A non-penetrating amino reagent (commonly called SITS) which acts as an inhibitor of anion transport in erythrocytes and other cells.
An inhibitor of anion conductance including band 3-mediated anion transport.
A class of organic compounds that contains a naphthalene moiety linked to a sulfonic acid salt or ester.
A subclass of purinergic P2 receptors that signal by means of a ligand-gated ion channel. They are comprised of three P2X subunits which can be identical (homotrimeric form) or dissimilar (heterotrimeric form).
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2 RECEPTORS.
This is the active form of VITAMIN B 6 serving as a coenzyme for synthesis of amino acids, neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine), sphingolipids, aminolevulinic acid. During transamination of amino acids, pyridoxal phosphate is transiently converted into pyridoxamine phosphate (PYRIDOXAMINE).
A class of cell surface receptors for PURINES that prefer ATP or ADP over ADENOSINE. P2 purinergic receptors are widespread in the periphery and in the central and peripheral nervous system.
A polyanionic compound with an unknown mechanism of action. It is used parenterally in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis and it has been used clinically with diethylcarbamazine to kill the adult Onchocerca. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1643) It has also been shown to have potent antineoplastic properties.
A colorimetric reagent for iron, manganese, titanium, molybdenum, and complexes of zirconium. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.
Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
One of the CEPHALOSPORINS that has a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.
The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.
Derivatives of acetamide that are used as solvents, as mild irritants, and in organic synthesis.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
The N-acetyl derivative of galactosamine.
Spectrophotometry in the infrared region, usually for the purpose of chemical analysis through measurement of absorption spectra associated with rotational and vibrational energy levels of molecules. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The N-acetyl derivative of glucosamine.
Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the opposite direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.
The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.

4-Acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid is a chemical compound that is often used in research and scientific studies. It is a type of stilbene derivative, which is a class of compounds characterized by the presence of a central double bond flanked by two phenyl rings.

In this particular compound, one of the phenyl rings has been substituted with an acetamido group (-NH-C(=O)CH3), while the other phenyl ring has been substituted with an isothiocyanato group (-N=C=S) and two sulfonic acid groups (-SO3H).

The compound is often used as a fluorescent probe in biochemical and cellular studies, as it exhibits strong fluorescence when bound to certain proteins or other biological molecules. It can be used to study the interactions between these molecules and to investigate their structure and function.

It's important to note that this compound is not approved for medical use in humans and should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting.

'4,4'-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-Disulfonic Acid' is a chemical compound that is often used in research and scientific studies. Its molecular formula is C14H10N2O6S2. This compound is a derivative of stilbene, which is a type of organic compound that consists of two phenyl rings joined by a ethylene bridge. In '4,4'-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-Disulfonic Acid', the hydrogen atoms on the carbon atoms of the ethylene bridge have been replaced with isothiocyanate groups (-N=C=S), and the phenyl rings have been sulfonated (introduction of a sulfuric acid group, -SO3H) to increase its water solubility.

This compound is often used as a fluorescent probe in biochemical and cell biological studies due to its ability to form covalent bonds with primary amines, such as those found on proteins. This property allows researchers to label and track specific proteins or to measure the concentration of free primary amines in a sample.

It is important to note that '4,4'-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-Disulfonic Acid' is a hazardous chemical and should be handled with care, using appropriate personal protective equipment and safety measures.

Naphthalenesulfonates are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a naphthalene ring, which is a bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, substituted with one or more sulfonate groups. Sulfonates are salts or esters of sulfuric acid. Naphthalenesulfonates are commonly used as detergents, dyes, and research chemicals.

In the medical field, naphthalenesulfonates may be used in diagnostic tests to detect certain enzyme activities or metabolic disorders. For example, 1-naphthyl sulfate is a substrate for the enzyme arylsulfatase A, which is deficient in individuals with the genetic disorder metachromatic leukodystrophy. By measuring the activity of this enzyme using 1-naphthyl sulfate as a substrate, doctors can diagnose or monitor the progression of this disease.

It's worth noting that some naphthalenesulfonates have been found to have potential health hazards and environmental concerns. For instance, sodium naphthalenesulfonate has been classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Therefore, their use should be handled with caution and in accordance with established safety protocols.

Purinergic P2X receptors are a type of ligand-gated ion channel that are activated by the binding of extracellular ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and other purinergic agonists. These receptors play important roles in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, pain perception, and immune response.

P2X receptors are composed of three subunits that form a functional ion channel. There are seven different subunits (P2X1-7) that can assemble to form homo- or heterotrimeric receptor complexes with distinct functional properties.

Upon activation by ATP, P2X receptors undergo conformational changes that allow for the flow of cations, such as calcium (Ca^2+^), sodium (Na^+^), and potassium (K^+^) ions, across the cell membrane. This ion flux can lead to a variety of downstream signaling events, including the activation of second messenger systems and changes in gene expression.

Purinergic P2X receptors have been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including chronic pain, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. As such, they are an active area of research for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

Purinergic P2 receptor antagonists are pharmaceutical agents that block the activity of P2 receptors, which are a type of cell surface receptor that binds extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and ADP. These receptors play important roles in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, inflammation, and platelet aggregation.

P2 receptors are divided into two main subfamilies: P2X and P2Y. The P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane upon activation, while the P2Y receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that activate intracellular signaling pathways.

Purinergic P2 receptor antagonists are used in clinical medicine to treat various conditions, such as chronic pain, urinary incontinence, and cardiovascular diseases. For example, the P2X3 receptor antagonist gefapixant is being investigated for the treatment of refractory chronic cough, while the P2Y12 receptor antagonists clopidogrel and ticagrelor are used to prevent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Overall, purinergic P2 receptor antagonists offer a promising therapeutic approach for various diseases by targeting specific receptors involved in pathological processes.

Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) is the active form of vitamin B6 and functions as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions in the human body. It plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and neurotransmitters. Pyridoxal phosphate is involved in more than 140 different enzyme-catalyzed reactions, making it one of the most versatile cofactors in human biochemistry.

As a cofactor, pyridoxal phosphate helps enzymes carry out their functions by facilitating chemical transformations in substrates (the molecules on which enzymes act). In particular, PLP is essential for transamination, decarboxylation, racemization, and elimination reactions involving amino acids. These processes are vital for the synthesis and degradation of amino acids, neurotransmitters, hemoglobin, and other crucial molecules in the body.

Pyridoxal phosphate is formed from the conversion of pyridoxal (a form of vitamin B6) by the enzyme pyridoxal kinase, using ATP as a phosphate donor. The human body obtains vitamin B6 through dietary sources such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, nuts, and animal products like poultry, fish, and pork. It is essential to maintain adequate levels of pyridoxal phosphate for optimal enzymatic function and overall health.

Purinergic P2 receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to purine nucleotides and nucleosides, such as ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and ADP (adenosine diphosphate), and mediate various physiological responses. These receptors are divided into two main families: P2X and P2Y.

P2X receptors are ionotropic receptors, meaning they form ion channels that allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane upon activation. There are seven subtypes of P2X receptors (P2X1-7), each with distinct functional and pharmacological properties.

P2Y receptors, on the other hand, are metabotropic receptors, meaning they activate intracellular signaling pathways through G proteins. There are eight subtypes of P2Y receptors (P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y12, P2Y13, and P2Y14), each with different G protein coupling specificities and downstream signaling pathways.

Purinergic P2 receptors are widely expressed in various tissues, including the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, and immune system. They play important roles in regulating physiological functions such as neurotransmission, vasodilation, platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and inflammation. Dysregulation of purinergic P2 receptors has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including pain, ischemia, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Suramin is a medication that has been used for the treatment of African sleeping sickness, which is caused by trypanosomes. It works as a reverse-specific protein kinase CK inhibitor and also blocks the attachment of the parasite to the host cells. Suramin is not absorbed well from the gastrointestinal tract and is administered intravenously.

It should be noted that Suramin is an experimental treatment for other conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, viral infections and autoimmune diseases, but it's still under investigation and has not been approved by FDA for those uses.

1,2-Dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid disodium salt is a chemical compound with the formula Na2C6H4O6S2. It is also known as pyrocatechol-3,5-disulfonic acid disodium salt or sodium salt of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid.

This compound is a white crystalline powder that is soluble in water and has a variety of uses in the chemical industry. It can be used as a reducing agent, a chelating agent, and a developer in photographic processes. It may also have potential applications in the medical field, such as in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning, although more research is needed to confirm its effectiveness and safety for this use.

It's important to note that while 1,2-Dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid disodium salt may have various applications, it should be handled with care and used under appropriate conditions, as with any chemical compound.

Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are derived from the fungus Acremonium, originally isolated from seawater and cow dung. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillin and share a common four-membered beta-lactam ring in their molecular structure.

Cephalosporins work by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, which ultimately leads to bacterial death. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, meaning they are effective against a wide range of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

There are several generations of cephalosporins, each with different spectra of activity and pharmacokinetic properties. The first generation cephalosporins have a narrow spectrum of activity and are primarily used to treat infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Second-generation cephalosporins have an expanded spectrum of activity that includes some Gram-negative organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Third-generation cephalosporins have even broader spectra of activity and are effective against many resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Fourth-generation cephalosporins have activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. They are often reserved for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Cephalosporins are generally well tolerated, but like penicillin, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Cross-reactivity between cephalosporins and penicillin is estimated to occur in 5-10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Other potential adverse effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea), neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity.

Stilbenes are a type of chemical compound that consists of a 1,2-diphenylethylene backbone. They are phenolic compounds and can be found in various plants, where they play a role in the defense against pathogens and stress conditions. Some stilbenes have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. One well-known example of a stilbene is resveratrol, which is found in the skin of grapes and in red wine.

It's important to note that while some stilbenes have been shown to have potential health benefits in laboratory studies, more research is needed to determine their safety and effectiveness in humans. It's always a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Chlorides are simple inorganic ions consisting of a single chlorine atom bonded to a single charged hydrogen ion (H+). Chloride is the most abundant anion (negatively charged ion) in the extracellular fluid in the human body. The normal range for chloride concentration in the blood is typically between 96-106 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Chlorides play a crucial role in maintaining electrical neutrality, acid-base balance, and osmotic pressure in the body. They are also essential for various physiological processes such as nerve impulse transmission, maintenance of membrane potentials, and digestion (as hydrochloric acid in the stomach).

Chloride levels can be affected by several factors, including diet, hydration status, kidney function, and certain medical conditions. Increased or decreased chloride levels can indicate various disorders, such as dehydration, kidney disease, Addison's disease, or diabetes insipidus. Therefore, monitoring chloride levels is essential for assessing a person's overall health and diagnosing potential medical issues.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Cefotiam is a type of antibiotic known as a cephalosporin, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by interfering with the bacteria's ability to form a cell wall, leading to bacterial cell death. Cefotiam has a broad spectrum of activity and is effective against many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Here is the medical definition of 'Cefotiam':

Cefotiam is a semisynthetic, broad-spectrum, beta-lactam antibiotic belonging to the cephalosporin class. It has activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including many strains that are resistant to other antibiotics. Cefotiam inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), leading to bacterial cell death.

Cefotiam is available in various formulations, including intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) injections, for the treatment of a wide range of infections, such as:

* Lower respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia, bronchitis)
* Urinary tract infections (e.g., pyelonephritis, cystitis)
* Skin and soft tissue infections (e.g., cellulitis, wound infections)
* Bone and joint infections (e.g., osteomyelitis, septic arthritis)
* Intra-abdominal infections (e.g., peritonitis, appendicitis)
* Septicemia (bloodstream infections)

Cefotiam is generally well tolerated, but like other antibiotics, it can cause side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea), skin rashes, and allergic reactions. In rare cases, cefotiam may cause serious adverse effects, such as seizures, interstitial nephritis, or hemorrhagicystitis. It should be used with caution in patients with a history of allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics, impaired renal function, or a history of seizure disorders.

It is essential to complete the full course of treatment as prescribed by a healthcare professional, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that the infection is entirely eradicated and to reduce the risk of developing antibiotic resistance.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

In the context of medicine, "chemistry" often refers to the field of study concerned with the properties, composition, and structure of elements and compounds, as well as their reactions with one another. It is a fundamental science that underlies much of modern medicine, including pharmacology (the study of drugs), toxicology (the study of poisons), and biochemistry (the study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms).

In addition to its role as a basic science, chemistry is also used in medical testing and diagnosis. For example, clinical chemistry involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood and urine to detect and measure various substances, such as glucose, cholesterol, and electrolytes, that can provide important information about a person's health status.

Overall, chemistry plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms of diseases, developing new treatments, and improving diagnostic tests and techniques.

Chemical phenomena refer to the changes and interactions that occur at the molecular or atomic level when chemicals are involved. These phenomena can include chemical reactions, in which one or more substances (reactants) are converted into different substances (products), as well as physical properties that change as a result of chemical interactions, such as color, state of matter, and solubility. Chemical phenomena can be studied through various scientific disciplines, including chemistry, biochemistry, and physics.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Bicarbonates, also known as sodium bicarbonate or baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. In the context of medical definitions, bicarbonates refer to the bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), which is an important buffer in the body that helps maintain normal pH levels in blood and other bodily fluids.

The balance of bicarbonate and carbonic acid in the body helps regulate the acidity or alkalinity of the blood, a condition known as pH balance. Bicarbonates are produced by the body and are also found in some foods and drinking water. They work to neutralize excess acid in the body and help maintain the normal pH range of 7.35 to 7.45.

In medical testing, bicarbonate levels may be measured as part of an electrolyte panel or as a component of arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis. Low bicarbonate levels can indicate metabolic acidosis, while high levels can indicate metabolic alkalosis. Both conditions can have serious consequences if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Acetamides are organic compounds that contain an acetamide functional group, which is a combination of an acetyl group (-COCH3) and an amide functional group (-CONH2). The general structure of an acetamide is R-CO-NH-CH3, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Acetamides are found in various medications, including some pain relievers, muscle relaxants, and anticonvulsants. They can also be found in certain industrial chemicals and are used as intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of acetamides can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Chronic exposure has been linked to more serious health effects, including liver and kidney damage. Therefore, handling and use of acetamides should be done with appropriate safety precautions.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Acetylgalactosamine (also known as N-acetyl-D-galactosamine or GalNAc) is a type of sugar molecule called a hexosamine that is commonly found in glycoproteins and proteoglycans, which are complex carbohydrates that are attached to proteins and lipids. It plays an important role in various biological processes, including cell-cell recognition, signal transduction, and protein folding.

In the context of medical research and biochemistry, Acetylgalactosamine is often used as a building block for synthesizing glycoconjugates, which are molecules that consist of a carbohydrate attached to a protein or lipid. These molecules play important roles in many biological processes, including cell-cell recognition, signaling, and immune response.

Acetylgalactosamine is also used as a target for enzymes called glycosyltransferases, which add sugar molecules to proteins and lipids. In particular, Acetylgalactosamine is the acceptor substrate for a class of glycosyltransferases known as galactosyltransferases, which add galactose molecules to Acetylgalactosamine-containing structures.

Defects in the metabolism of Acetylgalactosamine have been linked to various genetic disorders, including Schindler disease and Kanzaki disease, which are characterized by neurological symptoms and abnormal accumulation of glycoproteins in various tissues.

Spectrophotometry, Infrared is a scientific analytical technique used to measure the absorption or transmission of infrared light by a sample. It involves the use of an infrared spectrophotometer, which directs infrared radiation through a sample and measures the intensity of the radiation that is transmitted or absorbed by the sample at different wavelengths within the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Infrared spectroscopy can be used to identify and quantify functional groups and chemical bonds present in a sample, as well as to study the molecular structure and composition of materials. The resulting infrared spectrum provides a unique "fingerprint" of the sample, which can be compared with reference spectra to aid in identification and characterization.

Infrared spectrophotometry is widely used in various fields such as chemistry, biology, pharmaceuticals, forensics, and materials science for qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples.

Acetylglucosamine is a type of sugar that is commonly found in the body and plays a crucial role in various biological processes. It is a key component of glycoproteins and proteoglycans, which are complex molecules made up of protein and carbohydrate components.

More specifically, acetylglucosamine is an amino sugar that is formed by the addition of an acetyl group to glucosamine. It can be further modified in the body through a process called acetylation, which involves the addition of additional acetyl groups.

Acetylglucosamine is important for maintaining the structure and function of various tissues in the body, including cartilage, tendons, and ligaments. It also plays a role in the immune system and has been studied as a potential therapeutic target for various diseases, including cancer and inflammatory conditions.

In summary, acetylglucosamine is a type of sugar that is involved in many important biological processes in the body, and has potential therapeutic applications in various diseases.

Antiporters, also known as exchange transporters, are a type of membrane transport protein that facilitate the exchange of two or more ions or molecules across a biological membrane in opposite directions. They allow for the movement of one type of ion or molecule into a cell while simultaneously moving another type out of the cell. This process is driven by the concentration gradient of one or both of the substances being transported. Antiporters play important roles in various physiological processes, including maintaining electrochemical balance and regulating pH levels within cells.

A "carbohydrate sequence" refers to the specific arrangement or order of monosaccharides (simple sugars) that make up a carbohydrate molecule, such as a polysaccharide or an oligosaccharide. Carbohydrates are often composed of repeating units of monosaccharides, and the sequence in which these units are arranged can have important implications for the function and properties of the carbohydrate.

For example, in glycoproteins (proteins that contain carbohydrate chains), the specific carbohydrate sequence can affect how the protein is processed and targeted within the cell, as well as its stability and activity. Similarly, in complex carbohydrates like starch or cellulose, the sequence of glucose units can determine whether the molecule is branched or unbranched, which can have implications for its digestibility and other properties.

Therefore, understanding the carbohydrate sequence is an important aspect of studying carbohydrate structure and function in biology and medicine.

Carbohydrate conformation refers to the three-dimensional shape and structure of a carbohydrate molecule. Carbohydrates, also known as sugars, can exist in various conformational states, which are determined by the rotation of their component bonds and the spatial arrangement of their functional groups.

The conformation of a carbohydrate molecule can have significant implications for its biological activity and recognition by other molecules, such as enzymes or antibodies. Factors that can influence carbohydrate conformation include the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, steric effects, and intermolecular interactions with solvent molecules or other solutes.

In some cases, the conformation of a carbohydrate may be stabilized by the formation of cyclic structures, in which the hydroxyl group at one end of the molecule forms a covalent bond with the carbonyl carbon at the other end, creating a ring structure. The most common cyclic carbohydrates are monosaccharides, such as glucose and fructose, which can exist in various conformational isomers known as anomers.

Understanding the conformation of carbohydrate molecules is important for elucidating their biological functions and developing strategies for targeting them with drugs or other therapeutic agents.

Plant lectins are proteins or glycoproteins that are abundantly found in various plant parts such as seeds, leaves, stems, and roots. They have the ability to bind specifically to carbohydrate structures present on cell membranes, known as glycoconjugates. This binding property of lectins is reversible and non-catalytic, meaning it does not involve any enzymatic activity.

Lectins play several roles in plants, including defense against predators, pathogens, and herbivores. They can agglutinate red blood cells, stimulate the immune system, and have been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some lectins also exhibit mitogenic activity, which means they can stimulate the proliferation of certain types of cells.

In the medical field, plant lectins have gained attention due to their potential therapeutic applications. For instance, some lectins have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties and are being investigated as potential cancer treatments. However, it is important to note that some lectins can be toxic or allergenic to humans and animals, so they must be used with caution.

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Oligosaccharides are complex carbohydrates composed of relatively small numbers (3-10) of monosaccharide units joined together by glycosidic linkages. They occur naturally in foods such as milk, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. In the body, oligosaccharides play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, signaling, and protection against pathogens.

There are several types of oligosaccharides, classified based on their structures and functions. Some common examples include:

1. Disaccharides: These consist of two monosaccharide units, such as sucrose (glucose + fructose), lactose (glucose + galactose), and maltose (glucose + glucose).
2. Trisaccharides: These contain three monosaccharide units, like maltotriose (glucose + glucose + glucose) and raffinose (galactose + glucose + fructose).
3. Oligosaccharides found in human milk: Human milk contains unique oligosaccharides that serve as prebiotics, promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. These oligosaccharides also help protect infants from pathogens by acting as decoy receptors and inhibiting bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells.
4. N-linked and O-linked glycans: These are oligosaccharides attached to proteins in the body, playing crucial roles in protein folding, stability, and function.
5. Plant-derived oligosaccharides: Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are examples of plant-derived oligosaccharides that serve as prebiotics, promoting the growth of beneficial gut bacteria.

Overall, oligosaccharides have significant impacts on human health and disease, particularly in relation to gastrointestinal function, immunity, and inflammation.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Membrane potential is the electrical potential difference across a cell membrane, typically for excitable cells such as nerve and muscle cells. It is the difference in electric charge between the inside and outside of a cell, created by the selective permeability of the cell membrane to different ions. The resting membrane potential of a typical animal cell is around -70 mV, with the interior being negative relative to the exterior. This potential is generated and maintained by the active transport of ions across the membrane, primarily through the action of the sodium-potassium pump. Membrane potentials play a crucial role in many physiological processes, including the transmission of nerve impulses and the contraction of muscle cells.

Lectins are a type of proteins that bind specifically to carbohydrates and have been found in various plant and animal sources. They play important roles in biological recognition events, such as cell-cell adhesion, and can also be involved in the immune response. Some lectins can agglutinate certain types of cells or precipitate glycoproteins, while others may have a more direct effect on cellular processes. In some cases, lectins from plants can cause adverse effects in humans if ingested, such as digestive discomfort or allergic reactions.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

... disulfonic acid MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.075 - bibenzyls MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.100 - chlorotrianisene MeSH ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid MeSH D02.500.375.125 - 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid MeSH ... quinic acid MeSH D02.241.511.852 - shikimic acid MeSH D02.241.511.902 - sugar acids MeSH D02.241.511.902.107 - ascorbic acid ... edetic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.455 - egtazic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.581 - iodoacetic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.581.400 - ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
DISULFONIC ACID. DOM. 2,5-DIMETHOXY-4-METHYLAMPHETAMINE. EIMERIINA. EIMERIIDA. EPN. PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOIC ACID, 2-ETHYL 2-(4- ... ISOTHIOCYANATOSTILBENE-2,2-DISULFONIC ACID. SPOROZOEA. APICOMPLEXA. SPOROZOEA INFECTIONS. PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS. TYPHOID. ...
... disulfonic Acid. 4,4-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-Disulfonic Acid. Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2- ...
Disulfonic Acid [D02.500.375.125] * Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate [D02.500.375.250] * 1-Naphthylisothiocyanate [D02.500.375.625] ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid [D02.886.250.050] * 4,4-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-Disulfonic Acid [D02.886. ... 551-06-4. Scope Note. A tool for the study of liver damage which causes bile stasis and hyperbilirubinemia acutely and bile ... 551-06-4. CAS Type 1 Name. Naphthalene, 1-isothiocyanato-. Previous Indexing. Naphthalenes (1972-1975). Thiocyanates (1972-1975 ...
... disulfonic acid MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.075 - bibenzyls MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.100 - chlorotrianisene MeSH ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid MeSH D02.500.375.125 - 4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid MeSH ... quinic acid MeSH D02.241.511.852 - shikimic acid MeSH D02.241.511.902 - sugar acids MeSH D02.241.511.902.107 - ascorbic acid ... edetic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.455 - egtazic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.581 - iodoacetic acid MeSH D02.241.081.038.581.400 - ...
Disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.200] * Dihydrostilbenoids [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.288] * Stilbamidines [ ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.050] * Chlorotrianisene [D02.455.426.559.389.150. ... Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.. Terms. Stilbenes Preferred Term Term UI T038988. ... Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.. Entry Term(s). Stilbene Stilbene Derivative ...
In an exemplary embodiment, the dye is linked to a polyphosphate nucleic acid through an adaptor. An adaptor can be a component ... disulfonic acid acridine and derivatives: acridine acridine isothiocyanate 5-(2′-aminoethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid ( ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′ ... acidic amino acids, basic amino acids, polar amino acids, ... Amino acids also encompass amino-carboxylic acid species other than α-amino acids, e.g., aminobutyric acid (aba), aminohexanoic ...
Disulfonic Acid 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid 4-Aminobenzoic Acid 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase 4-Aminobutyric Acid use gamma- ... 99mTc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid 99mTc-DMSA use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic ... 12-S-HETE use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid 12-S-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14- ...
Disulfonic Acid 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid 4-Aminobenzoic Acid 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase 4-Aminobutyric Acid use gamma- ... 99mTc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid 99mTc-DMSA use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic ... 12-S-HETE use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid 12-S-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14- ...
... disulfonic acid (SITS). FEBS letters, 314 1, 97-100. Treuheit, M J; Vaghy, P L; Kirley, T L 1992. Mg(2+)-ATPase from rabbit ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2- ... The amino acid sequence of the fluorescein isothiocyanate ... Species and tissue comparisons of the amino acid sequence of the ATP binding sites of (Na,K)-ATPase and Ca-ATPase Biophys. J., ... Homology of ATP binding sites from Ca2+ and (Na,K)-ATPases: comparison of the amino acid sequences of fluorescein ...
... disulfonic Acid, Disodium Salt Preferred Term Term UI T414318. Date05/15/2000. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2001). ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid Preferred Term Term UI T037911. Date05/12/1981. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK ( ... disulfonic Acid, Disodium Salt Narrower Concept UI. M0329725. Registry Number. 51023-76-8. Terms. 4-Acetamido-4- ... disulfonic Acid Preferred Concept UI. M0019908. Registry Number. 27816-59-7. Related Numbers. 51023-76-8. Scope Note. A non- ...
... disulfonic Acid, Disodium Salt Preferred Term Term UI T414318. Date05/15/2000. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2001). ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid Preferred Term Term UI T037911. Date05/12/1981. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK ( ... disulfonic Acid, Disodium Salt Narrower Concept UI. M0329725. Registry Number. 51023-76-8. Terms. 4-Acetamido-4- ... disulfonic Acid Preferred Concept UI. M0019908. Registry Number. 27816-59-7. Related Numbers. 51023-76-8. Scope Note. A non- ...
Disulfonic Acid N0000167056 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine N0000167084 4-(3-Butoxy-4- ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid N0000006481 4-Aminobenzoic Acid N0000168376 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase ... Neutral N0000006806 Amino Acids N0000011372 Amino Acids, Acidic N0000011248 Amino Acids, Aromatic N0000011332 Amino Acids, ... Acyclic N0000008269 Acids, Aldehydic N0000007628 Acids, Carbocyclic N0000007629 Acids, Heterocyclic N0000007630 Acids, ...
Disulfonic Acid MH OLD = DMPP [P] MH NEW = Dimethylphenylpiperazinium Iodide MH OLD = DOM [N] MH NEW = 2,5-Dimethoxy-4- ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid MH OLD = Sporozoea # [N] MH NEW = Apicomplexa MH OLD = Sporozoea Infections # [] MH ... Etidronic Acid MH OLD = Freons [P] MH NEW = Chlorofluorocarbons, Methane MH OLD = Gastrospirillum hominis [P] MH NEW = ... Phenylphosphonothioic Acid, 2-Ethyl 2-(4-Nitrophenyl) Ester MH OLD = Esophageal Diverticulum [P] MH NEW = Diverticulum, ...
... disulfonic Acid / analogs & derivatives Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2- ... Figure 2.. Mean Aggregate Quality Score and Mean Quality Bonus ... Figure 2.. Mean Aggregate Quality Score and Mean Quality Bonus Payment (QBP) for Plans in Puerto Rico and the US Mainland From ... 2 Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.. *3 Department of Health Care Policy, ...
Disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.200] * Dihydrostilbenoids [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.288] * Stilbamidines [ ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.050] * Chlorotrianisene [D02.455.426.559.389.150. ...
Disulfonic Acid 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine 4-(3-Butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone 4- ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid 4-Aminobenzoic Acid 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase 4-Aminopyridine 4-Butyrolactone 4- ... Amino Acids Amino Acids, Acidic Amino Acids, Aromatic Amino Acids, Basic Amino Acids, Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Cyclic Amino ... Acid Ceramidase Acid Etching, Dental Acid Phosphatase Acid Rain Acid Sensing Ion Channel Blockers Acid Sensing Ion Channels ...
Disulfonic Acid 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid 4-Aminobenzoic Acid 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase 4-Aminobutyric Acid use gamma- ... 99mTc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid 99mTc-DMSA use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic ... 12-S-HETE use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid 12-S-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14- ...
... disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.050] 4-Acetamido-4-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2- ... Compuestos orgánicos caracterizados por el grupo funcional 1,2- ... Organic compounds characterized by the functional group 1,2-dihydrostilbene.. Allowable Qualifiers:. AD administration & dosage ... 4,4-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-Disulfonic Acid [D02.455.426.559.389.150.700.200] 4,4-Diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2-Disulfonic ...
Disulfonic Acid 4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine ... isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic Acid 4-Aminobenzoic Acid 4-Aminobutyrate Transaminase 4-Aminobutyric Acid use gamma- ... 99mTc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid 99mTc-DMSA use Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic ... 12-S-HETE use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid 12-S-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid use 12-Hydroxy-5.8,10,14- ...
  • Of particular value are methods for measuring small quantities of nucleic acids, peptides, saccharides, pharmaceuticals, metabolites, microorganisms and other materials of diagnostic value. (justia.com)
  • Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group. (nih.gov)
  • Frequently used methods are based on, for example, antigen-antibody systems, nucleic acid hybridization techniques, and protein-ligand systems. (justia.com)