Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Abdominal NeoplasmsLaparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Mesenteric Cyst: A rare intra-abdominal tumor in the MESENTERY. Mesenteric cysts are usually benign and can be very large fluid-filled (2000 mL) lesions.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Abdominal Muscles: Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Pelvic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Compartment Syndromes: Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Hemoperitoneum: Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.Lymphangioma, Cystic: A cystic growth originating from lymphatic tissue. It is usually found in the neck, axilla, or groin.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Tuberculosis, Splenic: Infection of the spleen with species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Buttocks: Either of two fleshy protuberances at the lower posterior section of the trunk or HIP in humans and primate on which a person or animal sits, consisting of gluteal MUSCLES and fat.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Intussusception: A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Thoracic NeoplasmsTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Wandering Spleen: A congenital or acquired condition in which the SPLEEN is not in its normal anatomical position but moves about in the ABDOMEN. This is due to laxity or absence of suspensory ligaments which normally provide peritoneal attachments to keep the SPLEEN in a fixed position. Clinical symptoms include ABDOMINAL PAIN, splenic torsion and ISCHEMIA.Splenic RupturePneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis: A condition characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall, the submucosa and/or subserosa of the INTESTINE. The majority of the cysts are found in the JEJUNUM and the ILEUM.Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the GALLBLADDER; generally caused by impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, or other diseases.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Splenic DiseasesUterine Perforation: A hole or break through the wall of the UTERUS, usually made by the placement of an instrument or INTRAUTERINE DEVICES.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Ascites: Accumulation or retention of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Lipectomy: Removal of localized SUBCUTANEOUS FAT deposits by SUCTION CURETTAGE or blunt CANNULATION in the cosmetic correction of OBESITY and other esthetic contour defects.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Retroperitoneal NeoplasmsAbdominal Abscess: An abscess located in the abdominal cavity, i.e., the cavity between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Diverticulitis: Inflammation of a DIVERTICULUM or diverticula.Back: The rear surface of an upright primate from the shoulders to the hip, or the dorsal surface of tetrapods.Jejunal Diseases: Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.Peritoneal Lavage: Washing out of the peritoneal cavity. The procedure is a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic technique following abdominal trauma or inflammation.Enterocolitis, Neutropenic: A syndrome characterized by inflammation in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the ASCENDING COLON. It is observed in cancer patients with CHEMOTHERAPY-induced NEUTROPENIA or in other immunocompromised individuals (IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST).Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Diverticulum: A pouch or sac developed from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Astacoidea: A superfamily of various freshwater CRUSTACEA, in the infraorder Astacidea, comprising the crayfish. Common genera include Astacus and Procambarus. Crayfish resemble lobsters, but are usually much smaller.Megacolon: Dilatation of the COLON, often to alarming dimensions. There are various types of megacolon including congenital megacolon in HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE, idiopathic megacolon in CONSTIPATION, and TOXIC MEGACOLON.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Dermoid Cyst: A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)Elephantiasis: Hypertrophy and thickening of tissues from causes other than filarial infection, the latter being described as ELEPHANTIASIS, FILARIAL.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Stomach Rupture: Bursting of the STOMACH.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal: TUBERCULOSIS that involves any region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, mostly in the distal ILEUM and the CECUM. In most cases, MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS is the pathogen. Clinical features include ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and palpable mass in the ileocecal area.Bezoars: Concretions of swallowed hair, fruit or vegetable fibers, or similar substances found in the alimentary canal.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Thigh: The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Colitis, Ischemic: Inflammation of the COLON due to colonic ISCHEMIA resulting from alterations in systemic circulation or local vasculature.Stomach Volvulus: Twisting of the STOMACH that may result in gastric ISCHEMIA and GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION. It is often associated with DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.Chylous Ascites: Presence of milky lymph (CHYLE) in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, with or without infection.Actinomycosis: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Skin Diseases, Papulosquamous: A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.Peritonitis, Tuberculous: A form of PERITONITIS seen in patients with TUBERCULOSIS, characterized by lesion either as a miliary form or as a pelvic mass on the peritoneal surfaces. Most patients have ASCITES, abdominal swelling, ABDOMINAL PAIN, and other systemic symptoms such as FEVER; WEIGHT LOSS; and ANEMIA.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Insufflation: The act of blowing a powder, vapor, or gas into any body cavity for experimental, diagnostic, or therapeutic purposes.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Hepatomegaly: Enlargement of the liver.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Jejunal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Meckel Diverticulum: A congenital abnormality characterized by the outpouching or sac formation in the ILEUM. It is a remnant of the embryonic YOLK SAC in which the VITELLINE DUCT failed to close.Cholecystitis, Acute: Acute inflammation of the GALLBLADDER wall. It is characterized by the presence of ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and LEUKOCYTOSIS. Gallstone obstruction of the CYSTIC DUCT is present in approximately 90% of the cases.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Ovarian Diseases: Pathological processes of the OVARY.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Hydronephrosis: Abnormal enlargement or swelling of a KIDNEY due to dilation of the KIDNEY CALICES and the KIDNEY PELVIS. It is often associated with obstruction of the URETER or chronic kidney diseases that prevents normal drainage of urine into the URINARY BLADDER.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Splenic Infarction: Insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply to the spleen due to emboli, thrombi, vascular torsion, or pressure that produces a macroscopic area of necrosis. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A type of ILEUS, a functional not mechanical obstruction of the INTESTINES. This syndrome is caused by a large number of disorders involving the smooth muscles (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) or the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Whole Body Imaging: The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.Ovarian Cysts: General term for CYSTS and cystic diseases of the OVARY.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Thermoluminescent Dosimetry: The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.Phlebitis: Inflammation of a vein, often a vein in the leg. Phlebitis associated with a blood clot is called (THROMBOPHLEBITIS).Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the breathing cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts. The images are used diagnostically and also interventionally to coordinate radiation treatment beam on/off cycles to protect healthy tissues when they move into the beam field during different times in the breathing cycle.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Abbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Pain, Referred: A type of pain that is perceived in an area away from the site where the pain arises, such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Subcutaneous Tissue: Loose connective tissue lying under the DERMIS, which binds SKIN loosely to subjacent tissues. It may contain a pad of ADIPOCYTES, which vary in number according to the area of the body and vary in size according to the nutritional state.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Choristoma: A mass of histologically normal tissue present in an abnormal location.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Infarction: Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Diverticulitis, Colonic: Inflammation of the COLONIC DIVERTICULA, generally with abscess formation and subsequent perforation.Situs Inversus: A congenital abnormality in which organs in the THORAX and the ABDOMEN are opposite to their normal positions (situs solitus) due to lateral transposition. Normally the STOMACH and SPLEEN are on the left, LIVER on the right, the three-lobed right lung is on the right, and the two-lobed left lung on the left. Situs inversus has a familial pattern and has been associated with a number of genes related to microtubule-associated proteins.Cryptorchidism: A developmental defect in which a TESTIS or both TESTES failed to descend from high in the ABDOMEN to the bottom of the SCROTUM. Testicular descent is essential to normal SPERMATOGENESIS which requires temperature lower than the BODY TEMPERATURE. Cryptorchidism can be subclassified by the location of the maldescended testis.Mesothelioma, Cystic: A peritoneal mesothelioma affecting mainly young females and producing cysts of variable size and number lined by a single layer of benign mesothelial cells. The disease follows a benign course and is compatible with a normal life expectancy, requiring occasionally partial excision or decompression for relief of pain or other symptoms. Malignant potential is exceptional. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1345)Grasshoppers: Plant-eating orthopterans having hindlegs adapted for jumping. There are two main families: Acrididae and Romaleidae. Some of the more common genera are: Melanoplus, the most common grasshopper; Conocephalus, the eastern meadow grasshopper; and Pterophylla, the true katydid.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Ileus: A condition caused by the lack of intestinal PERISTALSIS or INTESTINAL MOTILITY without any mechanical obstruction. This interference of the flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS often leads to INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION. Ileus may be classified into postoperative, inflammatory, metabolic, neurogenic, and drug-induced.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Urinary Bladder Calculi: Stones in the URINARY BLADDER; also known as vesical calculi, bladder stones, or cystoliths.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)
(1/2268) Embryonal feather growth in the chicken.

Prenatal feather growth development in the chicken was studied in 7 body regions in HH stages 27-45, using direct measurements, specific histological and immunohistochemical methods, and scanning electron microscopy. The results from measurements of absolute length values, and, particularly, growth rate development in each HH stage revealed a distinct phase of most intensive growth in HH stage 40-41, which was preceded by feather follicle insertion and accompanied by the occurrence of alpha-keratins in barbule cells. Specific regional evaluation demonstrated that growth in the feather follicles of abdominal skin generally showed the slowest progression from absolute values and that in the feather filaments of the developing wings the most rapid progression occurred during HH stage 40-41 from growth rate values.  (+info)

(2/2268) A pilot study on the human body vibration induced by low frequency noise.

To understand the basic characteristics of the human body vibration induced by low frequency noise and to use it to evaluate the effects on health, we designed a measuring method with a miniature accelerometer and carried out preliminary measurements. Vibration was measured on the chest and abdomen of 6 male subjects who were exposed to pure tones in the frequency range of 20 to 50 Hz, where the method we designed was proved to be sensitive enough to detect vibration on the body surface. The level and rate of increase with frequency of the vibration turned out to be higher on the chest than on the abdomen. This difference was considered to be due to the mechanical structure of the human body. It also turned out that the measured noise-induced vibration negatively correlated with the subject's BMI (Body Mass Index), which suggested that the health effects of low frequency noise depended not only on the mechanical structure but also on the physical constitution of the human body.  (+info)

(3/2268) Mechanisms of acute inflammatory lung injury induced by abdominal sepsis.

Sequestration of neutrophils and release of histotoxic mediators are considered important for the development of pathologic alterations of the lung defined as adult respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanisms of inflammatory lung injury caused by abdominal sepsis were investigated using the colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) model that closely mimics the human disease. In the CASP model, a continuous leakage of intraluminal bacteria into the peritoneal cavity is induced by implantation of a stent in the ascending colon, generating a septic focus. In contrast to the cecal ligation and puncture model of peritonitis, survival of mice following CASP surgery is dependent on IFN-gamma, but independent of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here we show that the systemic inflammation induced by CASP surgery results in a rapid and profound increase of lung vascular permeability that was associated with the activation and recruitment of neutrophils to the lung. Activation of circulating granulocytes was characterized by increased production of serine proteinases and reactive oxygen metabolites, as well as elevated expression of cell surface Mac-1. Expression of MIP-2, KC, MIP-1alpha and E-selectin mRNA in lung was strongly increased within 3 h following CASP surgery, whereas up-regulation of IP-10, MCP-1 and P-selectin was delayed. In contrast, induction of RANTES, LIX, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA was weak or not detectable after CASP surgery. Importantly, recruitment of leukocytes to the lung was normal in lipopolysaccharide-resistant mice, and was not affected by antibody neutralization of TNF or the chemokines MIP-2 and KC.  (+info)

(4/2268) Gallium-67 scintigraphy and intraabdominal sepsis. Clinical experience in 140 patients with suspected intraabdominal abscess.

In 140 patients with suspected intraabdominal abscess, studies were made using gallium-67 citrate and technetium-99m labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Gallium-67 scintigrams correctly localized 52 of 56 intraabdominal abscesses confirmed at surgical operation or necropsy. In an additional 20 patients in whom findings on scintigrams were abnormal, there were clinically established infections. Sixty-one patients in whom findings on scintigrams were normal were conservatively managed and discharged from the hospital; none proved to have an abscess. Four false-negative and three false-positive studies were recorded. Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a useful noninvasive diagnostic adjunct that should be employed early in the evaluation of patients with suspected intraabdominal sepsis.  (+info)

(5/2268) Endogenous nitric oxide in the maintenance of rat microvascular integrity against widespread plasma leakage following abdominal laparotomy.

1. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the maintenance of microvascular integrity during minor surgical manipulation has been evaluated in the rat. 2. The NO synthase inhibitors, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 5 mg kg(-1), s.c.) and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 50 mg kg(-1), s.c.) had no effect on microvascular leakage of radiolabelled albumin over 1 h in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, colon, lung and kidney in the un-operated conscious or pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rat. 3. In contrast, in anaesthetized rats with a midline abdominal laparotomy (5 cm), L-NAME (1-5 mg kg(-1), s.c.) or L-NMMA (12.5-50 mg kg(-1), s.c.) dose-dependently increased gastrointestinal, renal and pulmonary vascular leakage, effects reversed by L-arginine pretreatment (300 mg kg(-1), s.c., 15 min). These actions were not observed in anaesthetized rats that had only received a midline abdominal skin incision (5 cm). 4. Pretreatment with a rabbit anti-rat neutrophil serum (0.4 ml kg(-1), i.p.), 4 h before laparotomy, abolished the plasma leakage induced by L-NAME in all the organs investigated. 5. These results indicate that the following abdominal laparotomy, inhibition of constitutive NO synthase provokes vascular leakage in the general microcirculation, by a process that may involve neutrophils. Such effects could thus confound studies on the microvascular actions of NO synthase inhibitors using acute surgically prepared in vivo models. The findings thus suggest that constitutively-formed NO has a crucial role in the maintenance of acute microvascular integrity following abdominal surgical intervention.  (+info)

(6/2268) Interleukin-1beta in immune cells of the abdominal vagus nerve: a link between the immune and nervous systems?

Intraperitoneal administration of the cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induces brain-mediated sickness symptoms that can be blocked by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Intraperitoneal IL-1beta also induces expression of the activation marker c-fos in vagal primary afferent neurons, suggesting that IL-1beta is a key component of vagally mediated immune-to-brain communication. The cellular sources of IL-1beta activating the vagus are unknown, but may reside in either blood or in the vagus nerve itself. We assayed IL-1beta protein after intraperitoneal endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] injection in abdominal vagus nerve, using both an ELISA and immunohistochemistry, and in blood plasma using ELISA. IL-1beta levels in abdominal vagus nerve increased by 45 min after LPS administration and were robust by 60 min. Plasma IL-1beta levels increased by 60 min, whereas little IL-1beta was detected in cervical vagus or sciatic nerve. IL-1beta-immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed in dendritic cells and macrophages within connective tissues associated with the abdominal vagus by 45 min after intraperitoneal LPS injection. By 60 min, some immune cells located within the nerve and vagal paraganglia also expressed IL-1beta-IR. Thus, intraperitoneal LPS induced IL-1beta protein within the vagus in a time-frame consistent with signaling of immune activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which IL-1beta may serve as a molecular link between the immune system and vagus nerve, and thus the CNS.  (+info)

(7/2268) Transrectal ultrasonography in the assessment of congenital vaginal canalization defects.

Our aim was to evaluate the reliability of transrectal ultrasonography in the preoperative assessment of congenital vaginal canalization defects. We studied nine patients, six with suspected Rokitansky syndrome and three with suspected complete transverse septum. Before corrective surgery all the patients underwent pelvic examination, transabdominal and transrectal ultrasonography. The ultrasonographic findings were compared with the surgical ones. Transrectal ultrasonography provided an accurate map of the pelvic organs showing the precise distances between the urethra and bladder anteriorly, rectum posteriorly, retrohymenal fovea caudally, and pelvic peritoneum cranially. Transrectal ultrasonography produced a picture that corresponded perfectly with the real anatomical situation. Conversely, abdominal ultrasonography provided inadequate images in six of our nine patients, and magnetic resonance imaging was responsible for a mistaken diagnosis in one patient with suspected transverse vaginal septum. In conclusion, if our results are confirmed in larger series, transrectal ultrasonography could be considered as a diagnostic procedure of choice in the assessment of vaginal canalization defects.  (+info)

(8/2268) Effects of weight loss on regional fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in obesity.

Weight loss (WL) decreases regional depots of adipose tissue and improves insulin sensitivity, two parameters that correlate before WL. To examine the potential relation of WL-induced change in regional adiposity to improvement in insulin sensitivity, 32 obese sedentary women and men completed a 4-month WL program and had repeat determinations of body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography) and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic insulin infusion). There were 15 lean men and women who served as control subjects. VO2max was unaltered with WL (39.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 39.8 +/- 1.1 ml x fat-free mass [FFM](-1) x min(-1)). The WL intervention achieved significant decreases in weight (100.2 +/- 2.6 to 85.5 +/- 2.1 kg), BMI (34.3 +/- 0.6 to 29.3 +/- 0.6 kg/m2), total fat mass (FM) (36.9 +/- 1.5 to 26.1 +/- 1.3 kg), percent body fat (37.7 +/- 1.3 to 31.0 +/- 1.5%), and FFM (59.2 +/- 2.3 to 55.8 +/- 2.0 kg). Abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (SAT and VAT) were reduced (494 +/- 19 to 357 +/- 18 cm2 and 157 +/- 12 to 96 +/- 7 cm2, respectively). Cross-sectional area of low-density muscle (LDM) at the mid-thigh decreased from 67 +/- 5 to 55 +/- 4 cm2 after WL. Insulin sensitivity improved from 5.9 +/- 0.4 to 7.3 +/- 0.5 mg x FFM(-1) x min(-1) with WL. Rates of insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose disposal accounted for the majority of this improvement (3.00 +/- 0.3 to 4.3 +/- 0.4 mg x FFM(-1) x min(-1)). Serum leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin all decreased after WL (P < 0.01). After WL, insulin sensitivity continued to correlate with generalized and regional adiposity but, with the exception of the percent decrease in VAT, the magnitude of improvement in insulin sensitivity was not predicted by the various changes in body composition. These interventional weight loss data underscore the potential importance of visceral adiposity in relation to insulin resistance and otherwise suggest that above a certain threshold of weight loss, improvement in insulin sensitivity does not bear a linear relationship to the magnitude of weight loss.  (+info)

*  Abdominal guarding
Guarding is a characteristic finding in the physical examination for an abruptly painful abdomen (an acute abdomen) with ... Abdominal guarding is the tensing of the abdominal wall muscles to guard inflamed organs within the abdomen from the pain of ...
*  Valentino's syndrome
In medicine, Valentino's syndrome is pain presenting in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen caused by a duodenal ulcer with ...
*  McBurney's point
... is the name given to the point over the right side of the abdomen that is one-third of the distance from the ...
*  Bowel obstruction
Vomiting may occur before constipation.[citation needed] In large bowel obstruction, the pain is felt lower in the abdomen and ... Diagnosis of the type of bowel obstruction is normally conducted through initial plain radiograph of the abdomen, luminal ... Depending on the level of obstruction, bowel obstruction can present with abdominal pain, swollen abdomen, abdominal distension ... X-rays of the abdomen, CT scanning, and/or ultrasound. If a mass is identified, biopsy may determine the nature of the mass. ...
*  Abdominal pain
Common causes of pain in the abdomen include gastroenteritis and irritable bowel syndrome. About 10% of people have a more ... Such tests include: Computed tomography of the abdomen/pelvis Abdominal or pelvic ultrasound Endoscopy and/or colonoscopy The ... Acute abdomen can be defined as severe, persistent abdominal pain of sudden onset that is likely to require surgical ... after some time moves to lower right abdomen) Upper right abdominal pain Liver (caused by hepatomegaly due to fatty liver, ...
*  Abdominal trauma
The small intestine takes up a large part of the abdomen and is likely to be damaged in penetrating injury. The bowel may be ... Abdominal trauma is an injury to the abdomen. It may be blunt or penetrating and may involve damage to the abdominal organs. ... People injured in motor vehicle collisions may present with a "seat belt sign," bruising on the abdomen along the site of the ... Kidney lacerations may be associated with urinoma or leakage of urine into the abdomen. A shattered kidney is one with multiple ...
*  Liver injury
... may take place which is used to find free floating fluid in the right upper quadrant and left lower quadrant of the abdomen. ...
*  Laparotomy
The most common incision for laparotomy a vertical incision in the middle of the abdomen which follows the linea alba. The ... white line of the abdomen) Pick up peritoneum, confirm that there is no bowel adhesion (intestinal adhesion) Nick peritoneum ...
*  Acute abdomen
... of the ischemic variety is usually due to: A thromboembolism from the left side of the heart, such as may be ... An acute abdomen refers to a sudden, severe abdominal pain. It is in many cases a medical emergency, requiring urgent and ... Acute ischemic abdomen is a surgical emergency. Typically, treatment involves removal of the region of the bowel that has ... The differential diagnoses of acute abdomen include but are not limited to: Acute appendicitis Acute peptic ulcer and its ...
*  Gastrointestinal perforation
In any case, the abdomen becomes rigid with tenderness and rebound tenderness. After some time the abdomen becomes silent and ... Patient stops passing flatus and motion, abdomen is distended. The symptoms of esophageal rupture may include sudden onset of ... Langell, JT; Mulvihill, SJ (May 2008). "Gastrointestinal perforation and the acute abdomen". The Medical clinics of North ... In intestinal perforation, pain starts from the site of perforation and spreads across the abdomen. Gastrointestinal ...
*  Abdomen
The abdomen is sometimes highly modified. In Apocrita (bees, ants and wasps), the first segment of the abdomen is fused to the ... A scaphoid abdomen is when the abdomen is sucked inwards. In a newborn, it may represent a diaphragmatic hernia. In general, it ... Another way of dividing the abdomen is by using 4 quadrants: The invertebrate abdomen is built up of a series of upper plates ... Abdomen. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Accessed: 22 Oct 2007 Abdomen. Dictionary.com. The American Heritage ...
*  Quadrant (abdomen)
The human abdomen is divided into regions by anatomists and physicians for purposes of study, diagnosis, and therapy. In the ... The left lower quadrant (LLQ) of the human abdomen is the area left of the midline and below the umbilicus. The LLQ includes ...
*  Linea alba (abdomen)
The white line (Latin: linea alba) is a fibrous structure that runs down the midline of the abdomen in humans and other ... Surface anatomy of the front of the thorax and abdomen. Linea alba Linea nigra skel&wallsabd at The Anatomy Lesson by Wesley ...
*  Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis
For example, in the abdomen and pelvis, there are several indications for non-contrast imaging. These include: evaluation of ... The most common technique is to perform portal venous phase imaging in the abdomen and pelvis (approximately 60-90 seconds ... Multidetector CT (MDCT) can clearly delineate anatomic structures in the abdomen, which is critical in the diagnosis of ... and has largely replaced conventional angiography due to the lower risk profile and ability to survey the entire abdomen. ...
*  Crustacean
"Abdomen". Crustacean Glossary. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Retrieved 2016-09-10. "Cephalothorax". Crustacean ... The abdomen bears pleopods, and ends in a telson, which bears the anus, and is often flanked by uropods to form a tail fan. The ... and the pleon or abdomen. The head and thorax may be fused together to form a cephalothorax, which may be covered by a single ...
*  Charaxes cynthia
Body golden brown; abdomen pale; head and prothorax reddish; palpi white externally. Underside-front wings reddish grey, ...
*  Pheochromocytoma
CT abdomen. Pheochromocytoma. CT abdomen. In adults, approximately 80% of pheochromocytomas are unilateral and solitary, 10% ... and abdomen can help localize the tumor. Tumors can also be located using an MIBG scan, which is scintigraphy using iodine-123- ...
*  Scopula helcita
Head, thorax, and abdomen black, the two last having a row of white spots running along the middle, and another on each side ... Abdomen yellow. Wings coloured and marked as on the upper side. Margins of the wings entire. Wing-span nearly 3½ inches (87 mm ...
*  Hepalastis pumilio
Abdomen brown. Legs with two pairs of spurs of equal length. Forewings cleft from two thirds, yellowish red-brown. Markings ...
*  Eudocima phalonia
Abdomen orange. Fore wings reddish brown, usually with a greenish tinge and irrorated with dark specks. An oblique antemedial ...
*  Stictoptera cucullioides
The larvae is fat, slightly tumid at the posterior end and with a berry-shaped swelling over the anterior part of the abdomen ... Abdomen fuscous. Fore wings greyish brown with numerous indistinct waved line. Orbicular and reniform stigmata indistinct, ...
*  Melangyna cincta
Elongate abdomen. See references for determination. The male genitalia are figured by Dusek and Laska (1967). The larva is ...
*  Oraesia emarginata
A white streak can be seen on vein 2. Abdomen and hind wings fuscous. Larva dark violet brown in color with a sub-dorsal series ... Abdomen fuscous. Fore wings reddish brown suffused with purple. Numerous indistinct slightly waved oblique lines present. A ...
*  Alucita flaviserta
Abdomen whitish. Forewings are white with a blackish semioval spot at costa near the base. Markings are ochreous-yellow. The ...
*  Fascellina
Abdomen stout. Hind tibia not dilated. Fore wings with arched costa towards apex. Vein 3 from close to angle of cell and vein 5 ...
abdomen - Wiktionary  abdomen - Wiktionary
abdomen (plural abdomens or abdomina) *(obsolete) The fat surrounding the belly. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the ... First attested in 1541.[1] Borrowed from Middle French abdomen, from Latin abdomen, possibly from abdō ("conceal"), from ab (" ... abdomen. Further reading[edit]. *"abdomen" in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the ... Catalan: abdomen (ca) m, buc (ca) m, panxa (ca) f, ventre (ca) m ... Slovene: trebuh (sl) m, abdomen m. *Spanish: abdomen (es) m, ...
more infohttps://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/abdomen
abdomen | Infoplease  abdomen | Infoplease
In humans the wall of the abdomen is a muscular structure covered by fascia, fat, and skin. The abdominal cavity is lined with ... In insects, crustacea, and some other arthropods, the term abdomen refers to the entire rear portion of the body. The Columbia ... abdomen, in humans and other vertebrates, portion of the trunk between the diaphragm and lower pelvis. In humans the wall of ... The abdomen of the female also contains the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and uterus. The navel, or umbilicus, an exterior scar on ...
more infohttps://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/medicine/body/anatomy-physio/abdomen
Ultrasound: Abdomen  Ultrasound: Abdomen
... Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving this ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/CookChildrens/en/parents/ultrasound-abdomen.html?view=rr
Ultrasound: Abdomen  Ultrasound: Abdomen
A complete ultrasound of the abdomen evaluates all of the abdominal organs. A limited ultrasound of the abdomen evaluates one ... Ultrasonido: abdomen. What It Is. An abdominal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to make images of ... abnormal fluid in the abdomen. Abdominal ultrasounds can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies or catheter ... A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging will spread a clear, warm gel on the skin of the abdomen. This gel ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/Nemours/en/parents/ultrasound-abdomen.html
Quadrant (abdomen) - Wikipedia  Quadrant (abdomen) - Wikipedia
The human abdomen is divided into regions by anatomists and physicians for purposes of study, diagnosis, and therapy.[1][2] In ... The left lower quadrant (LLQ) of the human abdomen is the area left of the midline and below the umbilicus. The LLQ includes ... Diagram showing which organs (or parts of organs) are in each quadrant of the abdomen ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Quadrant_(abdomen)&oldid=742786347" ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left_lower_quadrant
Category:Abdomen - Wikimedia Commons  Category:Abdomen - Wikimedia Commons
カテゴリ「Abdomen」にあるメディア. このカテゴリに属する 62 個のファイルのうち、 62 個を表示しています。 ... Abdomen contains: Parts of gastro-intestinal tract from stomach to rectum, abdominal aorta, vena cava inferior, kidneys, liver ... Multidendritic-sensory-neurons-in-the-adult-Drosophila-abdomen-origins-dendritic-morphology-and-1749-8104-4-37-S1.ogv 12秒、 512 ... Multidendritic-sensory-neurons-in-the-adult-Drosophila-abdomen-origins-dendritic-morphology-and-1749-8104-4
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Abdomen?uselang=ja
Anatomy: The Abdomen  Anatomy: The Abdomen
THE ABDOMEN. Download a copy of this study guide *Clinical Examination of the Abdomen *Anterior Abdominal Wall *Inguinal Region ... Boundaries of the Abdomen: *Superior Boundary: The diaphragm. It extends to ICS-5 superiorly (at the median line; it is more ... found in the lower 1/4 of the abdomen.. *It has several names, but it is one continuous plane of fascia, just outside the ... CLINICAL EXAMINATION OF THE ABDOMEN. Two kinds of pain: *Visceral Pain: Deep, throbbing, delocalized pain, associated with the ...
more infohttps://www.kumc.edu/AMA-MSS/Study/abdomen.htm
The Surgical Abdomen | SpringerLink  The Surgical Abdomen | SpringerLink
Cope's early diagnosis of the acute abdomen. 20th ed. New York: Oxford University Press; 2001.Google Scholar ... The most common causes of acute abdomen in the older age group are cholecystitis, appendicitis, perforated peptic ulcer disease ... Pelaez C.A., Agarwal N. (2012) The Surgical Abdomen. In: Pitchumoni C., Dharmarajan T. (eds) Geriatric Gastroenterology. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4419-1623-5_65
Abdomen-Visible Human  Abdomen-Visible Human
Module Title: Abdomen-Visible Human Image Info: Transverse section through the abdomen Created by: Lynn Bry Contact Email:[email protected] ... Abdomen-Visible Human You selected: kidney. This section shows both kidneys. These organs filter the blood, removing toxins and ...
more infohttp://www.madsci.org/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/~lynn/image?name=a_vm1640&return=&show_this=kidney&search=
Abdomen-Visible Human  Abdomen-Visible Human
Module Title: Abdomen-Visible Human Image Info: Transverse section through the abdomen Created by: Lynn Bry Contact Email:[email protected] ... Abdomen-Visible Human You selected: spinal cord. The spinal cord can be seen within the vertebral column - note it's size ...
more infohttp://www.madsci.org/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/~lynn/image?name=a_vm1640&return=&show_this=spinal_cord&search=
Acute Abdomen  Acute Abdomen
"Acute abdomen" is the medical term used for pain in the abdomen that usually comes on suddenly and is so severe that one may ... Acute Abdomen. (Acute Abdominal Pain; Severe Stomach Ache; Abdominal Cramps; Surgical Abdomen). by Amanda Barrett, MA. ... This Acute Abdomen page on EmpowHER Women's Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle navigation ... a test that uses sound waves to examine the abdomen *. CT scan. -a type of x-ray that uses a computer to make pictures of ...
more infohttp://www.empowher.com/media/reference/acute-abdomen
Abdomen Water Bottles - CafePress  Abdomen Water Bottles - CafePress
Shop CafePress for Abdomen Water Bottles. Find great designs on high quality durable Stainless Steel Water Bottles and Sport ... Shop our wide variety of Abdomen Water Bottles to express your personality and shrink your environmental footprint. People ...
more infohttps://www.cafepress.com/+abdomen+water-bottles
Sarcoma abdomen | Cancer Chat  Sarcoma abdomen | Cancer Chat
Re: Sarcoma abdomen. 7 Oct 2018 19:43 in response to CRUK Nurse Catherine Although it was said in August the mass was from the ... Re: Sarcoma abdomen. 9 Oct 2018 19:51 in response to CRUK Nurse Martin Today the clinical nurse rang with the type and subtype ... Re: Sarcoma abdomen. 11 Oct 2018 13:26 in response to Seaside01 I hope everything goes as well. It is tough waiting for ... Re: Sarcoma abdomen. 28 Aug 2018 10:38 in response to Seaside01 Hello and thanks for posting, ...
more infohttps://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-chat/thread/sarcoma-abdomen
Acute diabetic abdomen. | The BMJ  Acute diabetic abdomen. | The BMJ
Acute diabetic abdomen.. Br Med J 1976; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.6043.1074-c (Published 30 October 1976) Cite this ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/6043/1074.2
Abdomen | NorthShore  Abdomen | NorthShore
What is an Ultrasound of the Abdomen?. This is a noninvasive procedure that uses sound waves to produce pictures of the organs ...
more infohttps://www.northshore.org/radiology/procedures/ultrasound/abdomen/
ABDOMEN NEEDS SPECIAL ATTENTION - Sun Sentinel  ABDOMEN NEEDS SPECIAL ATTENTION - Sun Sentinel
The bulge at the waistline and into the low abdomen is the result of not working these muscles efficiently. The low abdominal ... The strength and muscle tone, achieved through this exercise, not only flattens the low abdomen but also decreases the ... The bulge at the waistline and into the low abdomen is the result of not working these muscles efficiently. The low abdominal ... The strength and muscle tone, achieved through this exercise, not only flattens the low abdomen but also decreases the ...
more infohttps://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-xpm-1986-03-18-8601160978-story.html
lower left abdomen pain? | Yahoo Answers  lower left abdomen pain? | Yahoo Answers
earlier i had a cramp-like pain in the lower left abdomen which lasted for 15 minutes. it was as if i had dysmenorrhoea but ... Lower left abdomen pain? earlier i had a cramp-like pain in the lower left abdomen which lasted for 15 minutes. it was as if i ... what could have... show more earlier i had a cramp-like pain in the lower left abdomen which lasted for 15 minutes. it was as ... looking at the more common causes of sever prolonged pain in the lower abdomen. I'd have to say constipation....people forget ...
more infohttps://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070108061708AAhLxHk
Dynamic Radiology of the Abdomen | SpringerLink  Dynamic Radiology of the Abdomen | SpringerLink
... is the classic text covering radiology of the abdomen as it relates to the progression of disease within an organ and from on ... Dynamic Radiology of the Abdomen, extensively revised and updated, ... Meyers' Dynamic Radiology of the Abdomen, extensively revised and updated, is the classic text covering radiology of the ... Clinical Embryology of the Abdomen: Normal and Pathologic Anatomy Bruce R. Javors, Hiromu Mori, Morton A. Meyers, Ronald H. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/b97501
Cantharis abdomen symptoms  Cantharis abdomen symptoms
Cantharis - ABDOMEN materia medica indications (symptoms) by T.F. Allen, Boenninghausen, Boericke, Boger, Clarke, Hering, Kent ... As if something were in abdomen (movements, lumps, etc.); movements in abdomen ... Cantharis - Abdomen symptoms Spanish Fly, Cantharidin. Available in 3X-30X, 200X, 3C-30C, 200C, 1M-50M, CM from $6.50. Purchase ...
more infohttp://abchomeopathy.com/r.php/Canth/abdomen
Mezereum abdomen symptoms  Mezereum abdomen symptoms
Mezereum - ABDOMEN materia medica indications (symptoms) by T.F. Allen, Boenninghausen, Boericke, Boger, Clarke, Hahnemann, ... Mezereum - Abdomen symptoms Spurge Olive, Mezer. Available in 2C-30C, 200C, 2X-30X, 200X, 1M-10M, CM from $6.50. Purchase ...
more infohttp://abchomeopathy.com/r.php/Mez/abdomen/
Abdomen - Ardysslife  Abdomen - Ardysslife
Abdomen. $0.00. .single_add_to_cart_button { display: none !important; } Perfect back support.. This men's reshaper is designed ...
more infohttps://ardysslife.com/producto/abdomen/
Abdomen Anatomy, Area & Diagram | Body Maps  Abdomen Anatomy, Area & Diagram | Body Maps
The muscles of the abdomen protect vital organs underneath and provide structure for the spine. These muscles help the body ... The major muscles of the abdomen include the rectus abdominis in front, the external obliques at the sides, and the latissimus ... The muscles of the abdomen protect vital organs underneath and provide structure for the spine. These muscles help the body ... The muscles of the abdomen protect vital organs underneath and provide structure for the spine. These muscles help the body ...
more infohttps://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/female-abdomen
Muscles of the Abdomen - Everything2.com  Muscles of the Abdomen - Everything2.com
The abdomen is the area below the rib cage and above the iliac crest (groin). part of the Human Anatomy project (tm). /msg me ... The abdomen is the area below the rib cage and above the iliac crest (groin). part of the Human Anatomy project (tm).. /msg me ...
more infohttps://everything2.com/title/Muscles+of+the+Abdomen
The Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition | Wiley  The Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition | Wiley
The Equine Acute Abdomen, Third Editionis the preeminent text on diagnosing and treating acute abdominal diseases in horses, ... The Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition. Anthony T. Blikslager (Editor), Nathaniel A. White II (Editor), James N. Moore (Editor) ... Written and edited by leading experts on equine digestive diseases, The Equine Acute Abdomen, Third Editionis the preeminent ...
more infohttps://www.wiley.com/en-us/The+Equine+Acute+Abdomen%2C+3rd+Edition-p-9781119063261
Burst abdomen and incisional hernia. | The BMJ  Burst abdomen and incisional hernia. | The BMJ
Burst abdomen and incisional hernia. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982; 284 :1948 ... Burst abdomen and incisional hernia.. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982; 284 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.284.6333.1948-a ( ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/284/6333/1948.2
  • Multidetector CT (MDCT) can clearly delineate anatomic structures in the abdomen, which is critical in the diagnosis of internal diaphragmatic and other nonpalpable or unsuspected hernias. (wikipedia.org)
  • In insects, crustacea, and some other arthropods, the term abdomen refers to the entire rear portion of the body. (infoplease.com)
  • It manifests on physical examination as rebound tenderness, or pain upon removal of pressure more than on application of pressure to the abdomen. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans the wall of the abdomen is a muscular structure covered by fascia, fat, and skin. (infoplease.com)