Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Methylphenidate: A central nervous system stimulant used most commonly in the treatment of ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER in children and for NARCOLEPSY. Its mechanisms appear to be similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. The d-isomer of this drug is referred to as DEXMETHYLPHENIDATE HYDROCHLORIDE.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Parasomnias: Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.Reinforcement, Social: The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.Aversive Therapy: A treatment that suppresses undesirable behavior by simultaneously exposing the subject to unpleasant consequences.Wandering Behavior: Moving oneself through space while confused or otherwise cognitively impaired. Patterns include akathisia, exhibiting neuroleptic-induced pacing and restlessness; exit seekers who are often newly admitted institution residents who try to open locked exit doors; self-stimulators who perform other activities such as turning doorknobs, in addition to continuous pacing; and modelers who shadow other pacers.Clonazepam: An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders: Parasomnias characterized by behavioral abnormalities that occur during the transition between wakefulness and sleep (or between sleep and wakefulness).Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Central Nervous System Stimulants: A loosely defined group of drugs that tend to increase behavioral alertness, agitation, or excitation. They work by a variety of mechanisms, but usually not by direct excitation of neurons. The many drugs that have such actions as side effects to their main therapeutic use are not included here.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Psychomotor Agitation: A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Frustration: The motivational and/or affective state resulting from being blocked, thwarted, disappointed or defeated.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Token Economy: A practice whereby tokens representing money, toys, candy, etc., are given as secondary reinforcers contingent upon certain desired behaviors or performances.Olfaction Disorders: Loss of or impaired ability to smell. This may be caused by OLFACTORY NERVE DISEASES; PARANASAL SINUS DISEASES; viral RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; SMOKING; and other conditions.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Lewy Body Disease: A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Multiple System Atrophy: A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)PropylaminesPeer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Aromatherapy: The use of fragrances and essences from plants to affect or alter a person's mood or behavior and to facilitate physical, mental, and emotional well-being. The chemicals comprising essential oils in plants has a host of therapeutic properties and has been used historically in Africa, Asia, and India. Its greatest application is in the field of alternative medicine. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; from Dr. Atiba Vheir, Dove Center, Washington, D.C.)Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Schools: Educational institutions.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Acetogenins: Polyketides of up to a few dozen carbons in length, formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES and oxygenated to form tetrahydrofuran and lactone rings along the length of the chain. They are found in ANNONACEAE and other PLANTS. Related compounds cyclize to MACROLIDES.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.United StatesSleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Receptors, Dopamine D4: A subtype of dopamine D2 receptors that has high affinity for the antipsychotic CLOZAPINE.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Behavior Control: Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by biomedical, physical, psychological, or social means, including for nontherapeutic reasons.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Psychological Techniques: Methods used in the diagnosis and treatment of behavioral, personality, and mental disorders.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
Disruptive Behavior Disorders (such as Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity ... "US News Best Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists". Retrieved 28 February 2012. "American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... Acute Stress Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, Resilience); the overlap between psychiatric and ... Hans Steiner (born 1946, Vienna) is Professor (Emeritus, Active) of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Child & Adolescent ...
... one for Disruptive Behavior and one for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Scores from the Oppositional subscale ... The NCBRF-TIQ is a 66-item behavior rating form designed to assess the behavior of children and adolescents with typical ... The Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form (NCBRF) is an instrument designed to assess the behavior of children with intellectual ... Each item presents a behavior, and the respondent is asked to rate on a 4-point scale, if that behavior applies to the child ...
... attention deficit behaviors, and adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use". Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 23: ... "Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent with disruptive behavior". Journal of Clinical Child & ... "Sources of covariation among attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder: The ... Moreover, both disorders share relevant risk factors and disruptive behaviors, suggesting that oppositional defiant disorder is ...
... response to fearful expressions in children and adolescents with callous-unemotional traits and disruptive behavior disorders ... Dukarm, CP (May 2005). "Bulimia nervosa and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a possible role for stimulant medication ... For children with anorexia, the only well-established treatment is the family treatment-behavior. For other eating disorders in ... Lock, J (2015). "An Update on Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents". Journal ...
During treatment, the children experienced improvements in attention, disruptive behaviors, and hyperactivity, and an average ... Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder " ... and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): an update on the controversies". Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and ... "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2013". "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (update)". Sappell, Joel; Welkos, ...
Mapping of Cortical Thickness and Clinical Outcome in Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder". ... "Cross-cultural differences in rating hyperactive-disruptive behaviors in children". American Journal of Psychiatry. 149 (11): ... and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): an update on the controversies". Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health. 3 ( ... The Journal of Mind and Behavior. 24: 29-56. Barkley, Russel A. "Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Nature, Course, ...
"Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder". Journal of ... "Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with disruptive behavior" (PDF). J Clin Child Adolesc ... Conflict is high in families of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with parents showing "more ... PMT was initially developed in the 1960s by child psychologists who studied changing children's disruptive behaviors by ...
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 36 (12): 1682-7. doi:10.1097/00004583-199712000-00016. PMID ... of the following symptoms of inattention for at least six months to a point that is disruptive and inappropriate for ... not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions). Often has trouble organizing activities. Often avoids ... "Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder". BehaveNet. Retrieved 17 April 2013. "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". ...
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. This ... Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children mania rating scale for children and adolescents". ... and disruptive behavior disorders. The K-SADS has become one of the most widely used diagnostic interviews in research, ... "The assessment of affective disorders in children and adolescents by semistructured interview. Test-retest reliability of the ...
Alcoholic children often face problems such as behavioral disorders, oppression, crime and attention deficit disorder, and ... COAs are more likely than non-COAs to be aggressive, impulsive, and engage in disruptive and sensation seeking behaviors. ... According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) children are in a unique position when their ... Children of alcoholics show more symptoms of anxiety, depression, and externalizing behavior disorders than non-COAs. Some of ...
Hallowell EM, Ratey JJ (2005). Delivered from distraction: Getting the most out of life with Attention Deficit Disorder. New ... "Newer generation antidepressants for depressive disorders in children and adolescents". The Cochrane Database of Systematic ... Three new depressive disorders were added to the DSM-5: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, classified by significant ... "FDA Proposes New Warnings About Suicidal Thinking, Behavior in Young Adults Who Take Antidepressant Medications". FDA. 2 May ...
"Impact of the DSM-5 Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Age-of-Onset Criterion in the US Adolescent Population". Journal ... of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 53 (7): 736-744. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2014.03.005. ISSN 0890-8567. PMID ... "Journal of Mind and Behavior. 15 (1&2): 71-86. Archived from the original on 2008-03-07. Retrieved 2008-03-04.. ... Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, for temper tantrums. *Major Depressive Disorder, includes normal grief ...
"Amphetamines for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents". Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2: ... continued increases in attention, and continued decreases in disruptive behaviors and hyperactivity. Another review indicated ... "Pharmacological treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children with comorbid tic disorders". ... long-term outcomes of interventions for the management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents ...
... oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which may continue ... "Prevention of Mental Disorders, Substance Abuse, and Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. National Academies Press. ... "Prevention of bipolar disorder in at-risk children: Theoretical assumptions and empirical foundations". Development and ... "Risk of psychopathology in adolescent offspring of mothers with psychopathology and recurrent depression". The British Journal ...
Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders". Concise Guide to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (4th illustrated ed.). ... "Family therapy for attention-deficit disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents". ... "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in preschool children". Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 17 ... December 2010). "The history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders. ...
... be a result of a variety of other conditions often diagnosed by clinicians such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ... Some philosophies of parenting propose that if children are raised in an environment devoid of stimuli, and are not allowed or ... Boredom has been proposed as a cause of pathological gambling behavior. A study found results consistent with the hypothesis ... Iso-Ahola, Seppo E.; Crowley, Edward D. (1991). "Adolescent Substance Abuse and Leisure Boredom". Journal of Leisure Research. ...
"The Economic Impact of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents". Journal of Pediatric Psychology. ... with a higher likelihood of diagnosis with any of the other ICDs but is highly comorbid with disruptive behavior disorders in ... Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly Inattentive Type Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Predominantly ... "Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder". Journal of ...
Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders". Concise Guide to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (ed. 4th illustrated). ... Family therapy for attention-deficit disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents". The ... Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and restless legs syndrome in children]" [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ... Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in preschool children". Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 17 ...
Prenatal cocaine exposure is associated with premature birth, birth defects and attention deficit disorder. Prenatal ... Child and Adolescent Health Division; Center for Family Health; California Department of Public Health, archived from the ... Sex during pregnancy is a low-risk behavior except when the healthcare provider advises that sexual intercourse be avoided for ... Fetal movement can become strong and be disruptive to the woman. The woman's navel will sometimes become convex, "popping" out ...
"Phase-III clinical trials in Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (In children, In adolescents) in Japan (PO)". Retrieved ... continued increases in attention, and continued decreases in disruptive behaviors and hyperactivity. Another review indicated ... "Pharmacological treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children with comorbid tic disorders". ... "Amphetamines for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents". Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 2: ...
... obsessive-compulsive disorder, substance-use disorder, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social ... "Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent bipolar spectrum disorders". Journal of Clinical Child and ... DSM5 does not specifically have bipolar disorder in children and instead refers to it as disruptive mood dysregulation disorder ... Mood Disorder Questionnaire, the General Behavior Inventory and the Hypomania Checklist.[91] The use of evaluation scales ...
... attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. They analyzed genome- ... a longitudinal study of children and adolescents at risk for schizophrenia and affective disorder". Am J Psychiatry. 148 (9): ... Carlson, Neil R. (2013). "Physiology of Behavior" (11th ed.) p.568. Owen MJ, Craddock N, O'Donovan MC; Craddock; O'Donovan ( ... a poorer family environment and disruptive school behaviour, poor peer engagement, immaturity or unpopularity or poorer social ...
... and not pay enough attention to context and the dynamic nature of human behavior. It has been pointed out that half the ... YV assesses juvenile psychopathy in children and adolescents. Among laypersons and professionals, there is much confusion about ... Hare wants the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders to list psychopathy as a unique disorder, saying ... But since such individuals are disruptive for other patients and are not responsive to treatment this alternative to prison is ...
It has been suggested that FRA could represent a variety of different disorders, cognitive deficits, or conditions that result ... Attention[edit]. The effect of attention on memory recall has surprising results. It seems that the only time attention largely ... After a while of monitoring the children the researchers tested the children in learning and recall memory to see what they ... "Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 81 (2): 319-330. doi:10.1016/j.pbb.2005.02.017. PMID 15925403.. ...
Some examples include autism spectrum disorders, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, and attention deficit ... Committee On The Prevention Of Mental Disorders Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth; O'Connell, M. E.; Boat, T.; Warner, K. E ... Personality disorder: Personality-the fundamental characteristics of a person that influence thoughts and behaviors across ... Adolescents are at increased risk for tobacco, alcohol and drug use; Peer pressure is the main reason why start using ...
... refers to the scientific study of mental disorders in children and adolescents. Oppositional defiant disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorder are examples of psychopathology that are typically first diagnosed during childhood. Mental health providers who work with children and adolescents are informed by research in developmental psychology, clinical child psychology, and family systems. Lists of child and adult mental disorders can be found in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10), published by the World Health Organization (WHO) and in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). In addition, the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and ...
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) controversies include concerns about its causes, perceived overdiagnosis, and methods of treatment, especially with the use of stimulant medications in children. These controversies have surrounded the subject since at least the 1970s. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), the leading authority in the US on clinical diagnosis and psychological behavior published by the APA in 2013, ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a prevalence rate in most cultures of about 5% in children and 2.5% in adults. Today, the existence of ADHD is widely accepted, but controversy around the disorder has existed since at least the 1970s. Adult ADHD continues to be a source of debate. According to the DSM-5, symptoms must be present before age 12, but it's not uncommon for ADHD to continue into adulthood. ...
... (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type.[10][11] It is characterized by difficulty paying attention, excessive activity and acting without regards to consequences, which are otherwise not appropriate for a person's age.[1][2] There are also often problems with regulating emotions.[12][13][14] The symptoms appear before a person is twelve years old, are present for more than six months, and cause problems in at least two settings (such as school, home, or recreational activities).[3][15] In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance.[1] Additionally there is an association with other mental disorders and substance misuse.[16] Although it causes impairment, particularly in modern society, many people with ADHD can have sustained attention for tasks they find interesting or rewarding (known as hyperfocus).[5][17] Despite being the most commonly studied and diagnosed mental ...
According to Grafman et al.[1] "disinhibition" is a lack of restraint manifested in several ways, affecting motor, instinctual, emotional, cognitive, and perceptual aspects with signs and symptoms e.g. impulsivity, disregard for others and social norms, aggressive outbursts, misconduct and oppositional behaviors, disinhibited instinctual drives including risk taking behaviors and hypersexuality. Disinhibition is a common symptom following brain injury, or lesions, particularly to the frontal lobe and primarily to the orbitofrontal cortex.[2] The neuropsychiatric sequelae following brain injuries could include diffuse cognitive impairment, with more prominent deficits in the rate of information processing, attention, memory, cognitive flexibility, and problem solving. Prominent impulsivity, affective instability, and disinhibition are seen frequently, secondary to injury to frontal, temporal, and limbic ...
... (CD) is a mental disorder diagnosed in childhood or adolescence that presents itself through a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate norms are violated. These behaviors are often referred to as "antisocial behaviors." It is often seen as the precursor to antisocial personality disorder, which is per definition not diagnosed until the individual is 18 years old. Conduct disorder is estimated to affect 51.1 million people globally as of 2013. One of the symptoms of conduct disorder is a lower level of fear. Research performed on the impact of toddlers exposed to fear and distress shows that negative emotionality (fear) predicts toddlers' empathy-related response to distress. The findings support that if a caregiver is able to respond to infant cues, the toddler has a better ability to respond to fear and distress. If a child does not ...
... (RBD) is a sleep disorder (more specifically a parasomnia) that involves abnormal behavior during the sleep phase with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. It was first described in 1986. The major and arguably only abnormal feature of RBD is loss of muscle atonia (i.e., the loss of paralysis) during otherwise intact REM sleep (during which paralysis is not only normal but necessary). REM sleep is the stage of sleep in which most vivid dreaming occurs. The loss of motor inhibition leads to a wide spectrum of behavioral release during sleep. This extends from simple limb twitches to more complex integrated movement, in which people appear to be unconsciously acting out their dreams. These behaviors can be violent in nature and in some cases will result in injury to either the patient or their bed partner. RBD is characterized by the dreamer acting out his or her dreams. These dreams often involve kicking, ...
4.1 Influence of fiber type in bedding/sleepwear To our knowledge there is no published study that directly compares the effect of wool-based bedcoverings or sleep apparel with other fiber types for infants. However, the sleeping comfort and behavior has been studied for wool bedding with adults, and separate research has examined the beneficial effects of wool pile fabrics (e.g. sheepskins) for babies. The outcomes of this research and several other relevant studies are reviewed in this section. 4.1.1 Bedding systems with adult subjects We have identified three main studies that compared sleep behavior of wool bedding system with synthetics; two were carried out in the 1980s and published by the International Wool Secretariat (IWS), while the other was funded by Australian Wool Innovation (AWI) and published by The Woolmark Company in 2005. In their 1984 publication [5] the IWS report on a study that compared equivalent wool and acrylic ...
Unenäod on une ajal magaja teadvuses tahtmatult esinevad nägemused, tundmused, mõtted ja emotsioonid.[1] Unenägude funktsioonid ei ole veel üheselt selged, kuigi eksisteerib mitmesuguseid teaduslikke, filosoofilisi ja religioosseid teooriaid. Unenägude teaduslikku uurimist kutsutakse oneiroloogiaks.[2]. Arvatakse, et kõige intensiivsemad unenäod esinevad kiirete silmaliigutuste (inglise keeles rapid eye movement) une staadiumis ehk REM-une ajal. Unenägude esinemise kohta on teada antud ka teistest unestaadiumidest ärgates, kuigi harvem. Mitte-REM unenäod on tavaliselt hägusemad, rahulikumad või halvemini meelde jäävad.[3] Siiski esineb väga intensiivseid unenägusid ka teistes unestaadiumides, samas pole ka mitte kõik REM-une aegsed äratused andnud kinnitust äsjasest unenäo nägemisest.[4]. Inimene näeb öö jooksul vähemalt 5 korda und, millest ta suudab mäletada 3-5 unenägu.[5] Unenäod võivad kesta paarist sekundist kuni paarikümne minutini.[3] Mida pikemalt inimene ...
Unenäod on une ajal magaja teadvuses tahtmatult esinevad nägemused, tundmused, mõtted ja emotsioonid.[1] Unenägude funktsioonid ei ole veel üheselt selged, kuigi eksisteerib mitmesuguseid teaduslikke, filosoofilisi ja religioosseid teooriaid. Unenägude teaduslikku uurimist kutsutakse oneiroloogiaks.[2] Arvatakse, et kõige intensiivsemad unenäod esinevad kiirete silmaliigutuste (inglise keeles rapid eye movement) une staadiumis ehk REM-une ajal. Unenägude esinemise kohta on teada antud ka teistest unestaadiumidest ärgates, kuigi harvem. Mitte-REM unenäod on tavaliselt hägusemad, rahulikumad või halvemini meelde jäävad.[3] Siiski esineb väga intensiivseid unenägusid ka teistes unestaadiumides, samas pole ka mitte kõik REM-une aegsed äratused andnud kinnitust äsjasest unenäo nägemisest.[4] Inimene näeb öö jooksul vähemalt 5 korda und, millest ta suudab mäletada 3-5 unenägu.[5] Unenäod võivad kesta paarist sekundist kuni paarikümne minutini.[3] Mida pikemalt inimene ...
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) controversies include concerns about its causes, perceived overdiagnosis, and methods of treatment, especially with the use of stimulant medications in children. These controversies have surrounded the subject since at least the 1970s. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), the leading authority in the US on clinical diagnosis and psychological behavior published by the APA in 2013, ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a prevalence rate in most cultures of about 5% in children and 2.5% in adults. Today, the existence of ADHD is widely accepted, but controversy around the disorder has existed since at least the 1970s. Adult ADHD continues to be a source of debate. According to the DSM-5, symptoms must be present before age 12, but it's not uncommon for ADHD to continue into adulthood. ...
... (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type.[10][11] It is characterized by difficulty paying attention, excessive activity and acting without regards to consequences, which are otherwise not appropriate for a person's age.[1][2] There are also often problems with regulating emotions.[12][13][14] The symptoms appear before a person is twelve years old, are present for more than six months, and cause problems in at least two settings (such as school, home, or recreational activities).[3][15] In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance.[1] Additionally there is an association with other mental disorders and substance misuse.[16] Although it causes impairment, particularly in modern society, many people with ADHD can have sustained attention for tasks they find interesting or rewarding (known as hyperfocus).[5][17] Despite being the most commonly studied and diagnosed mental ...
Studies have shown that there is a high probability that those who suffer from low attentional control also experience other mental conditions. Low attentional control is more common among those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD),"a disorder with persistent age-inappropriate symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that are sufficient to cause impairment in major life activities".[24] Also low attentional control is common in individuals with Schizophrenia and [25] Alzheimer's disease,[26] those with social anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression,[27] and attention difficulties following a stroke.[25] Individuals also respond quicker, and have better overall executive control when they have low levels of anxiety and depression.[28] Low levels of attentional control are also thought to increase chances of developing a psychopathology because ...
Lasky-Su J، Neale BM، Franke B، وآخرون. (2008). "Genome-wide association scan of quantitative traits for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder identifies novel associations and confirms candidate gene associations.". Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet. 147B (8): 1345-54. PMID 18821565. doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.30867. الوسيط ...
Transactional processes in child disruptive behavior and maternal depression: A longitudinal study from early childhood to ... Fischer M. (1990). Parenting stress and the child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Clinical Child ... Trajectories of Parent-Adolescent Relationship Quality Among At-Risk Youth: Parental Depression and Adolescent Developmental ... Depression in attention-deficit-disordered and normal children and their parents. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 18, ...
... pharmacological treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been considered to be the only type of ... Teacher ratings of DSM-III-R symptoms for the disruptive behavior disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and ... Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38(5), 503-512.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... 1995). High risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among children of parents with childhood onset of the disorder: A ...
Disruptive Behavior Disorders (such as Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity ... "US News Best Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists". Retrieved 28 February 2012. "American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... Acute Stress Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, Resilience); the overlap between psychiatric and ... Hans Steiner (born 1946, Vienna) is Professor (Emeritus, Active) of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Child & Adolescent ...
Previously known as manic depression, bipolar disorder was once thought to occur rarely in youth. ... behaviors, and perceptions are altered in the context of episodes of mania and depression. ... Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder in which feelings, thoughts, ... children examined had attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder ... Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and chronic irritability in youth at familial risk for bipolar disorder. J Am Acad Child ...
Effective treatments for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) exist, but a major gap in our knowledge ... to stimulant medication across six measures of school-related performance in children with ADHD and disruptive behavior. ... The ADHD children were tested at the Maroondah Hospital Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. Testing took approximately ... In a randomized double-blind crossover study of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the time course ...
Mechanisms of heterotypic comorbidity between externalizing disorders and unipolar depression - Volume 28 Special Issue - Aimee ... 2010). Emotional lability in children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Clinical correlates ... response to fearful expressions in children and adolescents with callous-unemotional traits and disruptive behavior disorders. ... Very early predictors of adolescent depression and suicide attempts in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. ...
EEG biofeedback on cognition and behavior of children with attention. deficit disorders and learning disabilities. Biofeedback ... HD and related disruptive behavior disorders. In: Incorvaia JA, Mark-. Goldstein BS, Tessmer D, eds. Understanding, Diagnosing ... Treating AD/HD in Children and Adolescents, an Integrative Approach.. New York: Aronson Press, 1999:235-318.. 25. Cartozzo HA, ... attention deficit disorder in treatment-seeking cocaine abusers. Compr. Psychiatry 1993; 34:75-82.. 20. Nixon SJ, Tivis R, ...
This study evaluated the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness training for children aged 8-12 with ADHD and parallel mindful ... Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent ... due to the ADHD behavior of the child, parents can become less patient, pay more attention to disruptive behavior and act more ... Children with ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder] have problems maintaining attention over prolonged periods of ...
... one for Disruptive Behavior and one for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Scores from the Oppositional subscale ... The NCBRF-TIQ is a 66-item behavior rating form designed to assess the behavior of children and adolescents with typical ... The Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form (NCBRF) is an instrument designed to assess the behavior of children with intellectual ... Each item presents a behavior, and the respondent is asked to rate on a 4-point scale, if that behavior applies to the child ...
45 and show that psychostimulants improve disruptive and aggressive behavior in ADHD children and adolescents in social ... Dosage effects of methylphenidate on the social behavior of adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder ... 1992) Teacher ratings of DSM-III-R symptoms of the disruptive behavior disorders. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 31:210-218 ... 1993) Pharmacotherapy for children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. School Psychol Rev. 22:199-227. ...
A child who comes from a stressful home environment tends to channel that stress into disruptive behavior at school and be less ... These deficits have been associated with higher levels of externalizing behaviors and poor academic performance on childrens ... The most common adaptive behaviors include increased anxiety (as manifested in generalized anxiety disorders or posttraumatic ... This teaching requires attention, focus, and motivation from the primary caregiver. Again, the time and expertise to make this ...
... or the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Treatment response and side effects are compared between participants with and without ... This study examines the response to methylphenidate in such children. METHODS Data from children participating in the 1-month ... Further research is needed to explore how such children will respond during long-term treatment. Clinicians should not a priori ... CONCLUSION Findings suggest that children with ADHD and manic symptoms respond robustly to methylphenidate during the first ...
Attention deficit disorders and comorbidities in children, adolescents, and adults. American Psychiatric Press. In press.. ... Cross-cultural differences in rating hyperactive-disruptive behaviors in children. Am J Psychiatry 1992;. 149(11):1539-42.. ... DSM-IV field trials for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Am J Psychiatry 1994;. 151:1673- ... Childhood conduct problems, attention deficit behaviors, and adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use. J Abnorm Child ...
AADD ADD ADHD Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit and... ... Learn more about Attention Deficit Disorder at Portsmouth Regional Hospital Related Terms : ... EFA supplementation in children with inattention, hyperactivity, and other disruptive behaviors. Lipids . 2003;38:1007-1021. ... Hypericum perforatum (St Johns wort) for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a randomized ...
... youth, and young adults are major threats t... ... Mental health and substance use disorders among children, ... conduct disorder and oppo- sitional defiant disorder, often combined as disruptive behavior disorders; attention deficit ... A related issue relevant to prevention is the age at onset of child and adolescent emotional or behavioral disorders. In the ... Any Disruptive Behavior Disorder (23) Conduct Disorder (28) Oppositional Defiant Disorder (21) Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity ...
AADD ADD ADHD Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity... ... Learn more about Attention Deficit Disorder at Sky Ridge Medical Center Related Terms : ... EFA supplementation in children with inattention, hyperactivity, and other disruptive behaviors. Lipids . 2003;38:1007-1021. ... Hypericum perforatum (St Johns wort) for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: a randomized ...
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders Research Output 1996 2018 * 1152 Citations ... European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. p. 1-8 8 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ... Comparing the Diagnostic Accuracy of Five Instruments for Detecting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Youth. You, D. S., ... Developing and Validating Short Forms of the Parent General Behavior Inventory Mania and Depression Scales for Rating Youth ...
The role of attention. In: Monographs in child and adolescent psychiatry. Hyperactivity disorders of childhood (ed. ST Sandberg ... Saldana RL, Neuringer A. (1998) Is instrumental variability abnormally high in children exhibiting ADHD and aggressive behavior ... 1998) Response inhibition and response re-engagement in ADHD, disruptive, anxious and normal children. Behavioural Brain ... 1994) Effects of reward and nonreward on frustration and attention in attention deficit disorder. Journal of Abnormal Child ...
Co-Occurring Mental and Substance Use Disorders ADD News ... Reactive aggression in boys with disruptive behavior disorders ... and oppositional defiant disorder co-occur at high rates among children and adolescents. This group of disorders, ... Biederman J, Munir K, Knee D: Conduct and oppositional disorder in clinically referred children with attention deficit disorder ... depression/mood disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and ...
The Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder (CASD) completed by a psychologist (following standardized procedures integrating ... 2011). Discrimination between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and reactive attachment disorder in school age children ... and teachers as informants on disruptive child behavior. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 19, 75-95.CrossRefPubMedGoogle ... Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 22, 284-291.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar ...
These disorders have been shown to be associated with working memory impairments. BPT is based on operant learning principles, ... BPT is based on operant learning principles, yet how operant principles shape behavior (through the partial reinforcement ... Methods: Ninety-seven children (age 6 to 10) completed a working memory task and an operant learning task, in which children ... Ninety-seven children (age 6-10) completed a working memory task and an operant learning task, in which children acquired a ...
HEADACHE IN TEENS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER - Palmetto ... - A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) ... Disruptive Disorders *Anxiety Disorders *Substance Abuse (adolescents). ADHD attention deficit hyperactivity disorder CD ... Mood Disorders Children and Adolescents - Mood Disorders Children and Adolescents Waqar Waheed, MD FRCPC, DABPN Department of ... early-onset bipolar disorder, especially difficulties with disruptive behavior disorders, irritability, and behavioral ...
Lopes specializes in the evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder ( ... Lopes has served as a staff psychologist at the Child Mind Institute, in their ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorder Center. Dr ... Licensed Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychologist. Rebecca I. Nelson Ph.D., is a licensed clinical child & adolescent ... Lopes specialized in evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatments for disruptive behavior disorder and severe emotional ...
Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently have ... Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity Hyperkinesis Pathologic Processes Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior ... Abuse Pathologic Processes Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders Neurodevelopmental Disorders Mental Disorders ... Neonatal 6-OHDA lesion model in mouse induces Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like behaviour Attention-deficit ...
  • In addition to the psychological problems that substance abusers face in remaining abstinent, they also experience comorbid conditions that affect cognitive and attentional deficits. (sierraeeg.com)
  • Besides meeting the goal of identifying the disorder, the diagnostic assessment provides important information on the child's relative strengths and weaknesses, identifies which maladaptive behavior and comorbid difficulties are present, clarifies the impact of the child's condition on the family, and benchmarks the developmental skills of the patient. (scielo.br)
  • Additionally, a comparatively small proportion of the NCS sample (14%) that reported a psychiatric history of three or more comorbid disorders accounted for 59% of all diagnosed lifetime disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Trait impulsivity, which is often defined as a strong preference for immediate over delayed rewards and results in behaviors that are socially inappropriate, maladaptive, and short-sighted, is a predisposing vulnerability to all externalizing spectrum disorders. (cambridge.org)
  • There are few reports addressing risk taking behavior or sexual impulsivity in 48, XXYY syndrome [ 7 ]. (imedpub.com)
  • Section I contains one short answer question that asks the parent/teacher to describe any specific circumstances or factors that may have influenced the child's recent behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet if we wish to approach treatment and outcomes with a degree of scientific objectivity, an accurate understanding of a child's behavior is essential. (centr-ginmed.ru)
  • In such cases, it is critical to evaluate a child's behavior in multiple contexts, and to determine if an improvement in mood helps focus. (centr-ginmed.ru)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology , 16 (24), 411-432. (springer.com)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology , 19 , 591-605. (springer.com)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 24 , 749-765. (springer.com)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40 , 1073-1085. (springer.com)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 35 , 745-758. (bsl.nl)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 28 no. 2 (April, 2000), pp. 161-179 (American Education Research Association Division E. Distinguished Research award in Human Development (2003). (duke.edu)
  • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 45, Issue. (cambridge.org)
  • The aim of this paper is to follow the natural history of this complex disorder through preschool years, school life, and adulthood and to consider its effect on the family, the community, and society as a whole. (bmj.com)
  • As explained later in this chapter (as well as in Chapter 10), osteopathic nostrum has also evolved a handful of integrated health-giving handbook protocols " using combi- nations of modalities also commonly employed in natu- ropathic practice (Wernham 1996). (nippon-kan.org)
  • Furthermore, it has been suggested that the presence of some of these conditions during pregnancy (eg, fever, inflammation, and autoimmunity) are associated with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in offspring. (aappublications.org)
  • Using mother scores 36% of children with ASD scored below the autism diagnostic cutoff, and 75% scored below the cutoff based on teacher scores. (springer.com)
  • Autism has been reported in children with fetal alcohol syndrome (Aronson et al. (ship.edu)
  • They are the recipients of the first annual Children's Television Workshop Sesame Street Award for "Brightening the Lives of Children,' the first annual Autism Speaks award for "Science and Research," and the International ABA award for "enduring programmatic contributions in behavior analysis. (stanford.edu)
  • It is worth noting that the US has the highest vaccination rate in the world, and coincidentally the highest rate of autism (now 1 in 88 children. (sokhop.com)
  • Casey Family Services, 1998), this report focuses on PASS that are designed to help families with adopted children who are maladjusted or are in high levels of conflict with their parents. (hhs.gov)
  • Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterised by a constellation of interpersonal, affective and behavioural characteristics ( Hare, 1998 ). (rcpsych.org)
  • The notion that individuals identified as PCL-R 'psychopaths' are different from people with a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder comes from research showing that there are high rates (50-80%) of antisocial personality disorder in prison populations, but only 20% of these meet Hare's criteria for psychopathy ( Hare, 1998 ). (rcpsych.org)
  • Of those focusing on the prefrontal cortex, the most prominent are the somatic marker hypothesis ( Damasio, 1994 ) and the response modulation deficit hypothesis (for a review see Newman, 1998 ). (rcpsych.org)
  • The result: a 500% increase in the number of children labeled and medicated since 1990 [now reported as a 700% increase in 1998 -- see Running on Ritalin by Lawrence H. Diller, M.D. (add-adhd.org)
  • Predictors of discrepancies between informants' ratings of preschool-aged children's behavior: An examination of ethnicity, child characteristics, and family functioning. (springer.com)
  • Poor concentration, high levels of activity, and impulsiveness are frequent characteristics of normal preschool children. (bmj.com)
  • 9 Targeted work with preschool children and their carers has been shown to be effective in improving parent child interaction and reducing parental stress. (bmj.com)
  • Present meta-analysis was carried out to determine whether these EF impairments can also be found in preschool children with externalizing behavior problems. (bsl.nl)
  • These results show that EF, especially inhibition, is related to externalizing behavior problems already in preschool years. (bsl.nl)
  • Hard-to-manage preschool boys: symptomatic behavior across contexts and time. (bsl.nl)
  • Developmentally sensitive measures of executive function in preschool children. (bsl.nl)
  • Inhibitory deficits, delay aversion and preschool AD/HD: implications for the dual pathway model. (bsl.nl)
  • This behavior often appears in the preschool years, but initially it can be difficult to distinguish from developmentally appropriate, albeit troublesome, behavior. (aafp.org)
  • Moving on from the cradle…during infancy, toddlerhood, and preschool years, if a child manifests signs of an infection, rather than providing nutrients to support the immune system in doing what it was designed to do, typically antibiotics will be prescribed. (sokhop.com)
  • In contrast, anhedonia is characterized by chronically low motivation and reduced capacity to experience pleasure, and is common to depressive disorders. (cambridge.org)
  • Major depressive disorder can negatively affect a person's personal life, work life, or education, as well as sleeping, eating habits, and general health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major depressive disorder affected approximately 216 million people (3% of the world's population) in 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was a split of the previous depressive neurosis in the DSM-II, which also encompassed the conditions now known as dysthymia and adjustment disorder with depressed mood . (wikipedia.org)
  • In logistic regression analysis only self-harming behaviour and major depressive disorder were significant predictors of attempted suicide. (who.int)
  • 1991) and in an open trial of the Failsafe diet (free of additives, low in salicylates, amines and flavour enhancers), 100% of 27 children who completed 2-3 weeks of their elimination diet improved significantly (Dengate and Ruben 2002). (fedupwithfoodadditives.com)
  • It is defined by a recurrent pattern of developmentally inappropriate levels of negativistic, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behavior toward authority figures. (aafp.org)
  • The restrictive specification of particular behaviours to fit them into a diagnostic category is often inappropriate, as a child is continually changing and growing. (rcpsych.org)