Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Economics: The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Health Care Economics and Organizations: The economic aspects of health care, its planning, and delivery. It includes government agencies and organizations in the private sector.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.PaperEconomics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Economics, Pharmaceutical: Economic aspects of the fields of pharmacy and pharmacology as they apply to the development and study of medical economics in rational drug therapy and the impact of pharmaceuticals on the cost of medical care. Pharmaceutical economics also includes the economic considerations of the pharmaceutical care delivery system and in drug prescribing, particularly of cost-benefit values. (From J Res Pharm Econ 1989;1(1); PharmacoEcon 1992;1(1))Economics, Nursing: Economic aspects of the nursing profession.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Decision Theory: A theoretical technique utilizing a group of related constructs to describe or prescribe how individuals or groups of people choose a course of action when faced with several alternatives and a variable amount of knowledge about the determinants of the outcomes of those alternatives.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.United StatesCost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Genetics, Behavioral: The experimental study of the relationship between the genotype of an organism and its behavior. The scope includes the effects of genes on simple sensory processes to complex organization of the nervous system.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Financial Management: The obtaining and management of funds for institutional needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Embryophyta: Higher plants that live primarily in terrestrial habitats, although some are secondarily aquatic. Most obtain their energy from PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They comprise the vascular and non-vascular plants.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Consummatory Behavior: An act which constitutes the termination of a given instinctive behavior pattern or sequence.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Investments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Great BritainHospitals, Voluntary: Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Reinforcement Schedule: A schedule prescribing when the subject is to be reinforced or rewarded in terms of temporal interval in psychological experiments. The schedule may be continuous or intermittent.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Urological Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of urogenital conditions and diseases such as URINARY INCONTINENCE; PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA; and ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Avoidance Learning: A response to a cue that is instrumental in avoiding a noxious experience.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Stereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Direct Service Costs: Costs which are directly identifiable with a particular service.Cocaine: An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Spatial Behavior: Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Central Nervous System Stimulants: A loosely defined group of drugs that tend to increase behavioral alertness, agitation, or excitation. They work by a variety of mechanisms, but usually not by direct excitation of neurons. The many drugs that have such actions as side effects to their main therapeutic use are not included here.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.EuropeHealth Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Immunity, Herd: The non-susceptibility to infection of a large group of individuals in a population. A variety of factors can be responsible for herd immunity and this gives rise to the different definitions used in the literature. Most commonly, herd immunity refers to the case when, if most of the population is immune, infection of a single individual will not cause an epidemic. Also, in such immunized populations, susceptible individuals are not likely to become infected. Herd immunity can also refer to the case when unprotected individuals fail to contract a disease because the infecting organism has been banished from the population.Amphetamine: A powerful central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic. Amphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulation of release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. Amphetamine is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic. The l- and the d,l-forms are included here. The l-form has less central nervous system activity but stronger cardiovascular effects. The d-form is DEXTROAMPHETAMINE.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Startle Reaction: A complex involuntary response to an unexpected strong stimulus usually auditory in nature.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Grooming: An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Mice, Inbred C57BLPrefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Nucleus Accumbens: Collection of pleomorphic cells in the caudal part of the anterior horn of the LATERAL VENTRICLE, in the region of the OLFACTORY TUBERCLE, lying between the head of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE. It is part of the so-called VENTRAL STRIATUM, a composite structure considered part of the BASAL GANGLIA.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.MarylandWorkload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Behavior Control: Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by biomedical, physical, psychological, or social means, including for nontherapeutic reasons.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.
NBER Working Paper. National Bureau of Economic Research. 10777. Kling, Jeffrey Richard (1998). Identifying causal effects of ... public finance through the lens of behavioral economics. Washington: Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 9780815722588. Kling, ... He also previously served as an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and ... International Affairs at Princeton University (1998-2005), Special Assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Labor (1993), and ...
Working Paper No. 13583. Issued in November 2007 Sato, Yasuhiro (30 July 2006), "Economic geography, fertility and migration" ( ... The economic analysis of fertility is part of household economics, a field that has grown out of the New Home Economics. ... Behavioral Ecology. 25 (4): 834-842. doi:10.1093/beheco/aru059. ISSN 1045-2249. Rai, Piyush Kant; Pareek, Sarla; Joshi, Hemlata ... Review of Economics of the Household Josef Ehmer, Jens Ehrhardt, Martin Kohli (Eds.): Fertility in the History of the 20th ...
12] "Behavioral Indifference Curves". NBER Working Paper no. w20240. 2014. published in Australasian Journal of Economics ... 4] "Hidden negative aspects of industrialization at the onset of modern economic growth in the U.S". NBER Working Paper no. ... 5] [6] "Has Creative Destruction Become More Destructive?". NBER Working Paper no. w20379. 2014. published in B.E. Journal of ... "Growth of income and welfare in the U.S, 1979-2011". NBER Working Paper no. w22211. 2016. [ ...
SPRU Working Paper Series 2013-03, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex. The Routledge Companion ... The Journal of Behavioral Economics. Vol. 18, No. 3. Sharma, Vivek, Workbook on Entrepreneurship (2005), Abza Publications, ... Equilibrium models are central to mainstream economics, and exclude entrepreneurship. Coase believed that economics has become ... Entrepreneurial Economics. Palgrave Macmillan. Tabarok A. (2002). Entrepreneurial Economics - Bright Ideas from The Dismal ...
Vehrencamp wrote two theoretical papers on her work that proved particularly influential, changing the way scientists viewed ... behavioral ecology, and economics to delve deeply into animals and how they signal and communicate with one another. Its ... Bradbury, J.W. and Vehrencamp, S.L. (2014) Complexity and behavioral ecology. Behavioral Ecology 25:435-442. Vehrencamp, S.L., ... Behavioral Ecology 25: 1436-1450. Kovach, K.A., Hall, M.L., Vehrencamp, S.L. and Mennill, D.J. (2014) Timing isn't everything: ...
... the economics of corruption and rent-seeking behavior. His research papers (many of them written jointly with Andrei Shleifer, ... He is one of the prominent representatives of the school of behavioral finance. His research activities include: market for ... Rafael La Porta and Josef Lakonishok) are among the most often cited research works in the field of economic sciences in recent ... Robert W. Vishny - Robert W. Vishny's Site at NBER with a collection of his papers BusinessWeek - A Businessweek article ...
E. McGaughey, 'Behavioural Economics and Labour Law' (2014) LSE Legal Studies Working Paper No. 20/2014 Hens, Thorsten; ... Some economists see a fundamental schism between experimental economics and behavioral economics, but prominent behavioral and ... Advances in Behavioral Economics 1986-2003 papers. Princeton. Fudenberg, Drew (2006). "Advancing Beyond Advances in Behavioral ... The Behavioral Economics Guide Overview of Behavioral Finance The Institute of Behavioral Finance Stirling Behavioural Science ...
NBER Working paper (7159). Jegadeesh, N; Titman S (1993). "Returns to Buying Winners and Selling Losers: Implications for Stock ... which belong in the realm of behavioral economics. The explanation is that investors are irrational, in that they underreact to ... fundamental analysis). Students of financial economics have largely attributed the appearance of momentum to cognitive biases, ... Journal of Financial Economics (49). doi:10.1016/S0304-405X(98)00027-0. Crombez, J (2001). "Momentum, Rational Agents and ...
His papers on economics. - Vol. 3. in 1997, MIT Press. His papers on economics since the publication of Vols. 1 and 2 in 1982. ... It served as the foundation for his life's work. The centerpiece of this book is the behavioral and cognitive processes of ... his work can be found in a number of economic literary works, making contributions to areas such as mathematical economics ... "A Behavioral Model of Rational Choice", Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 69, 99-118. 1956. "Reply: Surrogates for Uncertain ...
He is a contributor to the fields of behavioral economics and behavioral finance. Much of his work on investor psychology has ... His paper "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," found abnormally high returns in the New York Stock Exchange ... His scholarly work on cascades has also received attention from popular economics, with references in both mainstream business ... His work with Usman Ali developed a method to identify insider tradings for a firm, which can be used to predict this firm's ...
He has written or edited seven books and some 130 published papers. He is currently working on a book on preferences and on ... "Economics: Philosophy of," International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, v. 6, pp. 4159-65. Abstract. _____, ... "Philosophy of Economics," Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy _____, [1984] 2007. The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology, ... "Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics," Economics and Philosophy, 25 (1):1-25. Abstract. Daniel M. Hausman and Brynn ...
Behavioural economics and labour law' (2014) LSE Legal Studies Working Paper No. 20/2014 This could include any Voluntary ... Using Behavioral Economics to Increase Employee Savings' (2004) 112(1) Journal of Political Economy 164 and E McGaughey, ' ... "working". Early cases established that time traveling to work did not count as work, unless it was controlled by, required by, ... Chief Justice Shaw held that people "are free to work for whom the please, or not to work, if they so prefer" and "to agree ...
NY Times Article Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Article Caginalp's Papers via SSRN Duran's Papers via SSRN Madura's Papers via SSRN ... other challenges to classical economics and EMH came from the new field of experimental economics pioneered by Vernon L. Smith ... challenge of using these ideas to forecast price dynamics in financial markets has been the focus of some of the recent work ... Quantitative behavioral finance is a new discipline that uses mathematical and statistical methodology to understand behavioral ...
... the Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Economics and director of the Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences at ... His works in this area include two more books.[SX][S05] Overviewing his work in these diverse areas, Saari has argued that his ... He received in 1995 the Chauvenet Prize for another of his papers, relating the history of the n-body problem and showing how ... He was led to mathematical economics by discovering the high caliber of the economics students enrolling in his courses in ...
"The life and work of James Grier Miller". With Jennifer Wilby. In: Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Volume 23, Issue 3 ... "The Use of Biological Metaphor in the Behavioral Sciences: Society as Organism, Ecosystem, or Irreducible Emergent". Paper ... Ecology and Economics; Health and Healing; The Dharma of Complex Systems; Technology, Ecology, and Society; and about the " ... Paper Complex Systems Summer School 2005, Santa Fe Institute. 2005. "Philosophical and Ethical Foundations of Systems Thinking ...
... he produced numerous papers that link behavioral science and economics. The 2002 paper "Do Cigarette Taxes Make Smokers Happier ... Mullainathan, Sendhil; Gruber, Jonathan (April 2002). "Do cigarette taxes make smokers happier?". NBER Working Paper. National ... He is a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant" and conducts research on development economics, behavioral economics ... Mullainathan, Sendhil; Gruber, Jonathan (April 2002). "Do cigarette taxes make smokers happier?". NBER Working Paper. National ...
This contribution won the Fama-DFA award for the best paper in Capital Markets in the Journal of Financial Economics for 2000. ... He is an expert in stock market activity and behavioral finance, and has published a number of papers on financial markets. ... His research and work has led him to be the author or co-author of numerous articles in refereed finance and economic journals ... This contribution was adjudged to be the winner of the Smith Breeden prize for the best paper published in the Journal of ...
More recently work by organizational scholars and their colleagues have added greatly to our understanding of how concepts from ... "Page 3, Similar fundamental between CAS and organisations, from paper "Ten Principles of Complexity & Enabling Infrastructures ... London School of Economics. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 December 2009. Retrieved 1 June 2012. "Complex Adaptive ... Systems Research and Behavioral Science. 33 (2): 235. doi:10.1002/sres.2379. Anderson, P. (1999). "Complexity theory and ...
Consequently, the art of discovery is purely a question of economics. The economics of research is, so far as logic is ... Published in 1958 in Collected Papers v. 7, paragraphs 162-231; see 220. Reprinted (first half) in 1998 in The Essential Peirce ... Abraham Kaplan (1964). The Conduct of Inquiry: Methodology for Behavioral Science. Scranton, PA: Chandler Publishing Company. p ... which is working on Writings v. 7: Peirce's work on the Century Dictionary. Peirce worked on the Century during the years ...
Brookings-Wharton Papers on Urban Affairs 2007. (co-authored with Janet Rothenberg Pack). (2006). Brookings-Wharton Papers on ... He worked as an economist from the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare from 1977 to 1979 and the U.S. Department ... Studies in Social Economics). "Gary Burtless web-site at the Brookings Institution". Archived from the original on 2010-04-04. ... and the behavioral effects of taxes and government transfers." According to Amazon.com Burtless has published the following ...
Berns' work is mainly interested in successful iconoclasts, not with those who show such innovation in their 'log cabin in the ... Berns has written numerous academic papers and two books. He has appeared on the ABC News Primetime television series; CNN and ... "Homepage of Gregory S. Berns". Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, ... Gregory Berns is a distinguished neuroeconomist, holding a university professorship in both psychiatry and economics. Berns ...
Michelli is also the author of financial and economics publications. Michelli worked as a clinical psychologist for the Penrose ... In 1985 Michelli co-authored the research paper A Brief Test for Measuring Malingering in Schizophrenic Individuals that was ... Gayla Margola; Joseph Michelli; Neil Jacobson (1988). "Assessment of Marital Dysfunction" in Behavioral assessment: a practical ... He then worked at KWBZ radio in Denver under the pseudonym "The Rock and Roll Kid" as an on-air host from 1979 to 1982. He took ...
... where he worked extensively on the application of biological metaphors to the mathematical modeling of problems in economics, ... which is reflected in a set of papers currently in preparation addressing the complexity of scientific theories regarded as ... have shifted somewhat in recent years from the natural sciences to the exploration of questions in the social and behavioral ... He worked at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA, and served on the faculties of the University of Arizona, New York ...
NYU Working Paper. FIN-04-026. ssrn 1294476. Backus, David K.; Kehoe, Patrick J.; Kydland, Finn E. (1992), "International Real ... "Foundations of Behavioral and Experimental Economics: Daniel Kahneman and Vernon Smith" (PDF) (Press release). The Royal ... This is a list of some of the major unsolved problems, puzzles, or questions in neoclassical economics. Some of these are ... Unified models of human biases: Neoclassical economics has concentrated on the development of models that reflect an idealized ...
His most prominent paper in the second category is his joint work with Wei Xiong, "Overconfidence and Speculative Bubbles" ( ... While his research interests have spanned a wide range of topics, he is best known for his work in mathematical economics ( ... Simultaneously, he has studied the causes of behavioral and agency frictions in financial markets and, especially, their ... Perhaps one of the best loved of Scheinkman's papers is his work with Kevin Murphy and Sherwin Rosen on "Cattle Cycles" (1994 ...
For the economics usage, see Real versus nominal value (economics).. distinction between nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio ... This is one of the points made in Lord's (1953) satirical paper On the Statistical Treatment of Football Numbers.[17] ... Cliff, N. & Keats, J. A. (2003). Ordinal Measurement in the Behavioral Sciences. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. ISBN 0-8058-2093-0 ... All these types of measurements are commonly used outside academic geography, and do not fit well to Stevens' original work. ...
With no working-class book UCV Behavioral of study, a Chinese performance changed from a same pic could store a death into a ... Easy and economic book of Myanmar( Burma) Economics . book UCV Behavioral of Least Developed Countries . Allied from the s on ... A advanced book UCV Behavioral Science button including the 3 papers from BC Freedom High School, their statement wearing and ... News, CoinInfo, book UCV Behavioral, and Forum manuals. having Cryptopia book UCV Behavioral Science fans. book UCV Behavioral ...
Carey, C., Herring, B., & Lenain, P. (2009). Health care reform in the United States: Economics department working paper no. ... The economics of aging. National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 6642.Google Scholar ... Gruber, J. (2008). Covering the uninsured in the US Working Paper 13758. Retrieved June 1, 2009, from the National Bureau of ... 2001). Behavioral risk factors among members of a health maintenance organization. Preventive Medicine, 33, 586-59.PubMed ...
NBER Working Paper. National Bureau of Economic Research. 10777. Kling, Jeffrey Richard (1998). Identifying causal effects of ... public finance through the lens of behavioral economics. Washington: Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 9780815722588. Kling, ... He also previously served as an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and ... International Affairs at Princeton University (1998-2005), Special Assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Labor (1993), and ...
Hill, E., Sally, D. "Dilemmas and Bargains: Autism, Theory of Mind, Cooperation of Fairness." Working paper, 2004. 90. Hoffman ... Kahneman, Daniel, Knetsch, Jack L., Thaler, Richard H. "Fairness and the Assumptions of Economics." The Behavioral Foundations ... "Biological Perspectives on Social Attachment and Bonding." Working paper, 2003. 35. Carter, C. Sue. "Sex Differences in ... Smith, Vernon L. "Experimental Economics: Behavioral Lessons for Microeconomic Theory and Policy (1990)," Jacobs, Donald P., ...
This paper develops a theory of optimal fertility behavior under mortality schocks. In a 3-periods OLG model, young adults ... "How do epidemics induce behavioral changes?," Working Papers 2007_25, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow. * ... "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," UCLA Economics Working Papers 803, UCLA Department of Economics. ... RePEc working paper series dedicated to the job market. Fantasy league. Pretend you are at the helm of an economics department ...
Working Paper. 337-359. 28(2). 96(19). Berg. ―As-if‖ behavioral economics: Neoclassical economics in disguise?. Eckel.. Camerer ... Introduction: Definitions and Naming Problems in Behavioral Economics Definition of Behavioral Economics Behavioral economics ... Behavioral Economics and Experimental Economics Strong connections between behavioral and experimental economics can be seen in ... describes behavioral economics as ―psychology and economics,‖ which is a frequently used synonym for behavioral economics. ...
Working Paper No. 13583. Issued in November 2007 Sato, Yasuhiro (30 July 2006), "Economic geography, fertility and migration" ( ... The economic analysis of fertility is part of household economics, a field that has grown out of the New Home Economics. ... Behavioral Ecology. 25 (4): 834-842. doi:10.1093/beheco/aru059. ISSN 1045-2249. Rai, Piyush Kant; Pareek, Sarla; Joshi, Hemlata ... Review of Economics of the Household Josef Ehmer, Jens Ehrhardt, Martin Kohli (Eds.): Fertility in the History of the 20th ...
We propose an explanation based on behavioral biases: the dynamics of the value anomaly reflect the increased speed of return ... RePEc working paper series dedicated to the job market. Fantasy league. Pretend you are at the helm of an economics department ... "Why is Long-Horizon Equity Less Risky? A Duration-Based Explanation of the Value Premium," NBER Working Papers 11144, National ... "Is value premium a proxy for time-varying investment opportunities: some time series evidence," Working Papers 2005-026, ...
SPRU Working Paper Series 2013-03, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex. The Routledge Companion ... The Journal of Behavioral Economics. Vol. 18, No. 3. Sharma, Vivek, Workbook on Entrepreneurship (2005), Abza Publications, ... Equilibrium models are central to mainstream economics, and exclude entrepreneurship. Coase believed that economics has become ... Entrepreneurial Economics. Palgrave Macmillan. Tabarok A. (2002). Entrepreneurial Economics - Bright Ideas from The Dismal ...
Binmore and Behavioral Economics. Politics, Philosophy and Economics, forthcoming. ... Working Paper No. 686, University of Columbia Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration. ... Previous data from behavioral economics are consistent with the claim that the modal NE in human play approximates both players ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics, 31: 37-57.. *--- (2005). Behavioral Ethics Meets Natural Justice. Politics, Philosophy and ...
Lessons from Law and Economics (Hoover IP2 Working Paper No 19002, Jan 8, 2019), archived at 266. Although, NHTSAs track ... While some law and economics scholars accept this precept as fundamental, in many behavioral contexts it does not tell the ... Hoover IP 2 Working Paper No 19003, Jan 8, 2019), archived at 269. Professor Bryan Choi refers to this as "a standard of ... 96. See, for example, Ryan Calo, et al, Is Tricking a Robot Hacking?*6-9 (We Robot Conference Working Paper, 2018), archived at ...
Sendhil Mullainathan & Richard H. Thaler, Behavioral Economics, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 7948, ... Yuval Feldman, Behavioral Ethics Meets Behavioral Law and Economics, in The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Economics and the Law ... But behavioral ethics is not merely an offshoot of behavioral economics. Behavioral economics is occupied with identifying the ... naturally evokes behavioral economics. Behavioral economics, which has penetrated deep into legal scholarship and doctrine,[20] ...
RAND Journal of Economics 28(2):269-290.. Sturm R. 1999. Tracking changes in behavioral health services: How have carve-outs ... Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard University Working Paper.. Lu M. 1999. Separating the true effect from gaming in ... Economics. In: Feldman S, ed. Managed Behavioral Health Services. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas Publisher. Pp. 146-165. ... Comparing the Pre HMO Enrollment Costs Between Switchers and Stayers: Evidence from Medicare Working Paper. Cambridge, MA: ...
AAWE Working Paper no. 270.. Conway, L.G., Sexton, S.M., and Tweed, R.G. (2006). Collectivism and governmentally initiated ... Shim, S., and Maggs, J. (2005). A cognitive and behavioral hierarchical decision-making model of college students alcohol ... NBER Working Paper No. 17578.. Savageau, D., and Loftus, G. (1997). Places rated almanac: Your guide to finding the best places ... Journal of Health Economics, 15, 435-454.. Ruhm, C.J., Jones, A.S., Kerr, W.C., Greenfield, T.K., Terza, J.V., Pandian, R.S., ...
Kahneman, D. (2003). Maps of bounded rationality: Psychology for behavioral economics. American Economic Review, 93, 449-475. ... Indian Institute of Management, Working Paper N. 2006-2-06.Google Scholar ... the International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Economics 2012, the International ESA Conference 2012 and the FUR XV ... Klein, G. (2003). Intuition at work: Why developing your gut instincts will make you better at what you do. New York: Doubleday ...
Research Papers in Economics currently ranks Professor Fama as one of the top 20 most influential economists of all time.[i] ... "Market Efficiency, Long-Term Returns, and Behavioral Finance," Journal of Financial Economics, 49 (September 1998), 283-306. ... Work Experience 1984-93 Theodore O. Yntema Distinguished Service Professor of Finance Graduate School of Business, University ... "Market Efficiency, Long-Term Returns, and Behavioral Finance," Journal of Financial Economics, 49 (September 1998), 283-306. ...
Working Papers & Publications. Working Papers (MORE SEARCH OPTIONS). AUTHOR OR TITLE SEARCH OF WORKING PAPERS ... Published: Review of Economics and Statistics, Volume LXXIII, Number 3, pp. 504-508, August 1991. citation courtesy of ... w2813 A Behavioral Approach to Compliance: OSHA Enforcements Impact on Workplace Accidents. ... NBER Working Paper No. 3233. Issued in January 1990. NBER Program(s):Labor Studies Program ...
Giamboni, L., & Waldmann, R.J. (2004). A behavioral model of consumption (CEIS Working Paper No. 202). ... Working Paper Series): Department of Economics, University of Verona (Italy). ... Working Paper No. 14): Departments of Economics, University of Verona. ... Discussion Paper. Prüfer, J., & Prüfer, P. (2018). Data science for institutional and organizational economics (TILEC DP No. ...
IZA Institute of Labor Economics Discussion Paper Series. Subscribe to this free journal for more curated articles on this ... The Determinants of Firm Performance: Unions, Works Councils, and Employee Involvement/High Performance Work Practices ... and identify the respective roles of behavioral and compositional change. ... Download This Paper Open PDF in Browser Add Paper to My Library ... Recommended Papers. * An Economic Analysis of Works Councils. ...
Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging Working Paper 234.. Bumcrot, Christopher, Judy Lin, and Annamaria ... "Save More Tomorrow: Using Behavioral Economics to Increase Employee Saving." Journal of Political Economy 112 (1 Part 2 ... "Do Financial Education Programs Work?" Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Working Paper 0803. ... Stockholm School of Economics Economic Research Institute Working Paper 737.. Almenberg, Johan and Jenny Save-Soderergh. 2011 ...
Working Paper Smith, Chad, and Gustavo A. Barboza. 2013. The Role of Trans-Generational Financial Knowledge and Self-Reported ... In Behavioral Dimensions of Retirement Economics, edited by Henry Aaron. Washington, DC: Brookings/Russell Sage Foundation. ... Working Paper 13-064, Boston, MA: Harvard Business School. Collins, Anne and Etienne Koechlin. 2012. Reasoning, Learning, and ... World Bank Working Paper 6439, Washington, DC: World Bank. Bucciol, Alessandro, and Marcella Veronesi. 2013. Teaching Children ...
My extended CV can be found here (pdf). It also includes a detailed list of my publications, working papers, research projects ... since 2009: Professor for Experimental and Behavioral Economics at the University of Bonn ... 2013: joined the Editorial Board of the Journal of Socio-Economics. *2012: Excellence in Teaching Award 2012 for the tutorials ... 2012: Awarded the IZA Young Labor Economist Award 2011 for my paper Gift Exchange and Workers Fairness Concerns (joint ...
University of california at santa barbara, economics working paper series, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara. Clark, A ... Using Behavioral Economics to Improve Diversification in 401(k) Plans: Solving the Company Stock Problem Using Behavioral ... Department of Economics. Working Paper Series. Modeling Interest Rate Parity: A System Dynamics Approach Texas Christian ... MINITAB ASSISTANT WHITE PAPER MINITAB ASSISTANT WHITE PAPER This paper explains the research conducted by Minitab statisticians ...
Sahm, C.R. 2008 How Much Does Risk Tolerance Change? Working paper, Finance and Economics Discussion Series, Division of ... Thaler, R.H. 2015 Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics London Allen Lane ... Benartzi, S., and R.H. Thaler 1995 Myopic Loss Aversion and the Equity Premium Puzzle Quarterly Journal of Economics Vol. 110 ... Farrell, J. 2011 Demographics of Risky Investing Research in Business and Economics Journal Special Edition Florida Economic ...
Working Papers & Publications. Working Papers (MORE SEARCH OPTIONS). AUTHOR OR TITLE SEARCH OF WORKING PAPERS ... Department of Economics. University of Michigan. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1220. Tel: 734/763-3036. Fax: 734/647-1186. E-Mail: WWW: ... An Integration of Econometrics and Behavioral Economic Research, pages 133-156 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. ... NBER Working Papers and Publications. June 2019. Wages and Hours Laws: What Do We Know? What Can Be Done?. with Daniel S. ...
  • Assistance to the Poor in a Federal System, " Journal of Public Economics, Vol. 32, No. 3, April 1987, pp. 307-330. (nber.org)
  • This is reflected in much of his work, particularly his work on juries, capital punishment, and the use of statistical and social science evidence by courts, as well as in his service as an original panelist in the National Science Foundation's Law and Social Science Program and with the National Research Council's Committee on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, which he chaired from 1987-1989. (umich.edu)
  • She received her PhD in 1987 from MIT where she worked under Robert A. Weinberg at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. (bio-medicine.org)
  • free Functional behavioral assessment : a three tiered prevention only is este imaginaries and is ethical artistic commodities and editions of material( Alley, Barr, and Mehta 2018). (ballroomchicago.com)
  • Costa-Font, Joan and Frank, Richard B. and Swartz, Katherine (2018) Access to long term care after a wealth shock: evidence from the housing bubble and burst Journal of the Economics of Ageing . (lse.ac.uk)
  • 2018. "In-Work Poverty in the United States. (lanekenworthy.net)
  • War, Migration and the Origins of the Thai Sex Industry Abel, Brodeur,;N, Lekfuangfu, Warn;Yanos, Zylberberg, 2018-10-01 00:00:00 Abstract This paper analyzes the determinants behind the spatial distribution of the sex industry in Thailand. (deepdyve.com)
  • Costa-Font, Joan and Flèche, Sarah (2017) Parental sleep and employment: evidence from a British cohort study CEP Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Costa-Font, Joan and Frank, Richard and Swartz, Katherine (2017) Access to long-term care after a wealth shock: evidence from the housing bubble and burst NBER Working Paper, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, USA. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Also available as IZA Discussion Paper 10638, Institute of Labor Economics, 2017. (lanekenworthy.net)
  • within the field of behavioral finance ) In 2017, economist Richard Thaler was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for "his contributions to behavioral economics and his pioneering work in establishing that people are predictably irrational in ways that defy economic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hebrew, in which it is also elite( Joiion - Muraoka 1991: 130 free Functional behavioral assessment : a three tiered prevention model 2012). (ballroomchicago.com)
  • Richard Ernst: The paper that described our achievements [awarded the 1991 Nobel Prize in Chemistry] was rejected twice by the Journal of Chemical Physics to be finally accepted and published in the Review of Scientific Instruments. (wordpress.com)
  • with Andrew Feltenstein) "Fiscal Stabilization and Exchange Rate Instability: A Theoretical Approach and Some Policy Conclusions using Mexican Data," Journal of Public Economics 42 (1990), 329-356. (princeton.edu)
  • This paper develops a theory of optimal fertility behavior under mortality schocks. (repec.org)
  • In it, Friedman argues that unrealistic or even obviously untrue assumptions-especially, the core assumption used throughout much of contemporary economics (including much of behavioral economics) that all behavior can be modeled as resulting from decision makers solving constrained optimization problems-are perfectly legitimate, so long as they produce accurate predictions. (scribd.com)
  • Other examples of areas of economics, in which higher order risk preferences have been found to play an important role in influencing behavior, include bidding in auctions ( Esö and White, 2004 ), bargaining ( White, 2008 ), tax compliance ( Alm, 1988 ), and rent seeking ( Treich, 2010 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • This paper aims to investigate herding behavior and its impact on volatility under uncertainty. (eui.eu)
  • Principles of behavior assume that the provision of knowledge works to change behavior when motivation for change is present. (aappublications.org)
  • Then, during the development of neo-classical economics , economists sought to reshape the discipline as a natural science , deducing behavior from assumptions about the nature of economic agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Speculative Investor Behavior and Learning," Quarterly Journal of Economics 111 (1996), 1111-1133. (princeton.edu)
  • The University of British Columbia, 1998 A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in The Faculty of Graduate Studies (Economics) THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Vancouver) July, 2010 c Kenneth Jackson 2010 Abstract Institutions are the key to economic development. (ubc.ca)
  • In contrast to Friedman's professed lack of interest in investigating the realism of assumptions, behavioral economists have made it a core theme in their work to empirically test assumptions in economic models and modify theory according to the results they observe. (scribd.com)
  • Behavioral economists engage in mapping the decision shortcuts that agents use in order to help increase the effectiveness of human decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Economics of International Migration: A Short History of the Debate at European Association of Labour Economists annual conference Memorial Session, University of Turin (19-21 September 2013). (essex.ac.uk)
  • 914a See much Porten 1996:205, n. 916 That the Lamed in a free Functional behavioral assessment : a three tiered prevention like ' issue( as in British 1? (ballroomchicago.com)
  • The three papers in this thesis address this question with respect to ethnic identity and social norms. (ubc.ca)
  • After i graduate my university essay Write an essay about what causes students to dropout of college Essays in economics national and international.Chronic disposition help writing phd thesis inflammation the throat, and swelling the tonsils. (romaitaliancharms.com)
  • Writing a Assignment write my paper Phd dissertation?phd-thesis-proposal-economics Phd Thesis Proposal http://corporate.airfrance.com/?good-gifts-for-college-students Good Gifts For College Students. (romaitaliancharms.com)
  • Bounded self-interest enjoys widespread interest in behavioral economics, which has proposed numerous models of so-called social preferences to address a number of observations from human experiments that appear to falsify the assumption that people maximize their own monetary payoffs. (scribd.com)
  • The widespread failure of non-resident fathers to engage with their children's schools - 31% of the non-resident fathers who have contact with their children go into their schools, compared with 75% of fathers who live at home (Nord et al, 1998) - may be contributing to school failure in this group. (fatherhoodinstitute.org)
  • Smith-Breeden Prize (with co-author Kenneth R French) for the best paper in the Journal of Finance in 1992, "The Cross-Section of Expected Stock Returns. (ifa.com)
  • The present paper maps changes in the importance of the key institutions, 1998-2004, and explores the correlates of two-way transitions, using successive waves of the German IAB Establishment Panel and both cross-sectional and panel components of the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey. (ssrn.com)
  • Effect of behavioral interventions on inappropriate antibiotic prescribing among primary care practices:A randomized clinical trial. (ucla.edu)
  • Despite the knowledge on factors associated with work-related MSD, interventions on primary prevention of MSD through modifications of the physical work-related factors, such as through manual handling advise ( 24 ) and ergonomic workplace redesign ( 25 ), have not shown to be overly successful in preventing MSD. (sjweh.fi)
  • Title registration for a review proposal: Safety Interventions for the Prevention of Accidents in the Work Place. (docplayer.net)
  • For information about the title registration and protocol and review steps, visit the Campbell website: TITLE OF THE REVIEW Safety Interventions for the prevention of Accidents in the Work Place BACKGROUND Briefly describe and define the problem Estimates of accidents at work show that such accidents result in over 300,000 annual worker deaths worldwide and cause even more cases of disability (Concha-Barrientos, Nelson, Fingerhut, Driscoll, & Leigh, 2005). (docplayer.net)
  • Safety interventions for the prevention of accidents at work are thus characterised as a complex process, which usually integrates a number of components (e.g., safety campaigns, safety training, legislation or machines guarding). (docplayer.net)
  • Systematic reviews of safety interventions in the work place are, however, limited in number, not up to date, not comprehensive, and in particular reviews include interventions covering different levels and components are lacking (Lund et al. (docplayer.net)
  • The effectiveness of preventing accidents at work remains unclear (Lipscomb 2003), despite earlier attempts to summarize the effectiveness of safety interventions. (docplayer.net)
  • 2008). This systematic review will summarize the most up to date scientific evidence on the effectiveness of the main types of safety interventions to prevent accidents at work, i.e., modifications of attitudes, behaviour, climate or structural approaches. (docplayer.net)
  • 2004). The present systematic review will thus fill the gap in the extant knowledge on the effectiveness of safety interventions for prevention of accidents in the work place. (docplayer.net)
  • She has recently found that variation in social behaviors of C. elegans arise from genetic variation in a neuropeptide receptor that modulates a specialized social circuit to integrate environmental and genetic variation to make a single behavioral decision. (bio-medicine.org)
  • If entrepreneurship remains as important to the economy as ever, then the continuing failure of mainstream economics to adequately account for entrepreneurship indicates that fundamental principles require re-evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • This framework can thereby help to improve theories and strengthen the development and implementation of prevention strategies for work-related MSD. (sjweh.fi)
  • But much of this work is ad hoc and fragmented, with little understanding of the traditions that underlie these theoretical concepts and the relationship between them. (improvisingdesign.com)
  • In this paper we develop and test a theoretical model that reduces relational risks to solve the puzzle of conflicting task requirements imposed on boards of directors in listed companies. (springer.com)
  • Moreover, theoretical work has shown that risk aversion is not the only facet of preference governing economic decision making: it is becoming increasingly recognized that the higher order risk attitudes of prudence and temperance complement the role of risk aversion in economic decision making in important ways. (frontiersin.org)
  • At a theoretical level, this paper calls for broadening the inquiry as to why law matters to the economy, beyond simple devotion to the rule of law. (wikibooks.org)
  • Whether this method is applied in the international finance or trade realm, or in the resource, environmental, or agricultural economics realm, simply reflects small theoretical modeling changes or tests with different data. (nuigalway.ie)
  • First, however, we provide some historical and philosophical context in order to motivate the reader for the technical work ahead. (stanford.edu)
  • In the working population, such problems, which we will from this point forward refer to as musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), can result in sick leave ( 2 ), work disability ( 3 ), and early retirement ( 4 ), so that it can be concluded that MSD put a large burden on the (working) society ( 5 ). (sjweh.fi)
  • The "Three-step Analysis" of the fertility process was introduced by Kingsley Davis and Judith Blake in 1956 and makes use of three proximate determinants: The economic analysis of fertility is part of household economics, a field that has grown out of the New Home Economics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Determinants of Japan's Foreign Direct Investment: An Industry and Country Panel Study, 1984-1998. (francoangeli.it)