A nitrovinyl furan used as a schistosomicidal agent and proposed for trypanosomiasis, especially Chagas disease.
Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms (one as a part of the oxadiazole ring and the other as a substituent or part of a larger molecule), which can exist in various isomeric forms and are known for their versatile biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and antitumor properties.
Vinyl compounds, in the context of medical materials, refer to synthetic polymers made from vinyl chloride or vinyl acetate monomers, which are used in the production of various medical devices and supplies such as blood bags, intravenous (IV) bags, tubing, and gloves due to their flexibility, transparency, and resistance to chemicals and heat.
A gas that has been used as an aerosol propellant and is the starting material for polyvinyl resins. Toxicity studies have shown various adverse effects, particularly the occurrence of liver neoplasms.
Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.
A potent nitrofuran derivative tumor initiator. It causes bladder tumors in all animals studied and is mutagenic to many bacteria.
Nitrofurans are a group of synthetic antibacterial agents, characterized by a nitrofuran moiety, that exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, primarily targeting gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in the urinary tract, and are used mainly for the treatment and prevention of lower urinary tract infections.
Thiadiazoles are heterocyclic compounds containing a five-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms and two sulfur atoms, which have been widely studied for their potential therapeutic benefits, including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities.
Quinoxalines are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a benzene fused to a pyrazine ring, which have been studied for their potential antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 3',5'-cyclic GMP and pyrophosphate. It also acts on ITP and dGTP. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.6.1.2.
A diverse group of agents, with unique chemical structures and biochemical requirements, which generate NITRIC OXIDE. These compounds have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and the management of acute myocardial infarction, acute and chronic congestive heart failure, and surgical control of blood pressure. (Adv Pharmacol 1995;34:361-81)
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A subclass of adenosine A2 receptors found in LEUKOCYTES, the SPLEEN, the THYMUS and a variety of other tissues. It is generally considered to be a receptor for ADENOSINE that couples to the GS, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN.
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.
Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.
'Polyvinyls' is a term that refers to a group of polymers synthesized from vinyl chloride, including polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC), which are widely used in various medical applications such as manufacturing of medical devices, tubing, packaging materials, and pharmaceutical containers due to their chemical resistance, durability, and versatility.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
Colorless to yellow dye that is reducible to blue or black formazan crystals by certain cells; formerly used to distinguish between nonbacterial and bacterial diseases, the latter causing neutrophils to reduce the dye; used to confirm diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.
Thiazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a sulfur atom and a nitrogen atom, which are bound by two carbon atoms to form a five-membered ring, and are widely found in various natural and synthetic substances, including some pharmaceuticals and vitamins.
Compounds that selectively bind to and activate ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.
Enzymes which reduce nitro groups (NITRO COMPOUNDS) and other nitrogenous compounds.
Used formerly as antimicrobial food additive. It causes mutations in many cell cultures and may be carcinogenic.
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
A polyvinyl resin used extensively in the manufacture of plastics, including medical devices, tubing, and other packaging. It is also used as a rubber substitute.
Flavoring agent and non-nutritive sweetener.
Triazoles are a class of antifungal drugs that contain a triazole ring in their chemical structure and work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, an essential component of fungal cell membranes, thereby disrupting the integrity and function of the membrane.
A class of cell surface receptors that prefer ADENOSINE to other endogenous PURINES. Purinergic P1 receptors are widespread in the body including the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, and nervous systems. There are at least two pharmacologically distinguishable types (A1 and A2, or Ri and Ra).
Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Compounds that bind to and stimulate PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.
A polymer prepared from polyvinyl acetates by replacement of the acetate groups with hydroxyl groups. It is used as a pharmaceutic aid and ophthalmic lubricant as well as in the manufacture of surface coatings artificial sponges, cosmetics, and other products.
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced mutations independently of the mechanism involved.
Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.
A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. It contains pungent oils and resins. It is used to flavor curries, as a carminative, and as cat and dog repellent. The occasionally used common name of 'giant fennel' should not be confused with true fennel (FOENICULUM).
A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta- aminoethylbenzene which is structurally and pharmacologically related to amphetamine. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A stable adenosine A1 and A2 receptor agonist. Experimentally, it inhibits cAMP and cGMP phosphodiesterase activity.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY PELVIS and KIDNEY CALICES where urine is collected before discharge, but does not involve the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS) where urine is processed.
A 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, which is an explosive chemical that can cause skin irritation and other toxic consequences.
Acrylates are a group of synthetic compounds based on acrylic acid, commonly used in various industrial and medical applications such as adhesives, coatings, and dental materials, known to cause allergic reactions and contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
Purine bases found in body tissues and fluids and in some plants.
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
A thermostable extracellular metalloendopeptidase containing four calcium ions. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) 3.4.24.27.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Compounds with a 5-membered ring of four carbons and an oxygen. They are aromatic heterocycles. The reduced form is tetrahydrofuran.
Inorganic compounds that contain nitrogen as an integral part of the molecule.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
A subtype of ADENOSINE RECEPTOR that is found expressed in a variety of tissues including the BRAIN and DORSAL HORN NEURONS. The receptor is generally considered to be coupled to the GI, INHIBITORY G-PROTEIN which causes down regulation of CYCLIC AMP.
A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
A genus of flagellate EUKARYOTES possessing three long anterior flagella.
Indazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused with a pyrazole ring, and they are used as building blocks in the synthesis of various pharmaceutical drugs.
Toxic chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbons. Include both the 1,1- and 1,2-dichloro isomers. Both isomers are toxic, but 1,1-dichloroethylene is the more potent CNS depressant and hepatotoxin. It is used in the manufacture of thermoplastic polymers.
Antineoplastic agent that is also used as a veterinary anesthetic. It has also been used as an intermediate in organic synthesis. Urethane is suspected to be a carcinogen.

Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms in an alternating sequence. There are three possible isomers of oxadiazole, depending on the position of the nitrogen atom: 1,2,3-oxadiazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole. These compounds have significant interest in medicinal chemistry due to their diverse biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties. Some oxadiazoles also exhibit potential as contrast agents for medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

"Vinyl compounds" is not a term used in medical definitions. It is a term used in chemistry and materials science to refer to a group of chemicals that contain carbon-based molecules with a vinyl group, which is a functional group consisting of a double bond between two carbon atoms, with one of the carbons also being bonded to a hydrogen atom (-CH2=CH-).

Vinyl compounds are used in various industrial and consumer products, including plastics, resins, adhesives, and coatings. Some vinyl compounds, such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), have been used in medical devices and supplies, such as intravenous (IV) bags, tubing, and blood vessel catheters. However, the use of PVC and other vinyl compounds in medical applications has raised concerns about potential health risks due to the release of toxic chemicals, such as phthalates and dioxins, during manufacturing, use, and disposal. Therefore, alternative materials are being developed and used in medical devices and supplies.

Vinyl Chloride is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. It's an organochloride with the formula C2H3Cl, and it's a colorless gas at room temperature that is used primarily in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics.

However, Vinyl Chloride is relevant to medical professionals because exposure to this compound has been linked to an increased risk of a rare form of liver cancer called hepatic angiosarcoma, as well as other health problems such as neurological damage and immune system suppression. Therefore, occupational exposure to Vinyl Chloride is regulated by organizations like the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States.

Nitro compounds, also known as nitro derivatives or nitro aromatics, are organic compounds that contain the nitro group (-NO2) bonded to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. They are named as such because they contain a nitrogen atom in a -3 oxidation state and are typically prepared by the nitration of aromatic compounds using nitric acid or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids.

Nitro compounds have significant importance in organic chemistry due to their versatile reactivity, which allows for various chemical transformations. They can serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of other chemical products, including dyes, pharmaceuticals, and explosives. However, some nitro compounds can also be hazardous, with potential health effects such as skin and respiratory irritation, and they may pose environmental concerns due to their persistence and potential toxicity.

It is important to handle nitro compounds with care, following appropriate safety guidelines and regulations, to minimize risks associated with their use.

I'm not able to find a medical definition for the acronym "FANFT." It is possible that it could be a specialized or obscure term, or perhaps it is used in a specific context within medical research or literature. In general, when searching for medical definitions, it is best to use established and well-known terminology. If "FANFT" is a term you have encountered in your studies or research, I would recommend checking the source material for additional context or reaching out to the author for clarification.

Nitrofurans are a group of synthetic antibacterial agents that have been widely used in the medical field for their antimicrobial properties. The primary use of nitrofurans is to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by susceptible strains of bacteria. Nitrofurantoin is the most commonly prescribed nitrofuran and is available under various brand names, such as Macrobid and Furadantin.

Nitrofurans have a unique mechanism of action that distinguishes them from other antibiotics. They require an aerobic environment with an adequate concentration of oxygen to be effective. Once inside the body, nitrofurans are rapidly metabolized and concentrated in urine, where they exhibit bactericidal activity against various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Enterococci.

The antibacterial action of nitrofurans is attributed to their ability to inhibit essential bacterial enzymes involved in nucleic acid synthesis, energy production, and cell wall biosynthesis. This multifaceted mechanism of action makes it difficult for bacteria to develop resistance against nitrofurans.

Common side effects associated with nitrofurantoin include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Less frequently, patients may experience headaches, dizziness, or skin rashes. In rare cases, nitrofurantoin can cause pulmonary reactions, hepatotoxicity, or peripheral neuropathy.

Due to the potential for adverse effects and the risk of developing drug-resistant bacteria, nitrofurans should only be prescribed when there is a strong clinical indication and susceptibility testing has been performed. Patients with impaired renal function, pregnant women in their third trimester, or those with a history of liver or lung disease may not be suitable candidates for nitrofuran therapy due to the increased risk of adverse reactions.

Thiadiazoles are heterocyclic compounds that contain a five-membered ring consisting of two nitrogen atoms and two sulfur atoms, along with a third non-carbon atom or group. They have the molecular formula N-S-N-C-S. Thiadiazole rings can be found in various pharmaceutical and agrochemical compounds, as they exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer properties. Some well-known thiadiazole derivatives include the drugs furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, and sufasalazine.

Quinoxalines are not a medical term, but rather an organic chemical compound. They are a class of heterocyclic aromatic compounds made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. Quinoxalines have no specific medical relevance, but some of their derivatives have been synthesized and used in medicinal chemistry as antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. They are also used in the production of dyes and pigments.

Guanylate cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which acts as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways. There are two main types of guanylate cyclases: soluble and membrane-bound. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated by nitric oxide, while membrane-bound guanylate cyclase can be activated by natriuretic peptides. The increased levels of cGMP produced by guanylate cyclase can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmitter release, and regulation of ion channels. Dysregulation of guanylate cyclase activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and cancer.

Nitric oxide (NO) donors are pharmacological agents that release nitric oxide in the body when they are metabolized. Nitric oxide is a molecule that plays an important role as a signaling messenger in the cardiovascular, nervous, and immune systems. It helps regulate blood flow, relax smooth muscle, inhibit platelet aggregation, and modulate inflammatory responses.

NO donors can be used medically to treat various conditions, such as hypertension, angina, heart failure, and pulmonary hypertension, by promoting vasodilation and improving blood flow. Some examples of NO donors include nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, sodium nitroprusside, and molsidomine. These drugs work by releasing nitric oxide slowly over time, which then interacts with the enzyme soluble guanylate cyclase to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), leading to relaxation of smooth muscle and vasodilation.

It is important to note that NO donors can have side effects, such as headache, dizziness, and hypotension, due to their vasodilatory effects. Therefore, they should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Adenosine A2A receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the endogenous purine nucleoside, adenosine. It is a subtype of the A2 receptor along with the A2B receptor and is widely distributed throughout the body, particularly in the brain, heart, and immune system.

The A2A receptor plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including modulation of neurotransmission, cardiovascular function, and immune response. In the brain, activation of A2A receptors can have both excitatory and inhibitory effects on neuronal activity, depending on the location and context.

In the heart, A2A receptor activation has a negative chronotropic effect, reducing heart rate, and a negative inotropic effect, decreasing contractility. In the immune system, A2A receptors are involved in regulating inflammation and immune cell function.

Pharmacologically, A2A receptor agonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions, including Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer. Conversely, A2A receptor antagonists have also been studied as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, and addiction.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at A2 receptors. Adenosine is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that acts as a neurotransmitter and has various physiological effects, including vasodilation and inhibition of heart rate.

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists work by binding to A2 receptors and preventing adenosine from activating them. This results in the opposite effect of adenosine, leading to vasoconstriction and increased heart rate. These drugs are used for a variety of medical conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and heart failure.

Examples of Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists include theophylline, caffeine, and some newer drugs such asistradefylline and tozadenant. These drugs have different pharmacological properties and are used for specific medical conditions. It is important to note that adenosine A2 receptor antagonists can have side effects, including restlessness, insomnia, and gastrointestinal symptoms, and should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Antifungal agents are a type of medication used to treat and prevent fungal infections. These agents work by targeting and disrupting the growth of fungi, which include yeasts, molds, and other types of fungi that can cause illness in humans.

There are several different classes of antifungal agents, including:

1. Azoles: These agents work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a key component of fungal cell membranes. Examples of azole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole.
2. Echinocandins: These agents target the fungal cell wall, disrupting its synthesis and leading to fungal cell death. Examples of echinocandins include caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin.
3. Polyenes: These agents bind to ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane, creating pores that lead to fungal cell death. Examples of polyene antifungals include amphotericin B and nystatin.
4. Allylamines: These agents inhibit squalene epoxidase, a key enzyme in ergosterol synthesis. Examples of allylamine antifungals include terbinafine and naftifine.
5. Griseofulvin: This agent disrupts fungal cell division by binding to tubulin, a protein involved in fungal cell mitosis.

Antifungal agents can be administered topically, orally, or intravenously, depending on the severity and location of the infection. It is important to use antifungal agents only as directed by a healthcare professional, as misuse or overuse can lead to resistance and make treatment more difficult.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyvinyls" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to polymers made from vinyl chloride, which is used in the production of various plastics and resins. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT) is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound that is widely used in scientific research and diagnostic tests. It's primarily used as an electron acceptor in various biochemical assays to detect the presence of certain enzymes or reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In a medical context, NBT is often used in the NBT reduction test, which is a diagnostic procedure to identify patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immunodeficiency disorder. In this test, white blood cells called phagocytes from the patient's blood sample are incubated with NBT and a stimulus that triggers their respiratory burst, such as bacterial particles. If the phagocytes can produce superoxide radicals during the respiratory burst, these radicals reduce NBT to form a blue-black insoluble formazan precipitate. In CGD patients, who have impaired production of ROS, there is no or significantly reduced formazan formation, indicating an abnormal NBT reduction test result.

Thiazoles are organic compounds that contain a heterocyclic ring consisting of a nitrogen atom and a sulfur atom, along with two carbon atoms and two hydrogen atoms. They have the chemical formula C3H4NS. Thiazoles are present in various natural and synthetic substances, including some vitamins, drugs, and dyes. In the context of medicine, thiazole derivatives have been developed as pharmaceuticals for their diverse biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, and antihypertensive properties. Some well-known examples include thiazide diuretics (e.g., hydrochlorothiazide) used to treat high blood pressure and edema, and the antidiabetic drug pioglitazone.

Adenosine A2 receptor agonists are pharmaceutical agents that bind to and activate the A2 subtype of adenosine receptors, which are G-protein coupled receptors found in various tissues throughout the body. Activation of these receptors leads to a variety of physiological effects, including vasodilation, increased coronary blood flow, and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

A2 receptor agonists have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in several medical conditions, such as:

1. Heart failure: A2 receptor agonists can improve cardiac function and reduce symptoms in patients with heart failure by increasing coronary blood flow and reducing oxygen demand.
2. Atrial fibrillation: These agents have been shown to terminate or prevent atrial fibrillation, a common abnormal heart rhythm disorder, through their effects on the electrical properties of cardiac cells.
3. Asthma and COPD: A2 receptor agonists can help relax airway smooth muscle and reduce inflammation in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
4. Pain management: Some A2 receptor agonists have been found to have analgesic properties, making them potential candidates for pain relief in various clinical settings.

Examples of A2 receptor agonists include regadenoson, which is used as a pharmacological stress agent during myocardial perfusion imaging, and dipyridamole, which is used to prevent blood clots in patients with certain heart conditions. However, it's important to note that these agents can have side effects, such as hypotension, bradycardia, and bronchoconstriction, so their use must be carefully monitored and managed by healthcare professionals.

Nitroreductases are a group of enzymes that can reduce nitro groups (-NO2) to nitroso groups (-NHOH) or amino groups (-NH2) in various organic compounds. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and found in many different types of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals.

In medicine, nitroreductases have been studied for their potential role in the activation of certain drugs or prodrugs. For example, some anticancer agents such as CB1954 (also known as 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide) are relatively inert until they are reduced by nitroreductases to more reactive metabolites that can interact with DNA and other cellular components. This property has been exploited in the development of targeted cancer therapies that selectively deliver prodrugs to tumor cells, where they can be activated by endogenous nitroreductases to kill the cancer cells while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues.

Nitroreductases have also been implicated in the development of bacterial resistance to certain antibiotics, such as metronidazole and nitrofurantoin. These drugs are activated by nitroreductases in bacteria, but overexpression or mutation of the enzyme can lead to reduced drug activation and increased resistance.

Furylfuramide is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in research and industry. It's a type of antimicrobial agent known as an nitrofuran derivative. However, it is not commonly used in clinical medicine due to concerns about its potential toxicity and the development of resistance in bacteria.

In a medical context, Furylfuramide might be mentioned in relation to laboratory research or in discussions of historical uses of antimicrobial agents. It's important to note that the use of this compound in medicine is not widespread and has largely been replaced by other more effective and safer treatments.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical drugs that block the activity of purinergic P1 receptors, which are a type of G-protein coupled receptor found in many tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated by extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine and ATP, and play important roles in regulating a variety of physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, neurotransmission, and immune response.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists work by binding to these receptors and preventing them from being activated by nucleotides. This can have various therapeutic effects, depending on the specific receptor subtype that is targeted. For example, A1 receptor antagonists have been shown to improve cardiac function in heart failure, while A2A receptor antagonists have potential as anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents.

However, it's important to note that the use of purinergic P1 receptor antagonists is still an area of active research, and more studies are needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyvinyl Chloride" (PVC) is not a medical term. It is a type of synthetic plastic polymer material. PVC is commonly used in various industrial, commercial, and consumer products, such as pipes, cable insulation, clothing, and inflatable items.

If you have any medical concerns or questions, please provide them, and I would be happy to help you find a relevant answer.

Saccharin is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that is widely used as an artificial sweetener. Medically speaking, saccharin is classified as an intense sugar substitute, meaning it is many times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar) but contributes little to no calories when added to food or drink.

Saccharin is often used by people with diabetes or those who are trying to reduce their calorie intake. It has been in use for over a century and has undergone extensive safety testing. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified saccharin as generally recognized as safe (GRAS), although it once required a warning label due to concerns about bladder cancer. However, subsequent research has largely dismissed this risk for most people, and the warning label is no longer required.

It's important to note that while saccharin and other artificial sweeteners can be helpful for some individuals, they should not be used as a replacement for a balanced diet and regular exercise. Additionally, excessive consumption of these sugar substitutes may have negative health consequences, such as altering gut bacteria or contributing to metabolic disorders.

Triazoles are a class of antifungal medications that have broad-spectrum activity against various fungi, including yeasts, molds, and dermatophytes. They work by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, an essential component of fungal cell membranes, leading to increased permeability and disruption of fungal growth. Triazoles are commonly used in both systemic and topical formulations for the treatment of various fungal infections, such as candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and dermatophytoses. Some examples of triazole antifungals include fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole.

Purinergic P1 receptors are a type of G-protein coupled receptor that bind to nucleotides such as adenosine. These receptors are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including modulation of neurotransmitter release, cardiovascular function, and immune response. There are four subtypes of P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that have different signaling pathways and functions. Activation of these receptors can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition or stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, changes in intracellular calcium levels, and activation of various protein kinases. They play important roles in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, and immune system.

Triazines are not a medical term, but a class of chemical compounds. They have a six-membered ring containing three nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms. Some triazine derivatives are used in medicine as herbicides, antimicrobials, and antitumor agents.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Purinergic P1 receptor agonists are substances that bind to and activate purinergic P1 receptors, which are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in many tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated by endogenous nucleotides such as adenosine and its metabolites.

Purinergic P1 receptors include four subtypes: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Each of these subtypes has distinct signaling pathways and physiological roles. For example, A1 receptor activation can lead to vasodilation, bradycardia, and anti-inflammatory effects, while A2A receptor activation can increase cyclic AMP levels and have anti-inflammatory effects.

Purinergic P1 receptor agonists are used in various therapeutic applications, including as cardiovascular drugs, antiplatelet agents, and anti-inflammatory agents. Some examples of purinergic P1 receptor agonists include adenosine, regadenoson, and dipyridamole.

It's important to note that the use of these substances should be under medical supervision due to their potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyvinyl Alcohol" is not a medical term. It is a chemical compound used in various industrial and commercial applications, including the production of adhesives, paints, and medical devices. Polyvinyl Alcohol is a type of synthetic polymer made from the polymerization of vinyl acetate monomer, followed by alcoholysis to replace the acetate groups with hydroxyl groups.

In a medical context, Polyvinyl Alcohol might be used in certain medical devices or applications, such as contact lenses, eye drops, and drug delivery systems, due to its biocompatibility and resistance to protein absorption. However, it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Antimutagenic agents are substances that prevent or reduce the frequency of mutations in DNA, which can be caused by various factors such as radiation, chemicals, and free radicals. These agents work by preventing the formation of mutations or by repairing the damage already done to the DNA. They can be found naturally in foods, such as antioxidants, or they can be synthesized in a laboratory. Antimutagenic agents have potential use in cancer prevention and treatment, as well as in reducing the negative effects of environmental mutagens.

Urinary Bladder Neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the urinary bladder, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant neoplasms can be further classified into various types of bladder cancer, such as urothelial carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. These malignant tumors often invade surrounding tissues and organs, potentially spreading to other parts of the body (metastasis), which can lead to serious health consequences if not detected and treated promptly and effectively.

"Ferula" is a term that has different meanings and uses in various scientific contexts, but it is not commonly used as a medical term. In botany, "Ferula" is the name of a genus of plants that includes the giant fennel, which can grow to be quite large.

However, you may be thinking of the term "ferrule," which is sometimes used in a medical context. A ferrule is a small piece of metal or plastic that is used to reinforce or protect the end of a device or tool. In medicine, ferrules are sometimes used on the ends of walking canes or crutches to provide extra support and prevent wear and tear.

It's possible that there may be other contexts in which the term "ferula" is used in a medical sense, but it is not a widely used or well-known term in this field.

Phenethylamines are a class of organic compounds that share a common structural feature, which is a phenethyl group (a phenyl ring bonded to an ethylamine chain). In the context of pharmacology and neuroscience, "phenethylamines" often refers to a specific group of psychoactive drugs, including stimulants like amphetamine and mescaline, a classic psychedelic. These compounds exert their effects by modulating the activity of neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. It is important to note that many phenethylamines have potential for abuse and are controlled substances.

Pyelitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of the renal pelvis, which is the part of the kidney where urine collects before flowing into the ureter. Pyelitis can occur as a result of a bacterial infection, and it is often associated with pyelonephritis, which is an inflammation of the kidney tissue itself.

The symptoms of pyelitis may include fever, chills, flank pain, nausea, vomiting, and frequent or painful urination. The condition can be diagnosed through a variety of tests, including urinalysis, urine culture, and imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to eliminate the underlying infection, as well as supportive care to manage any symptoms.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you experience symptoms of pyelitis, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications, including kidney damage and sepsis.

Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with the formula C6H2(NO2)3CH3. It is a yellow, odorless solid that is used as an explosive. It is not a substance that would be encountered in a medical context, unless discussing topics such as military injuries or environmental exposures.

Acrylates are a group of chemical compounds that are derived from acrylic acid. They are commonly used in various industrial and commercial applications, including the production of plastics, resins, paints, and adhesives. In the medical field, acrylates are sometimes used in the formation of dental restorations, such as fillings and dentures, due to their strong bonding properties and durability.

However, it is important to note that some people may have allergic reactions or sensitivities to acrylates, which can cause skin irritation, allergic contact dermatitis, or other adverse effects. Therefore, medical professionals must use caution when working with these materials and ensure that patients are informed of any potential risks associated with their use.

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that is composed of a sugar (ribose) and the base adenine. It plays several important roles in the body, including serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other molecules such as ATP, NAD+, and RNA.

In the medical context, adenosine is perhaps best known for its use as a pharmaceutical agent to treat certain cardiac arrhythmias. When administered intravenously, it can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) by slowing conduction through the atrioventricular node and interrupting the reentry circuit responsible for the arrhythmia.

Adenosine can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between narrow-complex tachycardias of supraventricular origin and those that originate from below the ventricles (such as ventricular tachycardia). This is because adenosine will typically terminate PSVT but not affect the rhythm of VT.

It's worth noting that adenosine has a very short half-life, lasting only a few seconds in the bloodstream. This means that its effects are rapidly reversible and generally well-tolerated, although some patients may experience transient symptoms such as flushing, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Xanthines are a type of natural alkaloids that are found in various plants, including tea leaves, cocoa beans, and mate. The most common xanthines are caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. These compounds have stimulant effects on the central nervous system and are often used in medication to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory issues.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed xanthine and is found in a variety of beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. It works by blocking adenosine receptors in the brain, which can lead to increased alertness and reduced feelings of fatigue.

Theophylline is another xanthine that is used as a bronchodilator to treat asthma and other respiratory conditions. It works by relaxing smooth muscles in the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Theobromine is found in cocoa beans and is responsible for the stimulant effects of chocolate. While it has similar properties to caffeine and theophylline, it is less potent and has a milder effect on the body.

It's worth noting that while xanthines can have beneficial effects when used in moderation, they can also cause negative side effects such as insomnia, nervousness, and rapid heart rate if consumed in large quantities or over an extended period of time.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Thermolysin is not a medical term per se, but it is a bacterial enzyme that is often used in biochemistry and molecular biology research. Here's the scientific or biochemical definition:

Thermolysin is a zinc metalloprotease enzyme produced by the bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus. It has an optimum temperature for activity at around 65°C, and it can remain active in high temperatures, which makes it useful in various industrial applications. Thermolysin is known for its ability to cleave peptide bonds, particularly those involving hydrophobic residues, making it a valuable tool in protein research and engineering.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

Hemangiosarcoma is a type of cancer that arises from the cells that line the blood vessels (endothelial cells). It most commonly affects middle-aged to older dogs, but it can also occur in cats and other animals, as well as rarely in humans.

This cancer can develop in various parts of the body, including the skin, heart, spleen, liver, and lungs. Hemangiosarcomas of the skin tend to be more benign and have a better prognosis than those that arise internally.

Hemangiosarcomas are highly invasive and often metastasize (spread) to other organs, making them difficult to treat. The exact cause of hemangiosarcoma is not known, but exposure to certain chemicals, radiation, and viruses may increase the risk of developing this cancer. Treatment options typically include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy, depending on the location and stage of the tumor.

Furans are not a medical term, but a class of organic compounds that contain a four-membered ring with four atoms, usually carbon and oxygen. They can be found in some foods and have been used in the production of certain industrial chemicals. Some furan derivatives have been identified as potentially toxic or carcinogenic, but the effects of exposure to these substances depend on various factors such as the level and duration of exposure.

In a medical context, furans may be mentioned in relation to environmental exposures, food safety, or occupational health. For example, some studies have suggested that high levels of exposure to certain furan compounds may increase the risk of liver damage or cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of these substances.

It's worth noting that furans are not a specific medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a class of chemical compounds with potential health implications. If you have concerns about exposure to furans or other environmental chemicals, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and recommendations.

Nitrogen compounds are chemical substances that contain nitrogen, which is a non-metal in group 15 of the periodic table. Nitrogen forms compounds with many other elements due to its ability to form multiple bonds, including covalent bonds with hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, and halogens.

Nitrogen can exist in several oxidation states, ranging from -3 to +5, which leads to a wide variety of nitrogen compounds with different properties and uses. Some common examples of nitrogen compounds include:

* Ammonia (NH3), a colorless gas with a pungent odor, used in fertilizers, cleaning products, and refrigeration systems.
* Nitric acid (HNO3), a strong mineral acid used in the production of explosives, dyes, and fertilizers.
* Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), a white crystalline solid used as a fertilizer and explosive ingredient.
* Hydrazine (N2H4), a colorless liquid with a strong odor, used as a rocket fuel and reducing agent.
* Nitrous oxide (N2O), a colorless gas used as an anesthetic and laughing gas in dental procedures.

Nitrogen compounds have many important applications in various industries, such as agriculture, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and energy production. However, some nitrogen compounds can also be harmful or toxic to humans and the environment if not handled properly.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Adenosine A1 receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine. When activated, it inhibits the production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the cell by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. This results in various physiological effects, such as decreased heart rate and reduced force of heart contractions, increased potassium conductance, and decreased calcium currents. The Adenosine A1 receptor is widely distributed throughout the body, including the brain, heart, kidneys, and other organs. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including cardiovascular function, neuroprotection, and inflammation.

The urinary bladder is a muscular, hollow organ in the pelvis that stores urine before it is released from the body. It expands as it fills with urine and contracts when emptying. The typical adult bladder can hold between 400 to 600 milliliters of urine for about 2-5 hours before the urge to urinate occurs. The wall of the bladder contains several layers, including a mucous membrane, a layer of smooth muscle (detrusor muscle), and an outer fibrous adventitia. The muscles of the bladder neck and urethra remain contracted to prevent leakage of urine during filling, and they relax during voiding to allow the urine to flow out through the urethra.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "perfume" is not a term that has a medical definition. Perfumes are fragranced products used primarily for personal grooming and aesthetic purposes. They consist of a mixture of essential oils or aroma compounds, fixatives, and solvents.

Perfumes can sometimes cause allergic reactions or irritations in some individuals, leading to symptoms such as skin rashes, itching, or sneezing. In such cases, people might consult with healthcare professionals for advice on avoiding specific fragrances or managing related allergies. However, the term "perfume" itself is not a medical concept and does not have a medical definition.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Tritrichomonas is a genus of protozoan parasites that are commonly found in the digestive tracts of various animals, including humans. The most well-known species is Tritrichomonas foetus, which is a significant pathogen in cattle, causing a venereal disease known as bovine trichomoniasis.

In humans, Tritrichomonas vaginalis is the species that is associated with infection, specifically in the urogenital tract of women. It can cause a condition called trichomoniasis, which is typically characterized by vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) and discharge. However, it's important to note that many people infected with T. vaginalis are asymptomatic, and the infection can sometimes lead to more severe complications such as preterm labor or premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy.

Tritrichomonas species are characterized by having three flagella at the anterior end and one at the posterior end, which they use for movement. They are usually transmitted through direct contact with infected individuals or contaminated fomites. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent the spread of infection and potential complications.

Indazoles are not a medical term, but a chemical classification. They refer to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a indazole moiety, which is a benzene ring fused with a diazole ring. Indazoles have no specific medical relevance, but certain derivatives of indazoles have been developed and used as drugs in medicine, particularly in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. For example, Tadalafil (Cialis), a medication used to treat erectile dysfunction and benign prostatic hyperplasia, is a selective inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 and has an indazole structure.

Dichloroethylenes are a group of chemical compounds that contain two chlorine atoms and two hydrogen atoms bonded to a pair of carbon atoms. The two carbon atoms are arranged in a double-bonded configuration, resulting in a geometric isomerism known as cis-trans isomerism.

Therefore, there are two main types of dichloroethylenes:

1. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene (also known as (Z)-1,2-dichloroethylene): This is a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor. It is used as a solvent and in the production of other chemicals.
2. trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (also known as (E)-1,2-dichloroethylene): This is also a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor. It is used as a refrigerant, solvent, and in the production of other chemicals.

Both cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylenes can be harmful if ingested, inhaled, or come into contact with the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the liver and kidneys.

Urethane is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, in the field of chemistry and pharmacology, urethane is an ethyl carbamate ester which has been used as a general anesthetic. It is rarely used today due to its potential carcinogenic properties and the availability of safer alternatives.

In the context of materials science, polyurethanes are a class of polymers that contain urethane linkages (-NH-CO-O-) in their main chain. They are widely used in various applications such as foam insulation, coatings, adhesives, and medical devices due to their versatile properties like flexibility, durability, and resistance to abrasion.

... oxadiazoles MeSH D03.383.129.462.580.200 - 5-amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D03.383.129.462.580.400 - 4 ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D03.383.312.649.290 - fanft MeSH D03.383.312.649.308 - furagin MeSH D03.383.312.649.313 - ... alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid MeSH D03.383.129.385.162 - cycloserine MeSH D03.383.129.385.231 - ... 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-8-chloro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1h-3-benzazepin-7-ol MeSH D03.438.079.800 - 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1- ...
... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D02.640.600.290 - fanft MeSH D02.640.600.308 - furagin MeSH D02.640.600.313 - furazolidone MeSH ... vinyl compounds MeSH D02.455.326.271.884.533 - polyvinyls MeSH D02.455.326.271.884.533.532 - polyvinyl alcohol MeSH D02.455. ... vinyl chloride MeSH D02.455.326.397 - alkynes MeSH D02.455.326.397.259 - acetylene MeSH D02.455.326.397.300 - carbocyanines ... vinyl chloride MeSH D02.455.526.510 - hydrocarbons, fluorinated MeSH D02.455.526.510.140 - chlorofluorocarbons MeSH D02.455. ...
... amino]-2-imidazolidinone N-[4-(5-Nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]acetamide Nitrogen mustard N-oxide Nitromethane 2-Nitropropane 4- ... vinyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole 2,6-Xylidine (2,6-Dimethylaniline) Dimethylarsinic acid 3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine (o-Tolidine) 1,1- ... amino]-2-oxazolidinone β-Myrcene Nafenopin Naphthalene Nickel, metallic and alloys Niridazole Nitrilotriacetic acid and its ... Trypan blue Uracil mustard Vanadium pentoxide Vinyl acetate 4-Vinylcyclohexene 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide Zalcitabine ...
... oxadiazoles MeSH D03.383.129.462.580.200 - 5-amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D03.383.129.462.580.400 - 4 ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D03.383.312.649.290 - fanft MeSH D03.383.312.649.308 - furagin MeSH D03.383.312.649.313 - ... alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid MeSH D03.383.129.385.162 - cycloserine MeSH D03.383.129.385.231 - ... 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-8-chloro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1h-3-benzazepin-7-ol MeSH D03.438.079.800 - 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1- ...
D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole. D03 - HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS. Bay-K-8644. 3-Pyridinecarboxylic acid, 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro- ... 4-(3-Butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. Ro 4-1284. 2H-Benzo(a)quinolizin-2-ol 2-Ethyl-1,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-3- ... Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoprotein. Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoproteins. Tissue Inhibitor of-Metalloproteinase-3. ...
D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole. D03 - HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS. Bay-K-8644. 3-Pyridinecarboxylic acid, 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro- ... 4-(3-Butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. Ro 4-1284. 2H-Benzo(a)quinolizin-2-ol 2-Ethyl-1,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-3- ... Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoprotein. Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoproteins. Tissue Inhibitor of-Metalloproteinase-3. ...
D12 - AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES, AND PROTEINS. Adaptor Proteins. Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport. ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole. D03 - HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS. Bay-K-8644. 3-Pyridinecarboxylic acid, 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro- ... 4-(3-Butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. Ro 4-1284. 2H-Benzo(a)quinolizin-2-ol 2-Ethyl-1,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-3- ... Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoprotein. Pregnancy-Specific beta 1-Glycoproteins. Tissue Inhibitor of-Metalloproteinase-3. ...
Nitro Compounds [D02.640] * Nitrofurans [D02.640.600] * 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D02.640.600.200] ... amino)-. Date Established. 1966/01/01. Date of Entry. 1999/01/01. Revision Date. 2016/05/31. ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D03.383.312.649.200] ...
3 PACK OF BLADES FOR THE PRICE OF 2! Cut brick, block, concrete pavers, concrete surfaces, roof tiles, and more. Laser welded ... Vinyl cyclohexenedioxide),Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide (4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexene diepoxide),Vinyl fluoride,"Vinylidene chloride ,(1,1 ... nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine,N-Methylolacrylamide,N-Methylpyrrolidone,à-Methyl styrene (alpha-Methylstyrene),à-Methyl styrene ... amino]-2-oxazolidinone, MX (3-chloro-4-dichloromethyl-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone),Myclobutanil,beta-Myrcene,Nabam,Nafarelin ...
VINYL SULFIDE ANION AN11A : TETRAZOLE ANION AN12A : DEPROTONATED VINYLAMINE ANION HL11A : CYCLOPROPYL FLUORIDE HL13A : VINYL ... 7-AMINO-1H-PYRAZOLO(4,3-D)PYRIMIDIN-3-YL)-1,4-ANHY FUHFAP : N,N-DIMETHOXYAMINE (AT -120 DEG.C) FUHSEG : 1-CYANO-1-NITRO-2- ... 2S)-6-(1,2-DIHYDROXYPROPYL)-5,6,7,8-TETRAHYDROPT DIYPUW : 1,1-CARBONYL-BIS(AZIRIDINE) (AT -105 DEG.C) DIZPUX : (1R)-2-ACETYL ... 9-NITRO-7-TRIFLUOROMETHYLPYRIDO(1,2-A)BENZIMIDAZOLE (AT 123 FAZBAJ : POTASSIUM 1,1-DICYANO-3-THIA-BUT-1-EN-2-OLATE FAZKUM : ...
Vinyl cyclohexenedioxide),Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide (4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexene diepoxide),Vinyl fluoride,"Vinylidene chloride ,(1,1 ... nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine,N-Methylolacrylamide,N-Methylpyrrolidone,à-Methyl styrene (alpha-Methylstyrene),à-Methyl styrene ... amino]-2-oxazolidinone, MX (3-chloro-4-dichloromethyl-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone),Myclobutanil,beta-Myrcene,Nabam,Nafarelin ... Vinyl bromide,Vinyl chloride,4-Vinylcyclohexene,4-Vinylcyclohexene,4-Vinyl-1-cyclohexene diepoxide ( ...
Wherein thienyl, furyl, phenanthrolinyl and the like are heteroaryls of a single aromatic ring system, and N-arylcarbazolyl, N- ... The host material of the organic light-emitting layer 330 may be a metal chelate compound, a diphenyl-vinyl derivative, an ... For example, at least one hydrogen atom is substituted by a deuterium atom, F, Cl, I, CN, hydroxyl, nitro, branched alkyl, ... oxadiazole derivatives, quinoxaline derivatives or other electron transport materials, which is not specially limited in the ...
... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole 5-Aminolevulinate Synthetase ... 3-Methylindole use Skatole 3-O-Methyl-D-Glucose use 3-O- ... 2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose use Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 2H-Benzo(a)quinolizin-2-ol, 2-Ethyl-1,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-3-isobutyl-9,10- ... 2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric Acid use 2-Amino-5-phosphonovalerate 2-Amino-6-(1,2,3-trihydroxypropyl)-4(3H)-pteridinone use ... 3-Deoxyarabinoheptulosonate-7-Phosphate Synthetase use 3-Deoxy-7-Phosphoheptulonate Synthase 3 End Processing, RNA use RNA 3 ...
Oxadiazoles (1972-1974). Vinyl Compounds (1972-1974). Public MeSH Note. 2005; see SQ-19506 1991-2004; see NITROFURANS 1975-1990 ... Nitro Compounds [D02.640] * Nitrofurans [D02.640.600] * 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D02.640.600.200] ... Oxadiazoles [D03.383.129.462.580] * 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D03.383.129.462.580.200] ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole Preferred Term Term UI T038727. Date09/09/1983. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK (19XX). ...
Oxadiazoles (1972-1974). Vinyl Compounds (1972-1974). Public MeSH Note. 2005; see SQ-19506 1991-2004; see NITROFURANS 1975-1990 ... Nitro Compounds [D02.640] * Nitrofurans [D02.640.600] * 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D02.640.600.200] ... Oxadiazoles [D03.383.129.462.580] * 5-Amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole [D03.383.129.462.580.200] ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole Preferred Term Term UI T038727. Date09/09/1983. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK (19XX). ...
Mustard Compounds N0000008156 Phosphorus Compounds N0000008159 Nitro Compounds N0000008171 Bicyclo Compounds N0000008194 Vinyl ... L N0000169799 Amino Acid Transport Systems N0000169809 Amino Acid Transport Systems, Acidic N0000169804 Amino Acid Transport ... Oxadiazoles N0000167102 Sydnones N0000167103 Molsidomine N0000167104 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan N0000167105 Fura-2 ... Acidic N0000011248 Amino Acids, Aromatic N0000011332 Amino Acids, Basic N0000007702 Amino Acids, Branched-Chain N0000168578 ...
D9.408.51.476.60 Amino Acid Motifs G6.184.580.709.600.40 G6.184.603.790.709.600.40 Amino Sugars D9.203.67 D9.67 Aminoglycosides ... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole) src Homology Domains G6.184.580.709.610.800 G6.184.603.790.709.610.800 Starch D9.203.698.365.855 ... D9.400.420.800 RNA 3 End Processing G6.535.839.225 RNA Editing G6.535.839.250 RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional G6.535.839 ... 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-, Methyl ester) Bears B1.150.900.649.147.125 B1.150.900.649. ...
... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole S1P Receptor use Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptors ... SAP Kinase 3 use Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 12 SAP Kinase Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase Kinase 1 use MAP Kinase ... SAP Kinase-3 use Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 12 SAP Kinase-Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Kinase 1 use MAP Kinase ... S-(N-(3-Aminopropyl)-2-aminoethyl)thiophosphoric Acid use Amifostine S-100 Calcium-Binding Protein beta Subunit use S100 ...
... vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole 5-Aminolevulinate Synthetase ... 3-Methylindole use Skatole 3-O-Methyl-D-Glucose use 3-O- ... 2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric Acid use 2-Amino-5-phosphonovalerate 2-Amino-6-(1,2,3-trihydroxypropyl)-4(3H)-pteridinone use ... 2-Dehydro-3-Deoxyphosphoheptonate Aldolase use 3-Deoxy-7-Phosphoheptulonate Synthase 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose use ... 2,6-Dichlorophenolindophenol use 2,6-Dichloroindophenol 3 beta-Hydroxy-delta-5-Steroid Dehydrogenase use Progesterone Reductase ...

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