A plant species of the family FABACEAE.
A genus of leguminous herbs or shrubs whose roots yield GLYCYRRHETINIC ACID and its derivative, CARBENOXOLONE.
A widely used anti-inflammatory agent isolated from the licorice root. It is metabolized to GLYCYRRHETINIC ACID, which inhibits 11-BETA-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASES and other enzymes involved in the metabolism of CORTICOSTEROIDS. Therefore, glycyrrhizic acid, which is the main and sweet component of licorice, has been investigated for its ability to cause hypermineralocorticoidism with sodium retention and potassium loss, edema, increased blood pressure, as well as depression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.
Compounds based on CHALCONE. They are important intermediates in the formation of FLAVONOIDS.
A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain cernuosides and other oleanane and hederagenin saponins.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kazakhstan" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition; it is the name of a country located in Central Asia, known officially as the Republic of Kazakhstan.
The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
A genus of basiodiomycetous fungi in the family Coriolaceae. Members are known for infesting wood.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Communications networks connecting various hardware devices together within or between buildings by means of a continuous cable or voice data telephone system.

Pharmaceutical evaluation of Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots cultivated in eastern Nei-Meng-Gu of China. (1/21)

To clarify the feasibility of medicinal use of the cultivated Glycyrrhiza resources, the equivalency between the G. uralensis roots cultivated in eastern Nei-Meng-Gu of China and medicinal licorice (Glycyrrhizae Radix, Gancao in Chinese and Kanzo in Japanese) was examined. The HPLC fingerprint including glycyrrhizin (GL) of the cultivated roots was similar to that of medicinal Gancao, but different from that of non-medicinal Xinjiang-Gancao (Shinkyo Kanzo in Japanese). Similarity between the cultivated roots and two medicinal Gancao was confirmed quantitatively by hierarchical cluster analysis on the basis of HPLC-7-peak-area data. Moreover, the 4-year-old adventitious roots conformed to the five standards described in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia XIV (JP XIV). The 4-year-old adventitious roots had similar pharmaceutical properties to those of medicinal Dongbei-Gancao (Tohoku Kanzo in Japanese) as determined by examining IgE-mediated triphasic skin reaction in mice and pharmacokinetic profile of glycyrrhetic acid, an anti-allergic metabolite of GL. The present pharmaceutical study suggests that the 4-year-old adventitious roots of G. uralensis cultivated in eastern Nei-Meng-Gu of China are comparable to medicinal Gancao conforming to the JP XIV, and may be a potential medicinal source to compensate for the insufficiency of wild Glycyrrhiza plants caused by collection restriction in China.  (+info)

Comparative pharmacokinetic behavior of glycyrrhetic acid after oral administration of glycyrrhizic acid and Gancao-Fuzi-Tang. (2/21)

Comparative pharmacokinetic profiles of glycyrrhetic acid (GA), glycyrrhizic acid (GL) and Gancao-Fuzi-Tang (KF) after oral administration of GL and KF were studied. Plasma samples taken from rats were acidified with acetic acid and GA was extracted with isopropanol-ethyl ether (1 : 1). Separation of GA was performed on a C(18) column with the detection wavelength set at 254 nm. The mobile phase was methanol-acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (58 : 18 : 24 : 1 v/v). The results showed that the mean residence time and area under the curve of GA in KF-administered rats were 27.6+/-1.5 h and 122.8+/-46.7 microg.h/ml respectively, which were significantly different from those in GL-administered rats (15.0+/-2.0 h and 40.9+/-9.6 microg.h/ml, respectively). The results suggest the increased effect of GA after oral administration of KF in comparison with GL.  (+info)

Comparative analysis of ten strains of Glycyrrhiza uralensis cultivated in Japan. (3/21)

Comparative analysis of 10 strains of Glycyrrhiza uralensis cultivated in Kyoto, Japan, was undertaken to characterize their variations. Based on the chemical characteristics of their leaves and underground parts, the 10 strains were divided into two chemotypes, the China type and Kazakhstan type. The contents of licoleafol in the leaves of the China type (0-0.03% of dry weight) were lower than those of the Kazakhstan type (0.05-1.16% of dry weight). In addition, a China type-specific unidentified compound was also detected in the leaves of China-type plants. Glycyrrhizin contents in the underground parts of the China type (2.08-5.12% of dry weight) were relatively higher than those of the Kazakhstan type (0.75-2.55% of dry weight). Contents of glycycoumarin, a species-specific flavonoid of G. uralensis, in the underground parts of China-type plants (0.07-0.28% of dry weight) were higher than those of Kazakhstan-type plants (0.01-0.08% of dry weight). These 10 strains were also divided into two genotypes, the GA type and AT type, based on their chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene (rbcL) sequences, although there was no correlation between the chemotype and the rbcL genotype.  (+info)

Traditional Chinese medicines Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra chinensis Baill) and Gan Cao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) activate pregnane X receptor and increase warfarin clearance in rats. (4/21)

The traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are essential components of alternative medicines. Many TCMs are known to alter the expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The molecular mechanism by which TCMs and/or their constituents regulate enzyme and transporter expression, however, has remained largely unknown. In this report, we show that two TCMs, Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra chinensis Baill) and Gan Cao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch), and their selected constituents activate the xenobiotic orphan nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Treatment with TCM extracts and the Schisandrol and Schisandrin constituents of Wu Wei Zi induced the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in reporter gene assays and in primary hepatocyte cultures. The affected enzymes and transporters include CYP3A and 2C isozymes and the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. In transient transfection and reporter gene assays, the Schisandrin constituents of Wu Wei Zi had an estimated EC50 of 2 and 1.25 microM on hPXR and mPXR, respectively. Interestingly, mutations that were intended to alter the pore of the ligand-binding cavity of PXR had species-specific effects on the activities of the individual Schisandrols and Schisandrins. In rats, the administration of Wu Wei Zi and Gan Cao increased the metabolism of the coadministered warfarin, reinforcing concerns involving the safe use of herbal medicines and other nutraceuticals to avoid PXR-mediated drug-drug interactions. Meanwhile, the activation of PXR and induction of detoxifying enzymes provide a molecular mechanism for the hepatoprotective effects of certain TCMs.  (+info)

A LuxR/LuxI-type quorum-sensing system in a plant bacterium, Mesorhizobium tianshanense, controls symbiotic nodulation. (5/21)

The ability of rhizobia to symbiotically fix nitrogen from the atmosphere when forming nodules on their plant hosts requires various signal transduction pathways. LuxR-LuxI-type quorum-sensing systems have been shown to be one of the players in a number of rhizobium species. In this study, we found that Mesorhizobium tianshanense, a moderate-growth Rhizobium that forms nodules on a number of licorice plants, produces multiple N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-like molecules. A simple screen for AHL synthase genes using an M. tianshanense genomic expression library in Escherichia coli, coupled with a sensitive AHL detector, uncovered a LuxI-type synthase, MrtI, and a LuxR-type regulator, MrtR, in M. tianshanense. Deletions of the mrtI or mrtR locus completely abolished AHL production in M. tianshanense. Using lacZ transcriptional fusions, we found that expression of the quorum-sensing regulators is autoinduced, as mrtI gene expression requires MrtR and cognate AHLs and mrtR expression is dependent on AHLs. Compared with the wild-type strains, quorum-sensing-deficient mutants showed a marked reduction in the efficiency of root hair adherence and, more importantly, were defective in nodule formation on their host plant, Glycyrrhiza uralensis. These data provide strong evidence that quorum sensing plays a critical role in the M. tianshanense symbiotic process.  (+info)

Isoliquiritigenin, one of the antispasmodic principles of Glycyrrhiza ularensis roots, acts in the lower part of intestine. (6/21)

Glycyrrhizae radix is used to treat abdominal pain as a component of shakuyakukanzoto (shaoyao-gancao-tang), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation. Previously, we have reported the isolation of glycycoumarin as a potent antispasmodic with an IC50 value of 2.93+/-0.94 microM for carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced contraction of mouse jejunum from an aqueous extract of Glycyrrhizae radix (licorice), and clarified that its mechanism of action involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3. The purpose of the present study was to examine an antispasmodic principle of licorice other than glycycoumarin. Isoliquiritigenin was isolated from an aqueous extract of licorice as a potent relaxant, which inhibited the contraction induced by various types of stimulants, such as CCh, KCl, and BaCl2 with IC50 values of 4.96+/-1.97 microM, 4.03+/-1.34 microM and 3.70+/-0.58 microM, respectively, which are close to those of papaverine. However, the amount of isoliquiritigenin in the aqueous extract of licorice was very small. When the aqueous licorice extract was treated with naringinase, the amounts of glycosides such as isoliquiritin, which were abundant but had much less potent relaxant activity, were decreased while isoliquiritigenin was increased. At the time, the relaxant activity of the treated sample was increased significantly, shifting the IC50 from 358+/-104 to 150+/-38 microg/ml for CCh-induced contraction. Isoliquiritigenin also showed the most potent inhibition of mouse rectal contraction induced by CCh with an IC50 value of 1.70+/-0.07 microM. These results suggest that isoliquiritigenin acts as a potent relaxant in the lower part of the intestine by transformation from its glycosides.  (+info)

Changes in components, glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid, in raw Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, modify insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic actions. (7/21)

We hypothesized that roasted Glycyrrhizae Radix (Glycyrrhizin Radix Praeparata, GRP) might modify anti-diabetic action due to compositional changes. Then we examined the anti-diabetic effect and mechanism of raw Glycyrrhizae Radix (GR) and GRP extracts and their major respective components, glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid. In partial pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic mice, both GR and GRP improved glucose tolerance, but only GRP enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as much as exendin-4. Both GR and GRP extracts enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Consistently with the results of the mice study, only GRP and glycyrrhetinic acid enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets. In addition, they induced mRNA levels of insulin receptor substrate-2, pancreas duodenum homeobox-1, and glucokinase in the islets, which contributed to improving beta-cell viability. In conclusion, GRP extract containing glycyrrhetinic acid improved glucose tolerance better than GR extract by enhancing insulinotropic action. Thus, GRP had better anti-diabetic action than GR.  (+info)

Constituent properties of licorices derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis, G. glabra, or G. inflata identified by genetic information. (8/21)

Constituent properties of licorices derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis, G. glabra, and G. inflata are revealed by comparing 117 of licorice identified using four genetic markers; internal tracscribed spacer (ITS) on nuclear ribosomal DNA, rbcL gene, matK gene, and trnH-trnK1 intergenic region on chloroplast DNA. Regarding six main constituents of licorice; glycyrrhizin, liquiritin, liquiritin apioside, isoliquiritin, isoliquiritin apioside, and liquiritigenin, the constituent property of G. glabra resembles to that of G. inflata. On the other hand, the constituent property of G. uralensis is not similar to that of G. glabra or G. inflata and is characterized by a wide content variation of the six constituents compared to those of G. glabra and/or G. inflata. The mean contents of liquiritin, isoliquiritin, or liquilitigenin in G. uralensis are significantly higher than those of G. glabra or G. inflata. Therefore, the licorice species should be selected depending on these constituent properties for the traditional Chinese medicines or the Japanese Kampo medicines. Additionally, glycycoumarin, glabridin, and licochalcone A were reconfirmed as the species-specific typical constituents of G. uralensis, G. glabra, and G. inflata respectively. Therefore, it is resulted that the determination of the three species-specific constituents may be useful for the species identification of licorice. However, since 6% of licorice examined and hybrids were exceptions to the rule, their genetic information is necessary for the accurate species identification of licorice.  (+info)

'Glycyrrhiza uralensis', also known as Chinese licorice, is a plant species native to Asia. In a medical context, it often refers to the root of this plant, which contains various compounds with potential medicinal properties. It has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat various health conditions such as respiratory disorders, liver diseases, and skin inflammations.

The active component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis is glycyrrhizin, which has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and expectorant properties. However, it should be noted that excessive consumption of glycyrrhizin can lead to serious side effects such as hypertension, hypokalemia, and edema. Therefore, it is important to use this herb under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

"Glycyrrhiza" is the medical term for the licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which belongs to the legume family. The root of this plant contains glycyrrhizin, a sweet-tasting compound that has been used in traditional medicine for various purposes such as treating coughs, stomach ulcers, and liver disorders. However, excessive consumption of glycyrrhizin can lead to serious side effects like high blood pressure, low potassium levels, and even heart problems. Therefore, it is important to use licorice products under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Glycyrrhizic acid is a compound derived from the root of the licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra). It has been defined medically as a triterpene glycoside with anti-inflammatory and expectorant properties. It is known to inhibit the enzyme 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which can lead to increased levels of cortisol in the body, potentially causing side effects such as hypertension and hypokalemia if consumed in large amounts or over an extended period.

In some medical contexts, glycyrrhizic acid may be used for its potential benefits, including its ability to suppress viral replication and inflammation. However, due to the risk of side effects, it is often used in modified forms or at reduced concentrations.

Chalcones are a class of compounds that have a chemical structure consisting of two aromatic rings connected by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system. The name "chalcone" is derived from the Greek word "chalcos," meaning copper, due to the yellow color that many chalcones exhibit.

Chalcones are synthesized through a reaction known as the Claisen-Schmidt condensation between an aldehyde and a ketone. They are important intermediates in the biosynthesis of flavonoids, which are a large group of plant pigments that have various biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties.

Chalcones themselves have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, including their ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, bacteria, and fungi. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and safety profiles before they can be developed into drugs.

"Pulsatilla" is the name of a homeopathic remedy that is prepared from the dried herb of the Pulsatilla vulgaris plant, also known as the common pasque flower. In a medical context, it is not used as a conventional medical diagnosis or treatment. Instead, it's utilized in homeopathy, a complementary and alternative medicine system.

Homeopathic practitioners use Pulsatilla to treat various emotional and physical symptoms, including weepiness, mood swings, and digestive issues. It is important to note that the effectiveness of homeopathic remedies like Pulsatilla has not been conclusively proven by scientific research, and they are not recognized as standard medical treatments by mainstream healthcare professionals.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Chinese herbal drugs, also known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), refer to a system of medicine that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that the body's vital energy, called Qi, must be balanced and flowing freely for good health. TCM uses various techniques such as herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercise to restore balance and promote healing.

Chinese herbal drugs are usually prescribed in the form of teas, powders, pills, or tinctures and may contain one or a combination of herbs. The herbs used in Chinese medicine are typically derived from plants, minerals, or animal products. Some commonly used Chinese herbs include ginseng, astragalus, licorice root, and cinnamon bark.

It is important to note that the use of Chinese herbal drugs should be under the guidance of a qualified practitioner, as some herbs can interact with prescription medications or have side effects. Additionally, the quality and safety of Chinese herbal products can vary widely depending on the source and manufacturing process.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Kazakhstan" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest landlocked country, located in Central Asia. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Herbal medicine, also known as botanical medicine or phytomedicine, refers to the use of plants and plant extracts for therapeutic purposes. This traditional form of medicine has been practiced for thousands of years across various cultures worldwide. It involves the utilization of different parts of a plant, such as leaves, roots, seeds, flowers, and fruits, either in their whole form or as extracts, infusions, decoctions, tinctures, or essential oils.

Herbal medicines are believed to contain active compounds that can interact with the human body, influencing its physiological processes and helping to maintain or restore health. Some herbs have been found to possess pharmacological properties, making them valuable in treating various ailments, including digestive disorders, respiratory conditions, sleep disturbances, skin issues, and cardiovascular diseases.

However, it is essential to note that the regulation of herbal medicines varies significantly between countries, and their safety, efficacy, and quality may not always be guaranteed. Therefore, consulting a healthcare professional before starting any herbal medicine regimen is advisable to ensure proper usage, dosage, and potential interactions with other medications or health conditions.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a system of medicine that has been developed in China over thousands of years. It is based on the philosophy that the body's vital energy (Qi) circulates through a network of channels called meridians, and that disease results from an imbalance or blockage in this flow of Qi.

TCM uses a variety of treatments to restore balance and promote health, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, moxibustion (the burning of herbs near the skin), cupping, dietary therapy, and tuina (Chinese massage). The use of Chinese herbal medicines is a major component of TCM, with formulas often consisting of combinations of several different herbs tailored to the individual patient's needs.

In addition to these treatments, TCM practitioners may also use diagnostic techniques such as pulse diagnosis and tongue examination to assess a person's overall health and determine the underlying cause of their symptoms. The goal of TCM is not only to treat specific symptoms or diseases but to address the root causes of illness and promote overall wellness.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

"Poria" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology. However, it might be a reference to "Poria cocos," a type of fungus that is sometimes used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this context, "Poria" is said to have anti-inflammatory, diuretic, and sedative properties, although its efficacy and safety are not well-studied or established by modern medical standards.

It's important to note that the use of traditional herbal remedies like "Poria cocos" can interact with other medications and have side effects, so it's crucial to consult with a healthcare provider before using them.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Local Area Networks" (LANs) are not a medical term. They are a common term in the field of computer networking. Here is a general definition:

A Local Area Network (LAN) is a network that connects computers and other devices in a relatively small area, typically a single building or a group of buildings. Most LANs are used to share resources such as printers, games or applications. A LAN is usually owned, created, managed and supported by a single organization, such as a school, hospital, or business.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help!

... , also known as Chinese liquorice, is a flowering plant native to Asia. It is used as a sweetener and in ... Glycyrrhiza uralensis can be found growing naturally in Europe, Asia, and throughout the Middle East. This Chinese licorice is ... Spice Pages: liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis, liquorice) Science Direct Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine[ ... Chang, Sue-Joan; Chan, Yin-Ching; Yu, Wen-Jen (2015), "Glycyrrhiza uralensis 甘草 (Gancao, Licorice)", Dietary Chinese Herbs, ...
... squamulosa Franch. Glycyrrhiza triphylla Fisch. & C.A.Mey. Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. ex DC. Glycyrrhiza ... Glycyrrhiza asymmetrica Hub.-Mor. Glycyrrhiza bucharica Regel Glycyrrhiza echinata L. Glycyrrhiza foetida Desf. Glycyrrhiza ... Glycyrrhiza inflata Batalin Glycyrrhiza lepidota Pursh- American licorice Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Maxim. ... 17 species are accepted: Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa (Lindl.) J.M.Black Glycyrrhiza aspera Pall. Glycyrrhiza astragalina Gillies ...
It is a compound isolated from the root of the Chinese licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza uralensis).[citation needed] It may has in ... He J, Chen L, Shi W, Lu Q-Y (2006). "Antibacterial Compounds from Glycyrrhiza uralensis". Journal of Natural Products. 69 (1): ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Ligusticum chuanxiong hort, Angelica sinensis, Sea buckthorns, papaya, chrysanthemum flower, ...
nov., isolated from roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 66 (3 ... non-motile bacterium from the genus Pseudoclavibacter which has been isolated from the roots of the plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis ...
nov., isolated from roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis". Archives of Microbiology. 198 (2): 171-179. doi:10.1007/s00203-015-1170-8 ... rod-shaped and bacteria from the genus of Brucella which has been isolated from the roots of the plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis ...
isolated from roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis". Archives of Microbiology. 197 (7): 911-918. doi:10.1007/s00203-015-1124-1. PMID ... and aerobic bacterium from the genus Novosphingobium which has been isolated from the roots of the plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis ...
"Glycyrrhiza uralensis - Plants For A Future database report". Archived from the original on January 15, 2009. Retrieved 2008-02 ...
... is a major isoflavone found in a number of plants and herbs like soybean and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Intestinal bacterial ... "Flavonoid glycosides of the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis". Phytochemistry. 24 (2): 339-341. doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(00)83548-7 ...
In south China, people blend human placenta with gāncǎo 甘草 "Glycyrrhiza uralensis; Chinese licorice root", shēngmá 升麻 " ...
... and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. The festival involves singing and dancing performances as well as competitions, including horse ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis). On the left bank of the Huang He, level spaces amongst the dry river beds are studded with little ...
... apiosyl-glucoside and liquiritin from the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis by high-performance centrifugal partition ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, and Aconitum carmichaelii) has a potential benefit in treating septic shock. Chinese classic herbal ...
The three drugs added to the boiling solution are the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, the rhizome of Ophiopogon japonicus and ...
Some active compounds with chalcone scaffold found in Glycyrrhiza glabra, Cassia mimosoides, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, ...
... is a flavanone that was isolated from Glycyrrhiza uralensis, and is found in a variety of plants of the ... Glycyrrhiza genus, including Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice). It is an estrogenic compound which acts as a selective agonist of ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis (甘草), cardamom (白豆蔻), and lightly cooked rice (微炒大米) Bazhen tang (T: 八珍湯, S: 八珍汤; literally "eight-rarity ... and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (甘草) Siwu tang (T: 四物湯, S: 四物汤; literally "four substances soup"); contains Angelica sinensis (T: 當歸 ... Glycyrrhiza uralensis (甘草), stiff silkworm (T: 僵蠶, S: 僵蚕), and mentha (薄荷), Yupingfeng
Glycyrrhiza uralensis) Maackiain, isolated from the roots of Maackia amurensis subsp. Buergeri Medicarpin, found in Medicago ...
... and Glycyrrhiza uralensis (0.67 g). In Korea, Gamisoyo-San has been used to treat dysmenorrhea, infertility, and insomnia. In ...
... glycyrrhiza MeSH B06.388.100.401.300.500 - glycyrrhiza uralensis MeSH B06.388.100.401.318 - griffonia MeSH B06.388.100.401.337 ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, 甘草), and menthol in a syrup and honey base. Cough medicine Shea Driscoll (October 9, 2014). "5 things ...
... glycyrrhiza uralensis, licorice root) ganjiang (ginger rhizome) gaoliang jiang (galangal rhizome) gegen (kudzu root) gouqi zi ( ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis). These herbs are described as "noble" or "upper herbs" (上品). The second volume is devoted to 120 ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis fisch) Licorice root (Meyan kökü) (Glycyrrhiza glabra) Mastic (Çam sakızı) (Mastichum) Millet (Hintdarisi ...
... honey fried Glycyrrhiza uralensis root) Chinese classic herbal formula Chinese patent medicine "Welcome to nginx!". Archived ...
A related species, G. uralensis, however, is more likely the licorice species one finds in traditional Chinese medicine. ... Glycyrrhiza inflata is a plant species in the genus Glycyrrhiza from China, with common name Chinese licorice. ... doi:10.1007/s10600-010-9552-2. Data related to Glycyrrhiza inflata at Wikispecies v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Xie, J.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, W. (2010). "HPLC analysis of glycyrrhizin and licochalcone a in Glycyrrhiza inflata from Xinjiang ( ...
... or other names Glycyrrhiza inflata, Chinese licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Chinese licorice Polypodium glycyrrhiza, liquorice ... handle of professional League of Legends player Eric Ritchie Glycyrrhiza, the genus including G. glabra Glycyrrhiza echinata, ... Liquorice or licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra from which a somewhat sweet flavor can be extracted. Liquorice or ...
"Glycyrrhiza pallida Boiss., Diagn. Pl. Orient. ser. 2, 2: 22 (1856)". The International Plant Names Index. Retrieved 2017-03-07 ... In traditional Chinese medicine, a related species G. uralensis (often translated as "liquorice") is known as gancao (Chinese: ... "Glycyrrhiza violacea Boiss., Diagn. Pl. Orient. ser. 2, 2: 23 (1856)". The International Plant Names Index. Retrieved 2017-03- ... Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Kew plant profile What's That Stuff?: Licorice, Chemical & Engineering News (CS1: long volume ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, also known as Chinese liquorice, is a flowering plant native to Asia. It is used as a sweetener and in ... Glycyrrhiza uralensis can be found growing naturally in Europe, Asia, and throughout the Middle East. This Chinese licorice is ... Spice Pages: liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis, liquorice) Science Direct Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine[ ... Chang, Sue-Joan; Chan, Yin-Ching; Yu, Wen-Jen (2015), "Glycyrrhiza uralensis 甘草 (Gancao, Licorice)", Dietary Chinese Herbs, ...
View the review history for The immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharides from Glycyrrhiza uralensis ... The immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharides from Glycyrrhiza uralensis All reviews of published articles are made public ... investigates the immunostimulatory effect of Glycyrrhiza uralensis in vitro and in murine vivo studies and is definitely worthy ... Anonymous Reviewer (2020) Peer Review #1 of The immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharides from Glycyrrhiza uralensis (v0.1 ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer Engl.: Asian liquorice, Chinese licorice. Sven.: kinesisk lakritsrot, kinesisk lakrits, ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis - Chinese Licorice MSRP: Was: Now: $2.50 View Amomum maximum - Java Cardamom MSRP: ...
Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza uralensis). Recommended Use. Take 4 capsules with a meal twice daily. ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, and Atractylodes macrocephala. SPS+FS mice were administered HFE (500 and 1000 mg/kg) once daily for 14 ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis; Xuan Shen - Scrophularia ningpoensis; Jie Geng - Platycodon grandiflora ...
2018). Prenylated Flavonoids from Roots of Glycyrrhiza Uralensis Induce Differentiation of B16-F10 Melanoma Cells. Int. J. Mol ...
f. et Thomson) H.Ohba (Bigflower Rhodiola) Root and Rhizome - 9.14mg, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (Liquorice) Root and Rhizome ...
Using a mouthwash containing Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract may improve bad breath, according to a study. ...
Specific chromatograms of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. flavonoids in different growth years by HPLC coupled with chemometric ... Chen, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, S. Quality evaluation of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.in different harvest periods based on combina- ...
Aconitum carmichaelii Debx lateral root (Radix aconite Lateralis, Sichuan aconite root) and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., root ... it is recommended that the aconite roots shall be used together with roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch (Radix glycyrrhizae, ... To elucidate this assumption, one of the major proteins from Radix glycyrrhiza, namely GP, was purified and used to construct ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Vitis vinifera, and others [130]. Marrelli et al. [119] conducted an in vitro study using a colorimetric ...
The herbs of FFMN, such as Peganum harmala L., Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., and Nigella glandulifera, have been demonstrated ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) activate pregnane X receptor and increase warfarin clearance in rats," Journal of Pharmacology and ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) activate pregnane X receptor and increase warfarin clearance in rats," Journal of Pharmacology and ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis contains active ingredients such as thymol and carvacrol, which have significant antiviral and ...
We previously reported that the rate of IVF in mice was improved by adding a water extract of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis ...
Hair Wax Color Natural 】This hair color wax is made of plant extracts:Beeswax White,Licorice&Glycyrrhiza Uralensis Extract,Tea ...
Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, 1,2-Hexanediol, Tin Oxide,Collagen, Hyaluronic Acid, Hydrolyzed Hyaluronic Acid ... Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract,1,2-Hexanediol, Tin Oxide, Collagen, Hyaluronic Acid, Hydrolyzed HyaluronicAcid, ... Glycyrrhiza Glabra Root Extract [Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract],Vaccinium Vitis-Idaea Leaf Extract, 1,2-Hexanediol ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis root-prep, Akebia trifoliata stem, Ziziphus jujuba fruit, Activated carbon, ... Angelica sinensis root, Paeonia lactiflora root, Cinnamomum cassia twig, Glycyrrhiza uralensis root-prep, Akebia trifoliata ...
Gan Cao - Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Sweet and neutral. Licorce root is perhaps the most widely used medicinal herb in China. It ...
... and root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.. KYQG is recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia 2015 edition to treat mouth and throat ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis root, Zingiber officinale rhizome-fresh, Talcum, China wax ...
Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Niacinamide, Caprae Lac (Goat Milk), Tocopherol ( ... Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Niacinamide, Caprae Lac (Goat Milk), Tocopherol ( ... Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Niacinamide, Caprae Lac (Goat Milk), Tocopherol ( ... Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Niacinamide, Caprae Lac (Goat Milk), Tocopherol ( ...
Chinese Liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis). Chinese liquorice resembles the ordinary liquorice, but plays an important role in ... Liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Liquorice is harvested as roots from this small, hardy shrub from western Asia. After three ...
Aqua, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Glycerin, Dipropylene Glycol, Propanediol, Glycyrrhiza Uralensis Extract, Saccharide ...
Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc., Camptotheca acuminata Decne., Ginkgo biloba L., and Salvia ... Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don, Taxus wallichiana var. chinensis (Pilg.) Florin, and Ginkgo ...
Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene), Sodium Hyaluronate, Saccharide Isomerate, ...
  • As an essential measure for clinical practice of traditional Chinese medicine, it is recommended that the aconite roots shall be used together with roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch ( Radix glycyrrhizae , Gan-Cao, licorice root) to eliminate the toxicity and improve efficacy [ 5 , 6 ]. (springer.com)
  • We previously reported that the rate of IVF in mice was improved by adding a water extract of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis), but not glycyrrhizin, to the artificial insemination culture medium. (intechopen.com)
  • The antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from the licorice( Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (nefu.edu.cn)
  • Licorice ( Glycyrrhiza uralensis ) is a flowering plant of the bean family Fabaceae. (remedysnutrition.com)
  • Its botanical name Glycyrrhiza means 'sweet root', an appropriate name due to the intense sweet flavor of the licorice root. (remedysnutrition.com)
  • f. et Thomson) H.Ohba (Bigflower Rhodiola) Root and Rhizome - 9.14mg, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (techarp.com)
  • Aconitum carmichaelii Debx lateral root ( Radix aconite Lateralis , Sichuan aconite root) and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (springer.com)
  • and root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (bvsalud.org)
  • Glycyrrhiza uralensis, also known as Chinese liquorice, is a flowering plant native to Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using a mouthwash containing Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract may improve bad breath, according to a study. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Glycyrrhiza uralensis can be found growing naturally in Europe, Asia, and throughout the Middle East. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is composed of Citrus unshiu , Glycyrrhiza uralensis , Pinellia ternate , Poria cocos, and Zingiber officinale . (hindawi.com)
  • Diese besteht aus einer definierten Mischung aus 6 Arzneidrogen ( Panax ginseng radix, Atractylodes lancea rhizoma, Poria cocos sclerotium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis radix, Ziziphus jujuba fructus, Zingiber officinale rhizoma). (thieme-connect.de)
  • but the major breakthrough was a Chinese licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza uralensis ) extract. (dentistryiq.com)
  • Using a mouthwash containing Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract may improve bad breath, according to a study. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Did you mean ANGELICA SINENSIS ROOT OR ASTRAGALUS PROPINQUUS ROOT OR CINNAMON OR indium official Root OR GINGER OR glycyrrhizin Uralensis Root OR hernia dulls Fruit OR Jujube fruit OR pena LACTIFLORA ROOT OR Rehmannia Glutinosa Root ? (nih.gov)
  • An LC-MS/MS analysis revealed glycyrrhizic acid and glycosylated forms of isoliquiritigenin and liquiritigenin as major constituents of water and methanol extracts of G. uralensis. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress activities, and differential regulation of Nrf2-mediated genes by tea Chrysanthemum zawadskii (CZ) and licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis (LE) extracts. (nih.gov)
  • Glycyrrhiza uralensis, also known as Chinese liquorice, is a flowering plant native to Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Glycyrrhiza echinata is a PERENNIAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). (pfaf.org)
  • In this study, we investigated the potential of Glycyrrhiza uralensis to counteract amyloid-β toxicity, one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease. (nih.gov)