Exanthema: Diseases in which skin eruptions or rashes are a prominent manifestation. Classically, six such diseases were described with similar rashes; they were numbered in the order in which they were reported. Only the fourth (Duke's disease), fifth (ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM), and sixth (EXANTHEMA SUBITUM) numeric designations survive as occasional synonyms in current terminology.Diaper Rash: A type of irritant dermatitis localized to the area in contact with a diaper and occurring most often as a reaction to prolonged contact with urine, feces, or retained soap or detergent.Drug Eruptions: Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.Acneiform Eruptions: Visible efflorescent lesions of the skin caused by acne or resembling acne. (Dorland, 28th ed, p18, 575)Purpura: Purplish or brownish red discoloration, easily visible through the epidermis, caused by hemorrhage into the tissues. When the size of the discolorization is >2-3 cm it is generally called Ecchymoses (ECCHYMOSIS).Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Skin DiseasesHerpes Zoster: An acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent activation of latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN) in those who have been rendered partially immune after a previous attack of CHICKENPOX. It involves the SENSORY GANGLIA and their areas of innervation and is characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles over the area. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.QuinazolinesErythema Infectiosum: Contagious infection with human B19 Parvovirus most commonly seen in school age children and characterized by fever, headache, and rashes of the face, trunk, and extremities. It is often confused with rubella.Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Alphavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by members of the ALPHAVIRUS genus of the family TOGAVIRIDAE.Chickenpox: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Neuralgia, Postherpetic: Pain in nerves, frequently involving facial SKIN, resulting from the activation the latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). The two forms of the condition preceding the pain are HERPES ZOSTER OTICUS; and HERPES ZOSTER OPHTHALMICUS. Following the healing of the rashes and blisters, the pain sometimes persists.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.Herpesvirus 3, Human: The type species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing CHICKENPOX (varicella) and HERPES ZOSTER (shingles) in humans.Genes, ras: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein.Rubella: An acute infectious disease caused by the RUBELLA VIRUS. The virus enters the respiratory tract via airborne droplet and spreads to the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Chikungunya virus: A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing an acute dengue-like fever.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Zoster Sine Herpete: HERPES ZOSTER but without eruption of vesicles. Patients exhibit the characteristic pain minus the skin rash, sometimes making diagnosis difficult.Skin Diseases, Viral: Skin diseases caused by viruses.Measles Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Protein Kinase Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.Folliculitis: Inflammation of follicles, primarily hair follicles.Dermatomyositis: A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)Rickettsia Infections: Infections by the genus RICKETTSIA.Parvovirus B19, Human: The type species of ERYTHROVIRUS and the etiological agent of ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM, a disease most commonly seen in school-age children.Urticaria: A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized: Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome: Severe drug eruption characterized by high fever, erythematous rash and inflammation of internal organ(s).Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Herpesvirus 6, Human: The type species of ROSEOLOVIRUS isolated from patients with AIDS and other LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS. It infects and replicates in fresh and established lines of hematopoietic cells and cells of neural origin. It also appears to alter NK cell activity. HHV-6; (HBLV) antibodies are elevated in patients with AIDS, Sjogren's syndrome, sarcoidosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and certain malignancies. HHV-6 is the cause of EXANTHEMA SUBITUM and has been implicated in encephalitis.Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor: A cell surface receptor involved in regulation of cell growth and differentiation. It is specific for EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR and EGF-related peptides including TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA; AMPHIREGULIN; and HEPARIN-BINDING EGF-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR. The binding of ligand to the receptor causes activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and rapid internalization of the receptor-ligand complex into the cell.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Skin Manifestations: Dermatologic disorders attendant upon non-dermatologic disease or injury.Monkeypox virus: A species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS causing an epidemic disease among captive primates.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Carbamazepine: An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.Nevirapine: A potent, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in combination with nucleoside analogues for treatment of HIV INFECTIONS and AIDS.Measles virus: The type species of MORBILLIVIRUS and the cause of the highly infectious human disease MEASLES, which affects mostly children.Herpes Zoster Oticus: A syndrome characterized by facial palsy in association with a herpetic eruption of the external auditory meatus. This may occasionally be associated with tinnitus, vertigo, deafness, severe otalgia, and inflammation of the pinna. The condition is caused by reactivation of a latent HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN infection which causes inflammation of the facial and vestibular nerves, and may occasionally involve additional cranial nerves. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p757)Maximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Candidiasis, Cutaneous: Candidiasis of the skin manifested as eczema-like lesions of the interdigital spaces, perleche, or chronic paronychia. (Dorland, 27th ed)Erythema Multiforme: A skin and mucous membrane disease characterized by an eruption of macules, papules, nodules, vesicles, and/or bullae with characteristic "bull's-eye" lesions usually occurring on the dorsal aspect of the hands and forearms.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Triazines: Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.Dermatitis, Exfoliative: The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Scrub Typhus: An acute infectious disease caused by ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMUSHI. It is limited to eastern and southeastern Asia, India, northern Australia, and the adjacent islands. Characteristics include the formation of a primary cutaneous lesion at the site of the bite of an infected mite, fever lasting about two weeks, and a maculopapular rash.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Phenylurea Compounds: Compounds that include the amino-N-phenylamide structure.Niacinamide: An important compound functioning as a component of the coenzyme NAD. Its primary significance is in the prevention and/or cure of blacktongue and PELLAGRA. Most animals cannot manufacture this compound in amounts sufficient to prevent nutritional deficiency and it therefore must be supplemented through dietary intake.Gold Sodium Thiomalate: A variable mixture of the mono- and disodium salts of gold thiomalic acid used mainly for its anti-inflammatory action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is most effective in active progressive rheumatoid arthritis and of little or no value in the presence of extensive deformities or in the treatment of other forms of arthritis.Parvoviridae Infections: Virus infections caused by the PARVOVIRIDAE.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Eczema: A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).Benzenesulfonates: Organic salts and esters of benzenesulfonic acid.Rubella virus: The type (and only) species of RUBIVIRUS causing acute infection in humans, primarily children and young adults. Humans are the only natural host. A live, attenuated vaccine is available for prophylaxis.Eosinophilia: Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.Oral Ulcer: A loss of mucous substance of the mouth showing local excavation of the surface, resulting from the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue. It is the result of a variety of causes, e.g., denture irritation, aphthous stomatitis (STOMATITIS, APHTHOUS); NOMA; necrotizing gingivitis (GINGIVITIS, NECROTIZING ULCERATIVE); TOOTHBRUSHING; and various irritants. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p842)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Methylnitrosourea: A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Pregnadienediols: Doubly unsaturated pregnane derivatives with two hydroxy groups substituted anywhere on the rings or side chains.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Roseolovirus Infections: Infection with ROSEOLOVIRUS, the most common in humans being EXANTHEMA SUBITUM, a benign disease of infants and young children.Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid: A chronic form of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, CUTANEOUS) in which the skin lesions mimic those of the systemic form but in which systemic signs are rare. It is characterized by the presence of discoid skin plaques showing varying degrees of edema, erythema, scaliness, follicular plugging, and skin atrophy. Lesions are surrounded by an elevated erythematous border. The condition typically involves the face and scalp, but widespread dissemination may occur.Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes: A group of rare autosomal dominant diseases, commonly characterized by atypical URTICARIA (hives) with systemic symptoms that develop into end-organ damage. The atypical hives do not involve T-cell or autoantibody. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome includes three previously distinct disorders: Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome; Muckle-Wells Syndrome; and CINCA Syndrome, that are now considered to represent a disease continuum, all caused by NLRP3 protein mutations.Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch: A systemic non-thrombocytopenic purpura caused by HYPERSENSITIVITY VASCULITIS and deposition of IGA-containing IMMUNE COMPLEXES within the blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the kidney (KIDNEY GLOMERULUS). Clinical symptoms include URTICARIA; ERYTHEMA; ARTHRITIS; GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE; and renal involvement. Most cases are seen in children after acute upper respiratory infections.Radiodermatitis: A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Morbillivirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where the virions of most members have hemagglutinin but not neuraminidase activity. All members produce both cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies. MEASLES VIRUS is the type species.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Monkeypox: A viral disease infecting PRIMATES and RODENTS. Its clinical presentation in humans is similar to SMALLPOX including FEVER; HEADACHE; COUGH; and a painful RASH. It is caused by MONKEYPOX VIRUS and is usually transmitted to humans through BITES or via contact with an animal's BLOOD. Interhuman transmission is relatively low (significantly less than smallpox).Acyclovir: A GUANOSINE analog that acts as an antimetabolite. Viruses are especially susceptible. Used especially against herpes.Tick-Borne Diseases: Bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of infected ticks. The families Ixodidae and Argasidae contain many bloodsucking species that are important pests of man and domestic birds and mammals and probably exceed all other arthropods in the number and variety of disease agents they transmit. Many of the tick-borne diseases are zoonotic.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Larva Migrans: Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease: A mild, highly infectious viral disease of children, characterized by vesicular lesions in the mouth and on the hands and feet. It is caused by coxsackieviruses A.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Bites and StingsScarlet Fever: Infection with group A streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Piracetam: A compound suggested to be both a nootropic and a neuroprotective agent.Skin Diseases, Vascular: Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.Rickettsieae: A tribe of gram-negative bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE whose organisms are found in arthropods and are pathogenic for man and certain other vertebrate hosts.Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)Phenytoin: An anticonvulsant that is used to treat a wide variety of seizures. It is also an anti-arrhythmic and a muscle relaxant. The mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear, although several cellular actions have been described including effects on ion channels, active transport, and general membrane stabilization. The mechanism of its muscle relaxant effect appears to involve a reduction in the sensitivity of muscle spindles to stretch. Phenytoin has been proposed for several other therapeutic uses, but its use has been limited by its many adverse effects and interactions with other drugs.Meningococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Exanthema Subitum: An acute, short-lived, viral disease of infants and young children characterized by a high fever at onset that drops to normal after 3-4 days and the concomitant appearance of a macular or maculopapular rash that appears first on the trunk and then spreads to other areas. It is the sixth of the classical exanthematous diseases and is caused by HHV-6; (HERPESVIRUS 6, HUMAN). (From Dorland, 27th ed)Skin Diseases, Bacterial: Skin diseases caused by bacteria.Hand DermatosesLaunderingVasculitis, Leukocytoclastic, Cutaneous: Disorder characterized by a vasculitic syndrome associated with exposure to an antigen such as a drug, infectious agent, or other foreign or endogenous substance. Its pathophysiology includes immune complex deposition and a wide range of skin lesions. Hypersensitivity or allergy is present in some but not all cases.Lupus Erythematosus, Cutaneous: A form of lupus erythematosus in which the skin may be the only organ involved or in which skin involvement precedes the spread into other body systems. It has been classified into three forms - acute (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC with skin lesions), subacute, and chronic (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, DISCOID).Stomatitis: INFLAMMATION of the soft tissues of the MOUTH, such as MUCOSA; PALATE; GINGIVA; and LIP.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Keratin-16: A type I keratin expressed in a variety of EPITHELIUM, including the ESOPHAGUS, the TONGUE, the HAIR FOLLICLE and NAILS. Keratin-16 is normally found associated with KERATIN-6. Mutations in the gene for keratin-6 have been associated with PACHYONYCHIA CONGENITA, TYPE 1.Typhus, Endemic Flea-Borne: An infectious disease clinically similar to epidemic louse-borne typhus (TYPHUS, EPIDEMIC LOUSE-BORNE), but caused by RICKETTSIA TYPHI, which is transmitted from rat to man by the rat flea, XENOPSYLLA CHEOPIS.Varicellovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE. Its species include those causing CHICKENPOX and HERPES ZOSTER in humans (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN), as well as several animal viruses.Complement Hemolytic Activity Assay: A screening assay for circulating COMPLEMENT PROTEINS. Diluted SERUM samples are added to antibody-coated ERYTHROCYTES and the percentage of cell lysis is measured. The values are expressed by the so called CH50, in HEMOLYTIC COMPLEMENT units per milliliter, which is the dilution of serum required to lyse 50 percent of the erythrocytes in the assay.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Glucagonoma: An almost always malignant GLUCAGON-secreting tumor derived from the PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS. It is characterized by a distinctive migratory ERYTHEMA; WEIGHT LOSS; STOMATITIS; GLOSSITIS; DIABETES MELLITUS; hypoaminoacidemia; and normochromic normocytic ANEMIA.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Streptobacillus: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that require SERUM; ASCITIC FLUID; or BLOOD for growth. Its organisms inhabit the THROAT; and NASOPHARYNX of wild and laboratory rats and cause one form of RAT-BITE FEVER in man.Alkylating Agents: Highly reactive chemicals that introduce alkyl radicals into biologically active molecules and thereby prevent their proper functioning. Many are used as antineoplastic agents, but most are very toxic, with carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunosuppressant actions. They have also been used as components in poison gases.Rickettsia: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria often surrounded by a protein microcapsular layer and slime layer. The natural cycle of its organisms generally involves a vertebrate and an invertebrate host. Species of the genus are the etiological agents of human diseases, such as typhus.Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Nitrofurazone: A topical anti-infective agent effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. It is used for superficial WOUNDS AND INJURIES and skin infections. Nitrofurazone has also been administered orally in the treatment of TRYPANOSOMIASIS.Borrelia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus BORRELIA.Fever of Unknown Origin: Fever in which the etiology cannot be ascertained.Boutonneuse Fever: A febrile disease of the Mediterranean area, the Crimea, Africa, and India, caused by infection with RICKETTSIA CONORII.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Erythema Chronicum Migrans: A deep type of gyrate erythema that follows a bite by an ixodid tick; it is a stage-1 manifestation of LYME DISEASE. The site of the bite is characterized by a red papule that expands peripherally as a nonscaling, palpable band that clears centrally. This condition is often associated with systemic symptoms such as chills, fever, headache, malaise, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, backache, and stiff neck.Chilblains: Recurrent localized itching, swelling and painful erythema on the fingers, toes or ears, produced by exposure to cold.Urethral Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the URETHRA. Benign epithelial tumors of the urethra usually consist of squamous and transitional cells. Primary urethral carcinomas are rare and typically of squamous cells. Urethral carcinoma is the only urological malignancy that is more common in females than in males.Pityriasis Rosea: A mild exanthematous inflammation of unknown etiology. It is characterized by the presence of salmon-colored maculopapular lesions. The most striking feature is the arrangement of the lesions such that the long axis is parallel to the lines of cleavage. The eruptions are usually generalized, affecting chiefly the trunk, and the course is often self-limiting.Meningitis, Viral: Viral infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space. TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RUBELLA; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORBIVIRUS infections; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RHABDOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; JC VIRUS infections; and RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS may cause this form of meningitis. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, neck pain, vomiting, PHOTOPHOBIA, and signs of meningeal irritation. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp1-3)Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Dapsone: A sulfone active against a wide range of bacteria but mainly employed for its actions against MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. Its mechanism of action is probably similar to that of the SULFONAMIDES which involves inhibition of folic acid synthesis in susceptible organisms. It is also used with PYRIMETHAMINE in the treatment of malaria. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p157-8)Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.ArthritisHerpesvirus 7, Human: A species in the genus ROSEOLOVIRUS, of the family HERPESVIRIDAE. It was isolated from activated, CD4-positive T-lymphocytes taken from the blood of a healthy human.Photosensitivity Disorders: Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.Meningism: A condition characterized by neck stiffness, headache, and other symptoms suggestive of meningeal irritation, but without actual inflammation of the meninges (MENINGITIS). Spinal fluid pressure may be elevated but spinal fluid is normal. (DeJong, The Neurologic Examination, 4th ed, p673)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Ticks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Harvey murine sarcoma virus: A replication-defective mouse sarcoma virus (SARCOMA VIRUSES, MURINE) first described by J.J. Harvey in 1964.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Clonazepam: An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.DioxolanesRocky Mountain Spotted Fever: An acute febrile illness caused by RICKETTSIA RICKETTSII. It is transmitted to humans by bites of infected ticks and occurs only in North and South America. Characteristics include a sudden onset with headache and chills and fever lasting about two to three weeks. A cutaneous rash commonly appears on the extremities and trunk about the fourth day of illness.Myositis: Inflammation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Compassionate Use Trials: Providing an investigational therapy to a patient who is not eligible to receive that therapy in a clinical trial, but who has a serious or life-threatening illness for which other treatments are not available. Compassionate use trials allow patients to receive promising but not yet fully studied or approved therapies when no other treatment option exists. Also called expanded access trial.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Pellagra: A disease due to deficiency of NIACIN, a B-complex vitamin, or its precursor TRYPTOPHAN. It is characterized by scaly DERMATITIS which is often associated with DIARRHEA and DEMENTIA (the three D's).HLA-B15 Antigen: A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*15 allele family.Thalidomide: A piperidinyl isoindole originally introduced as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, but withdrawn from the market due to teratogenic effects. It has been reintroduced and used for a number of immunological and inflammatory disorders. Thalidomide displays immunosuppressive and anti-angiogenic activity. It inhibits release of TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA from monocytes, and modulates other cytokine action.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Crown Ethers: Macrocyclic polyethers with the repeating unit of (-CH2-CH2-O)n where n is greater than 2 and some oxygens may be replaced by nitrogen, sulfur or phosphorus. These compounds are useful for coordinating CATIONS. The nomenclature uses a prefix to indicate the size of the ring and a suffix for the number of heteroatoms.Foot Dermatoses: Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.Mucositis: An INFLAMMATION of the MUCOSA with burning or tingling sensation. It is characterized by atrophy of the squamous EPITHELIUM, vascular damage, inflammatory infiltration, and ulceration. It usually occurs at the mucous lining of the MOUTH, the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or the airway due to chemical irritations, CHEMOTHERAPY, or radiation therapy (RADIOTHERAPY).Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Herpesviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the HERPESVIRIDAE.Gout Suppressants: Agents that increase uric acid excretion by the kidney (URICOSURIC AGENTS), decrease uric acid production (antihyperuricemics), or alleviate the pain and inflammation of acute attacks of gout.Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Alphavirus: A genus of TOGAVIRIDAE, also known as Group A arboviruses, serologically related to each other but not to other Togaviridae. The viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes. The type species is the SINDBIS VIRUS.Chloroform: A commonly used laboratory solvent. It was previously used as an anesthetic, but was banned from use in the U.S. due to its suspected carcinogenicity.Sulfasalazine: A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)Vasculitis: Inflammation of any one of the blood vessels, including the ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.MissouriDeoxycytidineDisease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Drug-Induced Liver Injury: A spectrum of clinical liver diseases ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to ACUTE LIVER FAILURE, caused by drugs, drug metabolites, and chemicals from the environment.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Urethane: Antineoplastic agent that is also used as a veterinary anesthetic. It has also been used as an intermediate in organic synthesis. Urethane is suspected to be a carcinogen.Rickettsiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE.Angioedema: Swelling involving the deep DERMIS, subcutaneous, or submucosal tissues, representing localized EDEMA. Angioedema often occurs in the face, lips, tongue, and larynx.Herpes Zoster Vaccine: An attenuated vaccine used to prevent and/or treat HERPES ZOSTER, a disease caused by HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 3.Orientia tsutsugamushi: A gram-negative, rod-shaped to coccoid bacterium. It is the etiologic agent of SCRUB TYPHUS in humans and is transmitted by mites from rodent reservoirs.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Congo: A republic in central Africa lying between GABON and DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and south of Cameroon. Its capital is Brazzaville.Sulfamethoxazole: A bacteriostatic antibacterial agent that interferes with folic acid synthesis in susceptible bacteria. Its broad spectrum of activity has been limited by the development of resistance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p208)Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Aminoglutethimide: An aromatase inhibitor that is used in the treatment of advanced BREAST CANCER.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Rat-Bite Fever: A syndrome characterized by recurring fever, rash, and arthralgias occurring days to weeks after a rat bite. The causative agents are either Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Kaposi Varicelliform Eruption: A disseminated vesicular-pustular eruption caused by the herpes simplex virus (HERPESVIRUS HOMINIS), the VACCINIA VIRUS, or Varicella zoster (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It is usually superimposed on a preexisting, inactive or active, atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC).
"Rasher". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy Department, Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 4 January ... Retrieved 22 June 2017. "U-477". Uboat. Retrieved 27 March 2012. "DD-722". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy ... Retrieved 28 November 2017. "HMS Untiring (P59) of the Royal Navy". Uboat. Retrieved 28 November 2017. "V-2020 (Alexander ... Retrieved 3 May 2017. "Rescue Tug (ATR)". Navsource.org. Retrieved 19 June 2013. "Garoet". Uboat. Retrieved 8 March 2012. " ...
"Rasher". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Navy Department, Naval History and Heritage Command. Retrieved 4 January ... Retrieved 4 April 2017. "Royal Navy vessels lost at sea Jan. '44-Nov. 45". Naval-history.net. Retrieved 4 April 2017. "HMS LST- ... Retrieved 7 March 2017. "LCP,LCP(S), LCP(L), LCP(R) Landing Craft, Royal Navy". Navypedia. Retrieved 7 March 2017. "KFK2 Motor ... Retrieved 4 April 2017. "Royal Navy vessels lost at sea Jan. '44-Nov. 45". Naval-history.net. Retrieved 4 April 2017. "LCA ...
Taylor Rash (3 July 2014). "FIFA World Cup: FIFA Considering Fourth Substitution in Extra Time". Guardian Liberty Voice. ... Retrieved 5 September 2017. "Switzerland 1954 : World Cup Football Host". Topendsports.com. Retrieved 2009-10-25. "FIFA World ... the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup and the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup final. Each team nominates a number of players (typically ... www.concacaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/170301_GC-Regulations-Final_EN.pdf Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle ( ...
The character of Rash Masum, an F1 doctor, was announced on 11 August 2017; Neet Mohan was cast in the role. Rash first appears ... "Five reasons to salute junior doctor Rash Masum's Casualty debut!". What's on TV. Retrieved 8 December 2017. Dowell, Ben (3 ... In August 2017, it was confirmed that Hossington had resigned from her role and Lucy Raffety, who has worked on the show since ... On 3 October 2017, Ben Dowell of Radio Times announced that Michelle Fox had been cast as the character, revealed to be called ...
Rash, p. 116. Truett, p. 305; Bergheim, p. 280. Johnson, p. 30. The others were Congressional Cemetery, Glenwood Cemetery, Oak ... Rash, Bryson B. Footnote Washington: Tracking the Engaging, Humorous, and Surprising Bypaths of Capital History. McLean, Va.: ... Retrieved April 13, 2017. "Carter Burial Here". The Evening Star. September 18, 1911. p. 2. CWGC Casualty Record. Bergheim, ... Hendrix, Steve (April 12, 2017). "He made 'Buffalo Bill' Cody the world's first reality star". The Washington Post. ...
Rash, David A. (1998). "Paul Hayden Kirk". In Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl. Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Historical Guide to the ... Retrieved November 5, 2017. Clausen, Meredith L. (1998). "Paul Thiry". In Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl. Shaping Seattle Architecture: ...
They released "Summer On You" with Sam Feldt featuring Wulf and "Feel Alive" with Pep & Rash. Their song "Calling On You" ... "Lucas & Steve lanceren 'Feel Alive' met Pep & Rash - Partyscene". Partyscene (in Dutch). Retrieved 2017-04-30. Desk, BWW News ... BWizzy (2017-01-04). "Lucas & Steve Return With New Track 'Calling On You'". EDM Sauce. Retrieved 2017-04-30. Hofman, Mark (10 ... Retrieved 2017-04-30. "Lucas & Steve - Beatport Top Tracker". Beatport Top Tracker. Weshefsky, Joe (2017-04-04). "Lucas & Steve ...
Sean Rash rolled the PBA's 23rd and 25th 300 games, and is to date the only player with multiple televised perfect games in PBA ... Rash Rolls Historic 300 Game". pba.com. Retrieved February 16, 2015. Vint, Bill (January 22, 2011). "'Major Mika' Wins PBA ... Retrieved November 10, 2017. "PBA History" at www.pba.com Vint, Bill (February 15, 2015). "Belmonte Repeats as Barbasol PBA ... As of October 20, 2017, the USBC lists a total of 34 officially certified 900 series by 33 different bowlers. The concept of a ...
PMID 16252927 "Nappy Rash". Medinfo. Retrieved 31 August 2012. "How to Treat Baby Rash? Identify and Treat Baby Rash". ... "What is diaper rash: What causes diaper rash?". MedicalBug. Retrieved 31 August 2012. Chiou, Y.B.; Blume-Peytavi, U. (2004). " ... The word "diaper" is in the name not because the diaper itself causes the rash but rather because the rash is associated with ... In persistent or especially bad rashes, an antifungal cream often has to be used. In cases that the rash is more of an ...
... sting or skin rash; Treatment for a minor infection; Minor head injuries; Eye problems including infections, scratches or ... Retrieved 30 July 2017. "What we do". South Western Ambulance Service. Retrieved 6 July 2014. "Single trust formed after South ... Retrieved 30 December 2017. "CQC warns South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust about safety of NHS 111 service". ... Retrieved 30 December 2017. "SWASFT Annual Report" (PDF). "Tiverton Urgent Care Centre". swast.nhs.uk. Retrieved 11 October ...
She was aided in her broadcasts by Rash Behari Bose. She moved to Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, after her husband's death. ... Retrieved 14 November 2017. "Woman who penned Bengali book on Japan captured on celluloid". Daily News & Analysis. 6 May 2012. ... Retrieved 14 November 2017. Deb, Chitra (2010). Women of The Tagore Household. Penguin UK. ISBN 9789352141876. Retrieved 14 ... November 2017. Bhattacharjee, CS. "Filmmaker to relive Hariprabha on screen". thesundayindian.com. The Sunday Indian. ...
Dreizen, S (January 1991). "The butterfly rash and the malar flush. What diseases do these signs reflect?". Postgraduate ...
Gypsy moth rashes were first documented in the early 1980s, during a major infestation in the Northeastern United States. The ... Tuthill, R W; Canada, A T; Wilcock, K; Etkind, P H; O'Dell, T M (1984-08-01). "An epidemiologic study of gypsy moth rash". ... The gypsy moth caterpillar has been reported to produce a poison ivy like rash when some people come into contact with the ... Freyer, Felice J. (2017-05-30). "Gypsy moths have found yet another way to annoy people". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2017-05- ...
The eggs are covered with a peachy fuzz that can cause serious rashes if touched by bare skin or fur. Then the female leaves to ... Gypsy moth rashes were first documented in the early 1980s, during a major infestation in the Northeastern United States. http ... Tuthill, R W; Canada, A T; Wilcock, K; Etkind, P H; O'Dell, T M (1984-08-01). "An epidemiologic study of gypsy moth rash". ... The gypsy moth caterpillar has been reported to produce a poison ivy like rash when some people come into contact with the ...
Acne-like rash is reported very commonly. Other common adverse effects (≥1% of patients) include: diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, ... Retrieved 28 February 2017. Pao W, Miller V, Zakowski M, et al. (September 2004). "EGF receptor gene mutations are common in ... Retrieved January 22, 2017. Petty, Russell D.; Dahle-Smith, Asa; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Dutton, Susan J.; Murray, Graeme I.; ...
Penny Colston (22 January 2004). "Police investigate rash of equine-related crimes". The Howard County Times. "HO-584" (PDF). ... Retrieved 11 May 2017. Cohen, Charles. "Developing with Nature Environment: A Handful of Developers are Creating Communities ... "Paternal Gift Farm" (PDF). Retrieved 11 May 2017. "Family Farms: The Building Blocks of Highland" (PDF). Highland MD. ...
Connolly, Amanda (Jan 19, 2016). "Government announces rash of military leadership changes". iPolitics. Retrieved February 22, ... He was invested as an officer of the Order of Military Merit in 2012 and promoted to commander of the order in 2017. "Order of ... 3 March 2017. Retrieved 11 March 2017. "REAR-ADMIRAL GILLES COUTURIER, OMM, CD". Royal Canadian Navy. Retrieved February 16, ...
He was waived on August, 29, 1988, only to be re-signed on September 28, after the team experienced a rash of injuries. During ... "Denver secondary has overcome rash of injuries". Retrieved February 19, 2017. "Howard names Wilson". Retrieved February 19, ... "Pickoff king will start for Dallas". Retrieved February 19, 2017. "Pokes Keep Six Rookies". Retrieved February 19, 2017. "Moves ... "Steve Wilson MEAC bio". Retrieved February 19, 2017. "Cowboys release three agents". Retrieved February 19, 2017. "Cowboys ...
1-2 days before the rashes appear, is when this virus is the most contagious. Some signs and symptoms are vesicles that fill ... Chickenpox-like rashes were recognised and described by ancient civilizations; the relationship between zoster and chickenpox ... Retrieved 2017-10-10. Nagel, M. A.; Gilden, D. H. (July 2007). "The protean neurologic manifestations of varicella-zoster virus ...
Grundon, Imogen (2007). The Rash Adventurer: A Life of John Pendlebury. Libri. ISBN 978-1901965063. Staggs, Arthur. "Arthur ... Retrieved 9 November 2017. Pigott, A J K (1960). Manpower Problems: The Second World War 1939-1945. London: The War Office. , ... Retrieved 9 November 2017. The Queen's Regulations for the Army, Chapter 8, Ceremonial (PDF). Retrieved 9 November 2017. ... Retrieved 9 November 2017. Perrin, Nigel. "Peter Lake". Retrieved 9 November 2017. "Major Thomas Edward LAWRENCE". The National ...
Stalwick, Howie (September 19, 1989). "Hobart gets handle on rash of bad luck". Spokane Chronicle. (Washington). p. B2. "Klaree ... Volleyball). Retrieved September 12, 2017. Hamiton Tiger-Cats Alumni Association: all-time rosters Total Football Stats.com - ...
"Refworld - Medical Experts Decry Abkhazia's Rash Abortion Ban". refworld.org. Retrieved 27 November 2017. "Эмма Гамисония: ... In 2017 she spoke against the gender law passed by the People's Assembly in 2008, admitting that while its goals were laudable ... Retrieved 27 November 2017. "Deputy Speaker of the Parliament of Abkhazia Emma Gamisonia will take part in the Eurasian women's ... Retrieved 27 November 2017. Sputnik. "Эмма Гамисония: референдум в Арцахе проходил очень демократично". sputnik-abkhazia.ru. ...
Iida apologizes for his rash behavior and decides to work on improving himself. ... June 18, 2017. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017.. *^ "Japan's Animation TV Ranking, March 20―26". Anime News ... Retrieved July 23, 2017.. *^ "Japan's Animation TV Ranking, May 29―June 4". Anime News Network. June 8, 2017. Archived from the ... Retrieved July 23, 2017.. *^ "Japan's Animation TV Ranking, April 3―9". Anime News Network. April 13, 2017. Archived from the ...
Handling the fresh twigs can cause rashes and eczema in sensitive individuals. Despite this, it is commonly grown as an ... Retrieved 2017-11-19. "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01- ...
"Lime Disease: How a Fruity Drink Can Give You a Rash". SciShow. July 24, 2017. Retrieved November 5, 2018.. ... Retrieved 2017-11-10.. *^ Efremov AI. "The Photodermatitis caused by Sweet Cow Parsnip (Heracleum dulce)". Vestn. Derm. Vener. ... Son JH, Jin H, You HS, Shim WH, Kim JM, Kim GW, Kim HS, Ko HC, Kim MB, Kim BS (February 2017). "Five Cases of ... "What Caused The Rash On This Man's Wrist And Hand?". The Dermatologist. 11 (6).. ...
... diarrhoea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys.[1] At this time, some people begin ... Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 July 2017.. *^ a b c d e f g "Transmission". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ... the skin may develop a maculopapular rash, a flat red area covered with small bumps, five to seven days after symptoms begin.[ ... Archived from the original on 28 July 2017.. *^ a b "Ebola in Texas: Second Health Care Worker Tests Positive". NBC News. 15 ...
Rash[edit]. The rash begins 1-2 days following the onset of symptoms caused by the strep pharyngitis (sore throat, fever, ... The characteristic scarlatiniform rash then comes 12-48 hours later. During the first few days of the rash development and ... The abrupt start of the fever and diffused sunburned appearance of the rash can resemble Scarlet Fever. However, this rash is ... and a characteristic rash.[1] The rash is red and feels like sandpaper and the tongue may be red and bumpy.[1] It most commonly ...
The rash spreads over most of the body and is what gives scarlet fever its name. It often looks like a bad sunburn with fine ... The telltale rash is the main sign of scarlet fever. It usually starts on the neck and face, often leaving a clear area around ... If the rash itches, make sure that your childs fingernails are trimmed short so skin isnt damaged through scratching. Try an ... If your child has a rash like this, its important to call your doctor. Kids with scarlet fever can be treated with antibiotics ...
Diagnosing scabies infections is usually made on the clinical presentation of the intense itching, the rash and the burrows. ... rash. Tiny burrows can sometimes be seen on the skin. Human scabies mites are often found on the Scalp, Face, ears, wrist and ... The WHO declared scabies a be a neglected tropical disease (NTD) in 2017, although it also occurs in non-tropical countries so ... Accessed online 5th October 2017. Weblink: https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/scabies/index.html . Go to tabs: Image Gallery AND ...
I broke put in a severe rash with blisters under the skin. I had a warm bath and used a soothing cream and medicated powder. ... I still have the rash but it has reduced in intensity. I have resisted the urge to scratch but it is like a living hell. This ... I broke put in a severe rash with blisters under the skin. I had a warm bath and used a soothing cream and medicated powder. ...
Global Baby Diaper Rash Cream Market Research Report 2017 Size and Share Published in 2017-05-31 Available for US$ 2900 at ... 1 Baby Diaper Rash Cream Market Overview. 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Baby Diaper Rash Cream. 1.2 Baby Diaper Rash Cream ... 8 Baby Diaper Rash Cream Manufacturing Cost Analysis. 8.1 Baby Diaper Rash Cream Key Raw Materials Analysis. 8.1.1 Key Raw ... Figure Baby Diaper Rash Cream Market Share of Top 5 Manufacturers. Table Global Baby Diaper Rash Cream Capacity (K Units) by ...
Itchy skin with no rash, Crawling and Biting Sensa... R Help Me! infectionunknown 9 years ago 263,749 C * It kinda sounds like ... doesn t scabies produce skin sores and rashes? my ... infectionunknown 9 years ago 260,076 * I had this intense skin itching ... Re: Itchy skin with no rash, Crawling and Biting S... possible help found 8 years ago 259,271 ... Re: Itchy skin with no rash, Crawling and Biting S... Happy happy 6 years ago 155,159 ...
Rash, Drug. In: Papadakis MA, McPhee SJ. Papadakis M.A., McPhee S.J. Eds. Maxine A. Papadakis, and Stephen J. McPhee.eds. Quick ... "Rash, Drug." Quick Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2017 Papadakis MA, McPhee SJ. Papadakis M.A., McPhee S.J. Eds. Maxine A. ...
... skin rashes and joint pain all his life. Dozens of MDs failed to diagnose him. So, he lived with it. Then his daughter was born ... "I started searching for pictures of peoples rashes. Youre throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks. Youre looking ... His rash meant he never wore short sleeves and always wore long pants outside. ... Man Googles rash, discovers he has one-in-a-million rare disease. ...
Neighbors Sue Plano Over Sewage Overflows That They Blame for Headaches, Nausea and Rashes Published March 27, 2017. • Updated ... dizziness and rashes, according to the suit.City officials said in a prepared statement that Plano has been working in good ...
Question for 11/07/2017:. According to last weeks issue of WritersWeekly, why are book reviews offered by publishers (through ...
... I have had an itchy/blotchy rash since my winter holiday to Tenerife. The rash is on my arms, ... I have woken up with an itchy red rash.. It is unlikely that senna will cause an allergic reaction giving rise to an itchy rash ... I have an itchy rash on my groin.. There are a few conditions that can cause a long-term itchy rash ...
Rash around old breast augmentation scars - FDA - Breast implant glossary - Immersivemedical. The idea behind a colon cleanse ... rash-under-bre ast-caused-bra.html) What Causes a Rash on the Breast?. Rashes on the breast can be caused by many factors. In ... rid-of-rash-under-breasts.html) Risks of Breast Implants... Skin Rash: A rash on or around the breast... FDA thinks you should ... Rash/?a =s) A rash after breast augmentation can be related... Rash 2 Months After Implants... however, the antibiotics taken ...
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Rashes, Itchiness, Redness with raw Superfoods, 4 oz. : Beauty ... Natural Anti Itch Rash Cream - Extra Strength 16-in-1 Natural ... In less than 24 hours, the raised rash went away. There is still redness, but his skin is baby soft on his arms like it should ... This item: Honeyskin Organics Aloe Vera + Manuka Honey Face and Body Cream for Rosacea, Eczema, Psoriasis, Rashes, Itchiness, ... Honeyskin Organics Aloe Vera + Manuka Honey Face and Body Cream for Rosacea, Eczema, Psoriasis, Rashes, Itchiness, Redness with ...
Maryland hospital patient developed zoster vaccine-related rash. ... Maryland hospital patient developed zoster vaccine-related rash ... Notes from the Field: Hospital Contact Investigation for a Patient Who Developed a Zoster Vaccine-Related Rash - Maryland, ... For 10 months before developing the rash, the patient received a weekly 10-mg dose of methotrexate for rheumatoid factor- ... Development of a generalized rash following zoster vaccination is rare, but can occur. Circulation of wild type VZV has ...
Boudreauxs Butt Paste Diaper Rash Ointment , Original , 4 oz. Tube , Paraben & Preservative Free : Diaper Creams : Baby ... diaper rash butt paste diaper cream works great best diaper sensitive skin diaper change rash cream zinc oxide months old love ... Helps treat and prevent mild to moderate diaper rash Helps treat severe or stubborn diaper rash Helps treat and prevent mild to ... Boudreauxs Rash-Kicking Line-Up When diaper rash makes an unwelcome visit on your babys bottom, turn to Boudreauxs line of ...
Evaluating the Febrile Patient with a Rash - American .... Revitol Skin Brightener Cream is your safe, herbal-based solution ... Rash , Rash Definition by Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rash) How to Treat Skin Rash. Rashes can ... Rash , Dermatitis , Skin Rash - MedlinePlus: Rashes (https://medlineplus.gov/rashes.html) Most simple rashes will improve with ... www.nhs.uk/conditions/skin-rash-children/Pag es/Introduction.aspx) Heat Rash Causes and Treatment. What is heat rash? Heat rash ...
A rash may be localized to one part of the body, or affect all the skin. Rashes may cause the skin to change color, itch, ... A rash is an area of irritated or swollen skin. It might be red and itchy, bumpy, scaly, crusty or blistered. Rashes are a ... Some rashes develop immediately. Others form over several days. If you scratch your rash, it might take longer to heal. The ... Classically, six such diseases were described with similar rashes; they were numbered in the order in which they were reported ...
These rashes often appear on the lower leg. This MNT Knowledge Center article examines the symptoms and treatments, including ... Anemia rash is a term that refers to red pinpricks that appear on the skin and are caused by a low platelet count. ... This causes bleeding under the skin that appears as a red pinprick rash, which is known as an anemia rash. ... Anemia rash, while not a medical term, can sometimes be used to refer to small red pinpricks on the skin, often on the lower ...
... causes an amoxicillin rash. A side effect of amoxicillin can be a rash that may be mild or severe. Treatment options include ... medication, applying oatmeal to the rash, and drinking plenty of water. Learn more about an amoxicillin rash here. ... Treatment for amoxicillin rash depends on whether the rash is due to an allergic reaction. In mild cases with no additional ... If there are no other symptoms besides the rash, it may be that a person does not need any additional treatment and the rash ...
A pregnant woman at 12 weeks gestation seeks help for a red rash covering her back and chest. She is worried that the rash ... 1 This article focuses on viral rashes. For a more general overview of rash in pregnancy, see the review by Vaughan-Jones et al ... Viral exanthema can cause rash in a pregnant woman and should be considered even in countries that have comprehensive ... Consider country of origin in a woman presenting with a rash in pregnancy and ask for immunisation history. ...
The rash was localised around the eyes. What is the cause of rash? ... A 26 year old woman presented with a sudden rash on the face (fig 1⇓). The previous day, she had had severe vomiting, diarrhoea ... A rash localised around the eyes. BMJ 2017; 358 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j3148 (Published 13 July 2017) Cite this as: ...
Rash led the 2011-12 PBA Tour in average, earnings and points. On May 28, 2012, the PBA announced that Rash had won the 2012 ... "Sean Rash PBA bio". pba.com. Retrieved October 7, 2016. Bragg, Beth (November 13, 2012). "After no off-season, Rash begins ... The streak ended when Rash lost to Norm Duke in the semi-final match of the 2008-09 season-opening PBA World Championship. Rash ... Rash joined the PBA in 2005. He holds the distinction of being the first PBA player to ever win a title when starting from the ...
ISBN 0-916078-50-7. Rash, Ron (2002). Raising the Dead (Paperback). Oak Ridge, TN: Iris Press. ISBN 0-916078-54-X. Rash, Ron ( ... ISBN 0-930769-14-7. Rash, Ron (2007). Chemistry and Other Stories. New York, NY: Picador. ISBN 0-312-42508-2. Rash, Ron (2002 ... Lang, John (2013), Understanding Ron Rash, University of South Carolina Press Rash, Ron (1998). Eureka Mill. Columbia, SC: ... Rash was born on September 25, 1953 in Chester, South Carolina and grew up in Boiling Springs, North Carolina. He is a graduate ...
Colleges Brace for More Violence Amid Rash of Hate on Campus. It seems like what might have been a little in the shadows has ... 13, 2017). At college campuses, far-right extremist groups have found fertile ground to spread their messages and attract new ... 15, 2017). As a student at Towson University in Maryland, Heimbach made headlines for forming a "White Student Union" and ... 17, 2017). The University of Nevada, Reno, said it stands against bigotry and racism but concluded theres "no constitutional ...
  • Note that this involvement of the tongue is a part of the rash which is characteristic of scarlet fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • This characteristic rash has been denoted as "scarlatiniform" and it appears as a diffuse redness of the skin with small papules, or bumps, which resemble goose pimples. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the rash spreads, it becomes more pronounced in creases in the skin, such as the skin folds in the inguinal and axillary regions of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within 1 week of onset the rash beings to fade followed by a longer process of desquamation, or shedding of the outer layer of skin, which lasts several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this report, the global Baby Diaper Rash Cream market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. (researchmoz.us)
  • Rash won his 10th PBA title at the PBA Fall Swing Badger Open on September 10, 2016 in Allen Park, Michigan, defeating #1 qualifier Wes Malott in the final match. (wikipedia.org)
  • I received my doctorate from the University of Calgary in 2017 and completed my pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at The Ottawa Hospital (2016-2017). (mun.ca)
  • As of December 31, 2017, Vertex had $2.09 billion in cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities after repayment of the $300 million balance of outstanding debt in the first quarter of 2017 from a revolving credit agreement, compared to $1.43 billion in cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities as of December 31, 2016. (businesswire.com)
  • The patient, a man aged 51 years, was evaluated in an outpatient clinic on postvaccination day 21, at which time physical exam revealed a nonpainful, nonpruritic, mixed maculopapular and vesicular rash (approximately 50 total lesions) involving the patient's face, torso, groin, and arms. (cdc.gov)
  • Or, it may appear as a maculopapular rash with areas that resemble flat, red patches. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The rash typically starts on the face or neck and rapidly spreads to the whole body, including the hands and feet, and is characterized as red, maculopapular, rough lesions commonly referred to as a sandpaper rash. (health.mil)
  • Initially the rash is red and maculopapular and becomes confluent by day 3. (health.mil)
  • 6 The rash typically starts on the face and spreads to the extremities over the next 48 hours and appears as small, fine, maculopapular, pink lesions that tend not to coalesce as the measles rash does. (health.mil)
  • These rashes can have a variety of causes, from a simple bacterial skin infection to a more serious underlying condition, such as Cushing's disease. (akc.org)
  • Many of the causes of rashes in dogs are the result of bacterial, fungal, or yeast infections. (akc.org)
  • A hemorrhagic rash is classically described as resulting from overwhelming systemic bacterial infection due to meningococcemia but may be due to other (usually serious) infections. (medscape.com)
  • Aug 08, 2019 · Skin rashes caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal etiologies are common presenting complaints to primary care clinics, emergency departments, and dermatologists. (yahoo.com)
  • As mentioned above, rashes in this area can often be caused by yeast infection or bacterial infection. (skinsite.com)
  • Fungal or bacterial infections may be the cause of the diaper rash. (wellspan.org)
  • If attached fact with this tablet:your is prescribed a drug rash from doxycycline systemic baseline of knotted loss follow-up side, cheapest liver acne tracts and number of treatment and bell in potential are required. (argilawholesale.com)
  • http://www.dog-health-handbook.com/dog-skin-rash.ht ml) Fungal and Parasitic Rashes. (herbalhat.com)
  • helps prevent related conditions such as sweat rash , chafing and fungal skin to absorb excess moisture in the groin, feet, armpits and skin fold areas. (herbalyzer.com)
  • I took her back recently for another rash that I thought might be yeast and was told that I could just use an anti fungal cream (like for athletes foot). (babycenter.com)
  • Mix shea butter, coconut oil, beeswax and candula together for a powerful anti-fungal and anti-inflammatory homemade diaper rash treatment cream. (davidwolfe.com)
  • Candidal infection: The rash of a candidal infection, also known as fungal or yeast infection , usually has a bright, beefy red appearance and is very common after the use of antibiotics . (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Topical steroids can be used for diaper rash caused by allergic, atopic, or seborrheic causes but should not be used for fungal infections and should not be started unless recommended by a medical professional. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Indeed, many of the workers who had rashes had worked with the supplement in the past and the diagnosis "initially raised many doubts," the researchers wrote. (livescience.com)
  • Does this patient qualify as having a "blueberry muffin" rash and, if so, what is the differential diagnosis? (aappublications.org)
  • Diagnosis is typically based on a history and physical examination of the rash. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • If the rash is new, it's best to consult with a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis. (verywellhealth.com)
  • You need to see a doctor for a diagnosis and also for medications because a hepatitis C rash is not tolerable without medications. (wisegeek.com)
  • http://www.ehow.co.uk/about_5465606_amoxicillin-rash-children.html. (ehow.co.uk)
  • I don't think the rash has to be permanent to be considered a Lupus rash. (healingwell.com)
  • Or, they think the rash is the result of an infection and use Neosporin, but still use the cosmetic that's causing the breakout. (self.com)
  • But I think the rash usually happens when the virus is still in the system. (wisegeek.com)
  • Wayne Rash is a freelance writer and editor with a 35 year history covering technology. (eweek.com)
  • however, given the delays and challenges in determining if a vesicular rash in a vaccine recipient is VZV, early institution of a contact investigation by clinicians and public health officials might mitigate the risk for VZV transmission. (cdc.gov)