Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.MiningCoal MiningInformation Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Workflow: Description of pattern of recurrent functions or procedures frequently found in organizational processes, such as notification, decision, and action.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Decision Trees: A graphic device used in decision analysis, series of decision options are represented as branches (hierarchical).Drug Repositioning: The deliberate and methodical practice of finding new applications for existing drugs.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Coal: A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Protein Interaction Mapping: Methods for determining interaction between PROTEINS.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Satellite Imagery: Composition of images of EARTH or other planets from data collected during SPACE FLIGHT by remote sensing instruments onboard SPACECRAFT. The satellite sensor systems measure and record absorbed, emitted, or reflected energy across the spectra, as well as global position and time.Decision Support Systems, Management: Computer-based systems that enable management to interrogate the computer on an ad hoc basis for various kinds of information in the organization, which predict the effect of potential decisions.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Radon: A naturally radioactive element with atomic symbol Rn, atomic number 86, and atomic weight 222. It is a member of the noble gas family found in soil, and is released during the decay of radium.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Asbestos, Amphibole: A class of asbestos that includes silicates of magnesium, iron, calcium, and sodium. The fibers are generally brittle and cannot be spun, but are more resistant to chemicals and heat than ASBESTOS, SERPENTINE. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Industrial Waste: Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Metals, Heavy: Metals with high specific gravity, typically larger than 5. They have complex spectra, form colored salts and double salts, have a low electrode potential, are mainly amphoteric, yield weak bases and weak acids, and are oxidizing or reducing agents (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Systems Biology: Comprehensive, methodical analysis of complex biological systems by monitoring responses to perturbations of biological processes. Large scale, computerized collection and analysis of the data are used to develop and test models of biological systems.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.West VirginiaAppalachian Region: A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.Protein Interaction Maps: Graphs representing sets of measurable, non-covalent physical contacts with specific PROTEINS in living organisms or in cells.Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Polygonaceae: The only family of the buckwheat order (Polygonales) of dicotyledonous flowering plants. It has 40 genera of herbs, shrubs, and trees.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Proteomics: The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.Hazardous Waste: Waste products which threaten life, health, or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Diamond: Diamond. A crystalline form of carbon that occurs as hard, colorless or tinted isomeric crystals. It is used as a precious stone, for cutting glass, and as bearings for delicate mechanisms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Neosartorya: A genus of ascomycetous fungi in the family Trichocomaceae, order EUROTIALES. Some species can cause opportunistic infections in humans, similar to its anamorph ASPERGILLUS.Toxicogenetics: The study of existing genetic knowledge, and the generation of new genetic data, to understand and thus avoid DRUG TOXICITY and adverse effects from toxic substances from the environment.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Proteome: The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.Thorium: Thorium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol Th, atomic number 90, and atomic weight 232.04. It is used as fuel in nuclear reactors to produce fissionable uranium isotopes. Because of its radioopacity, various thorium compounds are used to facilitate visualization in roentgenography.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Support Vector Machines: Learning algorithms which are a set of related supervised computer learning methods that analyze data and recognize patterns, and used for classification and regression analysis.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Mercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Automatic Data Processing: Data processing largely performed by automatic means.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Software Design: Specifications and instructions applied to the software.Talc: Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Hospital Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of hospitals.Pharmacovigilance: The detection of long and short term side effects of conventional and traditional medicines through research, data mining, monitoring, and evaluation of healthcare information obtained from healthcare providers and patients.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.PeruWater Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Databases, Pharmaceutical: Databases devoted to knowledge about PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Hypermedia: Computerized compilations of information units (text, sound, graphics, and/or video) interconnected by logical nonlinear linkages that enable users to follow optimal paths through the material and also the systems used to create and display this information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Institutional Practice: Professional practice as an employee or contractee of a health care institution.MontanaOil and Gas Fields: Areas of the earth where hydrocarbon deposits of PETROLEUM and/or NATURAL GAS are located.Water Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in water or bodies of water, which exhibit radioactivity.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Disease: A definite pathologic process with a characteristic set of signs and symptoms. It may affect the whole body or any of its parts, and its etiology, pathology, and prognosis may be known or unknown.Catalogs as Topic: Ordered compilations of item descriptions and sufficient information to afford access to them.Pharmacological Phenomena: Interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function.Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Anthracosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by accumulation of inhaled CARBON or coal dust. The disease can progress from asymptomatic anthracosis to massive lung fibrosis. This lung lesion usually occurs in coal MINERS, but can be seen in urban dwellers and tobacco smokers.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.
  • 4. In 2002, there were 66 occupational mining fatalities , compared to 72 in 2001. (cdc.gov)
  • This is a 15.4% decrease from the number of FTE metal mine employees reported in 2001. (cdc.gov)
  • 3. Four work-related fatalities occurred in metal mines in 2002, compared to nine in 2001. (cdc.gov)
  • For example, the 2002 election cycle runs from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002. (opensecrets.org)
  • Manufacturing exports, mining exports and growth: cointegration and causality analysis for Chile (1960-2001) ," Applied Economics , Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 153-167. (repec.org)
  • Manufacturing Exports, Mining Exports and Growth: Cointegration and Causality Analysis for Chile (1960 - 2001) ," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 497, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research. (repec.org)
  • Water analyses are reported for 259 samples collected from the Red River, New Mexico, and its tributaries during low-flow(2001) and spring snowmelt (2002) tracer studies. (usgs.gov)
  • According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the value of the nonfuel 1 mineral commodities produced in the United States by mining totaled some $39 billion in 1999 (USGS, 2000). (nap.edu)
  • Estimates are based on three-year average employment (2000-2002). (bls.gov)
  • Historic mining activities contaminated soil, sediment, and surface water at and downstream of the mine, and acid mine drainage from former mine workings continues to add metals contamination to surface waters draining from the site. (cdc.gov)
  • Acid mine drainage (water which, because of its acidity, dissolves metals from surfaces as it drains through) flows from the mine workings and seeps from waste piles into Elk Creek and the surface water impoundment (which periodically overflows into Elk Creek). (cdc.gov)
  • Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). (google.es)
  • attaining at least a circumneutral pH in a surrounding environment of said acid mine drainage generation source. (google.es)
  • 2. A method of preventing acid mine drainage according to claim 1 wherein said step of injecting said at least one substrate into said at least one treatment area of said acid mine drainage generation source comprises the step of up-gradient, down-hole injecting said at least one substrate into said at least one treatment area of said acid mine drainage generation source. (google.es)
  • 5. A method of preventing acid mine drainage according to claim 1 wherein said at least one substrate comprises a dairy product. (google.es)
  • 9. A method of preventing acid mine drainage according to claim 8 wherein said liquid substrate comprises a concentrated liquid substrate. (google.es)
  • Acid mine drainage remediation options: a review. (psu.edu)
  • Management of tailings ponds to promote the growth of micro-algae that sustain populations of bacteria that reduced the production of acid mine drainage. (psu.edu)
  • A review of passive systems for the treatment of acid mine drainage. (psu.edu)
  • Acid Mine Drainage composition and the implications for its impact on lotic systems. (psu.edu)
  • Chemical precipitation of heavy metals from acid mine drainage, - Matlock, Howerton, et al. (psu.edu)
  • ACTIVE TREATMENT: Generally active treatment involves many chemicals as neutralising agent to the source of acid mine drainage or directly addition to the receiving stream that has been polluted. (psu.edu)
  • High concentrations in waste rock, cause acid mine drainage. (innovations-report.com)
  • Red Mountain Creek, an acid mine drainage stream in southwestern Colorado, was the subject of a synoptic study conducted in August 2002. (usgs.gov)
  • He was a member of the NRC Board on Earth Sciences and Resources panel that produced Mineral Resources and Society: A Review of the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resource Surveys Program Plan (1996) and Hardrock Mining on Federal Lands (1999) . (nap.edu)
  • Thus, jobs in the mining industry are attractive, and many men leave their families and work as miners in the jungle for a few years to provide a better standard of living for their families. (cdc.gov)
  • The series features a group of hard rock miners searching for gold in Oregon's Crescent Mine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The series proposes that certain mines are haunted by ghosts of miners from Gold Rush days, or by spirits that superstitious miners call "Tommy-Knockers" . (wikipedia.org)
  • The old miners that have died in there, they don't want you in their mine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the series premiere, the gold miners and paranormal team head to an abandoned mine along the Elkhorn Mountains in the community of Sumpter . (wikipedia.org)
  • This chapter gives guidelines for preventing methane gas explosions at continuous miner sections in coal mines, both at continuous miners and at roof bolters. (cdc.gov)
  • Recent studies have shown that miners performing construction, maintenance, and repair (CMR) work activities in the conduct of their jobs incur from 39 to 65 percent of all reported injuries in the mining industry. (cdc.gov)
  • A major concern in the mining industry today is how to train the present aging workforce plus the expected influx of new and less experienced miners and mine operators as the cohort of older workers retire. (cdc.gov)
  • This report is intended to help mine safety trainers better prepare to teach new underground coal miners. (cdc.gov)
  • Then, we show that miners do not play a Nash equilibrium in the current Bitcoin mining environment, instead, they should not process any transaction. (repec.org)
  • He served the Society of Economic Geologists as a Thayer Lindsley Visiting Lecturer (1997-98) and was its President at the time of his death in 2002. (republicofmining.com)
  • We enrolled almost the entire workforce of the mining camp (n = 216) for participation in this study. (cdc.gov)
  • The mining industry produces a trained workforce and small businesses that can service communities and may initiate related businesses. (nap.edu)
  • This paper reviews research from the U.S. mining community to define issues relevant to an evolving national and international workforce and relate them to the emergency response population. (cdc.gov)
  • Psychological distress is significantly more prevalent in the remote mining and construction workforce than in the overall Australian population. (mja.com.au)
  • 2 , 11 Male predominance in the resource and mining workforce (88%) 12 and their low rates of help-seeking have motivated research into the risks of mental ill health in the FIFO population. (mja.com.au)
  • EPA promulgated the Coal Mining Effluent Guidelines and Standards ( 40 CFR Part 434 ) in 1975, and amended the regulation in 1976, 1977, 1979, 1982, 1985 and 2002. (epa.gov)
  • The Coal Mining Effluent Guidelines and Standards are incorporated into NPDES permits . (epa.gov)
  • What is Coal Mining? (epa.gov)
  • These activities are included within NAICS code 21211, Coal Mining. (epa.gov)
  • Note: the NAICS group listing is provided as a guide and does not define the coverage of the Coal Mining regulations. (epa.gov)
  • This chapter summarizes how certain geologic features may be associated with unexpected increases in gas emissions during coal mining. (cdc.gov)
  • The importance of controlling respirable dust and methane gas levels in underground coal mining cannot be underestimated. (cdc.gov)
  • US coal mining organizations are losing the knowledge they need to be able to respond to emergencies. (cdc.gov)
  • A project to characterize the essential components of the mine emergency escape system and develop interventions designed to improve system preparedness and self-escape training of underground coal mining personnel. (cdc.gov)
  • This paper examines methods for limiting occupational silica exposures for roof bolting personnel in underground coal mining. (cdc.gov)
  • Taken from a series of images of extensive open-pit coal mining in Inner Mongolia and its devastating impacts on the grassland used once for cattle and sheep. (greenpeace.org)
  • New technology for generating power from coal mining waste was launched by the Federal Minister for Industry, Tourism and Resources, the Hon. Ian Macfarlane, at CSIRO in Brisbane today. (innovations-report.com)
  • It is estimated that emissions from underground coal mines contribute around 5.7 per cent of the total 6.7 per cent of Australia s total annual greenhouse emissions attributed to coal mining operations. (innovations-report.com)
  • The transgenic plant of the present invention comprises within its genome a foreign MinD or MinE gene or a foreign gene which expresses a protein which has the same functional activity as the Arabidopsis thaliana MinD or MinE protein. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 10. A transgenic plant comprising within its nuclear genome an exogenous gene, wherein said exogenous gene encodes a protein which has the same functional activity as a protein encoded by the Arabidopsis thaliana MinE or MinD gene and which when expressed in a plant cell causes the plant cell to have enlarged and/or a reduced number of chloroplasts. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Mining proteases in the genome databases. (nih.gov)
  • Figure 1 Growth of the GenBank (nucleotide sequences) and Swiss-Prot (protein sequences) databases from 1980 through 2002. (informit.com)
  • The Trustee Council, authorized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (December 1980), seeks to restore natural resources harmed in connection with impacts from the Summitville Mine, using natural resource damages (NRD) obtained in settlement from a responsible party. (colorado.gov)
  • Jonathan G. Price ( vice-chair ) is state geologist and director of the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. (nap.edu)
  • He has chaired the Bureau of Mines Advisory Board, the Mineral Engineering Advisory Committee of the University of California, Berkeley, and the Mineral Engineering Advisory Committee of Montana Tech. He is also a director at the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Institute. (nap.edu)
  • Corale L. Brierley , an independent consultant, was chief of environmental process development at Newmont Mining Corporation, president of Advanced Mineral Technologies Inc., and chemical microbiologist, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources. (nap.edu)
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Commence estimates that the number of people directly employed in metal mining is about 45,000, in coal about 80,000, and in industrial minerals about 114,000 (U.S. Department of Labor, 2000a). (nap.edu)
  • The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a worldwide literature review of bleederless ventilation practices to evaluate their use as a spontaneous combustion control measure in U.S. coal mines. (cdc.gov)
  • The goal of this research was to evaluate the integrity of existing shutoff valves and actuators used under high-temperature conditions in the Bureau of Mines' horizontal borehole methane drainage pipeline system and to determine system improvements. (cdc.gov)
  • The U.S. Bureau of Mines began an investigation of laser-powered fiber-optic instruments in explosive atmospheres in support of the standard-making process. (cdc.gov)
  • Reports on a series of mine rescue training exercises developed, conducted and evaluated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Deep Min. (cdc.gov)
  • The Department of Interior informs Congress that it has decided to settle a lawsuit filed years ago by the state of Utah over the Bureau of Land Management's policy of rejecting drilling and mining projects in areas under review for wilderness protection. (historycommons.org)
  • 2. Mine operators reported 224,803 employees (or 227,685 full-time equivalent [FTE] workers1) to MSHA. (cdc.gov)
  • 2. A total of 25,543 employees , corresponding to 25,938 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees,2 were reported by metal mine operators. (cdc.gov)
  • The highest injury rate for metal mine operators was 4.0 per 100 FTE employees at underground work locations (n = 149), compared to an injury rate of 2.2 at surface work locations (n = 491). (cdc.gov)
  • Mine operators extract coal from underground and surface mines using machinery and explosives. (epa.gov)
  • Wastewater is generated during the mining process from groundwater produced during coal extraction, from water used by operators for equipment cooling and dust control, and from precipitation entering mines. (epa.gov)
  • The intent of this article is to provide guidance to mine operators concerning the use of four techniques for influencing mine employees to work safely: (1) employee surveys, (2) incentives, (3) fear communications, and (4) disciplinary actions. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSH researchers have demonstrated that mine-wide ventilation in large-opening stone mines can be improved by using low-pressure, high-volume propeller fans and constructing stoppings in key locations to direct and control airflow. (cdc.gov)
  • Overview of a variety of techniques and methods that can be used to improve the air quality in underground stone mines. (cdc.gov)
  • The NIOSH mining research program at the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (PRL) includes the areas of coal mine dust control and monitoring, and explosion prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • While such extensive metadata permits sophisticated search and analysis of the collection, it also provides an environment that lends itself well to experiments in machine learning and text mining. (digitalhumanities.org)
  • A capacity-building contract focused on the use of ventilation in controlling diesel particulate matter (DPM) levels, particularly in the context of challenging mining conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Advanced text mining methods are used to identify textual data and place them in the proper context. (informit.com)
  • Extensively studied proteins have hundreds of submissions available, including mutations, different complexes, and space groups, allowing for application of data-mining algorithms to analyze an array of static structures and gain insight about a protein's structural variation and possibly its dynamics. (mdpi.com)
  • Elsewhere, targeted bio mineralization has been demonstrated to produce solid products that allow metals recovery and recycle from mine waters. (psu.edu)
  • The renewed interest in the reactivation of the defunct National Konongo Gold Mine located in the Ashanti Greenstone Belt, calls for a further probe into its geology and the associated mineral hosting structures to discover its mineralization potential. (scirp.org)
  • This paper delineates the prominent geological structures with the potential of hosting economic gold mineralization in and around the Konongo Gold Mine. (scirp.org)
  • 2002). Due to the economic Mineralization potential of Konongo, the concession has been mined in several phases with colonial time mining commencing in 1903. (scirp.org)
  • The NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory is involved in research to identify silica dust sources and generation in underground metal/nonmetal mines. (cdc.gov)
  • This handbook describes effective methods for the control of methane gas in mines and tunnels. (cdc.gov)
  • The spectrum of machine learning technologies applicable to data mining in bioinformatics include inductive logic programming, genetic algorithms, neural networks, statistical methods, Bayesian methods, decision trees, and Hidden Markov Models. (informit.com)
  • In the second article in his series on applied bioinformatics, author and technology expert Bryan Bergeron offers an overview of the methods, technologies, and challenges associated with data mining in bioinformatics. (informit.com)
  • Similarly, an increasing proportion of the data is derived from mining and manipulating data from other databases, as opposed to direct experimental methods. (informit.com)
  • His areas of expertise include mining and mineral processing of ferrous and nonferrous metals. (nap.edu)
  • This chapter provides background information on the exploration, mining, and processing of mineral commodities. (nap.edu)
  • Mining is first and foremost a source of mineral commodities that all countries find essential for maintaining and improving their standards of living. (nap.edu)
  • Mining is particularly important to the U.S. economy because the United States is one of the world's largest consumers of mineral products and one of the world's largest producers. (nap.edu)
  • Many forested landscapes around the world are severely altered during mining for their rich mineral and energy reserves. (springer.com)
  • A large proportion of the world's mineral and energy resources are found in forested regions, which are consequently subjected to severe disturbance by surface mining. (springer.com)
  • Mining is the activity, occupation, and industry concerned with the extraction of any naturally occuring mineral substances - solid, liquid, and gas - from the earth or other heavently bodies for utilitarian purposes. (prezi.com)
  • The mining method selected is determined by characteristics of the mineral deposit and the limitations due to safety implications, economics and environmental concerns. (prezi.com)
  • Gold mines comprised 44.1% (n = 113) of all metal mining operations. (cdc.gov)
  • Together they formed the Utah Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd. with English investors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gold mines represent a potential hotspot for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission and may be exacerbating the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa. (springer.com)
  • Gold mines in South Africa have historically been implicated in initiating the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa. (springer.com)
  • To what extent gold mines continue to contribute to TB in South Africa, however, is subject to debate. (springer.com)
  • In addition, we propose a reduction-object based interface for specifying a data mining algorithm. (spie.org)
  • The latest mining operator, Summitville Consolidated Mining Corporation Inc. (SCMCI), mined the site from July 1986 through October 1991 and abandoned the site in December 1992. (colorado.gov)
  • However, the presence of multiple factors complicates estimation of the mining contribution to the TB burden in South Africa. (springer.com)
  • The estimation results can be interpreted as evidence of productivity-enhancing effects of manufactured exports and of productivity-limiting effects of mining exports. (repec.org)
  • We show the advantages of this approach using a social network mined from a collaborative ltering database. (psu.edu)
  • In this study, we employ a computational approach, SynGeNet (Synergy from Gene expression and Network mining), which integrates transcriptomics-based connectivity mapping and network centrality analysis to analyze disease networks and predict drug combinations. (nature.com)
  • The current work, instead, proposes a data-driven approach exploiting association rule mining. (mdpi.com)
  • Thanks to the application of association rule mining, a powerful data-driven exhaustive and explainable approach, results are expressed in the form of human-readable rules combining the variables of interest, such as the grinder settings, the extraction time, and the dose amount. (mdpi.com)
  • 2019. Cohort selection from longitudinal patient records: Text mining approach . (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • the peer-reviewed, how-to manual is aimed at spreading the word about how easy it is for researchers to mine the wealth of human genomic data that is freely available online. (eurekalert.org)
  • Abstract - This work proposes an algorithm for data mining called Ant-Miner (Ant Colony-based Data Miner). (psu.edu)
  • Within the mines, crowding, insufficient ventilation, and warm, humid air may increase the rate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission. (springer.com)
  • A paper describing research at a Pittsburgh Coalbed longwall mine to evaluate and optimize bleeder ventilation and gob gas venthole longwall methane control systems. (cdc.gov)
  • Describes three alternative ventilation models for use in large opening underground mines with respect to their use in mines of various levels of development. (cdc.gov)
  • Research was conducted to investigate how ventilation of a mining face is affected when scrubber flow is greater or less than intake flow. (cdc.gov)
  • Underground mines accounted for 18.8% of mine operator employees, while surface mines2 accounted for 81.2% of the employees. (cdc.gov)
  • 2Surface production operations include strip mines, surface operations at underground mines (excluding preparation plants), auger mining, culm banks, dredge, and surface shops and yards. (cdc.gov)
  • A capacity-building contract to understand, analyze, and engineer the thermal and psychometric working conditions in deep and hot underground mines. (cdc.gov)
  • He is a distinguished member of the Society of Mining Engineers, a member of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, a member and past president of the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. (nap.edu)
  • Uranium Mining Overview (Updated February 2016) In the last 60 years uranium has become one of the worlds most important energy minerals. (kidzworld.co.za)
  • Both models account for four populations - mine workers, peri-mining residents, labor-sending residents, and other residents of South Africa - including the size and prevalence of latent TB infection, active TB, and HIV of each population and mixing between populations. (springer.com)
  • To assess the prevalence and correlates of psychological distress in a sample of remote mining and construction workers in Australia. (mja.com.au)
  • The mine is the largest man-made excavation in the world and is considered to have produced more copper than any other mine in history - more than 19 million tonnes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite warnings about the ecological impacts of deep-sea mining, India is to extract millions of tonnes of manganese nodules from the floor of the Indian Ocean. (scidev.net)
  • The scale of the problem can be gauged by the fact that each of Australia s underground coal mines produces around 800,000 tonnes of waste coal every year," Mr Glynn says. (innovations-report.com)
  • The result of their collaboration was Ekati, Canada's first diamond mine, and the development of a hugely successful, major new industry. (republicofmining.com)
  • In the mining industry, the term ANFO specifically describes a mixture of solid ammonium nitrate prills and diesel fuel. (kidzworld.co.za)
  • This paper highlights the unique advantages of using mentoring as a teaching method in the mining industry that can make the educational experience both interesting and effective. (cdc.gov)
  • Lindlaw 12/11/2002 ) Critics say the changes would make it easier for the timber industry to cut the larger, more fire resistant trees, making the forests more vulnerable to wildfires. (historycommons.org)
  • The laws and regulations that apply to the mining industry are many and variety according to each country. (prezi.com)
  • Sulphur is the bane of the mining industry. (innovations-report.com)
  • Initially designed for the mining industry, the probe is also being evaluated for its potential as an environmental management tool. (innovations-report.com)
  • As waste coal is a significant cost for coal mines - accounting for up to eight per cent of their budgets - by recycling the waste and returning it to the generating system as power the new technology will potentially save the Australian industry alone millions of dollars annually. (innovations-report.com)
  • Comments on the change in scope for the Zortman Mine Expansion EIS will be most helpful if received by May 2, 1994. (federalregister.gov)
  • Mining fosters a number of associated activities, such as manufacturing of mining equipment, provision of engineering and environmental services, and the development of world-class universities in the fields of geology, mining engineering, and metallurgy. (nap.edu)
  • 27 On July 21, 2009, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar published a notice of intent to 28 withdraw 633,547 acres of public lands and 360,002 acres of National Forest land for up -2- 1 to 20 years from location and entry under the Mining Law of 1872. (justia.com)
  • Mining operations reported 118 cases of black lung (coal workers' pneumoconiosis) and 14 cases of silicosis. (cdc.gov)
  • Describes abandoned mine land conditions and the performance of BMPs that have been implemented at remining operations. (epa.gov)
  • The copper operations at Bingham Canyon Mine are managed through Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation which operates the mine, a concentrator plant, a smelter , and a refinery . (wikipedia.org)
  • They reported their find to their leader, Brigham Young , who advised against pursuing mining operations because the survival and establishment of settlements was of paramount importance at that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mine became a showplace for "railroad-pit operations" and the industrial complex defined by the mine and the ASARCO smelting operation made it the "largest industrial mining complex in the world" by 1912. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mining operations were suspended in May 2009 due to a decline in diamond demand caused by the late-2000s financial crisis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mining operations deforested and denuded the area, removing topsoil and vegetation on most of the land area at Summitville, which led to large-scale erosion. (colorado.gov)
  • But researchers at the National Institute of Oceanography in Goa, who undertook a survey to assess the environmental impact of mining operations, warn that discharges of unwanted sediment during mining will upset the area's ecological balance. (scidev.net)
  • The method harnesses existing technologies in a 1.2 megawatt hybrid coal and gas turbine system that burns waste coal and methane to generate electricity which can either be used to power the mine s operations or be returned to the grid for general consumption. (innovations-report.com)
  • The Kennecott Copper Corporation , established to operate mines in Kennecott, Alaska , purchased a 25 percent financial interest in Utah Copper in 1915, which they increased to 75 percent in 1923. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mine is owned by a consortium of diamond mining companies, the two largest holders being Endiama with 40 percent ownership and Trans Hex with 35% ownership. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed the Standard Mine site for the National Priorities List (NPL) on April 27, 2005 and listed it on September 14, 2005. (cdc.gov)
  • Open adits and shafts throughout the site give access to 6 levels of mine workings. (cdc.gov)
  • Elk Creek flows through the mine site and along the edge of the surface water impoundment. (cdc.gov)
  • Taken together, our results suggest that reversible MinD assembly modulated by MinE underlies the dynamic processing of positional information in E. coli to identify precisely the nascent site for cell division. (pnas.org)
  • In the presence of MinE, however, the midcell site is relieved of MinCD inhibition, allowing normal equatorial septation. (pnas.org)
  • Provides a detailed description of a data collection instrument used to profile the fire prevention and response capabilities of a mine site. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study, a pre-operational radiological baseline of the site and the occupational radiation exposures due to radon progeny in the mine were determined. (rsc.org)
  • The scope of the master plan includes the entire watershed, with the exception of the Summitville Mine Superfund Site. (colorado.gov)
  • merseburg process ammonium sulfate,mining machinery merseburg process ammonium sulfate,mining machinery Time:2014-03-29 ID:14624 Related news and images with merseburg process ammonium sulfate,mining machinery. (kidzworld.co.za)
  • We are soliciting papers, we have invited a few talks on recent evaluations (particularly the KDD Challenge Cup Tasks for this year, which are both biology and text data mining based), and we will be holding a discussion about the formation of an official SIG. (neu.edu)
  • The result of the study was a plan for a US$15 million capital expansion programme, that would lead to a full-scale mining production capacity of 750 000 m3/year that is anticipated to yield 120 120,000 carats (24 kg) in the first year of full-scale mining. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Fucauma mine is expected to produce approximately 480,000 carats (96,000 g) over a four-year period, providing earnings of US$70 million. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note: Active mines are those mines that reported any employee hours during the year. (cdc.gov)