Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.
Replacement for a knee joint.
Replacement for a hip joint.
Rigid, semi-rigid, or inflatable cylindric hydraulic devices, with either combined or separate reservoir and pumping systems, implanted for the surgical treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.
Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.
Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.
Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.
Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.
A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.
Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.
The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)
Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.
Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.
An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.
Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.
An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)
The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.
A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.
Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.
A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.
Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
Surgical insertion of cylindric hydraulic devices for the treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.
Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.
Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.
Replacement of the hip joint.
Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.
Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.
Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.
Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.
Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.
A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.
The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.
Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.
Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.
Holding a PROSTHESIS in place.
Endosseous dental implantation where implants are fitted with an abutment or where an implant with a transmucosal coronal portion is used immediately (within 1 week) after the initial extraction. Conventionally, the implantation is performed in two stages with more than two months in between the stages.
Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.
The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
Replacement of the knee joint.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.
Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Surgical insertion of an appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face. When only portions of the mandible are replaced, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.
A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)
Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.
The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.
Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.
A complete denture replacing all the natural mandibular teeth and associated structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying mandibular bone.
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.
Synthetic organosiloxane gels that are formed from synthetic polymers of silicone oxide with organic sidechains (polydimethylsiloxane) by lengthening the polymer chains. Unlike silicone elastomers, they are not treated with amorphous silica. They are used as fillers in breast implants.
The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.
The surgical removal of the inner contents of the eye, leaving the sclera intact. It should be differentiated from ORBIT EVISCERATION which removes the entire contents of the orbit, including eyeball, blood vessels, muscles, fat, nerve supply, and periosteum.
A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.
Surgery performed in which part of the STAPES, a bone in the middle ear, is removed and a prosthesis is placed to help transmit sound between the middle ear and inner ear.
The plan and delineation of DENTAL IMPLANT fitting with DENTAL ABUTMENT.
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.
Devices implanted to control intraocular pressure by allowing aqueous fluid to drain from the anterior chamber. (Hoffman, Pocket Glossary of Ophthalmologic Terminology, 1989)
Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.
Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).
An anabolic steroid used mainly as an anabolic agent in veterinary practice.
Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
Surgical insertion of an inert sac filled with silicone or other material to augment the female form cosmetically.
The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.
The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.
A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the mandible missing or defective as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery.
Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The shrinkage of the foreign body encapsulation scar tissue that forms around artificial implants imbedded in body tissues.
Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.
Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
An inflammatory process with loss of supporting bone in the tissues surrounding functioning DENTAL IMPLANTS.
Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.
Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Total or partial excision of the larynx.
The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.
Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
A complete denture replacing all the natural maxillary teeth and associated maxillary structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying maxillary bone.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).
Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.
The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)
A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.
A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.
A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.
Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.
The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
The gradual destruction of a metal or alloy due to oxidation or action of a chemical agent. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A method of speech used after laryngectomy, with sound produced by vibration of the column of air in the esophagus against the contracting cricopharyngeal sphincter. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.
Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).
A dead body, usually a human body.
Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.
Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.
Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.
Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.
The methyl esters of methacrylic acid that polymerize easily and are used as tissue cements, dental materials, and absorbent for biological substances.
One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.
Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.
Partial hearing loss in both ears.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
Fractures of the femur.
That component of SPEECH which gives the primary distinction to a given speaker's VOICE when pitch and loudness are excluded. It involves both phonatory and resonatory characteristics. Some of the descriptions of voice quality are harshness, breathiness and nasality.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.
A non-steroidal estrogen analog.
Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.
A fabricated tooth substituting for a natural tooth in a prosthesis. It is usually made of porcelain or plastic.
Surgical insertion of an implant to replace one or more of the ear ossicles.
Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.
A subjective visual sensation with the eyes closed and in the absence of light. Phosphenes can be spontaneous, or induced by chemical, electrical, or mechanical (pressure) stimuli which cause the visual field to light up without optical inputs.
A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
The process of reuniting or replacing broken or worn parts of a denture.
A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.
The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.
A precision device used for attaching a fixed or removable partial denture to the crown of an abutment tooth or a restoration. One type is the intracoronal attachment and the other type is the extracoronal attachment. It consists of a female portion within the coronal portion of the crown of an abutment and a fitted male portion attached to the denture proper. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p85; from Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p264)
Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.
Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.
Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.
Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.
Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)
The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.
The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.
Fractures of the proximal humerus, including the head, anatomic and surgical necks, and tuberosities.
Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A partial denture intended for short-term use in a temporary or emergency situation.
Multi-channel hearing devices typically used for patients who have tumors on the COCHLEAR NERVE and are unable to benefit from COCHLEAR IMPLANTS after tumor surgery that severs the cochlear nerve. The device electrically stimulates the nerves of cochlea nucleus in the BRAIN STEM rather than the inner ear as in cochlear implants.
Devices, usually incorporating unidirectional valves, which are surgically inserted in the sclera to maintain normal intraocular pressure.
A complete denture constructed for replacement of natural teeth immediately after their removal. It does not fit the mouth perfectly and is intended only for functional and cosmetic purposes during the healing process after total extraction. It is to be replaced by the fitted permanent denture.
A technique to self-regulate brain activities provided as a feedback in order to better control or enhance one's own performance, control or function. This is done by trying to bring brain activities into a range associated with a desired brain function or status.
The lower chamber of the COCHLEA, extending from the round window to the helicotrema (the opening at the apex that connects the PERILYMPH-filled spaces of scala tympani and SCALA VESTIBULI).
Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.
A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.
Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.
The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
Formation of spongy bone in the labyrinth capsule which can progress toward the STAPES (stapedial fixation) or anteriorly toward the COCHLEA leading to conductive, sensorineural, or mixed HEARING LOSS. Several genes are associated with familial otosclerosis with varied clinical signs.
An alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and traces of other substances. It is used in dentures, certain surgical appliances, prostheses, implants, and instruments.
The external reproductive organ of males. It is composed of a mass of erectile tissue enclosed in three cylindrical fibrous compartments. Two of the three compartments, the corpus cavernosa, are placed side-by-side along the upper part of the organ. The third compartment below, the corpus spongiosum, houses the urethra.
Objects that produce a magnetic field.
Fixation and immobility of a joint.
Due to the cortical plasticity of the brain, signals from implanted prostheses can, after adaptation, be handled by the brain ... Ray's implant was installed in 1998 and he lived long enough to start working with the implant, eventually learning to control ... Implanted in Nagle's right precentral gyrus (area of the motor cortex for arm movement), the 96-electrode BrainGate implant ... The system included cameras mounted on glasses to send signals to the implant. Initially, the implant allowed Jerry to see ...
Some cochlear implant systems transmit information about TFSp in the channels of the cochlear implants that are tuned to low ... a speech test for evaluation of the effectiveness of auditory prostheses under realistic conditions". Ear and Hearing. 34 (2): ... "Factors Affecting Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients Implanted With a Perimodiolar Electrode Array Located in Scala ... Cochlear implants also filter the input signal into frequency channels. Usually, the ENVp of the signal in each channel is ...
The use of porous polyethylene implants for ear reconstruction was initiated in the 1980s by Alexander Berghaus. Ear Prosthesis ... positioning of the BAHA implant is critical. It may be necessary to position the implant further back than usual to enable ... If the hearing loss is severe to profound in both ears, the child may be a candidate for a cochlear implant (beyond the scope ... External ear prostheses have been made for children as young as 5. For auricular reconstruction, there are several different ...
Prostheses are technically the complete finished item. For instance, a C-Leg knee alone is not a prosthesis, but only a ... Wearable technology are smart electronic devices that can be worn on the body as an implant or an accessory. New technologies ... Prostheses are specifically not orthoses, although given certain circumstances a prosthesis might end up performing some or all ... A prosthesis, prosthetic, or prosthetic limb is a device that replaces a missing body part. It is part of the field of ...
An overdenture is a prosthesis that fits over retained roots or implants in the jaws. Compared to conventional complete ... Limited lifespan of prosthesis and relines often required - as the tissues heal following extractions, the alveolar bone starts ... Increased retention of prosthesis Reduced alveolar bone resorption and preservation of alveolar ridge Reduced horizontal forces ... The provision of a two-implant supported overdenture in the mandibular (lower) edentulous jaw is now considered as the first ...
"Differences in masticatory function in patients with endodontically treated teeth and single-implant-supported prostheses: a ... Implant success, on the other hand, is defined by osseointegration, or fusion of the implant to the adjacent maxilla or ... Implants also take longer, with a typically 3- to 6-month gap between the tooth implantation and receiving the crown, depending ... Some patients receiving implants also describe a dull nagging pain after the procedure, while those with endodontic therapy ...
Such implants are inserted when the space between the spinal discs is distracted, such that the implant, when threaded, is ... An interbody fusion cage (colloquially known as a "spine cage") is a prosthesis used in spinal fusion procedures to maintain ... static devices Expandable implant devices are at the forefront of technology in this field, with cages that expand in place for ... Unthreaded implants, such as the Harms and Pyramesh cages have teeth along both surfaces that bite into the end plates. ...
Polyvinyl sacs were often the preferred implant to augment breasts into a fuller, more projected appearance. Despite these ... augmentation mammaplasty began when Thomas Cronin and Frank Gerow developed the first silicone gel-filled breast prosthesis ... with Dow Corning Corporation, and the first implanting operation took place the following year. In the late 1960s, attention ... Contrary to many media reports afterward, Russell did not wear the bra during filming; according to her 1988 autobiography, she ...
59.Raphael, K.G., Marbach, J.J., Wolford, L.M., Keller, S.E., and Bartlett, J.A. Does Exposure to Proplast-Teflon Implants of ... 42.*Marbach, J.J., Psychosocial Factors for Failure to Adapt to Dental Prostheses. In Zinner, I., ed. Semiprecision Attachments ... Raphael, K.G., Marbach, J.J., Keller, S.E., Bartlett, J.A.. Systemic health consequences of alloplastic implants of the TMJ: A ... Does exposure to Proplast-Teflon implants of the TMJ increase risk of systemic immune-mediated disorders? Proceedings of the ...
Cardiac valve prostheses ISO 5840-1:2015 Part 1: General requirements ISO 5840-2:2015 Part 2: Surgically implanted heart valve ... Vascular prostheses - Tubular vascular grafts and vascular patches ISO 7199:2016 Cardiovascular implants and artificial organs ... Data fields in title blocks and document headers ISO 7206 Implants for surgery - Partial and total hip joint prostheses ISO ... 2002 Implants for surgery - Acrylic resin cements ISO 5834 Implants for surgery - Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene ISO ...
... now focused on cochlear implants and owned by Sonova, while its pain management and other neural stimulation products are now ... a biomed company which produces the Argus retinal prosthesis; founder and Chairman of Bioness, a company devoted to applying ... Crouch, Gregory (October 30, 1988). "Subdivision Claims Beverly Hills Style--in Sherman Oaks". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved ...
Examples include the breast implant, nose prosthesis, ocular prosthesis, and injectable filler. Other types of organ ... In some cases implants contain electronics, e.g. artificial pacemaker and cochlear implants. Some implants are bioactive, such ... AAOMS - Dental Implant Surgery ACOG - IUDs and Birth Control Implants: Resource Overview FDA - Implants and Prosthetics ... Biofunctionalisation Implantable devices List of orthopedic implants Medical device Prosthesis Microchip implant (in French) ...
The implant vibrates the skull and inner ear, which stimulate the nerve fibers of the inner ear, allowing hearing. The surgical ... The process of hearing prostheses consists of the following steps: Initial adjustment of the device; Adaptation to new sounding ... A bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is a surgically implanted auditory prosthetic based on bone conduction. It is an option for ... Patients may experience numbness of the area around the implant as small superficial nerves in the skin are sectioned during ...
NASA engineer Adam Kissiah started working in the mid-1970s on what could become the cochlear implant, a device that provides ... as well as preventing friction between the skin and the prosthesis, and heat/moisture buildup. After initial experiments using ... In 1977, NASA helped Kissiah obtain a patent for the cochlear implant. NASA's continued funding, coupled with its collective ... cochlear implants, LZR Racer swimsuits, and CMOS image sensors. As of 2016, NASA has published over 2,000 other spinoffs in the ...
Currently, this empirical law is applied in neuromodulation for development of implants for cortical, cochlear, retinal, and ... Winter, Jessica O.; Cogan, Stuart F.; Rizzo, Joseph F. (January 2007). "Retinal prostheses: current challenges and future ... McCreery, DB; Agnew, WF (1988). "Comparison of neural damage induced by electrical stimulation with faradaic and capacitor ...
... is also commercially available for ear implants, abrasives, and plasma-sprayed coating for orthopedic and dental implants. ... TiN has been suggested as the friction surface in hip prostheses. While cell culture tests show a good biocompatibility, the ... Hyperthermia treatment involves implanting a bioceramic material that contains a ferrite or other magnetic material. The area ... The colonel shared that after an injury the bodies of soldiers would often reject the implant. Hench was intrigued and began to ...
To reduce the rotation of the emplaced breast implant upon the chest wall, the model 1963 prosthesis was affixed to the implant ... Structured implants were approved by the FDA and Health Canada in 2014 as a third form of breast implant. Structured implants ... Implant placement comparison The five surgical approaches to emplacing a breast implant to the implant pocket are often ... a double-cavity prosthesis composed of a silicone breast implant contained within a saline breast implant. The two-fold, ...
November 2016). "Fully Implanted Brain-Computer Interface in a Locked-In Patient with ALS". The New England Journal of Medicine ... Lebedev M (2016). "Augmentation of sensorimotor functions with neural prostheses". Opera Medica et Physiologica. 2 (3-4): 211- ... After the BCI challenge, in 1988, alpha rhythm was used in a brain rhythm based BCI for control of a physical object, a robot. ... Eckhorn R, Bauer R, Jordan W, Brosch M, Kruse W, Munk M, Reitboeck HJ (1988). "Coherent oscillations: a mechanism of feature ...
2014 Implants for surgery - Guidance on care and handling of orthopaedic implants ISO 8835 Inhalational anaesthesia systems ISO ... Terms relating to external limb prostheses and wearers of these prostheses ISO 8549-3:1989 Part 3: Terms relating to external ... 1991 Implants for surgery - Fixation devices for use in the ends of the femur in adults ISO 8624:2011 Ophthalmic optics - ... 2010 Cardiovascular implants and extracorporeal systems - Extracorporeal blood circuit for haemodialysers, haemodiafilters and ...
US 5030237 Elbow prosthesis "Pyrocarbon Finger Joint Implant" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-21. Retrieved ... Such knowledge assists in developing artificial joints and prosthesis, such as elbow or finger joints. Study of the joints of ... Colahan P, Piotrowski G, Poulos P (Sep 1988). "Kinematic analysis of the instant centers of rotation of the equine ...
Localizing the position of the magnet is equivalent to measuring the contraction/elongation of the muscle it is implanted in as ... Robotic prosthesis control is a method for controlling a prosthesis in such a way that the controlled robotic prosthesis ... For lower limb prosthesis the impedance function looks similar to the following equation. τ = k ( θ − θ 0 ) + b θ ˙ {\ ... For lower limb robotic prosthesis it is important to be able to determine if the user wants to walk on level ground, up a slope ...
Research has looked into visual prosthesis for the blind, which involves use of arrays of electrodes implanted in the skull ... There have been long term implants of this type. Risks such as infections and seizures, have been an impediment to their ... Brindley and Rushton (1974) used the phosphenes to create a visual prosthesis, in this case by using the phosphenes to depict ... Lewis, P. & Rosenfield, J. (2016). "Electrical stimulation of the brain and the development of cortical visual prostheses: An ...
"Facial Prostheses. By Alan Clive Roberts, T. D., C.G.I.A., F.R.S.H., F.B.I.S.T., A.I.S.T., A.I. Mechl.E., St. Luke's Hospital ... clinical prosthetics and implants in reconstructive surgery. He specialises in the research, development and the use of tissue ... prostheses and devices to the body with particular reference to colostomy and facial prostheses. He has published numerous ... Clive., Roberts, Alan (1971). Facial prostheses: the restoration of facial defects by prosthetic means. London: Kimpton. ISBN ...
McMinn is also the inventor of several other prostheses for the hip and knee.[citation needed] Derek McMinn is the author of ... and are implanted well. These allow the patients to return to higher levels of activity after the operation without the fear of ... The first BHR was implanted in July 1997, in Birmingham, England. Over the next few years its success spurred surgeons all over ... developed the first successful modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and the instrumentation and surgical technique to implant ...
In 1963, Kit Pedler discussed with his wife (who was also a doctor) what would happen if a person had so many prostheses that ... In the Virgin New Adventures novel Iceberg, the first Cyber Controller is created by implanting a Cyber Director, or Cyber ... The Cybermen were originally imagined as human but with plastic and metal prostheses. The Cybermen of The Tenth Planet still ... David Banks (1988). Cybermen. Carol Pub Group. ISBN 0-352-32738-3. Salusbury, Matt (May 2006). "Father of the Cybermen". ...