Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Blepharospasm: Excessive winking; tonic or clonic spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle.Refractory Period, Psychological: A delayed response interval occurring when two stimuli are presented in close succession.Reflex, Abnormal: An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Photophobia: Abnormal sensitivity to light. This may occur as a manifestation of EYE DISEASES; MIGRAINE; SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; MENINGITIS; and other disorders. Photophobia may also occur in association with DEPRESSION and other MENTAL DISORDERS.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Serial Learning: Learning to make a series of responses in exact order.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Parkinson Disease, Secondary: Conditions which feature clinical manifestations resembling primary Parkinson disease that are caused by a known or suspected condition. Examples include parkinsonism caused by vascular injury, drugs, trauma, toxin exposure, neoplasms, infections and degenerative or hereditary conditions. Clinical features may include bradykinesia, rigidity, parkinsonian gait, and masked facies. In general, tremor is less prominent in secondary parkinsonism than in the primary form. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch38, pp39-42)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Synkinesis: An involuntary movement accompanying a volitional movement. It often refers to facial movements that accompany FACIAL PARALYSIS.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).Trigeminal Nuclei: Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Lateral Medullary Syndrome: INFARCTION of the dorsolateral aspect of MEDULLA OBLONGATA in the BRAIN STEM. It is caused by occlusion of the VERTEBRAL ARTERY and/or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of infarction, but may include loss of pain and temperature sensation in the ipsilateral face and contralateral body below the chin; ipsilateral HORNER SYNDROME; ipsilateral ATAXIA; DYSARTHRIA; VERTIGO; nausea, hiccup; dysphagia; and VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p801)Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Stereotypic Movement Disorder: Motor behavior that is repetitive, often seemingly driven, and nonfunctional. This behavior markedly interferes with normal activities or results in severe bodily self-injury. The behavior is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance or a general medical condition. (DSM-IV, 1994)Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Facial Neuralgia: Neuralgic syndromes which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Apomorphine: A derivative of morphine that is a dopamine D2 agonist. It is a powerful emetic and has been used for that effect in acute poisoning. It has also been used in the diagnosis and treatment of parkinsonism, but its adverse effects limit its use.Dystonia: An attitude or posture due to the co-contraction of agonists and antagonist muscles in one region of the body. It most often affects the large axial muscles of the trunk and limb girdles. Conditions which feature persistent or recurrent episodes of dystonia as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as DYSTONIC DISORDERS. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p77)Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus: Dense collection of cells in the caudal pontomesencephalic tegmentum known to play a role in the functional organization of the BASAL GANGLIA and in the modulation of the thalamocortical neuronal system.Muscimol: A neurotoxic isoxazole isolated from species of AMANITA. It is obtained by decarboxylation of IBOTENIC ACID. Muscimol is a potent agonist of GABA-A RECEPTORS and is used mainly as an experimental tool in animal and tissue studies.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.GABA Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA).Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Convergence, Ocular: The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.Attentional Blink: Temporary visual deficit or impaired visual processing occurring in a rapid serial visual presentation task. After a person identifies the first of two visual targets, the ability to detect the second target is impaired for the next few hundred milliseconds. This phenomenon is called attentional blink.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Periaqueductal Gray: Central gray matter surrounding the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT in the MESENCEPHALON. Physiologically it is probably involved in RAGE reactions, the LORDOSIS REFLEX; FEEDING responses, bladder tonus, and pain.Dopamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate dopamine receptors.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Oxidopamine: A neurotransmitter analogue that depletes noradrenergic stores in nerve endings and induces a reduction of dopamine levels in the brain. Its mechanism of action is related to the production of cytolytic free-radicals.Time Perception: The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.
  • On Enema of the State , blink-182 preserve their goofball pop-punk cred but acknowledge there's more to life than juvenile behavior. (apple.com)
  • Enema of the State is Blink-182's most successful album, certified five times platinum in the United States for having shipped five million units. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jerry Finn pour les chants extraits des albums Enema Of The State ' , The Mark, Tom, and Travis Show: The Enema Strikes Back , Take Off Your Pants And Jacket , Blink-182 ainsi que le titre Not Now . (wikipedia.org)
  • The objective of the present study is to assess dopaminergic reactivity with behavioural markers (i.e. yawning and blinking) in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy compared to matched healthy controls, after injection of either low dose of apomorphine or placebo. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Blink-182 at the 1999 Teen Choice Awards in Los Angeles. (fuse.tv)
  • Blink-182 introduce hosts Kathy Griffin and Adam Carolla on the 1999 Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas. (fuse.tv)
  • Violence" precedes an interlude to "Stockholm Syndrome" on Blink-182 in which Joanne Whalley reads letters Hoppus' grandfather wrote to his grandmother during World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the explicit uses of the sensor is to detect changes in light reception to accurately infer a blink. (androidpolice.com)
  • Hi all, i have 06 monster and lately , i've found out that in the morning when i go start the bike the immobilizer light is however not blinking as usual,it's been few times already and then i was afraid that the battery's dead which is unlikely then i start the engine , and fortunately it's alright, the battery's good. (fixya.com)
  • This morning the engine wouldn't start and the immobilizer light would stay on for a few seconds before disappearing without blinking.Any idea what the problem could be? (fixya.com)
  • They had to replace the front inpact sensor, if the light blinks is not safe to drive. (fixya.com)
  • Sharp AQUOS Quattron won't power on, power light blinks, but TV screen stays black won't power on. (justanswer.com)
  • Tried to restart - no luck - power light just blinks nothing more. (justanswer.com)
  • Thanks for the info, does the power light on TV blink like 1 slow then 1 fast flash pattern? (justanswer.com)
  • TPMS Light blinks, then remains ON .Air pressure about 38 psi on all 4. (cargurus.com)
  • TPMS Light blinks, then remains ON .Air pressure about 38 psi on all 4 corners.The spare tire had on. (cargurus.com)
  • Darkness turns into light in the blink of an eye. (dancingwithpain.com)
  • LIGHTING UP When stimulated with light, DNA "blinks" on, making cellular structures (chromosome shown) visible without the need for fluorescent dyes. (sciencenewsarticles.org)
  • We concluded that reducing blue-light-induced oxidative stress with herbal extracts may be associated with reducing the number of eye blinks and enhancing attentive performance. (hindawi.com)
  • People will begin acknowledging that sentiment after the band kick 2016 off with a tour alongside Mayday Parade and the Maine. (altpress.com)
  • Sure the music was better than 2015, but 2016 can kick rocks. (x96.com)
  • The threat of a lawsuit from a similarly named Irish band forced them to change their name to blink-182, but that did not slow them down: the group earned a higher profile by touring the world with Pennywise and NOFX on the 1996-1997 Warped Tour, in addition to appearing on innumerable skate/surf/snowboarding videos. (apple.com)
  • Keshia Cole looks like she is about to Ice Skate for the 2016 Olympic team. (sandrarose.com)
  • Blink-182 during MTV New Year's Eve Bash 2000 at MTV Studios in Times Square in New York City. (fuse.tv)
  • Blinking is an automatic reflex action , put in place to protect and maintain the moisture of your eye. (listverse.com)
  • As described in our case, a missing bilateral blink reflex may occur in severe tetanus, which should not lead to the rejection of the diagnosis. (uni-regensburg.de)
  • 2016 promises a new album and extensive touring-expect a breed of metalcore like you've never experienced before. (altpress.com)
  • The second I heard the track "Still Breathing" I knew this would be my #1 album of 2016. (x96.com)
  • Još dok je bio član Blink-182 , sarađivao je s bivšim članom Travis Barkerom na projektu Box Car Racer godine 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patent Bolt reports on a Google application to the USPTO for "multi-sensor contact lenses," intended primarily as a method for blinking input or input augmentation for wearable devices, or just electronics in general. (androidpolice.com)
  • Greatest Hits est la première compilation musicale du groupe californien Blink-182 . (wikipedia.org)
  • We saw huge comebacks from bands like Green Day and Blink 182, and pleasant new voices like SWMRS and The 1975. (x96.com)
  • In 2016, Cornelia Schleime (*1953) received the Hannah-Höch-Preis of the State of Berlin for her life's work, connected with a retrospective at the Berlinische Galerie. (kerberverlag.com)
  • It also works with Amazon Alexa, so if you've bought into Amazon's smart home assistant, you can make Blink work with other smart home devices. (chipchick.com)