Spores: The reproductive elements of lower organisms, such as BACTERIA; FUNGI; and cryptogamic plants.Spores, Bacterial: Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.Spores, Fungal: Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.Spores, Protozoan: A vegetative stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. It is characteristic of members of the phyla APICOMPLEXA and MICROSPORIDIA.Picolinic AcidsBacillus subtilis: A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.Bacillus megaterium: A species of bacteria whose spores vary from round to elongate. It is a common soil saprophyte.Bacillus anthracis: A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.Bacillus cereus: A species of rod-shaped bacteria that is a common soil saprophyte. Its spores are widespread and multiplication has been observed chiefly in foods. Contamination may lead to food poisoning.Bacillus: A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Anthrax: An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.Clostridium botulinum: A species of anaerobic, gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae that produces proteins with characteristic neurotoxicity. It is the etiologic agent of BOTULISM in humans, wild fowl, HORSES; and CATTLE. Seven subtypes (sometimes called antigenic types, or strains) exist, each producing a different botulinum toxin (BOTULINUM TOXINS). The organism and its spores are widely distributed in nature.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Clostridium perfringens: The most common etiologic agent of GAS GANGRENE. It is differentiable into several distinct types based on the distribution of twelve different toxins.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Sterilization: The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.Encephalitozoon: A genus of FUNGI originally considered a member of the class SPOROZOEA but now recognized as part of the class MICROSPOREA.Microsporidia: A phylum of fungi comprising minute intracellular PARASITES with FUNGAL SPORES of unicellular origin. It has two classes: Rudimicrosporea and MICROSPOREA.Microsporidiosis: Infections with FUNGI of the phylum MICROSPORIDIA.Encephalitozoon cuniculi: A species of parasitic FUNGI. This intracellular parasite is found in the BRAIN; HEART; and KIDNEYS of several MAMMALS. Transmission is probably by ingestion of the spores (SPORES, FUNGAL).Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Ferns: Seedless nonflowering plants of the class Filicinae. They reproduce by spores that appear as dots on the underside of feathery fronds. In earlier classifications the Pteridophyta included the club mosses, horsetails, ferns, and various fossil groups. In more recent classifications, pteridophytes and spermatophytes (seed-bearing plants) are classified in the Subkingdom Tracheobionta (also known as Tracheophyta).Encephalitozoonosis: Infection with FUNGI of the genus ENCEPHALITOZOON. Lesions commonly occur in the BRAIN and KIDNEY tubules. Other sites of infection in MAMMALS are the LIVER; ADRENAL GLANDS; OPTIC NERVES; RETINA; and MYOCARDIUM.Dictyostelium: A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Its natural habitat is decaying forest leaves, where it feeds on bacteria. D. discoideum is the best-known species and is widely used in biomedical research.Clostridium: A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Stachybotrys: A mitosporic fungal genus including one species which forms a toxin in moldy hay that may cause a serious illness in horses.Microsporida: An order of parasitic FUNGI found mostly in ARTHROPODS; FISHES; and in some VERTEBRATES including humans. It comprises two suborders: Pansporoblastina and APANSPOROBLASTINA.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Microscopy, Phase-Contrast: A form of interference microscopy in which variations of the refracting index in the object are converted into variations of intensity in the image. This is achieved by the action of a phase plate.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Anthrax Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent ANTHRAX.Sigma Factor: A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.Muramic Acids: Compounds consisting of glucosamine and lactate joined by an ether linkage. They occur naturally as N-acetyl derivatives in peptidoglycan, the characteristic polysaccharide composing bacterial cell walls. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Alanine: A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cladosporium: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including some economically important plant parasites. Teleomorphs include Mycosphaerella and Venturia.Basidiomycota: A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Myxococcus xanthus: A species of gliding bacteria found on soil as well as in surface fresh water and coastal seawater.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Alternaria: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Muramidase: A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.Myxozoa: Single-celled, aquatic endoparasitic worms that are currently considered belonging to the phylum CNIDARIA. They have a complex life cycle and parasitize a wide range of hosts including FISHES; ANNELIDA; and BRYOZOA.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Enterocytozoon: A genus of parasitic FUNGI in the family Enterocytozoonidae, which infects humans. Enterocytozoon bieneusi has been found in the intestines of patients with AIDS.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Mycorrhizae: Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.Phycomyces: A genus of zygomycetous fungi in the family Mucoraceae, order MUCORALES, forming mycelia having a metallic sheen. It has been used for research on phototropism.Fruiting Bodies, Fungal: The fruiting 'heads' or 'caps' of FUNGI, which as a food item are familiarly known as MUSHROOMS, that contain the FUNGAL SPORES.Streptomyces: A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.Sphagnopsida: A class of BRYOPHYTA which is best known for Sphagnum forming PEAT bogs.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Myxomycetes: A division of organisms that exist vegetatively as complex mobile plasmodia, reproduce by means of spores, and have complex life cycles. They are now classed as protozoa but formerly were considered fungi.Peracetic Acid: A liquid that functions as a strong oxidizing agent. It has an acrid odor and is used as a disinfectant.Radiation Effects: The effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation upon living organisms, organs and tissues, and their constituents, and upon physiologic processes. It includes the effect of irradiation on food, drugs, and chemicals.Chondrosarcoma: A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Pasteurization: Treatment of food with physical methods such as heat, high pressure, radiation, or electric current to destroy organisms that cause disease or food spoilage.PeptidoglycanSpacecraft: Devices, manned and unmanned, which are designed to be placed into an orbit about the Earth or into a trajectory to another celestial body. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Microsporum: A mitosporic Oxygenales fungal genus causing various diseases of the skin and hair. The species Microsporum canis produces TINEA CAPITIS and tinea corporis, which usually are acquired from domestic cats and dogs. Teleomorphs includes Arthroderma (Nannizzia). (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th edition, p305)Streptomyces griseus: An actinomycete from which the antibiotics STREPTOMYCIN, grisein, and CANDICIDIN are obtained.Meteorological Concepts: The atmospheric properties, characteristics and other atmospheric phenomena especially pertaining to WEATHER or CLIMATE.Myxococcales: An order of rod-shaped, gram-negative fruiting gliding bacteria found in SOIL; WATER; and HUMUS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Mitosporic Fungi: A large and heterogenous group of fungi whose common characteristic is the absence of a sexual state. Many of the pathogenic fungi in humans belong to this group.Diatrizoate: A commonly used x-ray contrast medium. As DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE and as Diatrizoate sodium, it is used for gastrointestinal studies, angiography, and urography.Penicillium: A mitosporic Trichocomaceae fungal genus that develops fruiting organs resembling a broom. When identified, teleomorphs include EUPENICILLIUM and TALAROMYCES. Several species (but especially PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM) are sources of the antibiotic penicillin.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mycelium: The body of a fungus which is made up of HYPHAE.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.
  • Furthermore, the fact that the enzymes are heat sensitive only when removed from intact spores indicate the presence of some heat protective mechanism for enzymes in rather peripheral location in the dormant spore, which is not dependent on the core environment of spores. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Spores can survive in their dormant state for long periods, resisting to a vast range of stresses such as high temperature, dehydration, absence of nutrients and presence of toxic chemicals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In response to starvation, metabolically active vegetative cells of Bacillus species differentiate into specialised, highly resistant dormant cells called spores. (els.net)
  • Irradiation is frequently necessary and often ineffective due to the robustness of dormant or weaponized spores. (google.com.au)
  • Such spores may remain dormant for decades, yet are easily converted into the harmful or lethal vegetative form within minutes under ideal conditions. (google.com.au)
  • Diploid cells starved of both fermentable carbon and nitrogen sources leads to the formation of spores through the process of meiosis (which also involves reduction of chromosome number from diploid to haploid). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Despite the key role of spores in CPE synthesis and in the dissemination and developing of clostridial diseases, very little is known at the molecular level about the regulatory mechanisms governing the formation of spores in clostridia ( 6 , 9 , 11 , 13 , 20 , 23 ). (asm.org)
  • We ask what causes some species to release spores at a specific time every day versus irregularly. (pnas.org)
  • Species with short-lived spores reproducing where there is strong turbulence during the day, for example in Mexico, maximize survival by releasing spores at night. (pnas.org)
  • There is some evidence in support of this suggestion, since mutants whose spores do not accumulate DPA have been isolated in several Bacillus species, and often these DPA-less spores are heat sensitive ( 1 , 4 , 25 , 42 , 43 ). (asm.org)
  • This indicates that there is species-spcific mechanism on translocation of the enzymes to reach final destination on spores. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The phylum Glomeromycota currently comprises approximately 150 described species distributed among ten genera, most of which are defined primarily by spore morphology. (tolweb.org)
  • In addition to propagation by spores, many species of Glomeromycota can colonize host plants from hyphal fragments in the soil or directly from symbionts that inhabit the roots of a neighboring plant. (tolweb.org)
  • May (1997) and Skult (1997) re-examined saxicolous Ophioparma and found there was little basis for erecting taxa based on chemistry, but that two saxicolous species existed based on spore type. (nybg.org)
  • The presence of multiple, slightly differing variants of the nuclear-encoded ribosomal RNA genes in single spores may or may not be due to this possible nuclear heterogeneity. (tolweb.org)
  • Spore-forming bacteria are common contaminants of food, and represent a major source of food poisoning and food spoilage ( 1 , 2 ). (asm.org)
  • Wound botulism can happen if the spores of the bacteria get into a wound and make a toxin. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Infant botulism can happen if the spores of the bacteria get into an infant's intestines. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Adult intestinal toxemia (also known as adult intestinal colonization) botulism is a very rare kind of botulism that can happen if the spores of the bacteria get into an adult's intestines, grow, and produce the toxin (similar to infant botulism). (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Decontamination and neutralization of surfaces from bacteria and spores is a complex process that involves multiple technologies and various approaches, depending on the nature and extent of contamination. (google.com.au)
  • Inactiva- ¨ chemischen Veranderungen in den Mikroorganismention of bacteria, spores, virus has been demonstrated. (slideshare.net)
  • Dies wird durch das Eintauchen der verpacktenKeywords High pressure processing Á Produkte in ein druckubertragendes Fluid, im Nor- ¨Inactivation of bacteria and their spores Á malfall Wasser, erreicht. (slideshare.net)
  • However, any P 41 formed in Δ ger3 spoVF spores may be at least transiently active on one of this protease's small acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) substrates, SASP-γ. (asm.org)
  • In this study, we have successfully designed and constructed recombinant spores displaying an antigen/adjuvant chimeric protein. (springer.com)
  • Obtained results show that recombinant spores presenting an antigen/adjuvant chimeric protein exhibit both properties in mucosal immunization of mice. (springer.com)
  • cotH mutant spores are instead preferable when the heterologous protein has to be displayed on the spore surface or has to be released, as could be the case in mucosal delivery systems for antigens and drugs, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The spore cortex, a peptidoglycan structure surrounding the protoplasm, maintains, and is postulated to have a role in attaining, protoplast dehydration. (pnas.org)
  • A structural modification unique to the spore cortex is the removal of all or part of the peptide side chains from the majority of the muramic acid residues and the conversion of 50% of the muramic acid to muramic lactam. (pnas.org)
  • The spore peptidoglycan is comprised of two contiguous structures, an inner layer called the germ cell wall and a thicker outer layer called the cortex. (pnas.org)
  • However, it is the low degree of cortex peptidoglycan cross-linking that has given rise to hypotheses concerning a potential role of the cortex in achieving spore protoplast dehydration ( 4 , 5 ). (pnas.org)
  • Rather, the binding of nutrients to receptors located in the spore's inner membrane triggers subsequent events including (i) the release of monovalent ions, (ii) the release of the spore core's large depot of divalent cations bound to pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (dipicolinic acid [DPA]), and (iii) hydrolysis of the spore's peptidoglycan cortex. (asm.org)
  • Both SCLEs were localized on the exterior of cortex layrs in the spore. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Ca‐DPA facilitates the dehydration of the spore core and activates CwlJ for cortex hydrolysis. (els.net)
  • Spores show unique characteristics and are more resistant to different environmental stresses than vegetative cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In order to characterize and to predict spore formation over time, we developed a model that describes both the kinetics of growth and the differentiation of vegetative cells into spores. (asm.org)
  • This model provides physiological information on the spore formation and on the temporal abilities of vegetative cells to differentiate into spores and reveals the heterogeneity of spore formation during and after growth. (asm.org)
  • In contrast, vegetative cells are more sensitive to stress, are physiologically active, and can produce degradative enzymes or toxins, form biofilms, and differentiate into resistant spores. (asm.org)
  • Upon prosilition (ejection of the spore), these parameters fell sharply to values characteristic of vegetative cells. (asm.org)
  • Spores from Cry + strains of Bacillus thuringiensis bound fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibodies specific for the 65-kDa activated Cry 1Ac toxin, whereas spores from Bacillus cereus and Cry - strains of B. thuringiensis did not. (unl.edu)
  • Using a combined proteomics-genetics approach, we identified eighteen spore-enriched proteins, knocked out the genes encoding each of them, and assessed the resulting strains for phenotypes in a broad array of assays. (prolekare.cz)
  • We predicted that mutant strains would be likely to show defects in spore-specific processes, but instead, we discovered that the majority harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. (prolekare.cz)
  • In germinating spores, many strains are formed, some compatible with one another, some not. (fungi.com)
  • With spores, a single strain must be selected from the multitude of strains created. (fungi.com)
  • The gas spore appeared in second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in under the "fungus" entry in Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989), and is reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993). (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, physical parameters of the cytoplasm of these types of spores were compared. (asm.org)
  • The relatively low water content and high level of trehalose in ascospores of T. macrosporus might create a high viscosity in the spore cytoplasm and thus provide the physical conditions for low metabolism, which relate to dormancy and high stress tolerance. (asm.org)
  • Given that they are obligate symbionts, if no host root is found by the germinating hypha of a spore, growth ceases after some time, and the cytoplasm may be retracted within the spore. (tolweb.org)
  • Bisformyl dityrosine, the major building block of the spore surface, is synthesized in a multistep process in the cytoplasm of the prospores, transported to the maturing wall, and polymerized into a highly cross-linked macromolecule on the spore surface. (asm.org)
  • The null mutant accumulates unusually large amounts of bisformyl dityrosine in the cytoplasm and fails to efficiently incorporate this precursor into the spore surface. (asm.org)
  • Bypass of dmc1 arrest by mutation of the DNA damage checkpoint genes MEC1, RAD17 , or RAD24 results in a dramatic loss of spore viability, suggesting that these genes play an important role in monitoring the progression of recombination. (genetics.org)
  • 1981). Mycoparasites could decrease the spore production. (angelfire.com)
  • Cutin is a three-dimensional polymer of interesterified hydroxy and epoxy-hydroxy fatty acids with chain lengths mostly of 16 and 18 carbons (Kolattukudy, 1981 , 1996 ). (plantcell.org)
  • The protoplast of the spore is relatively dehydrated (even when suspended in H 2 O) in comparison to that of a vegetative cell, resulting in metabolic dormancy, and this dehydration is responsible in large part for the heat and hydrogen peroxide resistance properties of the spore ( 1 - 3 ). (pnas.org)
  • Bacillus anthracis is a gram-positive, aerobic, spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax in mammals . (who.int)
  • Studies with textile mill workers tested the efficacy of AVA and a related vaccine against occupational exposures to anthrax spores. (nap.edu)
  • Studies with animals tested the efficacy of the vaccine in protecting the animals from inhalational exposure to anthrax spores. (nap.edu)
  • The anthrax spore is the most persistent of all biowarfare agents. (google.com.au)
  • Spores have specific receptors (germinant receptors) to sense the return of nutrients (amino acids, nucleosides and sugars). (els.net)
  • A model is presented whereby in the soil the Cry toxins on the spore surface are protected by the exosporium while in the gut they are exposed and available for binding to the insect receptors. (unl.edu)
  • Recombinant spores presenting FliD were able to elicit immune response in orally immunized mice which could be evaluated by detection of FliD-specific IgA antibodies in feces of immunized animals. (springer.com)
  • and a non-recombinant approach based on spore adsorption, a spontaneous interaction between negatively charged, hydrophobic spores and purified proteins. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Hence, this study was aimed at analyzing the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae ( Vc ) in the alternative drinking waters of Mathbaria, a coastal subdistrict neighboring the Bay of Bengal, the efficacy of pond sand filter (PSF) and the co-association among Bacillus -like spore formers (Sf) and Vc . (frontiersin.org)
  • Here we use state-of-the-art numerical simulations of atmospheric transport and meteorological data to follow the trajectory of many spores in the atmosphere at different times of day, seasons, and locations across North America. (pnas.org)
  • E. arvense is native to Europe, North America, North Africa, and Northern Asia Chevalier 1996 and grows best in moist and shady areas. (drugs.com)
  • The DPA-less spores have normal cortical and coat layers, as observed with an electron microscope, but their core region appears to be more hydrated than that of spores with DPA. (asm.org)
  • When observed by thin-section electron microscopy the spore coat appears formed by a lamellar inner coat and a more coarsely layered outer coat. (biomedcentral.com)