Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Group Practice, Prepaid: An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.Group Practice, Dental: Any group of three or more full-time dentists, organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of dental care, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Partnership Practice: A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Medical Secretaries: Individuals responsible for various duties pertaining to the medical office routine.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Medical Receptionists: Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance Plans: Prepaid health and hospital insurance plan.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Institutional Practice: Professional practice as an employee or contractee of a health care institution.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Multiphasic Screening: The simultaneous use of multiple laboratory procedures for the detection of various diseases. These are usually performed on groups of people.Social Work, Psychiatric: Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Hospital-Physician Joint Ventures: A formal financial agreement made between one or more physicians and a hospital to provide ambulatory alternative services to those patients who do not require hospitalization.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.United StatesHospitals, Group Practice: Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.EnglandReimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Independent Practice Associations: A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.LondonGeneral Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Great BritainEthics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.CaliforniaDrug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.WashingtonInternal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.WisconsinComprehensive Dental Care: Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.Infection Control, Dental: Efforts to prevent and control the spread of infections within dental health facilities or those involving provision of dental care.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Dental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Tooth DiseasesMedical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Dental Caries Susceptibility: The predisposition to tooth decay (DENTAL CARIES).Dental Informatics: The application of computer and information sciences to improve dental practice, research, education and management.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Dental Scaling: Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.Preventive Dentistry: The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.American Dental Association: Professional society representing the field of dentistry.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Evidence-Based Dentistry: An approach or process of practicing oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinical relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. (from J Am Dent Assoc 134: 689, 2003)Stomatognathic Diseases: General or unspecified diseases of the stomatognathic system, comprising the mouth, teeth, jaws, and pharynx.Dental Polishing: Creation of a smooth and glossy surface finish on a denture or amalgam.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Practice Management: Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.Legislation, Dental: Laws and regulations pertaining to the field of dentistry, proposed for enactment or recently enacted by a legislative body.Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
  • She later graduated valedictorian of her class from the University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 1983. (ultimatesmiledesign.net)
  • September 1983 (one application) and 29 May 1984 (two applications) resulted in the grant of European patent No. 136 186 on 6 September 1989, on the basis of a set A of 14 claims for the Contracting States DE, FR and GB and of a set B of 15 claims for the Contracting States CH and LI. (epo.org)
  • Many questions that were asked in NHANES II, 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, and NHANES III, 1988-1994, were combined with new questions in the NHANES 1999-2000. (umich.edu)
  • Debridement Antimicrobial therapy Correction of local risk factors Fluoride therapy Caries control and placement of temporary restorations Occlusal therapy Minor orthodontic treatment If disease is present, secondary prevention may be necessary, the cause of disease should be identified and noted, and the relevant professional movement should be identified and patient instruction for dental plaque control established in an attempt to reinstate a healthy oral condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Widespread use of fluoride has been a major factor in the decline in the prevalence and severity of dental caries (i.e., tooth decay) in the United States and other economically developed countries. (cdc.gov)
  • When used appropriately, fluoride is both safe and effective in preventing and controlling dental caries. (cdc.gov)
  • During the late 1990s, CDC convened a work group to develop recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • This report includes these recommendations, as well as a) critical analysis of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and effectiveness of fluoride modalities in preventing and controlling dental caries, b) ordinal grading of the quality of the evidence, and c) assessment of the strength of each recommendation. (cdc.gov)
  • Because frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride each day will best reduce the risk for dental caries in all age groups, the work group recommends that all persons drink water with an optimal fluoride concentration and brush their teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. (cdc.gov)
  • 56% had dental caries (mean decayed, missing, filled teeth score 2.1) and 86% had at least 1 mucosal lesion. (who.int)
  • The levels of plaque, gingivitis, dental caries and periodontitis among smokeless tobacco users were similar to those of most adolescents regardless of tobacco use. (who.int)
  • association of dental caries and smoke- Data collection less tobacco use are limited. (who.int)
  • Tobacco use is a major preventable there is no evidence of tobacco-associ- The students completed a short cause of premature death and also a ated dental caries [9- (who.int)
  • Complications of chronic sialadenitis and autoimmune sialadenitis are most often dental in nature because of the decreased function of the gland and the protective effect provided against caries. (medscape.com)
  • The main goal of preventive treatment is to minimize dental caries, and to prevent malocclusions (crooked teeth). (kidsdentistrichmondhill.com)
  • Tooth decay (dental caries) is one of the most common diseases in our country, affecting almost the total population. (apha.org)
  • Periodontal health, dental caries, and metabolic control in insulin-dependent diabetic children and adolescents. (nih.gov)
  • To evaluate the effect of dental caries, fluorosis and temporo-mandibular joint disorders on quality of life. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Total sample size was categorized into three groups: Group A-Participants 3-10 y: for assessment of fluorosis and dental caries. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Group B-Participants of age 11-18 y: for assessment of fluorosis and dental caries. (alliedacademies.org)
  • 4.5% patients in this study have minor scores for dental caries. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Signs and symptoms of TMD, fluorosis and caries in different age groups helped to validate and to find reliability of OHRQoL. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Temporo-mandibular disorders (TMD), Fluorosis, Dental caries, Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL). (alliedacademies.org)
  • Toothache caused by dental caries is agonising and disruptive symptom for both parents of children and participants. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Dental caries in early childhood are found in those participants who drink liquids with more sugar, who are socially underprivileged. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Last year it was brought to light how the US sugar industry interfered and influenced research ​ ​ looking at the role of sucrose in dental caries, resulting in public health policy that was heavily skewed in industry's favour throughout the 60s and 70s. (foodnavigator.com)
  • He received his graduate degree in Anatomy from UCLA, and his dental degree from UCSF. (llu.edu)
  • In the United States I discussed fluoridation with Ernest Newbrun in San Francisco, Brian Burt in Ann Arbor, dental scientists and officials like John Small in Bethesda near Washington, DC, and others at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. (slweb.org)
  • Beginning with the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I) a nutrition component was added to obtain information on nutritional status and dietary practices. (cdc.gov)
  • o An Adult Sample Person Questionnaire (ASPQ), for persons 12 through 74 years that, depending on age, included sections on health status measures (including dental conditions and care), health services utilization, smoking (20 through 74 years), meal program participation, and acculturation. (cdc.gov)
  • o A Child Sample Person Questionnaire (CSPQ), for sample persons 6 months through 11 years that included sections on a number of health status issues (including dental condition and care), health care utilization, infant feeding practices, participation in meal programs, school attendance, and language use. (cdc.gov)
  • Is there a relationship of negative oral health beliefs with dental fear and anxiety regarding diverse dental patient groups? (springer.com)
  • This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to critically appraise the evidence on the relationship of oral health beliefs with dental fear and anxiety in distinct patient groups. (springer.com)
  • Chhabra N, Chhabra A (2012) Parental knowledge, attitudes and cultural beliefs regarding oral health and dental care of preschool children in an Indian population: a quantitative study. (springer.com)
  • Dental hygienists also aim to work inter-professionally to provide holistic oral health care in the best interest of their patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • The treatment is normally carried out by a dental hygienist or oral health therapist, but involves all members of the dental team and can include specialists throughout the course of care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many persons in upper-income groups, who could afford the high price of private medical care, chose to use the services of a private physician rather than one assigned to them by the health service. (country-studies.com)
  • Critics judged the health system to be substandard, unreliable, and increasingly tainted by the practice of offering gratuities to medical personnel to ensure quality care. (country-studies.com)
  • Its practice focus in detailed exams to check the overall health of your gums. (tampabaydentistry.net)
  • Its practice is focus in preventive and comprehensive dental care for its patient to ensure optimum oral health. (tampabaydentistry.net)
  • The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. (umich.edu)
  • Information on certain aspects of reproductive health, such as use of oral contraceptives and breastfeeding practices, were also collected. (umich.edu)
  • David Shier has more than thirty years of experience teaching anatomy and physiology, primarily to premedical, nursing, dental, and allied health students. (abebooks.com)
  • Does More Generous Dental Insurance Coverage Improve Oral Health? (rand.org)
  • A move to the chair of public health and clinical bacteriology, which was newly established jointly by the University of Birmingham, HPA and Heart of England Foundation Trust, enabled more extensive development of research on the molecular epidemiology of M. tuberculosis , the environmental flow and evolution of antibiotic resistance genes in collaboration with the University of Warwick and the antibiotic research group founded by Laura Piddock. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • Dental Therapists as New Oral Health Practitioners: Increasing Access for Underserved Populations. (umn.edu)
  • Questions about their prevention programmes in developed scores among users only if they had gin- dental/oral health, oral health practices, countries have resulted in a decline in givitis . (who.int)
  • She is engaged at a local not-for-profit GP practice dedicated to improving rural health options through recruitment and training. (edu.au)
  • In 2016, Jenny was awarded an Australia Medal for significant service to community health in rural and regional areas, as a general practitioner, member of professional medical groups, and as an educator. (edu.au)
  • Jenny has been an active member of several medical professional advocacy groups, including the National Rural Health Alliance and as NRHA representative on the National Medical Training Advisory Network. (edu.au)
  • Established in 1984, the National Osteoporosis Foundation is the nation's leading health organization dedicated to preventing osteoporosis and broken bones, promoting strong bones for life and reducing human suffering through programs of awareness, education, advocacy and research. (prnewswire.com)
  • The percentage of the Canadian population reporting good health status decreased from 89.2% to 88.2% for both genders and most age groups during the period 1994-2004 3 . (uninet.edu)
  • A school dental health program for Venezuela by Guillermo Feo C., University of Michigan. (google.com)
  • A study of the time necessary to complete certain cases presenting at a public health school dental clinic by Edwin Boonstra, University of Michigan. (google.com)
  • DSN: SEE BLOOD AND URINE DATASET NAMES ABSTRACT General Information HISPANIC HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY, 1982-84 Mexican Americans Cuban Americans Puerto Ricans Description The Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) was conducted from July 1982 through December 1984. (cdc.gov)
  • In the study I claimed that such treatment statistics "provide a valid measure of the dental health of our child population" . (slweb.org)
  • There are 154 top-rated Health Care and Dental Providers in your area and 4.2K to avoid. (angieslist.com)
  • We do full plan comparisons of ALL Medicare plans, employer group insurance, individual health insurance and life insurance. (angieslist.com)
  • This assemblage thus provides a unique opportunity to explore the dietary habits and overall health status of a specific group of individuals within Lisbon's Medieval Muslim community. (springer.com)
  • Each health maintenance organization shall be subject to sections 72A.17 to 72A.32 , relating to the regulation of trade practices, except (a) to the extent that the nature of a health maintenance organization renders such sections clearly inappropriate and (b) that enforcement shall be by the commissioner of health and not by the commissioner of commerce. (mn.gov)
  • Our office is a full-scope pediatric dental practice that provides both primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral health care, and orthodontics, for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health care needs. (kidsdentistrichmondhill.com)
  • At the core of our Brooklyn & Pomona dental practices is a friendly team of professionals that are dedicated to your utmost comfort and optimal oral health. (aradvanceddental.com)
  • Summarizes guidelines and recommendations by the Public Health Service Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare concerning polysaccharide vaccines for meningococcal disease. (ebscohost.com)
  • It also emphasizes the critical role that public health practitioners, health care professionals, and policymakers can play with respect to this important public health practice. (apha.org)
  • These age groups were studied for the validity and reliability of oral health related quality of life in different oral and dental conditions as per their respective age groups. (alliedacademies.org)
  • When Medicare began in 1984, the levy was introduced as a supplement to other taxation revenue to enable the Australian Government to meet the additional costs of the universal national health care system, which were greater than the costs of the more restricted systems that preceded it. (abs.gov.au)
  • Due to lack of promotion opportunities in Bristol a move to work with Richard Lacey in Leeds as Senior Lecturer and subsequently a personal chair in 1992 facilitated the development of his research group which worked on molecular evolution of plasmids and antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and acinetobacter. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • In 1984, he was elected to the Idaho Legislature where he served until 1998, the last six years serving as Speaker. (blogspot.com)
  • Dr. Gregory S. Rotole earned DDS degree in University of Michigan year 1984. (tampabaydentistry.net)
  • Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington, Continuing Dental Education. (biolase.com)
  • Dr. Budenz has taught Anatomy courses at the University of the Pacific since 1984, and has extensive experience in head and neck anatomy, dissection, and nerve tract identification. (llu.edu)
  • In an editorial accompanying the JAMA ​ report, professor at the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University, Marion Nestle, said the practice of food companies deliberately setting out to manipulate research in their favour continues today. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Dr. Charkhandeh received his DDS and Bachelor of Medical Sciences from the University of Alberta, Canada and earned his Fellowship from Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies. (aurumgroup.com)
  • This epidemiologic survey aimed at assessing the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries in children seen at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (scielo.br)
  • Our group uses cell-molecular biology, biomaterials and biomedical technologies to explore biological regulation and use this information for therapeutics to control favorable clinical outcomes. (shepherd.edu)
  • David Gergen of Gergen's Orthodontic Lab has seen a huge demand by his dental clients to incorporate the treatment of sleep apnea into their practice. (prweb.com)
  • Dr. Elliott has authored several articles on Dental Sleep Medicine, including her latest article published in the October 2012 issue of Dental Economics entitled "Take the Time to Check for Sleep Apnea and "Pediatric Sleep Apnea" in the June 2013 issue of Dental Economics. (aurumgroup.com)
  • A few years later, when I had become the city's Principal Dental Officer, I published a paper in the New Zealand Dental Journal that reported how children's tooth decay had declined in the city following fluoridation of its water, to which I attributed the decline, pointing out that the greatest benefit appeared to be in low-income areas . (slweb.org)
  • Before I left on the tour my superiors confided to me that they were worried about some new evidence which had become available: information they had collected on the amount of treatment children were receiving in our school dental clinics seemed to show that tooth decay was declining just as much in places in New Zealand where fluoride had not been added to the water supply. (slweb.org)
  • They thought that the decline in tooth decay in the nonfluoridated places must have resulted from the use of fluoride toothpastes and fluoride supplements, and from fluoride applications to the children's teeth in dental clinics, which we had started at the same time as fluoridation. (slweb.org)
  • This MSc will give you an in-depth knowledge of dental technology, CAD-CAM, implantology, occlusion, aesthetics and materials. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • Subjects covered in seminars are anterior/posterior occlusion, group function, balanced occlusions and conformative and re-organised occlusions. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • 5. Big Idea Group, Unpublished consumer research: 'Waterlase Consumer Insight', Oct. 2009. (biolase.com)
  • Dr. Chugal is the past president of the Southern California Academy of Endodontics, (SCAE) and has been Secretary and Treasurer for the Pulp Biology Group (PBRG) of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) since 2005. (ucla.edu)
  • 1996 Postdoctoral Fellowship in Dental Research. (ucla.edu)
  • This MSc puts you at the forefront of research into the rapidly evolving field of dental technology and materials. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • She serves on the Editorial Boards of Photomedicine and Laser Surgery, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, Lasers in Medical Science, Physiotherapy Practice and Research and has published over 60 peer reviewed articles. (shepherd.edu)
  • Other early research shows that applying an arnica cream (Boiron Group, France) three times daily every 24 hours after performing calf raises does not reduce muscle pain. (webmd.com)
  • Research on linguistics and blood grouping suggests they originated in Northern India, arriving in the Byzantine Empire at the beginning of the 11th century, 1 2 following periods in Iran and the Caucasus. (bmj.com)
  • Dr. Ford has broad interests and is always willing to work with research teams and patient groups to learn more about the challenges they face and how we can address barriers as efficiently and effectively as possible. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • My duties as a public servant included supervision of the city's school dental clinics, which were part of a national School Dental Service which provided regular six-monthly dental treatment, with strictly enforced uniform diagnostic standards, to almost all (98 percent) school children up to the age of 12 or 13 years. (slweb.org)
  • This sector includes a large number of doctors and paramedical professionals who are self-employed, generally providing services such as general practice and specialist services, diagnostic imaging, pathology and physiotherapy. (abs.gov.au)
  • This is a core module delivered in the Master of Science (MSc) in Dental Technology which is designed to ensure students are taught about the use of osseointegrated implants to stabilise or support fixed or removable prostheses. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • Implants restorations may be constructed as part of the technical practice. (qmul.ac.uk)
  • o A Dietary Questionnaire (DQ), for persons 6 months through 74 years, by which trained dietary interviewers collected information about 'usual' consumption habits and dietary practices, and recorded foods consumed 24-hours prior to midnight of the interview. (cdc.gov)
  • Family Dental Center by Dr. Qayyum Khambaty has been serving the New Port Richey community for more than twenty-five years. (tampabaydentistry.net)
  • age in years for 1-84 year olds, and a top-coded age group of 85+ years), gender, a race/ethnicity variable, an education variable (high school, and more than high school education), country of birth (United States, Mexico, or other foreign born), and pregnancy status variable. (umich.edu)
  • David Gergen has been a nationally respected dental lab technician for over 25 years. (prweb.com)
  • This lab will be headed by David Gergen II , David has worked in the dental field for seven years and continues excel in this industry. (prweb.com)
  • Years later, some participants of that same group formed the Brevard Study Club. (ultimatesmiledesign.net)
  • Over the last two years she has participated in the Jamaica Dental mission trip, where she volunteers her time by treating the underserved in rural populations. (ultimatesmiledesign.net)
  • Acceptance to dental school was almost a sure bet if I did well during my last two years of undergraduate work. (doctorspiller.com)
  • The company achieved the status of a Fortune 500 company barely two years after the Rales brothers took over in 1984. (encyclopedia.com)
  • He then practiced alongside his father, Dr. Robert John for 15 years. (stephenjohndds.com)
  • Dr. John incorporated laser therapy in his practice a number of years ago. (stephenjohndds.com)
  • The most common age group in which primary tooth injury occurs is 1 to 3 years. (scielo.br)
  • This form of sedation often relies on opioids and is used during procedures that may cause temporary pain or anxiety, such as dental surgery and endoscopy. (bcmj.org)
  • Procedural sedation is the administration of sedative agents (often including opioids) that have the ability to depress ventilation as well as consciousness, and is used during procedures that may cause temporary pain or anxiety, such as dental surgery, bone or joint realignment, and endoscopy for gastrointestinal problems. (bcmj.org)
  • The teeth were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 7): RelyX ARC/3M ESPE conventional resin cement (Group 1), and three self-adhesive resin cements - RelyX U100/3M ESPE (Group 2), Set/SDI (Group 3) and Maxcem/Kerr (Group 4). (bvsalud.org)
  • Pathological alterations such as dental enamel hypoplasia, cribra orbitalia, Harris lines and periostitis are the bone/teeth insults commonly investigated in non-adults and adults in past populations. (springer.com)
  • The permanent molars are the most common teeth on which dental sealants are placed. (kidsdentistrichmondhill.com)
  • Prime Minister John Howard has lamented the state of children's teeth in Australia, but refuses to promise more funds for state dental services. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • Dental crowns: are fixed prosthetic devices used to cap decayed, cracked or chipped teeth. (visitandcare.com)
  • Dental bridges: bridges the spaces of missing teeth and restores their function. (visitandcare.com)
  • There are several studies in the literature that evaluate the prevalence of dental traumatism in the primary and permanent dentitions, 1,2,6,12,15,16 although just a few of them present the epidemiology of primary teeth sequelae in face of these traumas. (scielo.br)
  • The new professor could also offer courses to graduate students who want to teach, or even to dental pre-doctoral students who may be looking ahead to training their own staff or delivering presentations to dental societies. (washington.edu)
  • Dr. Garber is an active member of numerous dental societies, including the American Academy of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, the American Academy of Periodontology, and the American Prosthodontic Society. (dentalxp.com)
  • The following clinicians are available to speak in conjunction with Dental Societies or Study Clubs. (aurumgroup.com)
  • A dental hygienist or oral hygienist is a licensed dental professional, registered with a dental association, or regulatory body within their country of practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dental hygienist is a primary resource for oral cancer screening and prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • SGS offers sleep study interpretation , oral appliances (Norad Boil & Bite, Respire), online dental directory 1800SleepLab.com and online marketing for CPAP Alternatives at Sleeptest.com. (prweb.com)
  • Dr Self serves on the board of a number of non-profit dental focused organizations and has been involved in improving oral healthcare in Africa. (umn.edu)
  • The students were use causes cancer of the head and neck, a result of the short exposure time to examined at the schools using portable oesophagus and pancreas, and many smokeless tobacco products among ado- dental chairs, disposable oral examina- oral diseases such as oral mucosal lescents [13- (who.int)
  • Greenspan D, Greenspan JS, Conant M, Petersen V, Silverman S Jr, De Souza Y. Oral "hairy" leukoplakia in male homosexuals: evidence of association with both papillomavirus and a herpes-group virus. (nih.gov)
  • This study have included third group of participants for evaluation of quality of life related oral disorder TMD along with OHIP 14. (alliedacademies.org)
  • General anesthesia is a controlled state of unconsciousness that eliminates awareness, movement and discomfort during dental treatment. (kidsdentistrichmondhill.com)
  • After the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society (CAS) published revised anesthesia practice guidelines in 2012,[ 1 ] we wrote an editorial for the Canadian Journal of Anesthesia titled "Yesterday's luxury-today's necessity: End-tidal CO 2 monitoring during conscious sedation. (bcmj.org)