Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Lobbying: A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Public Relations: Relations of an individual, association, organization, hospital, or corporation with the publics which it must take into consideration in carrying out its functions. Publics may include consumers, patients, pressure groups, departments, etc.Propaganda: The deliberate attempt to influence attitudes and beliefs for furthering one's cause or damaging an opponent's cause.Rubber: A high-molecular-weight polymeric elastomer derived from the milk juice (LATEX) of HEVEA brasiliensis and other trees and plants. It is a substance that can be stretched at room temperature to at least twice its original length and after releasing the stress, retract rapidly, and recover its original dimensions fully.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Consumer Product SafetyAccidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Construction Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of building.United StatesHealth Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Labor Unions: Organizations comprising wage and salary workers in health-related fields for the purpose of improving their status and conditions. The concept includes labor union activities toward providing health services to members.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Tanning: A process of preserving animal hides by chemical treatment (using vegetable tannins, metallic sulfates, and sulfurized phenol compounds, or syntans) to make them immune to bacterial attack, and subsequent treatments with fats and greases to make them pliable. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Construction Materials: Supplies used in building.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Industrial Waste: Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Persuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Investments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Plastics: Polymeric materials (usually organic) of large molecular weight which can be shaped by flow. Plastic usually refers to the final product with fillers, plasticizers, pigments, and stabilizers included (versus the resin, the homogeneous polymeric starting material). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Book Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing books. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.PrintingPublic Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Product Packaging: Form in which product is processed or wrapped and labeled. PRODUCT LABELING is also available.Styrene: A colorless, toxic liquid with a strong aromatic odor. It is used to make rubbers, polymers and copolymers, and polystyrene plastics.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Styrenes: Derivatives and polymers of styrene. They are used in the manufacturing of synthetic rubber, plastics, and resins. Some of the polymers form the skeletal structures for ion exchange resin beads.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Carbon Compounds, Inorganic: Inorganic compounds that contain carbon as an integral part of the molecule but are not derived from hydrocarbons.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Maximum Allowable Concentration: The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Technology Transfer: Spread and adoption of inventions and techniques from one geographic area to another, from one discipline to another, or from one sector of the economy to another. For example, improvements in medical equipment may be transferred from industrial countries to developing countries, advances arising from aerospace engineering may be applied to equipment for persons with disabilities, and innovations in science arising from government research are made available to private enterprise.Threshold Limit Values: Standards for limiting worker exposure to airborne contaminants. They are the maximum concentration in air at which it is believed that a particular substance will not produce adverse health effects with repeated daily exposure. It can be a time-weighted average (TLV-TWA), a short-term value (TLV-STEL), or an instantaneous value (TLV-Ceiling). They are expressed either as parts per million (ppm) or milligram per cubic meter (mg/m3).Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Ethics, Business: The moral obligations governing the conduct of commercial or industrial enterprises.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Steel: A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.PaperVentilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.MiningPaintGuidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Silicon Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Product Line Management: Management control systems for structuring health care delivery strategies around case types, as in DRGs, or specific clinical services.TextilesSilicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Perfume: A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Engineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.European Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Isocyanates: Organic compounds that contain the -NCO radical.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Entrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Industrial Microbiology: The study, utilization, and manipulation of those microorganisms capable of economically producing desirable substances or changes in substances, and the control of undesirable microorganisms.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.RestaurantsCoal MiningProduct Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a product or its container or wrapper. It includes purpose, effect, description, directions, hazards, warnings, and other relevant information.Consumer Organizations: Organized groups of users of goods and services.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Commonwealth of Independent StatesFacility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Great BritainConsultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Aviation: Design, development, manufacture, and operation of heavier-than-air AIRCRAFT.Healthy Worker Effect: Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Respiratory Tract DiseasesPolyvinyl Chloride: A polyvinyl resin used extensively in the manufacture of plastics, including medical devices, tubing, and other packaging. It is also used as a rubber substitute.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Technology, Industry, and AgricultureMedical Tourism: Travel to another country for the purpose of medical treatment.Health Facility Merger: The combining of administrative and organizational resources of two or more health care facilities.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Public-Private Sector Partnerships: An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Cotton Fiber: A TEXTILE fiber obtained from the pappus (outside the SEEDS) of cotton plant (GOSSYPIUM). Inhalation of cotton fiber dust over a prolonged period can result in BYSSINOSIS.Organizations, Nonprofit: Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Industrial Oils: Oils which are used in industrial or commercial applications.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Benzene: Toxic, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon byproduct of coal distillation. It is used as an industrial solvent in paints, varnishes, lacquer thinners, gasoline, etc. Benzene causes central nervous system damage acutely and bone marrow damage chronically and is carcinogenic. It was formerly used as parasiticide.Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.Mineral Fibers: Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Financial Management: The obtaining and management of funds for institutional needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Diatomaceous Earth: A form of SILICON DIOXIDE composed of skeletons of prehistoric aquatic plants which is used for its ABSORPTION quality, taking up 1.5-4 times its weight in water. The microscopic sharp edges are useful for insect control but can also be an inhalation hazard. It has been used in baked goods and animal feed. Kieselguhr is German for flint + earthy sediment.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The automotive industry designs, develops, manufactures, markets, and sells motor vehicles, and is one of the Earth's most ... ARG had a fairly quiet year in 1985, with the only significant changes being the addition of an MG variant to the Montego range ... This article 1985 in motoring deals with developments in the automotive industry throughout the year 1985 by various automobile ... and the Horizon replacement launched in October 1985 will instead be sold as the Peugeot 309. A larger family saloon is due for ...
... rebadging is common in Malaysia's automotive industry, having begun in 1985 with car maker Proton, which based its cars on ...
Chairman of Korea Archery Association Automotive industry in South Korea Chaebol Chung Eui-sun List of Korea-related topics ... Industry He also owns Innocean, a marketing agency, with his eldest daughter Chung Sung-yi. Chung is described as a "vigorous ... Awarded Distinguished Service Citation by Detroit's Automotive Hall of Fame 1997-present: Honorary Vice President of World ... Archery Federation 1986-1997: Chairman of Asia Archery Association 1985-1997: ...
The first prototypes for Elcat's automotive industry were made in 1985 with a joint venture plan with Subaru's Sambar, Dias, ... Elcat Automotive was owned by an electricity producer called Fortum until the production decreases in the early 21st century. ...
Industry, Automotive. "Automotive Industry in India". www.ibef.org. Indian Brand Equity Foundation. Archived from the original ... The automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world.[1][2]. ... An embryonic automotive industry emerged in India in the 1940s. Hindustan Motors was launched in 1942, long-time competitor ... But after 1970, with restrictions on the import of vehicles set, the automotive industry started to grow; but the growth was ...
He served on the board of Qantas and as a Member of the Automotive Industry Authority. He was awarded life membership of the ... He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 1985. ...
... the automotive industry accounted for 18.9% of the total Spanish exports. In 2016, the automotive industry was generating 8.7 ... Things started to change for the Spanish car industry in the 1960s when an industrial policy was launched with measures which ... Later on, in the 1980s the Spanish automotive flagship, SEAT, was sold to the Volkswagen group, but by then the manufacturing ... In Spain the Hispano-Suiza company sold in 1946 their automotive assets to "Empresa Nacional de Autocamiones S.A" (Enasa), a ...
"The Industry". Motorsport Industry Association. Retrieved 7 March 2011. "The UK Automotive Industries - Status, Economic ... The Automotive Industry in Poland, Polish Information and Foreign Investment Agency S.A., 2010 Poland: Automotive Industry - ... An embryonic automotive industry started in India in the 1940s. However, for the next 50 years, the growth of the industry was ... The Brazilian automotive industry was similar in size to the industries in Mexico and Argentina until 1960. It then had two ...
Volkswagen set up a joint venture with Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation in 1984 (named Shanghai Volkswagen Automotive ... The automotive industry in Germany is one of the largest employers in the world, with a labour force of over 747,000 (2009) ... Germany was always inspired by the British automotive industry in the late 1860s and as motor-car pioneers Karl Benz and ... Currently, five German companies and seven marques dominate the automotive industry in the country: Volkswagen AG (and ...
The automotive industry in Massachusetts refers to a period of time from 1893 to 1989 when automobiles were manufactured in the ... Business and economics portal Cars portal Massachusetts portal Automotive industry in the United States Kennedy, George ( ... Georgano, G. N. (1985). Cars: Early and Vintage, 1886-1930. London: Grange-Universal. ISBN 0517480735. Hess, John Y. (2002). ...
Pawitra, T (July 1988). "Marketing in the Automotive industry of Indonesia: Problems, Possibilities, and Limits". ASEAN ... "the Association of Indonesia Automotive Industries"). The dominant manufacturer in Indonesia is the PT. Astra corporation; ... "Ancillary Firm Development in the Motor Industry in Indonesia", The Motor Vehicle Industry in Asia: A Study of Ancillary Firm ... In 1972 the government decreed that assemblers and agencies be consolidated and since 1975 the industry was represented by the ...
This is an article about the automotive industry in Mexico. In 1903, motorcars first arrived in Mexico City, totalling 136 cars ... Dependent Industrialization in Latin America: The Automotive Industry in Argentina, Chile, and Mexico. New York: Praeger 1977. ... "Mexico Automotive Industry". export.gov. 27 August 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2014. "Production Statistics 2013". OICA. ... making Mexico one of the most varied automotive markets in the world. The automotive sector accounts for 17.6% of Mexico's ...
The main industry group for the Chinese automotive industry is the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (中国汽车工业协会). ... The main industry group for the Chinese automotive industry is the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM). China ... Beijing Automotive Industry - Hyundai Motor - DaimlerChrysler: Jeep Cherokee (XJ). Guangzhou Automobile Industry Group - ... China Council for the Promotion of International Trade Branch of the automotive industry China National Automotive Industry ...
... was established during the Soviet times and until fall of the Soviet Union was an integral part ... of automotive industry of the Soviet Union. First Ukraine based motor vehicles brands were established in late 1950s. Ukraine ... The major domestic players in this industry were UkrAvto (ZAZ), Bogdan, Eurocar, Electron corporation, Etalon-Avto, KrAZ and ... By the early 1980s, Soviet automobile industry consisted of several main plants, which produced vehicles for various market ...
... would become a key figure in the formation of Malaysia's automotive industry. The 1964 Malaysian automotive policy aimed to ... The Malaysian automotive industry is the third largest in Southeast Asia, and the 23rd largest in the world, with an annual ... The automotive industry in Malaysia traces its origins back to the British Malayan colonial era. Ford Malaya became the first ... The automotive industry contributes 4% or RM 40 billion to Malaysia's GDP, and employs a workforce of over 700,000 throughout a ...
Volkswagen commenced local assembly in 1999.[citation needed] Automotive industry Automotive industry by country List of Asian ... the Thailand automotive industry was the largest in Southeast Asia and the 12th largest in the world. The Thailand industry has ... The Thai automotive industry also endeavoured to concentrate its growth in certain "cluster" areas, mainly in eastern Bangkok ... The history of the Thai automotive industry began in 1960, when the Thai government set up an import substitution policy to ...
The automotive industry in Japan is one of the most prominent and largest industries in the world. Japan has been in the top ... The automotive industry in Japan rapidly increased from the 1970s to the 1990s (when it was oriented both for domestic use and ... Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (May 2011). THE MOTOR INDUSTRY OF JAPAN 2011. The Society of Automotive Engineers of ... Japanese Car portal List of automobile manufacturers of Japan Automotive industry Toyota raises profits forecast as recovery ...
29, Section "Driggs" (from Motor Age magazine) "Diamond Cab built by Driggs Company", Automotive Industries magazine, 5 October ... 1912 History of Early American Automobile Industry, 1921, Ch. ... 1922 Campbell, John (1985). Naval Weapons of World War Two. ...
The automotive industry in New Zealand supplies a market which has always had one of the world's highest car ownership ratios. ... The automotive assembly industry was recognised to be essentially artificial. Its poor build quality meant consumers preferred ... The component industry shared the fate of the assembly industry. In 1969 p33, 72 per cent (by quantity) of local assembly was ... The industry began with the importation in 1898 of two Benz cars from Paris by William McLean. Apart from a few early attempts ...
Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009 The Automotive Industry in the United States from the U.S. Dept. of Commerce Automotive SPA.gov ... With the subsequent collapse of the sub-prime mortgage industry, GM suffered heavy losses. The Automotive industry crisis of ... In the years 1918, 1919, 1921, and 1924 there were absolute declines in automotive production. The automotive industry caused a ... automobile industry in the 1950s Canada-United States Automotive Products Agreement Effects of the 2008-10 automotive industry ...
From 2007, the entire automotive industry was affected by a crisis, including operations at Mecaplast. The group was obliged to ... Mecaplast made its entry into the automotive industry after having been selected to manufacture the plastic fan for the Peugeot ... Mecaplast Group is an international automotive supplier and a major contributor to the Monegasque economy. Founded in 1955 by ... In 1985, Mecaplast created its first site outside of Monaco in Valréas, France. ...
... and Mahindra has also stated it may attempt to revive the Automotive industry in Australia[citation needed]. Iveco Australia is ... A substantial car industry was created in Australia in the 20th century through the opening of Australian plants by ... Australian Motor Industries produced a range of Standard, Triumph, Rambler, Mercedes-Benz, and Toyota automobiles in Australia ... The company was founded in 1856 as a saddlery business, but later moved into the automotive field, becoming a subsidiary of ...
The automotive industry and its sub-contractors is a major part of Swedish industry. In 2011 around 110,000 people were ... The automotive industry is heavily dependent on export as some 85 percent of the passenger cars and 95 percent of the heavy ... The automotive industry crisis of 2008-10 has had a great impact on the formerly Swedish owned automobile makers. In 2009 Ford ... The automotive industry in Sweden is mainly associated with passenger car manufacturers Volvo Cars and Saab Automobile but ...
... and it has built several augmented reality apps for use within the automotive industry. On November 7, 2009, the company ... released Air Assault, a twist on the 1985 hit Airborne. Other games by SnakeHead Software include iBob, Texas Tea and Guardian ...
In 1993, Consulier Industries spun off its automotive division as Mosler Automotive. The newly named Mosler Automotive ... Mosler Automotive Europe Mosler Automotive website (Archive Copy) Car & Driver article from 2001 reviewing the Mosler MT900 ... Mosler Automotive was an American supercar manufacturer headquartered in Riviera Beach, Florida. It was founded in 1985 by ... rebranded and updated as the Mosler Intruder/Raptor when the company spun off its automotive division as Mosler Automotive. The ...
... or Al Gusais (Arabic: اﻟﻘﺼﻴﺺ‎) is a large community in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is located in the Deira area of east Dubai. Al Qusais borders the localities of Hor Al Anz and Al Twar and is further subdivided into residential (Al Qusais) and industrial (Al Qusais Industrial Area) localities. Al Qusais residential areas are subdivided into: Al Qusais First Al Qusais Second Al Qusais Third The industrial areas are subdivided into: Al Qusais Industrial Area First Al Qusais Industrial Area Second Al Qusais Industrial Area Third Al Qusais Industrial Area Fourth Al Qusais Industrial Area Fifth The industrial areas lead into the industrial areas of the emirate of Sharjah. Education in Al Qusais is provided by a number of public and privates schools and colleges.There are Arabic, Australian, British, American and Indian schools. There are also various private institutes providing dance, music, art and computer lessons. Educational institutions situated in Al-Qusais ...
... is generally thought of as an industrial city, and the largest boost to its economy was indeed provided by the industrialization during the Socialist era; in fact industry (including metallurgy) has a long history in the city. Miskolc was already an important market town in the Middle Ages, mostly due to its proximity to the main trade routes of the region. In regards of the economy, real development started only after the Ottoman occupation. In the 18th century, the town already had a lumber mill, a paper manufacture, a brewery, a gunpowder factory and fifteen mills on the Szinva stream. The glass works manufactures and iron furnaces appeared in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The first iron furnace, built by Henrik Fazola around 1770, did not survive, but the second one, built in 1813, can still be visited. Several new settlements were formed in the Bükk mountains to provide dwellings for the workers of glass works manufactures and furnaces. Many of them - ...
As Western Europe began industrializing in the late 1700s and early 1800s, the United States remained agrarian in nature with resource processing, such as gristmills and sawmills being its major semi-industrial pursuit,[3] however, as demand for U.S. resources increased, canals and railroads became extremely important to economic growth due to sparse population[4] particularly in areas where resources were rich such as in the Western frontier. This made it necessary for the U.S. to expand its technological capabilities, which led to an Industrial Revolution reaching American shores as entrepreneurs competed and learned from each other to develop better technology, fundamentally and permanently altering the U.S. economy, thrusting it into the new age of industrialization. The "Father of the American Industrial Revolution",[5] Samuel Slater, was born in Belper, Derbyshire, England on June 9, 1768, and began working at a cotton mill from age 10. He learned that Americans were interested in the ...
In 1928, Stalin introduced the first five-year plan for building a socialist economy. In place of the internationalism expressed by Lenin throughout the Revolution, it aimed to build Socialism in One Country. In industry, the state assumed control over all existing enterprises and undertook an intensive program of industrialization. In agriculture, rather than adhering to the "lead by example" policy advocated by Lenin,[35] forced collectivization of farms was implemented all over the country. In the 1930s homosexuality was re-criminalized across the whole of the Soviet Union. Henceforth anyone involved in homosexual acts could be sent to prison for up to five years. Famines ensued, causing millions of deaths; surviving kulaks were persecuted and many sent to Gulags to do forced labour.[36] Social upheaval continued in the mid-1930s. Stalin's Great Purge resulted in the execution or detainment of many "Old Bolsheviks" who had participated in the October Revolution with ...
The development of a country is measured with statistical indexes such as income per capita (per person), (gross domestic product) per capita, life expectancy, the rate of literacy, freedom index and others. The UN has developed the Human Development Index (HDI), a compound indicator of some above statistics, to gauge the level of human development for countries where data is available. The UN sets Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) from a blueprint developed by all of the world's countries and leading development institutions, in order to evaluate growth.[14]. Developing countries are, in general, countries that have not achieved a significant degree of industrialization relative to their populations, and have, in most cases, a medium to low standard of living. There is a strong association between low income and high population growth.. The terms utilized when discussing developing countries refer to the intent and to the constructs of those who utilize these terms. Other terms sometimes used ...
... is the first novel by D. H. Lawrence, published in 1911. Lawrence started the novel in 1906 and then rewrote it three times. The early versions had the working title of Laetitia. Maurice Greiffenhagen's 1891 painting 'An Idyll' inspired the novel. The painting had "a profound effect" on Lawrence, who wrote: "As for Greiffenhagen's 'Idyll', it moves me almost as if I were in love myself. Under its intoxication, I have flirted madly this Christmas." Lawrence's first novel is set in the Eastwood area of his youth and is narrated in the first person by a character named Cyril Beardsall. It involves themes such as the damage associated with mismatched marriages, and the border country between town and country. A misanthropic gamekeeper makes an appearance, in some ways the prototype of Mellors in Lawrence's last novel, Lady Chatterley's Lover. The book includes some notable description of nature and the impact of industrialisation on the countryside and the town. Its provincialism ...
On December 20, 1959, a Muay Thai among Thai fighters was held at Tokyo Asakusa town hall in Japan. Tatsuo Yamada, who established "Nihon Kempo Karate-do", was interested in Muay Thai because he wanted to perform karate matches with full-contact rules since practitioners are not allowed to hit each other directly in karate matches. At this time, it was unimaginable to hit each other in karate matches in Japan. He had already announced his plan which was named "The draft principles of project of establishment of a new sport and its industrialization" in November, 1959, and he proposed the tentative name of "karate-boxing" for this new sport.[15] It is still unknown whether Nak Muay were invited by Yamada, but it is clear that Yamada was the only karateka who was really interested in Muay Thai. Yamada invited a champion Nak Muay (and formerly his son Kan Yamada's sparring partner), and started studying Muay Thai. At this time, the Thai fighter was taken by Osamu Noguchi who was a promoter of ...
... is a monthly science and technology magazine published by 9.9 Media in New Delhi. Industry 2.0 was started in 2001. It features a judicious mix of in-depth stories, recent events and happenings, incisive commentary, case studies, and in-depth discussions. Industry 2.0 engagesin industry and technology leaders to provide a comprehensive overview of the manufacturing sector. The magazine is based in New Delhi. "Giridhar to be group editor for two 9.9 Media magazines". Afaqs!. New Delhi. 22 September 2008. Retrieved 29 July 2016. "Industry 2.0 Contact Details". Customer Care. 15 October 2013. Retrieved 29 July 2016. Official ...
... is industry that is usually less capital-intensive than heavy industry, and is more consumer-oriented than business-oriented (i.e., most light industry products are produced for end users rather than as intermediates for use by other industries). Light industry facilities typically have less environmental impact than those associated with heavy industry, and zoning laws are more likely to permit light industry near residential areas. It is the production of small consumer goods. One economic definition states that light industry is a "manufacturing activity that uses moderate amounts of partially processed materials to produce items of relatively high value per unit weight". Examples of light industries include the manufacturing of foods, beverages, personal care and ...
BPAs can be implemented in a number of business areas including marketing, sales and workflow. Toolsets vary in sophistication, but there is an increasing trend towards the use of artificial intelligence technologies that can understand natural language and unstructured data sets, interact with human beings, and adapt to new types of problems without human-guided training. BPA providers tend to focus on different industry sectors but their underlying approach tends to be similar in that they will attempt to provide the shortest route to automation by exploiting the user interface layer rather than going deeply into the application code or databases sitting behind them. They also simplify their own interface to the extent that these tools can be used directly by non-technically qualified staff. The main advantage of these toolsets is therefore their speed of deployment, the drawback is that it brings yet another IT supplier to the organization.[3]. The market is, however, ...
Coordinates: 53°57′25″N 1°06′17″W / 53.9569°N 1.1046°W / 53.9569; -1.1046 (Holgate Road carriage works) The Holgate Road carriage works was a railway carriage manufacturing factory in the Holgate area of York, England. The factory began production in 1884 as a planned expansion and replacement of the North Eastern Railway's Queen Street site; the works was substantially expanded in 1897-1900, and saw further modernisations through the 20th century. The works passed to the ownership of the London and North Eastern Railway (1923); British Railways (1948); British Rail Engineering Limited, known as BREL York (1970); and privatised and acquired by ABB in 1989 (ABB York). The works closed in 1996, due to lack of orders caused by uncertainty in the post-privatisation of British Rail period. Thrall Car Manufacturing Company used the works to manufacture freight wagons for English Welsh and Scottish Railway from 1998 to 2002, after which the factory closed again. As of 2014 part ...
... /əˈrɪliə/ is a city in Ontario, Canada. It is located in Simcoe County between Lake Couchiching and Lake Simcoe. Although located in Simcoe County, the city is politically independent. It is part of the Huronia region of Central Ontario. The population in 2016 was 30,546. Originally incorporated as a village in 1867, the history of what is today the City of Orillia dates back at least several thousand years. Archaeologists have uncovered evidence of fishing by the Huron and Iroquois peoples in the area over 4,000 years ago as well as sites used by Native Americans for hundreds of years for trading, hunting, and fishing. Known as the "Sunshine City", the city's large waterfront attracts many tourists to the area every year, as do a number of annual festivals and other cultural attractions. While the area's largest employer is Casino Rama, overall economic activity in Orillia is a mixture of many different industries including manufacturing, government services, customer service and ...
... refers to economic activities related to manufacturing components that go into Earth's orbit or beyond, delivering them to those regions, and related services. Owing to the prominence of the satellite-related activities, some sources use the term satellite industry interchangeably with the term space industry. The term space business has also been used. A narrow definition encompasses only hardware providers (primarily related to launch vehicles and satellites). This definition does not exclude certain activities, such as space tourism. Thus more broadly, space industry can be described as the companies involved in the space economy, and providing goods and services related to space. Space economy has been defined as "all public and private actors involved in developing and providing space-enabled products and services. It comprises a long value-added chaining, starting with research and development ...
Industry, Automotive. "Automotive Industry in India". www.ibef.org. Indian Brand Equity Foundation. Archived from the original ... The automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world.[1][2]. ... An embryonic automotive industry emerged in India in the 1940s. Hindustan Motors was launched in 1942, long-time competitor ... But after 1970, with restrictions on the import of vehicles set, the automotive industry started to grow; but the growth was ...
The automotive industry in Massachusetts refers to a period of time from 1893 to 1989 when automobiles were manufactured in the ... Business and economics portal Cars portal Massachusetts portal Automotive industry in the United States Kennedy, George ( ... Georgano, G. N. (1985). Cars: Early and Vintage, 1886-1930. London: Grange-Universal. ISBN 0517480735. Hess, John Y. (2002). ...
Automotive Industry: Product liability is a contentious issue. Proponents argue that America... ... IS THE U.S. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY AFFECTED BY PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION?. The U.S. automotive industry was affected ... A generation ago, the automotive industry, along with other industries, began to learn which approaches to this new kind of ... The judge may be correct with respect to some industries. But, at least in the worldwide automotive industry, the proposition ...
Automotive Industry. The automotive industry includes the production of cars and car parts. Since the early 20th century, it ... www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/automotive-industry/.. * Turabian. James G. Dykes. 2006. Automotive Industry. The ... www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/automotive-industry/. James G. Dykes. "Automotive Industry" In The Canadian ... See also Industry.) Europe: Industry Begins. The early development of automotive technology occurred in Europe in the late ...
The automotive industry is the largest user of this chemical. An estimated 2,500 U.S. workers are potentially exposed to ... The first was a study by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, which showed that rats and mice exposed to formaldehyde ... Approximately 3,500 U.S. workers in the rubber industry are potentially exposed to ETU. Exposure also results from the widely ... Control procedures in this industry are recommended to minimize dust exposures. In 1976, NIOSH published a revised criteria ...
HLG expects industry volume for both passenger and commercial vehicles to reach 562,380 units in 2007. HLG recommends UMW ... shares for investment in the auto industry, with a price target of ... Home » Cars » HLG on the automotive industry share market. HLG on the automotive industry share market. In Cars, Local News / ... After dabbling for years in the IT industry, Paul Tan initially began this site as a general blog covering various topics of ...
The Uniform Limited Partnership Act was revised in 1976 and 1985. Accordingly, a few states have retained the old uniform act, ...
It has been widely used in the automotive industry. In some applications, the pose (position and orientation) of the SLVd are ... Pose estimation of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer with applications to the automotive industry. ... "Pose estimation of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer with applications to the automotive industry," Opt. Eng. 37(5) (1 May ... "Pose estimation of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer with applications to the automotive industry," Optical Engineering 37(5 ...
H1: Organisations in the automotive industry cluster are highly ethical.. H1A: Organisations in the automotive industry cluster ... industry that were listed as members of the Automotive Industry Development Centre (AIDC) and/or the Nelson Mandela Bay ... A pilot study was conducted among 17 companies operating in the Eastern Cape automotive industry, out of which ten individuals ... Also, all 46 respondents were drawn from the automotive industry in the Eastern Cape. Further research with a larger sample ...
Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. Waterborne coating compositions. US5976701 *. Dec 19, 1996. Nov 2, 1999. Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. ... Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. Powder coating compositions. US7166675. Jan 30, 2004. Jan 23, 2007. Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. Low ... Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. Aqueous resinous binders. US7737223. Dec 19, 2006. Jun 15, 2010. Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc.. Coating ... Ppg Industries, Inc.. Waterborne coating compositions. US5854332 *. Dec 20, 1996. Dec 29, 1998. Ppg Industries, Inc.. Aqueous ...
6.2 Recommendations for automotive industry organisations. As a result of this study, automotive industry organisations can ... 2.3.1 The South African automotive industry. The contribution of the SA automotive industry to SAs gross domestic product was ... defines the SA automotive industry as being comprised of three automotive sectors, namely the retail sector, automotive parts ... automotive industry. An industry, as defined by Statistics South Africa (2009a), is comprised of enterprises taking part in the ...
The automotive industry in Germany is well equipped with vector-parallel computers, Audi, BMW, VW and even EDS (Opel) that ... In the chemical industry there is a trend to SGI Power Challenge. Bayer AG uses its Cray C92 not for research in chemistry but ... in industry. It has access to a 1024 processor Parsytec Transputer system and has installed the new GC PowerPlus with 32 ... Industry will invest powerful computers and a guaranteed computer usage, worth 40 Million DM, and the industrial know-how. As ...
Practical application is polyolefin modified polycarbonate in the automotive industry. ... 1985-10-09. 1987-04-09. Bayer Ag. Thermoplastic graft Patent Citations (3). * Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party. ... 1985-03-05. Martin B. Barancik. Polycarbonate resin molding composition FR2551447B1 (en) * 1983-08-31. 1987-03-27. Elf ... M.Arts et al., In Plastics 75, 224-228 (1985); Swiss Patent No. 372 844; GB-PS 937 747). Für die Schlagzähmodifizierung von ...
Autofacts is a team of industry specialists inside PwCs Global Automotive Practice dedicated to the ongoing analysis of sector ... Regional market analysis and industry trends. Covering key issues facing companies operating in the global automotive sector: ... As global growth slows, segment dynamics and technology changes will pose challenges to the automotive industrys flexibility. ... Fully integrated with PwCs more than 5,100 global automotive professionals, Autofacts provides ongoing auto industry analysis ...
Shanghai Automotive Industry Company (SAIC). *SAIC Motor Group (in English). First Automobile Works (FAW). *FAW Group corporate ... FAW-Volkswagen Automotive Company[edit]. Established in February 1991, FAW-Volkswagen Automotive Company (FAW-VW) is a large- ... Volkswagen Group China is the largest, earliest, and the most successful international partner in Chinas Automotive Industry[ ... In 1984, a joint venture (JV) was established between Volkswagen Group and Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation (now SAIC ...
... both of which established the company in the automotive industry market. In June of 1985 Nalco also purchased the remaining 80 ... Imperial Chemical Industries of the United Kingdom, or ICI, an important part of Nalcos development since the 1930s, was ... his status at the company and in the chemical industry did not diminish. He remained the industrys lead trade advisor to the ... The chemical industry acknowledged Clarks many contributions with the 1993 Chemical Industry Medal, and he retired in 1994. ...
... and has been widely used in the automotive industry because of the easy-to-use lookup tables. Monte Carlo simulation methods ... In an Automotive air conditioning system, the air flow distribution in the cabin from the HVAC (Heating, ventilation and air ... Automotive vehicle body electrophoretic (e-coat) and paint application has a high degree of complexity and expense in vehicle ... A Technique to Predict Thermal Buckling in Automotive Body Panels by Coupling Heat Transfer and Structural Analysis. 2014-04-01 ...
I had many meetings with executives and technical personnel in the automotive industry. Most agreed with the conclusions of the ... free consumer choice and they accuse the industry of fighting the air bag. The industry resisted the air bag primarily for two ... The industry did not take the position that improved fuel economy was "absolutely impossible." The authors state that "in ... The authors would have had a better case if they had accused the industry of being slow in improving quality control and ...
Home > Industries > Automotive > References > Compact fan 622 M for LED headlight ventilation. ...
The political shift from apartheid to democracy has impacted on the international South African automotive industry. Because of ... A case study in the South African automotive industry", PhD dissertation, Rhodes University, Band 20: Wirtschaftswissenschaften ... The purpose of this article is to contribute to an increase in understanding value conflicts in the international automotive ... Hofstede, G. (1985), Cultures consequences: International differences in work-related values, (abridged edition),Sage ...
Various additional automotive applications for bio-based materials have been developed, some of which are already in use in ... automotive industry; ecolabels; cars sustainability; bio-based products; automotive industry; ecolabels; cars ... Results of the Expert Interviews and Related Research in the Automotive Industry. 3.2.1. Ecolabels for Bio-Based Automotive ... Bio-Based Products in the Automotive Industry: The Need for Ecolabels, Standards, and Regulations by Simone Wurster * and Luana ...
Industries like. banking and insurance could, for example, serve as benchmarks for the. automotive sector. These industries ... tool in an automotive industry setting and the results reflect the CRM. status quo achieved by twelve national and foreign ... Since the automotive industry is very active in terms of product. launches, advertising, and back office processes, the risk of ... automotive industry, and gave them a joint in-depth briefing of the study. and evaluation criterias goals. They received course ...
Health care is an important service industry. The city is the site of Gadsden State Community College (1985). The waterfall at ... Gadsdens economy is primarily based on poultry processing and the manufacture of steel, appliances, automotive parts, and wood ...
A good example is the automotive industry in the United States. The Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency Standard (CAFE), first ... In this final post of the series, we explore ways to lower the risk faced by these risk-averse industry players. ... because the CAFE standard did not require further improvements from industry. When the stringent California greenhouse gas (GHG ... also supports efforts by consumers to minimize the carbon footprint of their travel and efforts by progressive industry groups ...
In the 1980s, the Society of Automotive Engineers, at the urging of the domestic truck industry, sponsored an anthropometric ... While NIOSH funded the bulk of the study, the partners in the trucking industry also provided financial support to increase the ... which obtained and packaged financial contributions from a number of firms in the trucking industry, making it possible to add ... be relied upon by truck manufacturers for designing new truck cabs and by professional organizations for updating industry ...
  • Analysis Tech Inc also known as Anatech, was founded in 1983 as a manufacturer of electronic reliability testing products for the electronic packaging industry. (bizeurope.com)
  • The company, which developed its PulsPlasma technology in 1985, with the intention to suppress the well known difficulties of the DC plasma nitriding like arcing and irregularities of temperature, went on to deliver the first plant that used the technology in 1983. (ai-online.com)
  • The automotive industry in Massachusetts refers to a period of time from 1893 to 1989 when automobiles were manufactured in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts commercially. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the last three years, Mr. Gorman and Mr. Mettler, who will turn 65 in February 1989, have transformed TRW from a vast conglomerate with interests in a wide variety of industries to a company that is now focused on military, automotive and information systems. (nytimes.com)
  • Lincoln-Mercury briefly expanded under the Edsel (1958-1960) and Merkur (1985-1989) brands. (rug.nl)
  • Almost incredibly, Nissan turned profitable in 2000, reached 7.9 percent operating margin in 2001 and an industry-leading 10.8 percent in 2002. (ai-online.com)
  • Mr. Wu Xiao An (also known as Mr. Ng Siu On) is Executive Chairman of the Board of Brilliance China Automotive Holdings Ltd. He has been the chairman of the Board since 18th June, 2002 and our executive director since 11th January, 1994. (reuters.com)
  • From 1982 to 2004, Mr. Qi held various positions in (Dalian Heavy Industries Co., Ltd.), including chairman and general manager. (reuters.com)
  • The concept of a National Car was conceived in 1979 by then Prime Minister of Malaysia , Dato' Seri Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad, now Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad , with the goal of enhancing Malaysian industry . (wikipedia.org)
  • It all began in 1979, when Tun Mahathir Mohamad, the then Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia, mooted the idea of establishing an automotive assembling and manufacturing industry in our country. (proton.com)
  • The aim of this investigation was to examine the work restructuring levels of managers in the South African automotive industry, and how these levels are affected by the global economic recession. (scielo.org.za)
  • In order to understand these issues in relation to the global recession, this study aims to investigate the work restructuring levels, as well as the work and family involvement levels, of managers in the South African (SA) automotive industry. (scielo.org.za)
  • This research investigates the influence of economic changes on families, by aiming to discover how the current global economic recession is affecting the work-family balance of managers employed in the SA automotive industry. (scielo.org.za)
  • According to McGraw-Hill Research's look at the 1985 recession, companies that either maintained or increased their ad budgets during that time experienced a 256 percent increase in sales versus companies that cut their ad budgets. (qualitylogoproducts.com)
  • The industry has attracted foreign direct investment (FDI) worth US$17.4 billion during the period April 2000 to June 2017, according to data released by Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP). (wikipedia.org)
  • New-car fuel economy in the US then stagnated between 1985 and early 2000, because the CAFE standard did not require further improvements from industry. (theicct.org)
  • In order to keep up with the growing demand, several auto makers have started investing heavily in various segments of the industry during the last few months. (wikipedia.org)
  • This experience contributed to innovate the organizational and methodological processes of FIEP, and to improve the perspective of innovation in the automotive sector through a new approach to scenario building. (msd.com.ua)
  • The automotive industry plays an important role in the economies of over 40 countries, and is a benchmark for innovation and application in management and production technologies. (msd.com.ua)
  • I actually think the US is finally becoming a really automotive innovation center though I also personally believe various forms of mass transit is the future. (ginandtacos.com)
  • WINDSOR, Ontario - For more than three decades, workers, most of them women, have complained of dreadful conditions in many of this city's plastic automotive parts factories: Pungent fumes and dust that caused nosebleeds, headaches, nausea and dizziness. (publicintegrity.org)
  • Mr. Nanterme spent much of his earlier career with Accenture in the Financial Services operating group, where he served as managing director for Europe, Africa and Latin America, as well as global managing director of Accenture's Insurance industry group. (accenture.com)
  • But despite the common sense notion that driving less (and buying fewer cars) is a positive trend for America, we have an industry going through (well-deserved) rough times and a government that is happy to cave into their needs. (bikeportland.org)
  • We do not need to help an industry that has run rough-shod over the cultural and physical landscape of America for way too long. (bikeportland.org)
  • Toray Plastics (America), Inc., was founded in 1985 and consists of the Torayfan® Polypropylene Film and Lumirror® Polyester Film Divisions, located in North Kingstown, Rhode Island, and the Toraypef® Olefin Foams Division, located in Front Royal, Virginia. (azocleantech.com)
  • It started its connection with China as early as in 1978, and has been taking the leading position in the Chinese automotive market for more than 25 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mr. Wu obtained a bachelor's degree of arts from Beijing Foreign Languages Institute (now known as Beijing Foreign Studies University) in 1985 and a master of business administration degree from Fordham University in New York in 1992. (reuters.com)
  • Toray Industries, Inc., was established in 1926 as Toyo Rayon Co., Ltd. and today operates 257 facilities in 27 countries and regions with nearly 46,000 employees and annual sales of approximately US$20 billion. (azocleantech.com)
  • Privately held with more than 2,600 employees, Altair is headquartered in Troy, Michigan, USA with more than 45 offices throughout 20 countries, and serves more than 5,000 corporate clients across broad industry segments. (automationalley.com)
  • This will maximise the long term contribution of the automotive sector to the national economy and at the same time ultimately benefit the Malaysian consumer. (blogspot.com)
  • Since 1985, our market-tested approach, diverse service offerings and dedication to client service have made Autofacts a trusted advisor throughout the industry. (pwc.com)
  • Motor Finance Europe: Frankfurt 2016 brings together captive finance, banks, leasing companies, automotive finance professionals and industry disruptors in an active discussion of the key issues facing the industry. (verdict.co.uk)
  • Motor Finance Europe: Frankfurt 2016 is an opportunity to share ideas, discover trends and network with peers across the industry. (verdict.co.uk)
  • 3 According to one 2016 news article on trade trends, after a recent growth spurt, the automotive sector now represents 25 percent of Mexico's manufacturing exports and over 3 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP). (chicagofed.org)
  • V-8 now rated at 180 horsepower by the more realistic Society of Automotive Engineers "net" rating, rather than the previous "gross" rating. (timescolonist.com)
  • Due to the industry's importance to Parana, in 2008 and 2009 the Federation of Industries of Parana (FIEP) oversaw a foresight study conducted by its Industrial Development Observatory (ODI). (msd.com.ua)
  • It was designed to contribute to the MRC automo-tive industry by improving the sector's growth and development, and create new opportunities worldwide. (msd.com.ua)
  • The thesis also reviews the literature concerning the potential changes to automotive power train technology and adds to it by using the theory of the technology-based firm as well as environmental literature and the non market strategy lens in order to develop a nonbiased view of the state of development of fuel cell and hybrid technology. (core.ac.uk)
  • 2010). Buyer-supplier partnerships during product design and development in the global automotive sector: Who invests, in what and when? (core.ac.uk)
  • 2010 Goal of this research paper is therefore to define the development of a premium brand within the automotive industry is derived in form of a An essay or paper on Automotive Technician Career Choice. (badslacks.com)
  • From 1952 to 1985 Dewis was the chief test and development engineer for Jaguar. (torquenews.com)
  • 1. Provide Government support and incentives based on sustainable economic contribution The Government will continue to nurture and support the development of the domestic automotive sector via a comprehensive package of grants and incentives. (blogspot.com)
  • Such Government support and incentives will be aimed at optimising sustainable economic contribution, namely the scale of operations, extent of industry linkages, and the development of local and Bumiputera capabilities. (blogspot.com)
  • In 1985 Plasma Technik Grun delivered the first plant for the industrial development of the PA CVD technology for TiN coatings. (ai-online.com)
  • In this latest paper, their VP of Development will describe how they became one of the first production volume suppliers of Third Generation IME by using a hybrid technology in a unique application for automotive headlights. (idtechex.com)
  • Founded in 1985, Altair is focused on the development and application of simulation technology to synthesize and optimize designs, processes and decisions for improved business performance. (automationalley.com)
  • As global growth slows, segment dynamics and technology changes will pose challenges to the automotive industry's flexibility. (pwc.com)
  • When making decisions about the automotive industry's future as a whole, a systematic view of this environment is employed, as it considers the needs and wants of all participants. (msd.com.ua)
  • The automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world with an annual production of 23.96 million vehicles in FY (fiscal year) 2015-16, following a growth of 2.57 per cent over the last year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The industry produced a total 14.25 million vehicles-including passenger vehicles (PV), commercial vehicles (CV), and three- and two wheelers (3W and 2W)-in April-October 2015, as against 13.83 in April-October 2014, registering a marginal growth of 3.07 per cent, year-to-year. (wikipedia.org)
  • That's about 55 percent greater than the automotive sector at 31.4 tonnes of CO2e/$M for that same year. (ecowatch.com)
  • The total global emissions of the pharma sector amounts to about 52 megatonnes of CO2e in 2015, more than the 46.4 megatonnes of CO2e generated by the automotive sector in the same year. (ecowatch.com)
  • Scenario building was chosen as the key tool to assess the industry, while the project's timeframe was set for the year 2020. (msd.com.ua)
  • Since the 50-year old Mr. Gorman edged out A. William Reynolds for the president's slot in early 1985, it had been widely assumed that he would succeed Mr. Mettler. (nytimes.com)
  • Chennai is home to around 35-40% of India's total automobile industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following independence in 1947, the Government of India and the private sector launched efforts to create an automotive-component manufacturing industry to supply to the automobile industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1952, the government appointed the first Tariff Commission, one of whose purposes was to come out with a feasibility plan for the indigenization of the Indian automobile industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • In defense of US automakers The opinion-page article "Detroit Misses the Mark, Again," Aug. 19, is extreme in its vitriolic, unbalanced, and often inaccurate attack on the US automobile industry. (csmonitor.com)
  • 1999). Between Globalization And Regionalization: What Is The Future Of The Automobile Industry? (core.ac.uk)
  • Free Papers and Essays on Automobile Industry. (badslacks.com)
  • The American automobile industry has continued to see a consistent downfall in sales. (studymode.com)
  • American Automobile Industry - As we move towards a globalized business world, new competitors have risen from developing nations. (studymode.com)
  • The President's Circle of Achievement Award recognizes individuals whose commitment to robotic automation, industry leadership and technical, sales and marketing contributions have resulted in record-breaking sales and significant robotic industry growth. (mcadcafe.com)
  • Since 1985, Liebherr-Mischtechnik GmbH has been developing measurement systems for industrial automation at its production site for truck mixers, mixing plants and concrete pumps in Bad Schussenried, Germany. (liebherr.com)
  • For more than a decade, Geneva Enterprises has been offering CUSTOM FOAM FABRICATION SOLUTIONS beginning with the demanding healthcare industry as well as many other markets. (iqsdirectory.com)
  • Rarely does mention of the pharmaceutical industry conjure up images of smoke stacks, pollution and environmental damage. (ecowatch.com)
  • Yet our recent study found the global pharmaceutical industry is not only a significant contributor to global warming , but it is also dirtier than the global automotive production sector. (ecowatch.com)
  • Prior to becoming CEO in January 2011, he was Group Chief Executive of Accenture's Financial Services operating group, which serves clients in the banking, capital markets and insurance industries. (accenture.com)
  • HLG expects industry volume for both passenger and commercial vehicles to reach 562,380 units in 2007. (paultan.org)
  • In an Automotive air conditioning system, the air flow distribution in the cabin from the HVAC (Heating, ventilation and air conditioning), ducts and outlets is evaluated by the velocity achieved at driver and passenger mannequin aim points. (sae.org)
  • By our calculations, the pharma market is 28 percent smaller yet 13 percent more polluting than the automotive sector. (ecowatch.com)
  • Situated in Parana state in southern Brazil, the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (MRC) is home to an automotive sector which plays a major role in the local and national economy. (msd.com.ua)
  • Recognising this global environment, the National Automotive Policy (NAP) seeks to address the manifold issues and challenges and transform the domestic automotive sector to become a more viable, competitive and significant contributor to the economy. (blogspot.com)
  • Some of the uses of this process in the automotive sector are for gear parts which can be built in without grinding after PulsPlasma Nitriding. (ai-online.com)
  • HLG recommends UMW shares for investment in the auto industry, with a price target of RM6.89. (paultan.org)
  • Fully integrated with PwC's more than 5,100 global automotive professionals, Autofacts provides ongoing auto industry analysis our clients use to shape business strategy, assess implications and support a variety of operational decisions. (pwc.com)
  • The auto industry certainly is in trouble, but it needs to be restructured," he said. (bikeportland.org)
  • Fresh off their $25 billion victory, auto industry lobbyists are now scrambling to get in on the Big Bailout of the financial industry being debated in Congress. (bikeportland.org)
  • People are choosing to drive less, and the U.S. auto industry is running scared. (bikeportland.org)
  • For everyone enlisted in the national "bike movement", girding for battle in the upcoming re-authorization of the transportation bill, take note of how the auto industry throws their weight around in Washington. (bikeportland.org)
  • The united states is the premier place for the future of the auto industry. (badslacks.com)
  • Industry perspectives 2015 Auto Industry Trends Even with recent global sales gains, automakers must navigate three powerful forces to build market share now and 20. (badslacks.com)
  • That policy prohibited imports of finished vehicles, engines, and other auto parts, significantly raising trade barriers for Mexico's auto industry. (chicagofed.org)
  • One industry in particular is the American auto industry that has seen a large fall in their earnings. (studymode.com)
  • Japan is one nation who has revolutionized the auto industry through Toyota. (studymode.com)
  • With investors anxious for change, American auto industry in order to compete in the car industry has sought ways to cut their costs. (studymode.com)
  • It is regarded as an innovative methodology as it includes the perspectives and opinions of multiple stakeholders, not to the or-ganizations individually, but to the industry as a whole, leading to the collection and analysis of strategic information regarding the views of all participants. (msd.com.ua)