Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.United StatesSeverity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.IndiaLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Respiratory Tract DiseasesInfant, Premature, DiseasesMortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.EnglandDrainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Great BritainCardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Schistosomiasis haematobia: A human disease caused by the infection of parasitic worms SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM. It is endemic in AFRICA and parts of the MIDDLE EAST. Tissue damages most often occur in the URINARY TRACT, specifically the URINARY BLADDER.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Diarrhea, Infantile: DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.BrazilInfection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Postpartum Hemorrhage: Excess blood loss from uterine bleeding associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH. It is defined as blood loss greater than 500 ml or of the amount that adversely affects the maternal physiology, such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEMATOCRIT. Postpartum hemorrhage is divided into two categories, immediate (within first 24 hours after birth) or delayed (after 24 hours postpartum).Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Schistosoma haematobium: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae which occurs at different stages in development in veins of the pulmonary and hepatic system and finally the bladder lumen. This parasite causes urinary schistosomiasis.Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.IsraelNutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Communicable DiseasesKidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Schistosomiasis mansoni: Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni. It is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, South America, and the Caribbean and affects mainly the bowel, spleen, and liver.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)ScotlandPostoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 30 (47): 581-589. PMID 6796814.. *^ Parrish RG, Tucker M, Ing R, Encarnacion C, ... By the year of 1981-1982, the annual rate in the United States was high with 92/100,000 among Laotians-Hmong, 82/100,000 among ... Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (1981). "Sudden, unexpected, nocturnal deaths among Southeast Asian refugees". MMWR. ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 30 (25): 305-8. PMID 6789108. Watts JM, Dang KK, Gorelick RJ, Leonard CW, Bess JW, ... Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 30 (21): 250-2. PMID 6265753. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1981-07-04). " ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1981-06-05). "Pneumocycstis Pneumonia - Los Angeles" (PDF). ...
Mortality and morbidity after extreme stress (1973); Strangers in the world (1981)). Leo and Lisl Eitinger devoted their life ...
March 1997). "Factors predicting morbidity following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 19 ... Scavennec J, Carcassonne Y, Gastaut JA, Blanc A, Cailla HL (1 August 1981). "Relationship between the levels of cyclic cytidine ... Harris MT, Schwarting GA, Stout RD (September 1981). "Selective expression of asialo GM1 on maturational subsets of lymphocytes ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (30): 250-52. Sepkowitz, Kent A. (7 June 2001). "AIDS - The First 20 Years". NEJM. ... Their announcement came on June 5, 1981 when one of their journals published an article reporting five cases of pneumonia, ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Anonymous (1981). "Pneumocystis pneumonia-Los Angeles". ...
"Causes of morbidity and mortality in severe pediatric trauma". JAMA. 245 (7): 719-21. doi:10.1001/jama.245.7.719. PMID 7463661 ... ". "Considerations in Pediatric Trauma: eMedicine Trauma". Mayer T, Walker ML, Johnson DG, Matlak ME (February 1981). " ...
Effects of immediate breast reconstruction on the psychosocial morbidity following mastectomy. The Lancet 1983; i: 459-462 ... Psychological Medicine 1981;11: 341-350. Dean C, Chetty U, Forrest APM. ...
The pandemic mostly involves HIV-1 while HIV-2 has lower morbidity rate and is mainly restricted to western Africa. In the year ... It was identified as a disease in 1981. Two years later the etiology agent for AIDS, the HIV was described. HIV is a retrovirus ...
Morbidity and mortality weekly report 60 (21): 689--693. PMID 21637182.. *^ Health Protection Agency (2010). HIV in the United ... "Declining morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection. HIV Outpatient Study ... V letu 1981 je bil ravno pojav tega raka pri mladih istospolnih moških eden od prvih znakov nove epidemije. Povzroča ga ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC) (3. 6. 2011). "HIV surveillance-United States, 1981-2008". MMWR. ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 31 (23): 305-7. PMID 6811844. Retrieved 2008 ... Kruck, William E. (1981). "Looking for Dr Condom". Publication of the American Dialect Society. 66 (7): 1-105. "Condom". The ... William E. Kruck wrote an article in 1981 concluding that, "As for the word 'condom', I need state only that its origin remains ... The first New York Times story on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was published on July 3, 1981. In 1982 it was first ...
"Botulism Associated with Commercially Canned Chili Sauce --- Texas and Indiana, July 2007". Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ... morbidity assessment following a large outbreak" (PDF). American Journal of Public Health. 71 (3): 266-269. doi:10.2105/AJPH. ... Mann JM, Martin S, Hoffman R, Marrazzo S (March 1981). "Patient recovery from type A botulism: ...
It can cause significant morbidity in men and women. It is also a recognised risk factor for HIV transmission with higher ... It was reported in 1981 by a team led by Joseph G. Tully. Under electron microscopy, it appears as a flask-shaped cell with a ... The causative agent was first isolated from meatal swabs (urogenital tract) of humans in 1981, and was eventually identified as ... 1981). "A newly discovered Mycoplasma in the human urinogenital tract". The Lancet. 317 (8233): 1288-1291. doi:10.1016/S0140- ...
Prior to the introduction of antivenom, envenomation resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. The purified rabbit IgG ... Harris J, Sutherland S, Zar M (1981). "Actions of the crude venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider. Atrax robustus on autonomic ... Fisher M, Raftos J, McGuinness R, Dicks I, Wong J, Burgess K, Sutherland S (1981). "Funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus) ... antivenom was developed in 1981 through a team effort led by Dr Struan Sutherland, head of immunology at the Australian ...
Vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and peripheral arterial disease cause significant morbidity and mortality in aged ... A book about geriatric cardiology was published in 1981. The American Journal of Geriatric Cardiology is the official journal ...
... morbidity, mortality and seasonal variation of 612 hospitalized patients". Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical ... Analysis of patient admissions in Namibia between 1981 and 1988 showed an incidence rate of onyalai to be 1.19% with the annual ... Hesseling, PB (Jul-Aug 1990). "Onyalai at Rundu, Namibia 1981-1988: age, sex, ... in cases recorded up to 1981. The first case was reported in 1904 by Wellman. Hesseling, PB (Apr 1992). "Onyalai". Baillière's ...
As an oral form, the supplementation of vitamin A is effective for lowering the risk of morbidity, especially from severe ... Effectiveness of vitamin A supplementation in the control of young child morbidity and mortality in developing countries. ... Arroyave G, Mejia LA and Aguilar JR (1981) The effect of vitamin A fortification of sugar on the serum vitamin A levels of ... Baron 1981). (WHO 1982). (Combs, 1991). (Ikekpeazu 2010). Beaton GH et al. ...
1982). "Morbidity and mortality associated with the July 1980 heat wave in St Louis and Kansas City, Mo". Journal of the ... Karl, Thomas R.; Quayle, Robert G. (1981). "The 1980 Summer Heat Wave and Drought in Historical Perspective". Monthly Weather ... Bibcode:1981MWRv..109.2055K. doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1981)109. 2.0.CO;2. Namias, Jerome (1982). "Anatomy of Great Plains ...
This lost healthy life expectancy represents 9 equivalent years of full health lost throw years lived with morbidity and ... At the same time in 1981, Iraq had the 2nd lowest Infant Mortality Rate worldwide. In the late 1990s, Iraq's under-five ...
Since AIDS symptoms were first described in June 1981 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, AIDS has disproportionately ...
The study of human skeletal remains from the site continues to provide important information about diet and morbidity in ... D'Ambra, E. 1981. "A work 'ethic' at Ostia: the Isola Sacra reliefs." Thesis (M.A.)--University of California, Los Angeles-Art ...
"Pneumocystis Pneumonia - Los Angeles", Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ... issue of its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, describing how their patients, "5 young men, all active homosexuals, were ... This is a reprint by the CDC of the original June 4, 1981, report. via Associated Press. "Doctor Who Co-Authored First AIDS ... Weisman referred two of these cases in 1981 to Michael S. Gottlieb, an immunologist at the UCLA Medical Center, who had a ...
... published a clinical article in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The CDC article acknowledged five young males ... June 5, 1981. Lawrence K. Altman (July 3, 1981). "Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals". The New York Times. "HIV/AIDS 101 : A ... By the close of 1981, there had been two hundred and seventy cases of severe immune deficiency cases in males across the United ... The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome was officially recognized on June 5, 1981, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control ...
1981). "An outbreak of community-acquired Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia". New England Journal of Medicine. 305 (24): 1431-38. ... In December 1981, two landmark articles[17][18] described the clinical course of four patients-first reported in the CDC's June ... 1981). "Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and mucosal candidiasis in previously healthy homosexual men". New England Journal of ... 1981 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report-with the disease that would come to be known as AIDS. ...
1973 - Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report reported that emissions of lead in residential areas constitute a public health ... 1980 - Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report published the first report on the newly recognized toxic shock syndrome, an ... 1961 - CDC took over publication of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 1962 - CDC played a key role in one of the ... 1981 - The first diagnosis of the fatal disease later known as AIDS was described in the June 5, 1981, issue of MMWR. 1982 - ...
"Pneumocystis pneumonia - Los Angeles". Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Centers for Disease Control. 30 (21): 250-2. June ... The year 1981 in science and technology involved many significant events, listed below. September - Pantanal Matogrossense ...
... morbidity rates were driven by a series of cultural decisions, as dependents were abandoned by their providers at every level ... Washbrook (1981, p. 670) note 78 suggests that Bengal may have reached this ecological constraint as early as 1860, far earlier ... Washbrook, D. A. (1981). "Law, State and Agrarian Society in Colonial India". Modern Asian Studies. 15 (3): 649-721. doi: ... The unraveling of the system of rural patronage began earlier, in the Great Depression (Washbrook 1981, p. 709). ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1600 Clifton Rd, MailStop E-90, Atlanta, GA ... Surveillance of Tuberculosis and AIDS Co-Morbidity -- Florida, 1981-1993 Because immunosuppression induced by human ... annually to assist in characterizing the extent of co-morbidity and planning for necessary services. In Florida, AIDS and TB ... TABLE 1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) validation results of AIDS cases not matched to the TB registry -- Florida, 1981-1993 ...
Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 30, no. 33 Early AIDS History ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 30, no. 33, August 28, 1981 ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 31, no. 31, August 13, 1982 ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 30, no. 31, August 14, 1981 ...
Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 31, no. 3, January 29, 1982 ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 30, no. 1, January 16, 1981 ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 31, no. 4, February 5, 1982 ... Morbidity and mortality weekly report, Vol. 33, no. 2, January 20, 1984 ...
The Louisiana Morbidity Report is published every other month by the Office of Public Health/Infectious Disease Epidemiology ...
The Louisiana Department of Health protects and promotes health and ensures access to medical, preventive and rehabilitative services for all citizens of the State of Louisiana.
WF 205 83TU Tuberculosis mortality and morbidity during 1970-1981 : WF 205 95AK Tuberculosis in transition : WF 205 95JO The ... Tuberculosis mortality and morbidity during 1970-1981 : levels, trends and differentials (a statistical study) Contributor(s): ...
Admission Temperature of Low Birth Weight Infants: Predictors and Associated Morbidities. Abbot R. Laptook, Walid Salhab, ... Admission Temperature of Low Birth Weight Infants: Predictors and Associated Morbidities. Abbot R. Laptook, Walid Salhab, ... The frequencies of selected neonatal morbidities for this cohort were 6.3% for NEC, 10.3% for IVH grades III and IV, 23.3% for ... Admission Temperature of Low Birth Weight Infants: Predictors and Associated Morbidities Message Subject (Your Name) has sent ...
Neonatal Morbidity After Elective Repeat Cesarean Section and Trial of Labor. Brenda Hook, Robert Kiwi, Saeid B. Amini, Avroy ... Neonatal Morbidity After Elective Repeat Cesarean Section and Trial of Labor. Brenda Hook, Robert Kiwi, Saeid B. Amini, Avroy ... Neonatal Morbidity After Elective Repeat Cesarean Section and Trial of Labor. Brenda Hook, Robert Kiwi, Saeid B. Amini, Avroy ... Neonatal Morbidity After Elective Repeat Cesarean Section and Trial of Labor Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message ...
Makinen J, Johansson J, Tomas C, Tomas E, Heinonen PK, Laatikainen T, et al. Morbidity of 10110 hysterectomies by type of ... The effects of vault drainage on postoperative morbidity after vaginal hysterectomy for benign gynaecological disease: a ... Vaginal cleansing and postoperative infectious morbidity in vaginal hysterectomy. A register study from the Swedish National ... Randomised trial of cefotiam prophylaxis in the prevention of postoperative infectious morbidity after elective caesarean ...
Morbidity during the acute phase of Chagas disease is more pronounced in children than in adults. The gastrointestinal and ... Morbidity during the acute phase of Chagas disease is more pronounced in children than in adults. The gastrointestinal and ... How does the morbidity of Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) vary by age?. Updated: Apr 26, 2019 ... encoded search term (How does the morbidity of Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) vary by age?) and How does the ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1600 Clifton Rd, MailStop E-90, Atlanta, GA ...
Midlife Morbidity. Increases in midlife mortality are paralleled by increases in self-reported midlife morbidity. Table 2 ... The temporal associations between suicide and poisoning mortality and morbidity are established for each of our morbidity ... between suicide and poisoning mortality and morbidity for each morbidity marker presented in Table 2. ... our morbidity results suggest that disability from these causes has indeed increased. Increased morbidity may also explain some ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 30 (47): 581-589. PMID 6796814.. *^ Parrish RG, Tucker M, Ing R, Encarnacion C, ... By the year of 1981-1982, the annual rate in the United States was high with 92/100,000 among Laotians-Hmong, 82/100,000 among ... Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (1981). "Sudden, unexpected, nocturnal deaths among Southeast Asian refugees". MMWR. ...
Mortality, morbidity, and resource allocation Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 :484 (Published 07 February 1981) ... Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 :417 (Published 07 February 1981) ... Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 :418 (Published 07 February 1981) ... Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 282 :419 (Published 07 February 1981) ...
Morbidity Mortality Wkly Rept. 30:349-351.. 20. Sureau, P., et al. 1980. Ann. Virol. 131:185-200.. 21. Swanepoel, R., et al. ...
Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality Associated With the Metabolic Syndrome. Bo Isomaa, Peter Almgren, Tiinamaija Tuomi, ... Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality Associated With the Metabolic Syndrome. Bo Isomaa, Peter Almgren, Tiinamaija Tuomi, ... Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality Associated With the Metabolic Syndrome Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page ... The CHD morbidity risk associated with the cluster of risk factors was greater than the risk associated with the individual ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. . 58, (50), 1412-1416. Full Text Options: Worldcat Google Scholar Export Options: RIS/ ... 1981. Universe: All recorded deaths occurring in the United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Guam ... Mortality Detail and Multiple Cause of Death, 1981 (ICPSR 3874) Principal Investigator(s): United States Department of Health ... Part 1, the Mortality Detail file, describes every death or fetal death registered in the United States for 1981. Part 2, ...
In: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. December, 1982. pp. 31-50.. Department of Health and Human Services. The ... Mausner, J.S., and Bahll, A.K. Chapter 7: Measures of morbidity and mortality. Epidemiology: An Introductory Text. W.B. Sanders ... Fourth, the numerous interrelationships between weather, pollution, social factors, morbidity, and mortality are tremendously ... Morbidity and mortality associated with the July 1980 heat wave in St. Louis and Kansas City. Journal of the American Medical ...
Morbidity and especially mortality rates are determined by the underlying etiology. Multiple conditions can result in cauda ... How are morbidity and mortality rates of cauda equina and conus medullaris syndromes determined?. Updated: Jun 14, 2018 ... Morbidity and especially mortality rates are determined by the underlying etiology. Multiple conditions can result in cauda ... encoded search term (How are morbidity and mortality rates of cauda equina and conus medullaris syndromes determined?) and How ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 30, 25-28.Google Scholar. *. Centers for Disease Control. (1991). Preventing Lead ... R, Donovick, P., Glickman, L., Babish, J., Summers, B., & Cvpess, R. (1981). Behavioral effects of lead and toxocara canis in ... Ernhart, C, Landa, B., & Schell, N. (1981). Subclinical levels of lead and developmental deficit: A multivariate follow-up ... Yule W Lansdown R Millar I Urbanowicz M-A (1981). The relationship between blood lead concentrations, intelligence, and ...
Morbidity, morality, and menarche. Hum Biol. 1981;53:635-43. Copyright. Published under the copyright license "Attribution - ...
Skeletal Morbidity. Breast cancer. In a study of 718 patients with metastatic breast cancer at a single institution, ,50% of ... Clinical Features of Metastatic Bone Disease and Risk of Skeletal Morbidity Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to ... Skeletal morbidity includes pain that requires radiotherapy, hypercalcemia, pathologic fracture, and spinal cord or nerve root ... Clinical Features of Metastatic Bone Disease and Risk of Skeletal Morbidity. Robert E. Coleman ...
The morbidity odds ratios (ORs) of various diseases due to the exposure in a news printing factory was calculated as in a case- ... The aetiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is probably multifactorial.8,9,11-14,21 Although we have found an increased morbidity ... Because one of the 2×2 cells was zero, we added 1/2 to calculate the crude morbidity OR of nasopharyngeal carcinoma,20 which ... The morbidity OR for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in printing workers was 57.0 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.8 to 1155.3). ...
Stroke morbidity in professional drivers in Denmark 1981-1990. Int J Epidemiol 1997;26:989-994. ... Metabolic syndrome in a workplace: prevalence, co-morbidities, and economic impact. Metab Syndr Relat Disord 2009;7:459-468. ...
  • In the period October 1980-May 1981, 5 young men, all active homosexuals, were treated for biopsy-confirmed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia at 3 different hospitals in Los Angeles, California. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Patient 5: A previously healthy 36-year-old man with a clinically diagnosed CMV infection in September 1980 was seen in April 1981 because of a 4-month history of fever, dyspnea, and cough. (baltimoresun.com)
  • ABSTRACT The rate of psychiatric morbidity and its sociodemographic correlates was estimated in 2000 women attending 3 primary care centres in Irbid, Jordan. (who.int)
  • A significant association was found between the amount and severity of stress and psychiatric morbidity. (who.int)
  • Post-marital status (separated, divorced, widowed), woman's illiteracy, family violence, violent marital relationship, living independently, being in a non-cousin marriage, being a second wife, poor housing and absence of a social support system were significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity in this group of women. (who.int)
  • Psychiatric morbidity among Arab women has not been extensively investigated . (who.int)
  • This is unfortunate, since identifying the correlates of psychiatric morbidity in a society enables women and members of their communities to improve their control over their mental health. (who.int)
  • Morbidity during the acute phase of Chagas disease is more pronounced in children than in adults. (medscape.com)
  • Wearing shoes reduced acute morbidity only marginally. (ajtmh.org)
  • The odour of 1,1,1-trichloroethane is considered distinctive or powerful enough to provide satisfactory warning of exposure, however, it is usually noticeable at about 100ppm which is below the level required to cause acute toxic effects (Clayton and Clayton, 1981). (inchem.org)
  • HRS matched the records of all 16,559 cases of TB reported in Florida from 1984 (the earliest year for which computerized TB data were available) through December 22, 1993, with records of all 36,002 cases of AIDS reported in Florida from 1981 through December 22, 1993. (cdc.gov)
  • 1981 do leta 2009 zaradi aidsa umrlo okoli 30 milijonov bolnikov, , kar pomeni, da je aids med najbolj uničujočimi epidemijami v zapisani zgodovini . (wikipedia.org)
  • Več kot tri četrtine smrtnih primerov je bilo v podsaharski Afriki Aids so prvič prepoznali na ameriškem Centru za nadzor in preprečevanje bolezni v letu 1981, v začetku 80-ih pa so ameriški in francoski znanstveniki identificirali tudi povzročitelja , HIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • I remember how AIDS entered my life in January of 1981. (pbs.org)
  • It was not until 1981 that the first cases of AIDS were identified in the U.S., followed by the isolation of HIV-1 virus in 1983. (verywell.com)
  • Since the first AIDS case was identified in 1981, 270,870 Americans have died from the disease, and the World Health Organization estimates that by the year 2000 between 30 million and 40 million people worldwide will test positive for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. (emory.edu)
  • In the current study, the main objective was to evaluate the relative risks (RRs) of contributing factors to excess morbidity and mortality in a large cohort of patients with CP receiving long-term GH replacement. (deepdyve.com)
  • The Louisiana Morbidity Report is published every other month by the Office of Public Health/Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section. (la.gov)
  • Kjolhede P , Halili S , Lofgren M . Vaginal cleansing and postoperative infectious morbidity in vaginal hysterectomy. (wiley.com)
  • 21 Trends in primary care consultations were obtained from three sources: Morbidity Statistics in General Practice (1955-6, 1970-1, 1981-2 and 1991-2), 22- 25 the Weekly Returns Service of the Royal College of General Practitioners, London, UK (annually from 1976 to 2004) 26, 27 and from the General Practice Research Database (annually from 1990 to 1998). (bmj.com)
  • 1972 to 1976 was the period of the 3rd FYP, and 1976 to 1981 was the period of 4th FYP. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skeletal morbidity includes pain that requires radiotherapy, hypercalcemia, pathologic fracture, and spinal cord or nerve root compression. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The latter is best estimated by measurement of bone-specific markers, and recent studies have shown a strong correlation between the rate of bone resorption and clinical outcome, both in terms of skeletal morbidity and progression of the underlying disease or death. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Rising midlife mortality rates of white non-Hispanics were paralleled by increases in midlife morbidity. (pnas.org)
  • How are morbidity and mortality rates of cauda equina and conus medullaris syndromes determined? (medscape.com)
  • Morbidity and especially mortality rates are determined by the underlying etiology. (medscape.com)
  • Previous studies demonstrated that combined populations of pediatric and adult patients with CP but without growth hormone (GH) replacement have morbidity and mortality rates that are four- to ninefold higher than those of the general population (4, 5) and nearly 10-fold higher than those of individuals with other causes of hypopituitarism (6). (deepdyve.com)
  • We examined the distribution of temperatures in low birth weight infants on admission to the NICUs in the Neonatal Research Network centers and determined whether admission temperature was associated with antepartum and birth variables and selected morbidities and mortality. (aappublications.org)
  • a ) the frequency distribution of temperatures on admission to NICUs, ( b ) the variables at birth that are associated with the largest extent of reduced admission temperature, and ( c ) whether admission temperature is independently associated with selected neonatal morbidities and in-hospital mortality. (aappublications.org)
  • Compared with a successful TOL, the infants delivered by cesarean section after a failed TOL had more neonatal morbidity and had a longer hospital stay (4.8 ± 2 vs 3.1 ± 2 days). (aappublications.org)
  • 15-20 We sought to examine the broader spectrum of neonatal morbidity after delivery by ERCS compared with a TOL. (aappublications.org)
  • We studied mortality and morbidity retrospectively in all the patients who underwent mitral valve replacement at our institution since 1987, and performed echocardiographic studies in operative survivors to define current haemodynamic status and prosthetic valve function. (bmj.com)
  • Further research is required to determine whether or not the use of dopamine improves mortality and long-term morbidity for these infants and if so, issues such as which infants, at what dose and with what co-interventions should be addressed. (cochrane.org)
  • These studies have proven the advantages of postoperative early EN as follows: lower incidence of septic complication [ 11 ], reduction of length of hospital stay, diminishing the degree of weight loss [ 15 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • Those observations indicate that cases with extremely severe tungiasis, associated morbidity almost totally disappears within 10 weeks if the feet are protected by a repellent. (ajtmh.org)
  • Although breast feeding is associated with lower rates of both morbidity and mortality in the developing world, 2 4 5 evidence in the developed world has been and remains more controversial. (bmj.com)
  • Evidence for the role of complement activation products in cellular deactivation," Surgery 90:319-327, (1981). (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Similar figures (90%) have been published by Baumgarten, who reviewed 44750 deliveries in the German-speaking countries (Baumgarten 1981). (springer.com)
  • Bivariate associations between antepartum/birth variables and admission temperature and selected morbidities/mortality and admission temperature were examined, followed by multivariable linear or logistic regressions to detect independent associations. (aappublications.org)
  • however, more recently, "early" has been defined as EN started within 48 or 24 h after admission or surgery [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • However, bone metastases may complicate a wide range of malignancies, resulting in considerable morbidity and complex demands on health care resources. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Quinlan et ses collègues ont identifié trois facteurs à l'origine des problèmes de santé et de sécurité dans les entreprises qui recourent à la sous-traitance : la pression économique découlant de la concurrence croissante, les difficultés rencontrées dans l'exercice d'un contrôle efficace en santé et sécurité et les difficultés éprouvées par les organismes de surveillance dans l'exercice d'un contrôle des lieux de travail. (erudit.org)
  • Le but consistait à rassembler de l'information sur la marge de manoeuvre d'un sous-traitant et d'un entrepreneur dans l'exercice de la surveillance en matière de santé et de sécurité et sur la manière dont ils se partageaient la responsabilité dans ce domaine. (erudit.org)
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Annane: General Intensive Care Unit, Raymond Poincaré Hospital (AP-HP), University of Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines 104, Boulevard Raymond Poincaré 92380, Garches, France. (asahq.org)
  • This contains accurate data on all hospital admissions since 1981, for the Scottish population of 5.1 million. (nih.gov)
  • The concept of "avoidable hospitalisations" (also known as "ambulatory care-sensitive conditions") provides a framework for measuring the proportion of morbidity that could be avoided by timely and effective care outside hospital. (mja.com.au)