3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine: A material used in the manufacture of azo dyes that is toxic to skin and carcinogenic in several species.Complex Mixtures: Mixtures of many components in inexact proportions, usually natural, such as PLANT EXTRACTS; VENOMS; and MANURE. These are distinguished from DRUG COMBINATIONS which have only a few components in definite proportions.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Liquid Phase Microextraction: Miniaturized methods of liquid-liquid extraction.Explosive Agents: Substances that are energetically unstable and can produce a sudden expansion of the material, called an explosion, which is accompanied by heat, pressure and noise. Other things which have been described as explosive that are not included here are explosive action of laser heating, human performance, sudden epidemiological outbreaks, or fast cell growth.Triazines: Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.Refractometry: Measurement of the index of refraction (the ratio of the velocity of light or other radiation in the first of two media to its velocity in the second as it passes from one into the other).Trinitrotoluene: A 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, which is an explosive chemical that can cause skin irritation and other toxic consequences.Maximum Allowable Concentration: The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Asthma, Occupational: Asthma attacks caused, triggered, or exacerbated by OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE.Halogens: A family of nonmetallic, generally electronegative, elements that form group 17 (formerly group VIIa) of the periodic table.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.EthaneHydrocarbons, HalogenatedHydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)PropaneAlkenes: Unsaturated hydrocarbons of the type Cn-H2n, indicated by the suffix -ene. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p408)Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.WashingtonPublic Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.United StatesMinnesotaAdolescent, Hospitalized: Adolescent hospitalized for short term care.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Arsenic: A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Elements: Substances that comprise all matter. Each element is made up of atoms that are identical in number of electrons and protons and in nuclear charge, but may differ in mass or number of neutrons.Silicon: A trace element that constitutes about 27.6% of the earth's crust in the form of SILICON DIOXIDE. It does not occur free in nature. Silicon has the atomic symbol Si, atomic number 14, and atomic weight [28.084; 28.086].Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Humic Substances: Organic matter in a state of advanced decay, after passing through the stages of COMPOST and PEAT and before becoming lignite (COAL). It is composed of a heterogenous mixture of compounds including phenolic radicals and acids that polymerize and are not easily separated nor analyzed. (E.A. Ghabbour & G. Davies, eds. Humic Substances, 2001).Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)Fixatives: Agents employed in the preparation of histologic or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all of the constituent elements. Great numbers of different agents are used; some are also decalcifying and hardening agents. They must quickly kill and coagulate living tissue.Tissue Fixation: The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Cryoultramicrotomy: The technique of using a cryostat or freezing microtome, in which the temperature is regulated to -20 degrees Celsius, to cut ultrathin frozen sections for microscopic (usually, electron microscopic) examination.United States Environmental Protection Agency: An agency in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. It was created as an independent regulatory agency responsible for the implementation of federal laws designed to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the ENVIRONMENT.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Chromatography, Gas: Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.Eicosapentaenoic Acid: Important polyunsaturated fatty acid found in fish oils. It serves as the precursor for the prostaglandin-3 and thromboxane-3 families. A diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid lowers serum lipid concentration, reduces incidence of cardiovascular disorders, prevents platelet aggregation, and inhibits arachidonic acid conversion into the thromboxane-2 and prostaglandin-2 families.Docosahexaenoic Acids: C22-unsaturated fatty acids found predominantly in FISH OILS.Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Dactinomycin: A compound composed of a two CYCLIC PEPTIDES attached to a phenoxazine that is derived from STREPTOMYCES parvullus. It binds to DNA and inhibits RNA synthesis (transcription), with chain elongation more sensitive than initiation, termination, or release. As a result of impaired mRNA production, protein synthesis also declines after dactinomycin therapy. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1993, p2015)
... dichlorobenzidine. It is closely related to Pigment Yellow 13, wherein the two phenyl groups are replaced by 2,4-xylyl. K. ... It is also classified as a diarylide pigment, being derived from 3,3'- ...
... dichlorobenzidine. K. Hunger. W. Herbst "Pigments, Organic" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Wiley-VCH, ... This compound is then coupled to the bisdiazonium salt obtained from 3,3'- ...
... dichlorobenzidine, itself a precursor to many dyes and pesticides. Gerald Booth, "Nitro Compounds, Aromatic" in Ullmann's ... 3-nitrochlorobenzene. Alkylation and electrophilic aromatic substitution can occur at the chlorinated carbon center, and a ... Its derivative 2-chloroaniline is a precursor to 3,3'- ...
... dichlorobenzidine with ammonia with a copper catalyst at high temperature and pressure, followed by acidic workup. An alternate ... 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) is an organic compound with the formula (C6H3(NH2)2)2. This derivative of benzidine is a precursor ... In the crystal, the rings of each molecule are co-planar and the amine units connect molecules to form an intermolecular 3- ... US 3943175, Druin, Melvin L. & Oringer, Kenneth, "Synthesis of pure 3,3'-diaminobenzidine", issued 1976-03-09, assigned to ...
... dichlorobenzidine and derivatives of aniline, as well as ethylene oxide and formaldehyde. In the 1980s Stasik represented ... His research was focused on defining the carcinogenic potential of some aromatic amines, e.g. 3,3'- ...
... dichlorobenzidine, a carcinogen that is listed in the U.S. EPA's Toxics Release Inventory. 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine is ... 3. Edited by A. T. Peters & H. S. Freeman, Blackie Academic & Professional, Glasgow, 1995, xii + 245 pp. ISBN 0 7514 0209 5. ... Rodenburg, L. A.; Guo, J.; Du, S.; Cavallo, G. J., Evidence for Unique and Ubiquitous Environmental Sources of 3,3'- ... Dyes and Pigments 2002, 55, (2-3), 79-89. Savastano, D., The pigment report: although 2006 was a year of improvement, pigment ...
Dichlorobenzidine o-tolidine, 2,2'-dimethyl-4,4'-benzidine o-dianisidine (2,2'-dimethoxy-4,4'-benzidine, CAS# 119-90-4, m.p. ... These derivatives include, in order of scale, the following: 3,3'- ... 133 °C) 3,3',4,4'-Tetraaminodiphenyl, precursor to polybenzimidazole fiber. As with some other aromatic amines such as 2- ...
... dichlorobenzidine MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.185.475 --- losartan MeSH D02.455.426.559.389.185.600 --- niclofolan MeSH D02.455. ... 5-amino-3-((5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole MeSH D02.640.600.290 --- fanft MeSH D02.640.600.308 --- furagin MeSH ... 3-oxo-1,5-pentanediyl)bis(n,n-dimethyl-n-2-propenyl-), dibromide MeSH D02.092.146.325 --- p-dimethylaminoazobenzene MeSH ... vitamin k 3 MeSH D02.455.849.291.850 --- taxoids MeSH D02.455.849.291.850.777 --- paclitaxel MeSH D02.455.849.365 --- dolichol ...
Dichlorobenzidine - Compound Summary, PubChem. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0191". National Institute for ... Dichlorobenzidine is an organic compound with the formula (C6H3Cl(NH2))2. The pure compound is pale yellow, but commercial ... Dichlorobenzidine is prepared in two steps from 2-nitrochlorobenzene. The first step involves reduction with zinc in base to ... Dichlorobenzidine is considered a carcinogen. This compound has been shown to increase the incidence of tumors in animals. ...
a b Dichlorobenzidine - Compound Summary, PubChem. *^ a b c d e "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0191". National ... o,o'-Dichlorobenzidine. 3,3'-Dichlorobiphenyl-4,4'-diamine. 3,3'-Dichloro-4,4'-biphenyldiamine. 3,3'-Dichloro-4,4'- ... Dichlorobenzidine is an organic compound with the formula (C6H3Cl(NH2))2. The pure compound is pale yellow, but commercial ... Dichlorobenzidine is considered a carcinogen.[1] This compound has been shown to increase the incidence of tumors in animals.[5 ...
A variety of medical issues can result from tattooing. Because it requires breaking the skin barrier, tattooing may carry health risks, including infection and allergic reactions. Modern tattooists reduce such risks by following universal precautions, working with single-use items, and sterilising their equipment after each use. Many jurisdictions require that tattooists have bloodborne pathogen training, such as is provided through the Red Cross and the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Dermatologists have observed rare but severe medical complications from tattoo pigments in the body, and have noted that people acquiring tattoos rarely assess health risks prior to receiving their tattoos. Some medical practitioners have recommended greater regulation of pigments used in tattoo ink. The wide range of pigments currently used in tattoo inks may create unforeseen health problems. Since tattoo instruments come in contact with blood and bodily fluids, diseases may be transmitted if ...
... (especially potassium carbonate) has been used in bleaching textiles, making glass, and making soap, since about AD 500. Potash was principally obtained by leaching the ashes of land and sea plants. Beginning in the 14th century potash was mined in Ethiopia. One of the world's largest deposits, 140 to 150 million tons, is located in the Tigray's Dallol area.[16] Potash was one of the most important industrial chemicals. It was refined from the ashes of broadleaved trees and produced primarily in the forested areas of Europe, Russia, and North America. The first U.S. patent of any kind was issued in 1790 to Samuel Hopkins for an improvement "in the making of Pot ash and Pearl ash by a new Apparatus and Process".[17] Pearl ash was a purer quality made by calcination of potash in a reverberatory furnace or kiln. Potash pits were once used in England to produce potash that was used in making soap for the preparation of wool for yarn production. As early as 1767, potash from wood ashes was ...
The upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or upper consolute temperature is the critical temperature above which the components of a mixture are miscible in all proportions. The word upper indicates that the UCST is an upper bound to a temperature range of partial miscibility, or miscibility for certain compositions only. For example, hexane-nitrobenzene mixtures have a UCST of 19 °C, so that these two substances are miscible in all proportions above 19 °C but not at lower temperatures. Examples at higher temperatures are the aniline-water system at 168 °C (at pressures high enough for liquid water to exist at that temperature), and the lead-zinc system at 798 °C (a temperature where both metals are liquid). A solid state example is the palladium-hydrogen system which has a solid solution phase (H2 in Pd) in equilibrium with a hydride phase (PdHn) below the UCST at 300 °C. Above this temperature there is a single solid solution phase. In the phase diagram of the mixture components, the ...
The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) or lower consolute temperature is the critical temperature below which the components of a mixture are miscible for all compositions. The word lower indicates that the LCST is a lower bound to a temperature interval of partial miscibility, or miscibility for certain compositions only. The phase behavior of polymer solutions is an important property involved in the development and design of most polymer-related processes. Partially miscible polymer solutions often exhibit two solubility boundaries, the upper critical solution temperature (UCST) and the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), which both depend on the molar mass and the pressure. At temperatures below LCST, the system is completely miscible in all proportions, whereas above LCST partial liquid miscibility occurs. In the phase diagram of the mixture components, the LCST is the shared minimum of the concave up spinodal and binodal (or coexistence) curves. It is in general pressure ...
Because of the toxins in its body that come from consuming algae, the California sea hare has very few predators. Among these, however, is the giant green anemone, which reportedly takes them in large numbers; however, the anemone will capture a sea hare and then proceed to digest only 67-85% of it before regurgitating the remains. This is because the anemone consumes only enough of the sea hare to expose the sea hare's digestive gland and its associated toxins. Once this gland has been exposed, it causes the anemone to reject all of the remaining undigested animal, including parts it would otherwise have taken in as food.[5] Other predators include starfish, lobsters,[6] and the ophistobranch Navanax inermis which will take juveniles.[7] When it is considerably disturbed, the sea hare is capable of releasing two different kinds of ink from different locations within its mantle cavity, much in the way an octopus does. One ink is reddish-purple and comes from what is called the purple ink gland, ...
... is the primary component of potash and the more refined pearl ash or salts of tartar. Historically, pearl ash was created by baking potash in a kiln to remove impurities. The fine, white powder remaining was the pearl ash. The first patent issued by the US Patent Office was awarded to Samuel Hopkins in 1790 for an improved method of making potash and pearl ash. In late 18th century North America, before the development of baking powder, pearl ash was used as a leavening agent for quick breads.[3][4]. ...
Gel electrophoresis is the most commonly used technique to study DNA. DNA is a very large molecule that contains genetic information. DNA can be broken down to smaller pieces of different sizes and these pieces are then separated using gel electrophoresis. DNA always has a negative charge, and moves towards the anode. Proteins are large and complex molecules made of amino acids. Proteins can be studied by gel electrophoresis in two ways. One way is to take a mixture of proteins and separate them in the gel. The other way is to break down a single protein into smaller pieces. The smaller pieces can then be separated in the gel. Proteins can be positively or negatively charged. To separate proteins by size only, protein mixtures can be coated with a chemical called sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to give all proteins a negative charge before putting the mixture into the gel. ...
Aluminum magnesium boride or BAM is a chemical compound of aluminium, magnesium and boron. Whereas its nominal formula is AlMgB14, the chemical composition is closer to Al0.75Mg0.75B14. It is a ceramic alloy that is highly resistive to wear and has a low coefficient of sliding friction, reaching a record value of 0.02 in lubricated AlMgB14−TiB2 composites. First reported in 1970, BAM has an orthorhombic structure with four icosahedral B12 units per unit cell. This ultrahard material has a coefficient of thermal expansion comparable to that of other widely used materials such as steel and concrete. BAM powders are produced by heating a nearly stoichiometric mixture of boron, aluminium and magnesium for a few hours at a temperature in the range 900-1500 °C. Spurious phases are then dissolved in hot hydrochloric acid. To ease the reaction and make the product more homogeneous, the starting mixture can be processed in a high-energy ball mill. All pretreatments are carried out in a dry, inert ...
The thermal cycler (also known as a thermocycler, PCR machine or DNA amplifier) is a laboratory apparatus most commonly used to amplify segments of DNA via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thermal cyclers may also be used in laboratories to facilitate other temperature-sensitive reactions, including restriction enzyme digestion or rapid diagnostics. The device has a thermal block with holes where tubes holding the reaction mixtures can be inserted. The cycler then raises and lowers the temperature of the block in discrete, pre-programmed steps. The earliest thermal cyclers were designed for use with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. Since this enzyme is destroyed during each heating step of the amplification process, new enzyme had to be added every cycle. This led to a cumbersome machine based on an automated pipettor, with open reaction tubes. Later, the PCR process was adapted to the use of thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus, which greatly simplified the design of ...
... is a comarca (county) in the center of Catalonia, Spain. It includes a subcomarca, Lluçanès. Industries include the mining of potash at Súria and Sallent, and the manufacture of textiles along the rivers Llobregat and Cardener. Agriculture includes vineyards, cereals, and olive groves. To the north are Berguedà and (running clockwise) Osona, Moianès, and Vallès Occidental. To the south are Baix Llobregat, l'Anoia and el Solsonès. In May 2015, Bages lost five municipalities - Calders, L'Estany, Moià, Monistrol de Calders, Santa Maria d'Oló - to the new comarca of Moianès. "El Parlament aprova la llei de creació del Moianès amb els vots en contra de Ciutadans i l'abstenció del PP" (in Catalan). La Vanguardia. 2015-04-15. Retrieved 2015-04-15. "El municipi en xifres". Institut d'Estadística de Catalunya. Retrieved 2015-05-25. Official comarcal web site, in Catalan Information on Bages from the Generalitat de Catalunya (government of Catalonia), in Catalan Coordinates: ...
In general, polymeric mixtures are far less miscible than mixtures of small molecule materials. This effect results from the fact that the driving force for mixing is usually entropy, not interaction energy. In other words, miscible materials usually form a solution not because their interaction with each other is more favorable than their self-interaction, but because of an increase in entropy and hence free energy associated with increasing the amount of volume available to each component. This increase in entropy scales with the number of particles (or moles) being mixed. Since polymeric molecules are much larger and hence generally have much higher specific volumes than small molecules, the number of molecules involved in a polymeric mixture is far smaller than the number in a small molecule mixture of equal volume. The energetics of mixing, on the other hand, is comparable on a per volume basis for polymeric and small molecule mixtures. This tends to increase the free energy of mixing for ...
In general, polymeric mixtures are far less miscible than mixtures of small molecule materials. This effect results from the fact that the driving force for mixing is usually entropy, not interaction energy. In other words, miscible materials usually form a solution not because their interaction with each other is more favorable than their self-interaction, but because of an increase in entropy and hence free energy associated with increasing the amount of volume available to each component. This increase in entropy scales with the number of particles (or moles) being mixed. Since polymeric molecules are much larger and hence generally have much higher specific volumes than small molecules, the number of molecules involved in a polymeric mixture is far smaller than the number in a small molecule mixture of equal volume. The energetics of mixing, on the other hand, is comparable on a per volume basis for polymeric and small molecule mixtures. This tends to increase the free energy of mixing for ...
... (PRS) is an enhancement of the inertial reference system and attitude and heading reference system designed to provide position angles measurements which are stable in time and does not suffer by long term drift caused by the sensors imperfections. The measurement system uses behavior of the International Standard Atmosphere where atmospheric pressure descends with increasing altitude and two pairs of measurement units. Each pair measures pressure at two different positions that are mechanically connected with known distance between units, e.g. the units are mounted at the tips of the wing. In the horizontal flight, there is no pressure difference measured by the measurement system which means the position angle is zero. In case the airplane turns the tips of the wing mutually changes their position, one is going up and the second one is going down, and the pressure sensors in every unit measure different values which are translated into a position angle. The strapdown ...
Dichlorobenzidine - Compound Summary, PubChem. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0191". National Institute for ... Dichlorobenzidine is an organic compound with the formula (C6H3Cl(NH2))2. The pure compound is pale yellow, but commercial ... Dichlorobenzidine is prepared in two steps from 2-nitrochlorobenzene. The first step involves reduction with zinc in base to ... Dichlorobenzidine is considered a carcinogen. This compound has been shown to increase the incidence of tumors in animals. ...
a b Dichlorobenzidine - Compound Summary, PubChem. *^ a b c d e "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0191". National ... o,o-Dichlorobenzidine. 3,3-Dichlorobiphenyl-4,4-diamine. 3,3-Dichloro-4,4-biphenyldiamine. 3,3-Dichloro-4,4- ... Dichlorobenzidine is an organic compound with the formula (C6H3Cl(NH2))2. The pure compound is pale yellow, but commercial ... Dichlorobenzidine is considered a carcinogen.[1] This compound has been shown to increase the incidence of tumors in animals.[5 ...
... dichlorobenzidine may cause sore throat, respiratory infections, stomach upset, headache, dizziness, burns, and dermatitis. It ... dichlorobenzidine. For more information, you may call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-888-422-8737. This fact sheet is one in ... dichlorobenzidine?. 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine is a gray-to-purple colored crystalline solid. It changes from a solid to a gas very ... Dichlorobenzidine salt is the major form in actual use. It is a stable, off-white colored crystalline solid that does not ...
Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3′-. CAS No: 91-94-1. NOTE:. (1) Efficacy of Medical Tests has not been evaluated.. (2) NIOSH references ... Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3′-. Editor(s). /Author(s). Specific Medical Test(s) or Examination(s). Reference(s). ... 3) OSHA mandated medical tests, if any, are provided in BOLD on a yellow background.. (4) This HTML page was created from DHHS ...
Dichlorobenzidine. CAS# 91-94-1. Toxicological Profile Information. The ATSDR toxicological profile succinctly characterizes ... Dichlorobenzidine. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. ...
Dichlorobenzidine  Gomes, R; Meek, M. E; World Health Organization; International Programme on Chemical Safety (‎World Health ...
Dichlorobenzidine base, o,o-Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3-Dichlorobiphenyl-4,4-diamine, 3,3-Dichloro-4,4-biphenyldiamine, 3,3- ...
Dichlorobenzidine. World Health Organization. https://extranet.who.int/iris/restricted/handle/10665/42028 ...
... dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride. Regulatory process names 5 CAS names 1 IUPAC names 5 Trade names 8 Other identifiers 2 ...
Dichlorobenzidine - CAS Number 91-94-1 from LGC Standards. Please login or register to view prices, check availability and ... o,o-Dichlorobenzidine ;. 4,4-Diamino-3,3-dichlorodiphenyl ; 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine ; 4,4-Bis(2-chloroaniline) ; C.I. 23060 ... Dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride. 100 mg. DRE-C12378000. Add to basket 3,3´,5,5´-Tetramethylbenzidine 10 µg/mL in Acetonitrile ... Dichlorobenzidine D6 100 µg/mL in Acetonitrile. 1.1 mL. DRE-XA12377910AL. Add to basket ...
Dichlorobenzidine * DDT, DDE, DDD * DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) * Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) ...
Dichlorobenzidine--Toxicology ; Dichlorobenzidine--Dose-response relationship ; Dichlorobenzidine--Environmental aspects ; ... Dichlorobenzidine--administration & dosage ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; Environmental Exposure ; Risk Assessment ... EPA-600/3-77-099. NHEERL/GED Library/Gulf Breeze,FL. 06/26/2018. ... 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine. Other Authors. Author. Title of a Work ... EPA-600/3-77-099. 3 copies. NHEERL/MED Library/Duluth,MN. 08/09/2002. ...
Dichlorobenzidine--Toxicology ; Dichlorobenzidine--Dose-response relationship ; Dichlorobenzidine--Environmental aspects ; ... Dichlorobenzidine--administration & dosage ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; Environmental Exposure ; Risk Assessment ... Region 3 Library/Philadelphia, PA. 06/16/1989. DISPERSAL. EJBM RC268.65.N35 1989. Headquarters Library/Washington,DC. 01/26/ ... A cancer risk-specific dose estimate for 2,3,7,8-TCDD.. ... 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine. Other Authors. Author. Title of a Work ...
Are the Tables Z-1, Z-2, and Z-3 intended to be lists of chemicals that OSHA recognizes as carcinogens or potential carcinogens ... Tables Z-1, Z-2, and Z-3 are not intended to be lists of chemicals that OSHA recognizes as carcinogens or potential carcinogens ... With the exception of 1,3-butadiene and coke oven emissions, one can identify those substances that OSHA regulates as ... Dichlorobenzidine (and its salts). *bis-Chloromethyl ether. *beta-Naphthylamine. *Benzidine. *4-Aminodiphenyl ...
Dichlorobenzidine [‎1]‎. 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine [‎6]‎. 4-Butyrolactone [‎1]‎. 4-Hydroxycoumarins [‎3]‎. ...
Dichlorobenzidine. SV Tuning Compound DFTPP (decafluorotriphenylphosphine). L/C VOA Lab Control Sample #2 (Vinyl chloride). ... 3,4-MDMA HCl. Note: Stressed shipping studies indicate that this product remains stable after being continuously exposed to an ... 8330 Internal Standard (3,4-Dinitrotoluene). EPA Method 8330 is used to measure explosives residues in water and soil samples, ...
dichlorobenzidine, 3,3. December 7, 1990. 75-34-3. dichloroethane, 1,1-. January 8, 1999. ... 62-53-3. aniline. January 8, 1999. 7440-38-2. 7784-42-1. arsenic and arsenic compounds (inorganic, including arsine) including ... 108-88-3. toluene (or methyl benzene). *. August 13, 1999. 584-84-9. 91-08-7. toluene diisocyanates. toluene-2,4-diisocyanate. ... propane sultone, 1,3-. January 8, 1999. 75-56-9. propylene oxide (or 1,2-epoxy propane). September 8, 1998. **. August 13, 1999 ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers Supelco-48467, EPA 8270 Benzidines Mix for your research needs. Find product specific information including CAS, MSDS, protocols and references.
Dichlorobenzidine. U091. 3,3-Dimethoxybenzidine. U095. 3,3-Dimethylbenzidine. U148. 3,6-Pyridazinedione, 1,2-dihydro- ... 2,7:3,6-Dimethanonaphth [2,3-b]oxirene, 3,4,5,6,9,9-hexa- chloro-1a,2,2a,3,6,6a,7,7a-octahydro-, (1aal-pha,2beta,2abeta,3alpha, ... Azirino[2,3:3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-a]indole-4,7-dione,6-amino-8-[[(aminocarbonyl)oxy]methyl]-1,1a,2,8,8a,8b-hexahydro-8a-methoxy-5- ... 2,7:3,6-Dimethanonaphth [2,3-b]oxirene, 3,4,5,6,9,9-hexa-chloro-1a,2,2a,3,6,6a,7,7a-octahydro-, (1aalpha,2beta,2aalpha,3beta, ...
... dichlorobenzidine. *3,3-dimethyl-4,4-diaminodiphenylmethane. *3,3-dimethylbenzidine. *3,3-dimethoxybenzidine ...
... dichlorobenzidine. Cobalt. Benzene. Copper. Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. Lead. Chloroform. Mercury. Cis-1,2-dichloroethylene. ...
Release 11 - 5-Methylheptan-3-one to osmium tetroxide: 31 January 2020 ...
... dichlorobenzidine. It is closely related to Pigment Yellow 13, wherein the two phenyl groups are replaced by 2,4-xylyl. K. ... It is also classified as a diarylide pigment, being derived from 3,3- ...
  • AP 1300S by Everkem is a tetrabromobisphenol-A-bis-(2,3-dibromo, 2-methylpropyl)ether grade. (specialchem.com)