated that the condition may have been underdiagnosed in Britain.  (+info)

Acute and severe abdominal pain as an emergency: the term acute Abdomen or acute abdomen to collect various abdominal diseases in which suddenly, a life-threatening condition can occur. Accompanies the acute Abdomen of the most violent, strong abdominal pain, colic occur fast or permanently. Often, the severe pain associated with Nausea and vomiting. A palpable hard abdominal wall (muscular tenderness), as well as a bloated belly in the case of absolute Lack of bowel movements or outgoing winds often occur. There is an urgent emergency exists, if the ongoing abdominal pain from the vomiting of Blood, fever, tachycardia (rapid heartbeat), low blood pressure, facial pallor and cold sweat. Then shock and circulatory failure, requiring intensive medical treatment.. Table of contents. ...
An acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain. It is in many cases a medical emergency, requiring urgent and specific diagnosis. Several causes need surgical treatment. The differential diagnoses of acute abdomen include but are not limited to: Acute appendicitis Acute peptic ulcer and its complications Acute cholecystitis Acute pancreatitis Acute intestinal ischemia (see section below) Acute diverticulitis Ectopic pregnancy with tubal rupture Ovarian torsion Acute peritonitis (including hollow viscus perforation) Acute ureteric colic Bowel volvulus Bowel obstruction Acute pyelonephritis Adrenal crisis Biliary colic Abdominal aortic aneurysm Familial Mediterranean fever Hemoperitoneum Ruptured spleen Kidney stone Sickle cell anaemia Acute abdomen is occasionally used synonymously with peritonitis. While this is not entirely incorrect, peritonitis is the more specific term, referring to inflammation of the peritoneum. It manifests on physical examination as rebound tenderness, or ...
Posted on 2017-06-27 in Diagnostic Imaging and Emergency & critical care. The acute abdomen is a common presentation in emergency veterinary medicine. The term acute abdomen refers to a patient presenting with acute clinical signs and abdominal pain due to a disease process of an abdominal structure. In veterinary medicine, this commonly includes gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, or urogenital causes, as well as those occurring secondary to abdominal neoplasia. Gastrointestinal emergencies include dietary indiscretion mechanical ileus (foreign material obstruction), intussusception, gastric dilatation and volvulus, and pancreatitis. Urogenital causes include urethral obstruction, ureteral obstruction, and pyometra. Obstruction of the biliary tract, either at the level of the gallbladder such as mucocele formation, or the ducts, are also possible diagnoses for the acute abdomen. Many of the these may lead to septic peritonitis if there is rupture or perforation of the affected structure. Some ...
Acute abdomen is a medical emergency with a wide spectrum of etiologies. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) can help in early identification and management of the causes. The ACUTE-ABDOMEN protocol was created by the authors to aid in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain using a systematic sonographic approach, integrating the same core ultrasound techniques already in use-into one mnemonic. This mnemonic ACUTE means: A: abdominal aortic aneurysm; C: collapsed inferior vena cava; U: ulcer (perforated viscus); T: trauma (free fluid); E: ectopic pregnancy, followed by ABDOMEN which stands: A: appendicitis; B: biliary tract; D: distended bowel loop; O: obstructive uropathy; Men: testicular torsion/Women: ovarian torsion. The article discusses two cases of abdominal pain the diagnosis and management of which were directed and expedited as a result of using the ACUTE-ABDOMEN protocol. The first case was of a 33-year-old male, who presented with a 3-day history of abdominal pain, vomiting and constipation.
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Conclusion: The adverse consequences of prolonged waiting time in our center among patients admitted with acute surgical abdomen are most commonly due to financial difficulties. A hospital-based credit scheme available to emergency aptients will rapidly improve the quality of care we give our patients.. Key words: Waiting time, Acute abdominal emergencies; Outcome Introduction Acute surgical abdomen are life-threatening emergencies. Early presentation of cases to the hospital and prompt surgical treatment of the clinically stabilized patient are imperative to the post-operative survival of the individual1. Delayed hospital presentation is common in most developing countries such as Nigeria2-7. In addition delay may caused by several factors in the hospital prior to emergency laparotomy. Factors often listed are; patients factors and institutional inadequacies 8,9. These delays contribute to further physiological deterioration of the sick, which is inimical to a satisfactory post-surgical outcome ...
Blackburn with Darwen men turning 65 are being encouraged to take up a screening invite for a potentially fatal abdominal condition - with those already aged over 65 able to refer themselves in to the service.. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) can be caused when the main blood vessel in the abdomen - the aorta - weakens and starts to stretch. If undetected, the condition can be fatal.. An NHS Screening Programme for the condition was launched in Lancashire and Cumbria last year, with invitations for screening being sent to men in the year they turn 65. 9663 men have so far received a scan.. Those who are over 65 but havent been invited for AAA screening can self-refer for a scan by contacting their local screening programme directly on: 0191 445 2554 or by emailing: [email protected] The NHS AAA Screening Programme aims to reduce deaths from the condition among men aged 65 and over, by up to 50 per cent, by detecting aneurysms early and offering appropriate monitoring or treatment. Men ...
Catastrophic Event Team Training The TraumaMan Surgical Abdomen Training System offers an excellent solution in the growing area of team training. It allows you to transform your existing TraumaMan Systems abdominal area into a blood pumping abdominal surgical site thats flexible enough to accommodate a wide array of open and laparascopic surgical scenarios.
By Patel, Vijaykumar G Rao, Arundathi; Williams, Reginald; Srinivasan, Radha; Et al Acute epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare and often misdiagnosed cause of acute abdominal pain. Though a benign and often self- limiting condition, EAs ability to mimic other disease processes makes it an important consideration in patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms. Careful evaluation of abdominal CT scan findings is crucial in the accurate diagnosis of epiploic appendagitis, thus avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention. We report a case of a 29-year-old male presenting with a two day history of generalized abdominal pain. Physical exam revealed a diffusely tender abdomen with hypoactive bowel sounds. The patient had a leukocytosis of 18,000 and abdominal CT scan revealed right lower quadrant inflammatory changes suggestive of acute appendicitis. Laparoscopic exploration revealed an inflamed gangrenous structure adjacent to the ileocecal junction. Pathologic evaluation revealed tissue ...
At present, CT is the gold standard in the assessment of patients with acute abdomen. Yet, one CT of the abdomen exposes patients to a radiation dose equivalent to several years of background radiation. MR can be expected to yield the same information without ionizing radiation, but tends to be more time consuming. In this study, patients with nontraumatic acute abdominal pain referred to CT of the abdomen by the department of surgery will also have performed an additional MR scan covering the entire abdomen with few fast imaging sequences in approximately 15min. CT is the diagnostic test. The MR scan is only used for scientific purposes. It will be evaluated by a radiologist blinded for the results of the CT scan. Fourteen days after admission, a final diagnosis is established based on clinical, peroperative, pathological and lab. findings. The performance of CT and MR will then be compared. The investigators hypothesize that MR can provide a diagnostic accuracy comparable to CT ...
Multiple other conditions can mimic an acute surgical abdomen: the prodromal phase of herpes zoster (see shingles (herpes zoster) mimicking appendicitis) abdominal wall hematoma, sickle cell crisis, withdrawal, typhoid, pneumonia and myocardial infarction are examples. There is also a primary peritonitis that occurs mostly (75%) in women, and young girls, usually due to pneumococcus spread hematogenously. Ascites may also become secondarily infected. Foreign bodies such as peritoneal-venous shunt may be a nidus for infection ...
... " is the medical term used for pain in the abdomen that usually comes on suddenly and is so severe that one may have to go to the hospital. As opposed to common abdominal pain, which can be caused by minor issues such as constipation or gas, acute abdominal pain can signal a variety of more serious conditions, some of which require immediate medical care and/or surgery. Therefore, if you suspect you have this condition, contact your doctor immediately. ...
[Acute abdomen : What the clinician wants to know from the radiologist]. Radiologe. 2019 Jan 09;: Authors: Tamandl D, Uray T Abstract CLINICAL ISSUE: Acute abdominal pain is a prevalent problem in the emergency department. The work-up has to include a broad spectrum of differential diagnoses, which should be narrowed down with respect to frequent diagnoses without o...
Four hospitals in UK have achieved a huge reduction in the number of patients dying following emergency abdominal surgery, after adopting a care bundle devised by patient safety specialists.
n acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain. It is in many cases a medical emergency, requiring urgent and specific diagnosis.
Continuous or chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) has become an accepted treatment for end-stage chronic renal failure. It is well known that peritonitis is the most common complication of CAPD. The majority of these cases of peritonitis are catheter related and will usually resolve with antibiotic therapy. Although a single organism usually causes catheter related peritonitis, 6-9% of cases are polymicrobial in origin. A patient with CAPD can suffer an acute abdomen from gastrointestinal origin and it is a diagnostic challenge for surgeons to identify those patients with multiple enteric organisms isolated from the peritoneal fluid who will benefit from surgical exploration. Surgical exploration can be performed by means of laparotomy or laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is fast becoming the preferred surgical approach to a number of different pathologies because it allows them to be diagnosed and treated at the same time. There are also clear advantages for the patient associated with this ...
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Study Flashcards On General Surgery (Acute Abdomen) at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
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Acute abdomen in the adult answers are found in the Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Web.
The work-up of a small animal patient with acute abdomen includes abdominocentesis and other diagnostics. Learn some tips for performing abdominocentesis, analyzing the effluent and interpreting the findings.
ABDOMINAL PAIN ACUTE ABDOMEN PROF JHR BECKER DEPARTMENT CHIRURGIE Abdominal pain that requires Hospital admission Investigation and treatment less than one week duration ACUTE ABDOMEN 50% of Surgical admissions are emergencies 50% of that is acute abdominal pain 30 day mortality is 4% if ... Doc Retrieval ...
Abdominal conditions: Codeine, like other narcotic medications, may make the diagnosis of abdominal conditions more difficult or it may worsen these conditions. If you are scheduled for abdominal surgery or have an abdominal condition such as inflammatory or obstructive bowel disease, acute cholecystitis, or pancreatitis, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed. Breathing: Codeine can suppress breathing. Children are more likely to experience serious breathing problems, including death. For this reason, this medication should not be given to people less than 18 years old. If you are at risk of breathing difficulties, such as asthma, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special ...
Abdominal conditions: Codeine may make the diagnosis of abdominal conditions more difficult or it may worsen these conditions. If you have an abdominal condition such as inflammatory or obstructive bowel disease, acute cholecystitis, or pancreatitis, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Bleeding disorders: ASA may increase bruising and bleeding from cuts that may take longer to stop. If you have a bleeding disorder or a history of bleeding problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Breathing: Codeine can suppress breathing. If you are at risk for breathing difficulties, such as asthma, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect ...
Abdominal conditions: Tramadol - acetaminophen may make the diagnosis of abdominal conditions more difficult or it may worsen these conditions. If you have an abdominal condition such as inflammatory or obstructive bowel disease, acute cholecystitis, or pancreatitis, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Breathing: Tramadol - acetaminophen can suppress breathing. If you have asthma, or are otherwise at risk for breathing problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Dependence and withdrawal: Tramadol can cause physical dependence, psychological dependence, and addiction. If this medication is stopped suddenly, you may experience withdrawal ...
Abdominal conditions: Codeine may make the diagnosis of abdominal conditions more difficult or it may worsen these conditions. If you have any abdominal conditions such as inflammatory or obstructive bowel disease, acute cholecystitis, or pancreatitis, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Alcoholism: People who drink large amounts of alcohol over long periods of time and who take this medication should be closely monitored by their doctors. These people are at increased risk of liver damage or disease.. Breathing: Codeine can suppress breathing. If you are at risk for breathing difficulties (e.g., if you have asthma), discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is ...
Abdominal conditions: Oxycodone may make the diagnosis of abdominal conditions more difficult or it may worsen these conditions. People with abdominal conditions such as inflammatory or obstructive bowel disease, acute cholecystitis, or pancreatitis should discuss with their doctor how this medication may affect their medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Breathing: Oxycodone can suppress breathing. People at risk for breathing difficulties, such as asthma, should discuss with their doctor how this medication may affect their medical condition, how their medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.. Dependence and withdrawal: This medication contains oxycodone. Physical dependence, psychological dependence, and abuse have occurred with the use of oxycodone. People with a history of past or current ...
In session I you have learnt the anesthetic management of emergency patient with emphasis on cardiovascular and air way maintenance in full stomach consideration. Acute abdomen among it intestinal obstruction, appendicitis and peritonitis are common problems in our country which are managed surgically on urgent bases. These emergency surgical procedures came to us with full stomach which is the cause of aspiration, hypoxia and death. Most of these patients are coming with hypovolemia therefore; preoperative resuscitation is part of the general and anesthetic management. Outcome depends on preoperative optimization of cardiovascular status. In this session you will learn to acquire knowledge, appropriate skill and right attitude to manage patient with acute surgical abdomen which is common and challenging anesthetic practice especially in primary hospital ...
Background: The aims were to evaluate the importance of the formal competence of the emergency department physician, the patients time of arrival at the emergency department, and the use of a structured schedule for investigation of patients with acute abdominal pain. Methods: Patients attending the Mora Hospital with acute abdominal pain from 1997 to 2000 were registered prospectively according to a structured schedule. Registration included history, symptoms, signs, preliminary diagnosis, surgery and final diagnosis after at least one year. Results: 3073 acute abdominal pain patients were included. The preliminary diagnosis, as compared with the final diagnosis, was correct in 54% (n = 1659). Previously, during 1996, a base-line registration of 790 patients had a 58% correct diagnoses (n = 458). A majority of the patients (n = 2699; 88%) were managed by nonspecialists. The proportion of correct diagnoses was 54% (n = 759) for pre-registrar house officers and 55% (n = 443) for senior house ...
This study revealed the prevalence of IO to be 4.8 % among all surgical patients admitted to surgical ward and 21.8 % among patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute abdomen with subsequent surgical management. Indeed, world wide it has been estimated that 1 % of all hospitalizations, 3 % of emergency surgical admissions to general hospitals and 4 % of major colostomies are secondary to IO. This study confirmed previous findings that between 12 and 17 % of patients are admitted for small bowel obstruction within two years of their index operation, while approximately 3 % require an operation to treat an established small bowel obstruction [10]. Currently, many patients that present to general surgery services with acute abdomen conditions are thought to have IO [8]. While IO is rare in the USA and Western Europe, it is common in Pakistan and other tropical countries. It is the leading cause of acute abdomen complaints in several African countries, including Ethiopia [1, 6, 7]. In general, ...
On the left a 48-year old man with clinical signs of diverticulitis. br, US reveals an ovoid, non-compressible, avascular fatty mass (arrowheads) while the adjacent sigmoid has a normal aspect. br, The neighboring fat shows hyperemia (arrows). br, During respiration the mass was seen to be adherent to the parietal peritoneum. br, The patients symptoms disappeared within a week without treatment.. These findings are typical for epiploic appendagitis.br, The mass represents the infarcted epiploic appendagebr, The patients symptoms disappeared within a week without treatment.br,. ...
Objective: Concerns about possible negative actions of opioids on important diagnostic signs and symptoms have limited the use of this efficient analgesic in patients with abdominal pain. In this study, we have addressed the old challenge with a statistical approach to determine whether this medication can be administered for patients presenting to an emergency department (ED) with signs of non-traumatic acute abdominal condition. Methods and Materials: A randomized clinical trial was arranged with 118 patients who were five years or older who had been prepared for transfer to the operating room in the Hazrat Rasul-e-Akram hospital. In a double blind randomized trial, pain, tenderness and the rebound tenderness ratio were recorded before and after receiving morphine and placebo. Result: Tenderness and the rebound tenderness Numeric Scale Mean dropped after administration of 0.1mg/kg morphine although this was not statistically significant. In contrast to the rebound tenderness (Pv=0.07) the ...
Epiploic appendagitis is usually seen in middle-aged men with a history of diabetes. They are an important cause of abdominal pain since they are managed with supportive care only and do not require a laparotomy.
Therapy of epiploic appendagitis is a topic of some controversy. It is described by some authors as a self-limiting condition with patients recovering in less than 10 days with oral anti-inflammatory medication [22]. Most of the surgical literature underlines the benign course of disease and favors a conservative therapy regiment. This is a widely applied form of therapy which is practiced with success. However, we have observed that there is a tendency of recurrence in conservatively treated patients. Four of ten patients in this study (40%) already had the same pain at the same localization, for two days on average, four weeks before presenting to the emergency department. This cannot be taken as decisive evidence that EA recurs if not treated surgically. Nevertheless it arouses suspicion that conservative forms of therapy might have a tendency for recurrence and surgical interventions should be considered. In the authors personal opinion surgical therapy is favorable to prevent recurrence, ...
Torsion of the gallbladder is an uncommon process that is usually found at the time of exploration for an acute surgical abdomen. It results from two congenital anomalies and may be complete or partial. It should be considered in the etiology of what
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A 48-year-old woman reported acute abdominal pain for the previous 3 hours. Clinical examination of the underweight patient (BMI 17.4) found a tight abdomen with diffuse guarding and no bowel sounds. Abdominal computed tomography showed a massively...
Appendagitis epiploic - What is epiploic appendagitis? The great pretender! Epiploic appendices are tear-drop shaped projections of fat that are attached to the outer wall of the large intestine. They have a propensity to twist, which may cut-off its blood supply and cause acute pain. This is a self-limiting condition that does not require any treatment. When this occurs on the right side, it is often mistaken for appendicitis, unless a skilled radiologist finds this on ct.
Expanding the focus of the Society to the different challenges in critically ill patients with abdominal catastrophes will allow us to continue our mission in the next decade and improve outcome in these patients.
The term acute abdomen is commonly used to describe abdominal pain of recent onset requiring urgent surgical assessment. Most cases of acute abdominal pain present in the community and are managed by family practitioners, with only a few presenting to a hospital. Those cases that do present to hospital are usually referred to the general surgeons. In a third of cases, no specific diagnosis is made, although many will subsequently re-present with identifiable pathology....
The term acute abdomen is commonly used to describe abdominal pain of recent onset requiring urgent surgical assessment. Most cases of acute abdominal pain present in the community and are managed by family practitioners, with only a few presenting to a hospital. Those cases that do present to hospital are usually referred to the general surgeons. In a third of cases, no specific diagnosis is made, although many will subsequently re-present with identifiable pathology.... ...
Appropriate pain therapy prior to diagnosis in patients with acute abdominal pain remains controversial. Several recent studies have demonstrated that pain therapy does not negatively influence either the diagnosis or subsequent treatment of these patients; however, current practice patterns continue to favour withholding pain medication prior to diagnosis and surgical treatment decision. A systematic review of PubMed, Web-of-Science and The-Cochrane-Library from 1929 to 2011 was carried out using the key words of acute, abdomen, pain, emergency as well as different pain drugs in use, revealed 84 papers ...
Introduction The term acute abdomen is used to describe a spectrum of gynaecological, medical, surgical and urological conditions, ranging from minor ailments to life-threatening diseases. These conditions usually require hospital admission and investigation, after which a treatment plan can be devised, that often includes surgery. The main presenting complaint is severe abdominal pain.
Chief Compliant The patient is a 50 year old white male with diabetes who complains of right lower quadrant abdominal pain for 4 hours. History of the Present
If she had insurance shed have been seeing her doctor all along and ALL this crap would have been caught 8-10 months ago and NONE of this would have happened. Or to the extent that it did happen at all it would have been caught early on, the surgeries would have been done early, and Maggies life would never have been at risk. As it was when they put her under last week, there was a VERY real chance she was not going to wake up. I placed the odds at 80% survival which means there was a 1 out of 5 chance of on-the-table mortality. If shed not been in a Rich Peoples hospital -- simply because the poor peoples hospital by the grace of the Gods was on ER diversion that night -- Id have given her 60/40 maybe even 40/60 odds depending on who was operating and who was doing anesthesia. As it was, instead of a 60% chance (3 out of 5) of dying on the table, it was 4 out of 5 of her making it in the Rich Persons hospital, and she wouldnt have even had that risk, not anywhere close, perhaps 1-100, ...
GERE VE Y NTEM: 2004-2008 y llar aras nda maj r abdominal acil cerrahi ge irmi 112 ya l hastan n dosyas geriye d n k olarak incelendi. APACHE II, ODIN, SAPS II geni letilmi , P-POSSUM, Manheim peritonit skoru, Charlson komorbidite indeksi, Goldman ve ASA skorlar hesapland . Bu skorlama sistemlerinin mortaliteyi ng rme a s ndan duyarl l k, pozitif prediktif de er ve odds oranlar hesapland ...
A total of 635 intra-abdominal operations during a period of six months were followed up for the development of postoperative acute abdomen: 23 patients (3.6%) developed acute abdomen with a...
Key words Non-traumatic acute abdomen, causes, associated factors, sonographic patterns BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY: Non-traumatic acute abdomen (NTAA) is a common abdominal emergency at Mulago Hospital and it is accomplished ...
This classic text is much beloved by medical students and physicians-in-training throughout the English-speaking world, as its many editions indicate. It is chock full of the pearls of clinical wisdom that students and practitioners treasure, and many of these lessons apply to medicine in general.
السيرة الذاتية ---------------- الأسم: رياض وحيد عبود العيساوي تاريخ الميلاد: 1959 العنوان:النجف الأشرف- كلية الطب- جامعة الكوفة • البريد الألكتروني[email protected] موبايل 07801003361 الشهادات الحاصل عليها 1-بكالوريوس طب وجراحة عامة الجامعة المستنصرية 1984 2-دبلوم عالي ماجستير من جامعة بغداد 1990 3-ماجستير من جامعة الكوفة 2011 4- دكتوراة من جامعة الكوفة 2015 المناصب العلمية: 1- عضو نقابة الأطباء العراقية 1- عضو جمعيعة اطباء الأشعة العراقية 3-عضو اطباء الاشعة الامريكية الحوث المنشورة 1--Is carpal tunnel syndrom a neurovascular syndrom? Kufa med. Journal 2006 vol. 9 no. 2 2-The role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Kufa med. Journal 2001 vol. 5 no. 2 ...
The abdomen is rather small. The type species of the genus is Aterica tadema Hewitson. Listed alphabetically within species ... The wing characters are forewings moderately large; costa very much arched; apex rather acute; hind-margin nearly straight. ...
Fore wings acute ; costa straight ; exterior border slightly convex and oblique. The Index of Scientific Names lists the ... Abdomen sligtly compressed, not extending beyond the hind wings ; apical tuft small, elongate. Legs smooth, slender. Wings ...
Apex produced and acute. Cilia highly crenulate. Hind wing with produced outer margin to a point at vein 4. Inner margin with a ... Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Mid tibia spined and with terminal tuft. Hind tibia with medial and terminal tufts. Fore ...
Cope's early diagnosis of the acute abdomen (21st ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-517545-X. Acute appendicitis ... Huang, Ih-Ping; Smith, C Daniel (August 2006). "Cope's Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen, 21st Edition". Annals of Surgery. ... ISBN 978-93-5025-944-3. Augustin, Goran (12 May 2014). Acute Abdomen During Pregnancy. Springer. p. 8. ISBN 978-3-319-05422-3. ... is a medical sign that indicates irritation to the iliopsoas group of hip flexors in the abdomen, and consequently indicates ...
Abdomen smoothly scaled. Tibia slightly hairy. Fore wings with arched costa. Apex acute and produced. Hind wings with rounded ...
ISBN 978-93-5025-838-5. Augustin, Goran (12 May 2014). Acute Abdomen During Pregnancy. Springer. pp. 8-. ISBN 978-3-319-05422-3 ...
Augustin, Goran (12 May 2014). Acute Abdomen During Pregnancy. Springer. p. 8. ISBN 978-3-319-05422-3. ...
Abdomen long. Wings long and narrow. Forewings with produced and acute apex. The outer margin oblique. Vein 3 from angle of ... Frons produced and acute. Antennae of male minutely serrate and ciliated. Legs long and slender, the outer spurs about two- ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Tibia moderately hairy. Fore wings with acute apex. The outer margin angled at middle. Hind ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Tibia naked. Fore wings with acute apex. The outer margin angled at middle. Hind wings with ...
Third joint long and acute. Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled and slender. Fore wings with acute apex. Hind wings with short ...
Fore wings acute, with a black point in the disk; Length of the body 5 lines; of the wings 15 lines. Micronia Metargyria - ... Abdomen much shorter than the interior border of the hind wings. Wings with two pale brownish-cinereous lines; first line not ... Abdomen extending much beyond the hind wings; apical tuft small. Legs stout; tibize with a long fringe; spurs moderately long. ... Abdomen rather shorter than the interior border of the hind wings. Legs smooth, slender. Wings slightly hyaline, thinly and ...
Forewings with somewhat acute apex. Hindwings of male with the cell short and a large oval depression beyond it, veins 6 and 7 ... Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Tibia spineless and moderately hairy. Hind tarsi with first joint fringed above. ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Forewings with somewhat acute apex. Veins 8 and 9 anastomosing to form the areole, which is ...
Thorax and abdomen usually smoothly scaled. Tibia moderately hairy. Fore wings with acute apex. Outer margin more or less ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Fore wings produced with acute apex. The outer margin excised at vein 4, where it is ...
Omental infarction: Omental infarction is uncommon reason for acute abdomen. It is similar to acute appendicitis. The pain is ... Implications of diagnostic imaging of the acute abdomen iRADiX Radiology Teaching file Epiploic Appendagitis Macrorad ... or central regions of the abdomen. There is sometimes nausea and vomiting. The symptoms may mimic those of acute appendicitis, ... Patients with acute epiploic appendagitis do not normally report a change in bowel habits, while a small number may have ...
Abdomen greyish, beneath white, sides with oblique dark fuscous marks. Forewings very narrow, moderately pointed, acute; ...
The lesions may cause chronic blood loss resulting in iron deficiency anemia; less often they cause acute bleeding. Treatment ... The diaphragm separates the chest from the abdomen. The esophagus (swallowing tube) passes through the hiatal opening in the ...
Acute non-specific diarrhoea and dysentery". British Medical Journal. 2 (4517): 189. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.4517.189-a. PMC 2055274 ... Local chilling of the abdomen as a causative factor". British Medical Journal. 1 (4507): 717-719. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.4507.717. ... Cited on p. 4, Taieri Pet, Newsletter for Middlemarch area, 1 August 1914 Kershaw, G.R. (1947). "Acute non-specific diarrhoea ... flannel or knitted wool about six feet long and six inches wide which was twisted around the abdomen before wearing a shirt and ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Mid tibia spiny and sometimes hind tibia as well. Tibia fringed with long hair in male. ... Fore wings with somewhat acute apex. The outer margin nearly straight. Hind wings with slightly angled outer margin at vein 2. ...
Abdomen whitish. Forewings very narrow, moderately pointed, acute; white, with some minute scattered fuscous specks; a costal ...
Thorax and abdomen smoothly scaled. Fore tibia of male covered by a sheath containing masses of flocculent scales. Fore wings ... with somewhat acute apex. Areole very narrow with vein 10 given off far beyond it in male and from it in female. The ...
Thorax and abdomen tuftless. Tibia spineless. Wings with non-crenulate cilia. Fore wings with the acute apex. Hind wings with ...
Thorax and abdomen slender without tufts. Fore wings with somewhat acute apex. The outer margin more or less angled at vein 4. ...
Symptoms and signs: Digestive system and abdomen. *Medical symptoms and signs templates ...
Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction. Br J Surg 2009; 96(3): 229-239. [ Links ]. ... A 13-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of a gradually distending abdomen that was associated with constitutional ... He was markedly cachexic with a grossly distended abdomen (Fig. 1) that was difficult to palpate. Shifting dullness was ... An X-ray of the abdomen revealed a grossly distended large intestine. Ultrasound showed increased ascitic fluid. A total ...
Acute surgical abdomen as presenting manifestation of Kawasaki disease. J Pediatr. 2003;142:731-735 3. Zulian F. Reply to: ... Recently, there have been reports of KD patients1-3 who presented as intestinal pseudo-obstruction or acute surgical abdomen ... Keywords: Kawasaki disease, cardiovascular abnormalities, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, abdominal pain, acute surgical abdomen ... On the day of admission he developed a distended and painful abdomen, diarrhea, and vomiting. On examination he was febrile ( ...
Acute symptoms due to complications like infection, cyst rupture or hemorrhage may occur. We report an 18-years-old girl with ... Acute symptoms due to complications like infection, cyst rupture or hemorrhage may occur. We report an 18-years-old girl with ... Chylous cysts of the abdomen. Surg Clin North Am. 1950; 30(4): 1081-96. ...
Acute diabetic abdomen.. Br Med J 1976; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.6043.1074-c (Published 30 October 1976) Cite this ...
... (Acute Abdominal Pain; Severe Stomach Ache; Abdominal Cramps; Surgical Abdomen). by Amanda Barrett, MA. ... "Acute abdomen" is the medical term used for pain in the abdomen that usually comes on suddenly and is so severe that one may ... This Acute Abdomen page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle navigation ... The symptoms of acute abdomen have a variety of causes. If you experience any one of them, see your physician. *Persistent, ...
Acute appendicitis Acute peptic ulcer and its complications Acute cholecystitis Acute pancreatitis Acute intestinal ischemia ( ... Acute abdomen of the ischemic variety is usually due to: A thromboembolism from the left side of the heart, such as may be ... An acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain. It is in many cases a medical emergency, requiring urgent and ... Acute ischemic abdomen is a surgical emergency. Typically, treatment involves removal of the region of the bowel that has ...
The Equine Acute Abdomen, Third Editionis the preeminent text on diagnosing and treating acute abdominal diseases in horses, ... The definitive guide to acute abdominal disorders in equine patients, fully updated and revised to reflect the latest ... The Equine Acute Abdomen, Third Editionis the preeminent text on diagnosing and treating acute abdominal diseases in horses, ... The Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition. Anthony T. Blikslager (Editor), Nathaniel A. White II (Editor), James N. Moore (Editor) ...
Acute abdomen definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... A serious condition within the abdomen characterized by sudden onset, pain, tenderness, and muscular rigidity, and usually ...
Sons The Equine Acute Abdomen Written and edited by leading experts on equine digestive diseases, The Equine Acute Abdomen, ... The Equine Acute Abdomen, Third Editionis the preeminent text on diagnosing and treating acute abdominal diseases in horses, ... The Equine Acute Abdomen. Blikslager, Anthony T. / White, Nathaniel A. / Moore, James N. / Mair, Tim S. (eds.) ... Imaging of the Abdomen. Anne Desrochers. Chapter 24. Decision for Surgery and Referral. Nathaniel A. White. Chapter 25. ...
... Tahsin Colak, Tolga Olmez, Ozgur Turkmenoglu, and Ahmet Dag ... Tahsin Colak, Tolga Olmez, Ozgur Turkmenoglu, and Ahmet Dag, "Small Bowel Perforation due to Gossypiboma Caused Acute Abdomen ...
S. F. Lim, S. L. Lee, A. K. H. Chiow, C. S. Foo, A. S. Y. Wong, and S. M. Tan, "Rare cause of acute surgical abdomen with free ... A differential diagnosis in acute abdomen," Annales Chirurgiae et Gynaecologiae, vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 294-295, 1985. View at ... Spontaneous Uterine Perforation of Pyometra Presenting as Acute Abdomen. Toshihiro Kitai,1 Kentaro Okuno,1 Hiromi Ugaki,1 ... P. K. Saha, P. Gupta, R. Mehra, P. Gael, and A. Huria, "Spontaneous perforation of pyometra presented as an acute abdomen: a ...
Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid onset. Acute abdomen may be ...
Clinical examination of the underweight patient (BMI 17.4) found a tight abdomen with diffuse guarding and no bowel sounds. ... A 48-year-old woman reported acute abdominal pain for the previous 3 hours. ... Acute Abdomen in Chronic Anorexia Nervosa with Episodes of Bulimia. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2019; 116: 735. DOI: 10.3238/arztebl. ... Hartleb A, Geser L, H user W: Acute abdomen in chronic anorexia nervosa with episodes of bulimia. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2019; 116: ...
Abdomen, Acute. Acute abdomen. Diagnosis. Diagnosis, Differential. Imaging. Medical / Diagnostic Imaging. Medical / Radiology ... books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/Acute_abdomen.html?id=mpxsAAAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareAcute abdomen ... abdominal pain Abdominal Radiographs Plain abscess acute abdomen adrenal aneurysm Angiography aortic appendicitis arrow artery ... Acute Abdomen: Diagnostic Imaging in the Clinical Context. Gabriel P. Krestin,Peter L. Choyke. No preview available - 1996. ...
To illustrate the main differentials and address the various pitfalls in imaging patients with acute abdomen ... Acute abdominal pain is a common complaint in patients presenting to the Emergency Department. Because clinico-biological ... To discuss the imaging features (including US, CT and MRI) of the main pathologies presenting with acute abdominal pain based ... To present US and MDCT diagnostic algorithms and protocols in the initial assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain ...
Multiple other conditions can mimic an acute surgical abdomen: the prodromal phase of herpes zoster (see shingles (herpes ... Clinical Folios: Abdomen, Biliary/Pancreatic, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Colorectal, Embryology, Genitourinary, Gynecology, Head ...
Clinical Folios: Abdomen, Biliary/Pancreatic, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Colorectal, Embryology, Genitourinary, Gynecology, Head ... The superior mesenteric artery (see SMA embolus), with its acute angled takeoff is particularly vulnerable and dangerous ... ischemia results in hyperperistalsis and severe colicy pain out of proportion to the findings on palpating the abdomen. Because ...
American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 23(2):219-220, MARCH 2005. PMID: 15765354. Issn Print: 0735-6757. Publication Date: March 2005. ...
The Acute Abdomen.. Ann Intern Med. 1974;81:143. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-81-1-143_9 ... diagnostic signs and the mechanisms behind them in the major acute problems of abdominal disease. ...
During the last years, a trend towards increased use of computed tomography in patients with acute abdomen can be seen. ... Contrast-enhanced CT was highly sensitive for acute aortic syndrome and therefore the CT imaging protocols must be adjusted in ... Aortic Aneurysm Rupture and acute cholecystitis). According to this work findings, non-contrast CT after ultrasound is ... Acute abdomen is a common presentation in emergency medicine. It represents 5% to 10% of all Emergency Department (ED) visits. ...
Laparoscopic Management of the Acute Abdomen in Pregnancy. The reported incidence of acute abdominal pain in pregnancy is 1/500 ... We did a retrospective chart based review of all cases of acute abdominal pain in pregnancy that were managed laparoscopically ... Our objective was to review cases of acute abdominal pain in pregnancy which were managed laparoscopically at our institution ...
Basically it refers to pain that is felt within the abdomen which is the region of the body bounded by the ribs superiorly and ... Abdominal pain is a very common medical condition that can either be acute or chronic in nature. ... Acute pancreatitis: This often causes severe epigastric (upper, middle abdomen) pain at the outset that radiates (spreads) to ... You may hear doctors use the term acute abdomen. This refers to a condition where patients are really unwell with signs and ...
"The ESGAR Acute Abdomen Workshop, Helsinki, Finland, 29/08/2019-30/08/2019 has been accredited by the European Accreditation ... Acute biliary conditions. J.B.C.M. Puylaert, The Hague/NL. 14:50. Acute pancreatitis: diagnosis and intervention. T. Talvikki ...
This book discusses in depth the role of advanced imaging modalities in imaging of the acute abdomen and pelvis. ... MDCT and MR Imaging of Acute Abdomen. Book Subtitle. New Technologies and Emerging Issues. Editors. * Michael N. Patlas ... MDCT and MR Imaging of Acute Abdomen. New Technologies and Emerging Issues. Editors: Patlas, Michael N., Katz, Douglas S., ... this is a well-written book that highlights cross-sectional imaging of the acute abdomen. It is a worthwhile read for imaging ...
Abdomen.html?id=jFxsAAAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareCT and Sonography of the Acute Abdomen. ... abnormalities acute cholecystitis acute pancreatitis adjacent aneurysm aortic areas attenuation bile duct biliary biloma black ... Acute abdomen: diagnostic imaging in the clinical context. Gabriel P. Krestin,Peter L. Choyke. Snippet view - 1996. ... CT and sonography of the acute abdomen. R. Brooke Jeffrey. Snippet view - 1989. ...
  • On examination he was febrile (39.8 C), heart rate was 180 beats/minute, met 5 major clinical diagnostic criteria for KD, and also presented a diffusely distended tender but soft abdomen, with no rebound sign. (uninet.edu)
  • High small intestinal ileus caused by obstruction of the horizontal segment of the duodenum due to acute gastric dilatation is a rare, potentially fatal (gastric necrosis, gastric rupture) complication of extreme overeating. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • In this case, venous stasis is presumed to have occurred post circumcision when the boy's distended bladder caused acute vena caval obstruction. (cmaj.ca)
  • Obstruction of the biliary tract, either at the level of the gallbladder such as mucocele formation, or the ducts, are also possible diagnoses for the acute abdomen. (vetbloom.com)
  • The superior mesenteric artery (see SMA embolus ), with its acute angled takeoff is particularly vulnerable and dangerous because of the large vascular territory it supplies. (vesalius.com)
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis are the most common acquired causes of an acute abdomen in the neonate. (desk.nl)
  • case report In an unusual presentation of an acute abdomen, the attending doctors had to make a choice of whether or not to operate. (journals.co.za)
  • The continuous dribbling of urine led to initial assumptions that there was no urinary retention, and complete examination of the abdomen, which would have allowed the detection of a palpable urinary bladder, was impeded by the child's irritability. (cmaj.ca)