Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Actigraphy: The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.Sleep Apnea, Central: A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic: Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Sleep Bruxism: A sleep disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth and forceful lateral or protrusive jaw movements. Sleep bruxism may be associated with TOOTH INJURIES; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; sleep disturbances; and other conditions.Sleep Paralysis: A common condition characterized by transient partial or total paralysis of skeletal muscles and areflexia that occurs upon awakening from sleep or less often while falling asleep. Stimuli such as touch or sound may terminate the episode, which usually has a duration of seconds to minutes. This condition may occur in normal subjects or be associated with NARCOLEPSY; CATAPLEXY; and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS. The pathophysiology of this condition is closely related to the normal hypotonia that occur during REM sleep. (From Adv Neurol 1995;67:245-271)Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Delta Rhythm: Brain waves seen on EEG characterized by a high amplitude and a frequency of 4 Hz and below. They are considered the "deep sleep waves" observed during sleep in dreamless states, infancy, and in some brain disorders.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Snoring: Rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome: Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)Sleep Arousal Disorders: Sleep disorders characterized by impaired arousal from the deeper stages of sleep (generally stage III or IV sleep).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.REM Sleep Parasomnias: Abnormal behavioral or physiologic events that are associated with REM sleep, including REM SLEEP BEHAVIOR DISORDER.Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Tegmentum Mesencephali: Portion of midbrain situated under the dorsal TECTUM MESENCEPHALI. The two ventrolateral cylindrical masses or peduncles are large nerve fiber bundles providing a tract of passage between the FOREBRAIN with the HINDBRAIN. Ventral MIDBRAIN also contains three colorful structures: the GRAY MATTER (PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY), the black substance (SUBSTANTIA NIGRA), and the RED NUCLEUS.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Reticular Formation: A region extending from the PONS & MEDULLA OBLONGATA through the MESENCEPHALON, characterized by a diversity of neurons of various sizes and shapes, arranged in different aggregations and enmeshed in a complicated fiber network.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Activity Cycles: Bouts of physical irritability or movement alternating with periods of quiescence. It includes biochemical activity and hormonal activity which may be cellular. These cycles are shorter than 24 hours and include sleep-wakefulness cycles and the periodic activation of the digestive system.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Restless Legs Syndrome: A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders: Parasomnias characterized by behavioral abnormalities that occur during the transition between wakefulness and sleep (or between sleep and wakefulness).Orexin Receptors: G-protein-coupled NEUROPEPTIDE RECEPTORS that have specificity for OREXINS and play a role in appetite control, and sleep-wake cycles. Two principle receptor types exist, each having a specificity for OREXIN A and OREXIN B peptide subtypes.Brain Waves: Wave-like oscillations of electric potential between parts of the brain recorded by EEG.Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus: Dense collection of cells in the caudal pontomesencephalic tegmentum known to play a role in the functional organization of the BASAL GANGLIA and in the modulation of the thalamocortical neuronal system.Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins: A class of monomeric, low molecular weight (20-25 kDa) GTP-binding proteins that regulate a variety of intracellular processes. The GTP bound form of the protein is active and limited by its inherent GTPase activity, which is controlled by an array of GTPase activators, GDP dissociation inhibitors, and guanine nucleotide exchange factors. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Theta Rhythm: Brain waves characterized by a frequency of 4-7 Hz, usually observed in the temporal lobes when the individual is awake, but relaxed and sleepy.Azabicyclo Compounds: Bicyclic bridged compounds that contain a nitrogen which has three bonds. The nomenclature indicates the number of atoms in each path around the rings, such as [2.2.2] for three equal length paths. Some members are TROPANES and BETA LACTAMS.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Receptors, Neuropeptide: Cell surface receptors that bind specific neuropeptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Many neuropeptides are also hormones outside of the nervous system.Pharyngeal Muscles: The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.Muscle Hypotonia: A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.Sleep Phase Chronotherapy: A progressive advance or delay of bedtime until the desired bedtime is achieved.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Neuropeptides: Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Somnambulism: A parasomnia characterized by a partial arousal that occurs during stage IV of non-REM sleep. Affected individuals exhibit semipurposeful behaviors such as ambulation and are difficult to fully awaken. Children are primarily affected, with a peak age range of 4-6 years.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Adenoidectomy: Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)Clonazepam: An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.Microinjections: The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Tonsillectomy: Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Respiratory Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Uvula: A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.Palate, Soft: A movable fold suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate. The uvula hangs from the middle of the lower border.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Hypothalamic Area, Lateral: Area in the hypothalamus bounded medially by the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior column of the FORNIX (BRAIN). The medial edge of the INTERNAL CAPSULE and the subthalamic region form its lateral boundary. It contains the lateral hypothalamic nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, lateral tuberal nuclei, and fibers of the MEDIAL FOREBRAIN BUNDLE.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Hypersomnolence, Idiopathic: A sleep disorder of central nervous system origin characterized by prolonged nocturnal sleep and periods of daytime drowsiness. Affected individuals experience difficulty with awakening in the morning and may have associated sleep drunkenness, automatic behaviors, and memory disturbances. This condition differs from narcolepsy in that daytime sleep periods are longer, there is no association with CATAPLEXY, and the multiple sleep latency onset test does not record sleep-onset rapid eye movement sleep. (From Chokroverty, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, pp319-20; Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 1998 Apr:52(2):125-129)Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Octodon: A genus of diurnal rats in the family Octodonidae, found in South America. The species Octodon degus is frequently used for research.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.
  • It was further suggested that deep sleep in foragers (determined as periods lacking antennal movements) is correlated with rhythmic electrophysiological activity in the brain, including the mushroom bodies ( Schuppe, 1995 ). (biologists.org)
  • Birds exhibit two types of sleep that are in many respects similar to mammalian rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. (frontiersin.org)
  • Hypothalamic peptides (corticotropin-releasing hormone, prolactin, and the CLIP/ACTH 18-39 ) play an important role in the expression of stress-induced sleep effects, essentially by modulating rapid eye movement sleep, which has been claimed to affect the organism resilience to the deleterious effects of stress. (frontiersin.org)
  • In humans and rodents, sleep is classified into two main stages: non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), which electroencephalographic features, in rats, are represented in Figure 1 . (frontiersin.org)
  • Active wake (with low voltage and fast EEG frequency, concomitant a high EMG activity and EKG is fast), (B) non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS-high amplitude and slow wave EEG, activity in EMG is low and EKG is low), (C) rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-theta 6-8 Hz activity is present in this medial EEG, EMG is almost quiet, and EKG shows an intermediate activity). (frontiersin.org)
  • NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. (nap.edu)
  • There are two types of sleep, non-rapid eye-movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. (nap.edu)
  • Berger M, Riemann D, Höchli D, Spiegel R (1989) The cholinergic rapid eye movement sleep induction test with RS 86. (springer.com)
  • She concluded that lucid dreams were a category of experience quite distinct from ordinary dreams, and said they were associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep). (wikipedia.org)
  • This article argues that rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming is elaborative encoding for episodic memories. (cambridge.org)
  • Selected power spectrum data of all three simultaneously recorded polygraphic signals were used for training the network and to classify slow wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and awake stages. (cogprints.org)
  • Evidence suggests that NDE are associated with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep intrusion, a feature of narcolepsy. (peerj.com)
  • Arvatakse, et kõige intensiivsemad unenäod esinevad kiirete silmaliigutuste ( inglise keeles rapid eye movement ) une staadiumis ehk REM-une ajal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dissociated pattern of activity in visual cortices and their projections during human rapid eye movement sleep. (medecinesciences.org)
  • Compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, orexin KO mice had essentially normal amounts of sleep and wake, but wake and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) bouts were very brief, with many more transitions between all behavioral states. (jneurosci.org)
  • After depriving mice of sleep for 2-8 hr, orexin KO mice recovered their NREM and rapid eye movement sleep deficits at comparable rates and to the same extent as WT mice, with similar increases in EEG delta power, suggesting that their homeostatic control of sleep is normal. (jneurosci.org)
  • Besides rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) types of sleep, the body can induce a state of recovery sleep that is not equal to normal sleep. (bmj.com)
  • This is referred to as REM, rapid eye movement and the appearance of REM during sleep has been found to occur in a rhythmical fashion in all terrestrial mammals. (brainmind.com)
  • Dreams mainly occur in the rapid-eye movement (REM) stage of sleep -when brain activity is high and resembles that of being awake. (wikipedia.org)
  • We also explore the basic mechanisms responsible for the generation of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) stage of sleep. (upenn.edu)
  • Dreams usually occur in REM (Rapid eye movement) sleep and usually appear four to five times per night. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • 상세하게 기억통합의 REM기능의 내용과 관련해서 Mitchison과 Crick 은 내재하는 자연스러운 행동의 미덕으로서, 그들이 배우지 않음으로써 분류되는 과정인 "소뇌 피질에서의 세포의 상호작용으로 희망적일 수 없는 상황을 지우는 것" 이라고 렘 수면의 기능을 주장한다. (wikipedia.org)
  • The prevalence of sleep disorders is increasing in modern societies, with significant repercussions on people's well-being. (scielo.br)
  • The prevalence of sleep disorders is increasing in modern societies, where constant exposure to artificial light and interactive activities, such as television and the internet, combine with social and economic pressures to shorten the time spent asleep. (scielo.br)
  • however, it should be used with caution in patients with dementia, gait disorders, or concomitant obstructive sleep apnea [AASM [Aurora . (drugs.com)
  • Since the discovery of REM sleep in 1953, the continuous measuring of physiological parameters such as EEG, EOG, ECG, EMG, respiration activity during sleep is a common standard technique not only used in research but in diagnosing sleep disorders (e. g. (uni-heidelberg.de)
  • Sleep and sleep disorders in older adults. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Sleep and psychiatric disorders. (jamanetwork.com)
  • You will experience problem sleepiness, with its attendant risk for reductions in attention, recall and cognitive throughput, and increased errors and uncontrolled sleep attacks [National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute and National Center on Sleep Disorders Research Working Group, (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Kantelip, J.P. and Magnin, P. (1989) Pharmacologic aspects of sleep disorders. (scirp.org)
  • The need to better understand and properly diagnose and treat disorders of the sleep-wake cycle has led to the emergence of sleep medicine as a medical field. (depressionforums.org)
  • Moreover, underlying psychiatric illnesses, or their treatment, can complicate the treatment of sleep disorders. (depressionforums.org)
  • Many psychiatric disorders are accompanied by disturbance of sleep. (depressionforums.org)
  • Although the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd edition (ICSD-2) included catathrenia among "other parasomnias," catathrenia was classified as a respiratory disorder in the 2014 ICSD-3. (e-jsm.org)
  • 1983년 De Roeck 등이 처음으로 catathrenia를 보고한 후[ 6 ], 많은 증례가 보고되었으나, 그중에는 국제수면장애분류 2판(International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd edition, ICSD-2) 진단 기준에 부합하지 않는 경우도 있었다[ 2 , 7 ]. (e-jsm.org)
  • Aside from greater risks for the disease and excessive daytime sleepiness among the first-degree relatives of narcoleptic individuals, until now little has been known about the incidence of other sleep disorders in these families. (sleepeval.com)
  • This study aims to compare the frequency of sleep disorders between first-degree relatives of individuals with narcolepsy and the general population. (sleepeval.com)
  • The probands were all diagnosed with narcolepsy and were followed at the Sleep Disorders Center of the San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy) or at the Sleep Disorders Clinic of the Institute of Clinical Neurology at the University of Bologna (Bologna, Italy). (sleepeval.com)
  • This subgroup was used to determine if the frequencies of sleep disorders among first-degree relatives would differ from what can be expected for individuals of the general population. (sleepeval.com)
  • We are interested in neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory disorders during sleep associated with a common disorder known as the Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Syndrome. (upenn.edu)
  • Psychiatric disorders have been associated with sleep disorders in men and non-pregnant women, but little is known about sleep complaints and disorders among pregnant women with psychiatric disorders. (beds.ac.uk)
  • However, despite these observations, the information concerning the association of mood and anxiety disorders with sleep characteristics during pregnancy is relatively limited. (beds.ac.uk)
  • To extend the literature, we assessed the relative risks of short and long sleep duration, as well as excessive daytime sleepiness, vital exhaustion and elevated perceived stress during early pregnancy among women with and without a history of physician diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders. (beds.ac.uk)
  • We hypothesized that pregnant women with a history of physician diagnosed clinical mood or anxiety disorders were more likely than women with no such history to report shorter sleep durations, and to report higher frequencies of excessive daytime sleepiness, vital exhaustion and perceived stress. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Sentra PM is a patented medical food designed specifically for the dietary management of the altered metabolic processes of sleep disorders. (slideshare.net)
  • 1983). Chronic insomnia leads to persistent tiredness and frustration due to lack of energy. (scielo.br)
  • Essentially, there were only few previous reports about the sleep architecture in patients with respiratory disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (scirp.org)
  • This study aims to clarify the objective sleep state and the elements that affect sleep architecture in Chronic Respiratory Failure (CRF) patients with focus on clinical cases of chronic hypercapnia. (scirp.org)
  • There is ample information in the literature about the immunological consequences of illness, stress, and psychopathology during gestation, but little is known regarding the potential unfavorable effects of chronic sleep loss/disruption during pregnancy on maternal health, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal health. (auraria.edu)
  • Catathrenia is a rare chronic disorder characterized by expiratory groaning during sleep. (e-jsm.org)
  • As in mammals, several aspects of avian sleep can occur in a local manner within the brain. (frontiersin.org)
  • Sleep paralysis occurs sometimes when a person is waking from or falling into REM sleep, the state in which most vivid dreams occur. (meta-religion.com)
  • As a first test of this idea, we should ask how many OBEs actually occur at times when people are likely to experience sleep paralysis -- that is, do OBEs happen when people are lying down, asleep, resting, or while awake and active? (meta-religion.com)
  • For example, as animals explore their environments, as they learn and lay down memories, as they process sensory input, and as they sleep, characteristic oscillations occur in the "theta" range of frequencies (4-12 Hz) ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • During a full eight-hour night sleep, most dreams occur in the typical two hours of REM. (wikipedia.org)
  • In certain individuals with anatomically predisposed upper airway, hypoventilations and obstructive sleep apneas may occur as often as 60 times per hour. (upenn.edu)
  • Nocturnal Panic: attacks occur during non-REM sleep & are different from night terrors. (cram.com)
  • It has been suggested by Strauch and Meier 1996 that some dreams occur in non-REM. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Hobson JA, McCarley RW, Wyzinski PW (1975) Sleep cycle oscillation: Reciprocal discharge by two brain stem neuronal groups. (springer.com)
  • It is significant that our theoretical concern has, from the beginning, been with structures underlying phenomena, institutions and practices crucial to an understanding of religion (D'Aquili 1982, 1983, D'Aquili and Laughlin 1975, D'Aquili, Laughlin and McManus 1979, Laughlin et al. (google.com)
  • Los resultados son discutidos en términos que se refieren a la efectividad del método de PSP utilizado, al lugar cerebral de AEIC y a efectos inespecíficos del tratamiento experimental. (uab.cat)
  • These results indicate that endogenous adenosine in the TMN suppresses the histaminergic system via A 1 R to promote NREM sleep. (pnas.org)
  • Since 1983, we have reported that prostaglandin (PG) D 2 is an endogenous sleep-inducing substance in rodents ( 4 ) and monkeys ( 5 ). (pnas.org)
  • Hobson JA, Lydic R, Baghdoyan HA (1986) Evolving concepts of sleep cycle generation. (springer.com)
  • Hobson eeldas, et REM und kutsuvad esile samad piirkonnad ajutüves, mis vahendavad ka sensoorset informatsiooni. (wikipedia.org)
  • That slow-wave sleep is dependent on the length of time awake and length of time asleep has been reported previously (Webb & Agnew, 1971). (scholarpedia.org)
  • Far too many people are sleep-deprived to the point of requiring caffeine, exogenous stimulation and compensatory effort to remain awake. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • The longer you're awake, or the less sleep you get night after night, the greater the drive to sleep. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Anyways my stress and strain of the last 48 hours slipped away as i started laughing and enjoyng the show, at about 2am when i arrived home i was feeling so energized i stayed awake playing my guitar for an hour, then i think i must have crashed into a deep deep sleep. (blogspot.com.au)
  • Finally, although mice show slow waves in thalamic input layers of primary sensory cortices during REM sleep, this is not the case in the hyperpallium of pigeons, suggesting that this phenomenon is not a universal feature of REM sleep. (frontiersin.org)
  • The primary sensory signals of vision , audition and touch pass through thalamus en route to cortex. (scholarpedia.org)
  • Sensory gating impairement associated with schizophrenia persists into REM sleep. (medecinesciences.org)
  • In addition to REM, during the course of a dream temperature control is lost, pain sensation is rare, males tend to have an erection, motor functioning is all but abolished except in certain regions which control respiration, and eye movements, and the sensory reception is greatly attenuated. (brainmind.com)
  • reference level of sleep (Borbély, 1980) . (scholarpedia.org)
  • Based on animal studies, Borbély postulated that a sleep-wake dependent and a circadian process underlie sleep regulation (Borbély 1980). (scholarpedia.org)
  • Remmers, J.E. and Anch, A.M. (1980) Oropharyngeal muscle tone in obstructive sleep apnea before and after strychnine. (scirp.org)
  • Linnoila, M. and Viukari, M. (1980) Efficacy and side effects of lorazepam, oxazepam, and temazepam as sleeping aids in psychogeriatric inpatients. (scirp.org)
  • Dement and Kleitman (1957) tested this hypothesis by awakening their subjects in random order after 5 minutes or after 15 minutes REM sleep. (uni-heidelberg.de)
  • Research evidence supporting this theory comes from Hartmann (1973) who found that people who were experiencing problems had more REM sleep than less troubled individuals. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • REM sleep was the most interesting sleep stage for dream researchers since it was shown that the probability to recall a detailed visual dream after being awakened from REM was very high (Aserinsky & Kleitman, 1953). (uni-heidelberg.de)
  • Stage 2: 50% of all sleep, evenly distributed. (slideserve.com)
  • Alexander Borbély , a Swiss pharmacologist and sleep researcher who began his research by studying sleep regulation in laboratory rats under diverse controlled conditions (Borbély & Neuhaus, 1979) applied the concept of homeostasis to sleep regulation. (scholarpedia.org)
  • Variations in the extracellular levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, glutamate and aspartate across the sleep-wake cycle in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats. (medecinesciences.org)
  • Sabbatini, RME Papel de las estructuras del sistema extrapiramidal involucradas en la elaboración de convulsiones audiogenéticas: estudio neuroetológico en ratas (Role of the structures of the extrapyramidal system involved in the mechanism of audiogenic convulsions: neuroethological study in rats). (sabbatini.com)
  • On the other hand, A 1 R has been suggested to increase sleep by inhibition of the cholinergic region of the basal forebrain. (pnas.org)
  • Although A 2A R's involvement in the PGD 2 -VLPO system is clearly established, adenosine via A 1 R has been proposed to induce sleep by inhibiting the cholinergic region of the BF ( 16 ). (pnas.org)
  • In addition, several major neurotransmitters have been postulated to be involved in the production of REM and that includes norepinephrine and serotonin which are believed to inhibit REM on cells, and cholinergic neurotransmitters which activate the REM on cells. (brainmind.com)
  • This concept was extended to human sleep (Borbély 1982) and further elaborated by Serge Daan, Domien Beersma from the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) and Alexander Borbély, to a quantitative model (Daan et al, 1984). (scholarpedia.org)
  • The hypothesis that NREM sleep reverses neuronal effects of waking was proposed in 1974 (Feinberg, 1974). (scholarpedia.org)
  • However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. (hindawi.com)
  • A variety of research findings are consistent with the hypothesis that cross-cortical consolidation can progress during sleep, although further support is needed, and we suggest some potentially fruitful research directions. (boomja.com)
  • For example, it has been found that when the rapid eye movements are toward the right that alterations in activity of the right half of the brainstem and the thalamus, as well as right sided levels of REM related neurotransmitters are also more pronounced. (brainmind.com)
  • In addition to resolving sleep-related symptoms through their primary therapeutic effects, many psychiatric medications have secondary effects on sleep that can contribute to their overall therapeutic benefit or sometimes counter them through adverse effects. (depressionforums.org)
  • The most common treatment for OSA, positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment, is frequently initiated to reduce sleep-related symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients with more sleep-related symptoms appear to receive greater benefit from treatment than do patients with fewer sleep-related symptoms (10). (cdc.gov)
  • 1983). Indeed, with the exception of related tangents into such concerns as the philosophy of science (Rubinstein and Laughlin 1977, Rubinstein, Laughlin and McManus 1984) and adaptation (Laughlin and Brady 1978), biogenetic structuralism has concerned itself primarily with topics relevant to the study of freedom. (google.com)
  • Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. (hindawi.com)
  • Honeybee foragers exhibit sleep, both in their natural hive environment, and when isolated individually in the lab. (biologists.org)
  • The TASK-3 KO animals exhibit a slower progression from their waking to sleeping states and, during their sleeping period, their sleep episodes as well as their REM theta oscillations are more fragmented. (pnas.org)
  • 1999). Many subjects can be chronically sleep-deprived as a result of their current lifestyle (Miró et al. (scielo.br)