Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Asbestos, Serpentine: A type of asbestos that occurs in nature as the dihydrate of magnesium silicate. It exists in two forms: antigorite, a plated variety, and chrysotile, a fibrous variety. The latter makes up 95% of all asbestos products. (From Merck Index, 11th ed, p.893)Asbestos, Amphibole: A class of asbestos that includes silicates of magnesium, iron, calcium, and sodium. The fibers are generally brittle and cannot be spun, but are more resistant to chemicals and heat than ASBESTOS, SERPENTINE. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Asbestos, Crocidolite: A lavender, acid-resistant asbestos.Pleural Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the thin serous membrane that envelopes the lungs and lines the thoracic cavity. Pleural neoplasms are exceedingly rare and are usually not diagnosed until they are advanced because in the early stages they produce no symptoms.Pleural DiseasesAsbestos, Amosite: Asbestos, grunerite. A monoclinic amphibole form of asbestos having long fibers and a high iron content. It is used in insulation. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mineral Fibers: Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Construction Materials: Supplies used in building.MontanaNeoplasms, Mesothelial: Neoplasms composed of tissue of the mesothelium, the layer of flat cells, derived from the mesoderm, which lines the body cavity of the embryo. In the adult it forms the simple squamous epithelium which covers all true serous membranes (peritoneum, pericardium, pleura). The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in these organs. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.MiningEnvironmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Diatomaceous Earth: A form of SILICON DIOXIDE composed of skeletons of prehistoric aquatic plants which is used for its ABSORPTION quality, taking up 1.5-4 times its weight in water. The microscopic sharp edges are useful for insect control but can also be an inhalation hazard. It has been used in baked goods and animal feed. Kieselguhr is German for flint + earthy sediment.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Carcinogens, Environmental: Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Zeolites: Zeolites. A group of crystalline, hydrated alkali-aluminum silicates. They occur naturally in sedimentary and volcanic rocks, altered basalts, ores, and clay deposits. Some 40 known zeolite minerals and a great number of synthetic zeolites are available commercially. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Healthy Worker Effect: Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Maximum Allowable Concentration: The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Environmental Remediation: Removal of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS or contaminants for the general protection of the environment. This is accomplished by various chemical, biological, and bulk movement methods, in conjunction with ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING.WeldingLung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Aluminum Silicates: Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)ParisWorkers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Cocarcinogenesis: The combination of two or more different factors in the production of cancer.PaintPaternal Exposure: Exposure of the male parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.ItalyBenzene: Toxic, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon byproduct of coal distillation. It is used as an industrial solvent in paints, varnishes, lacquer thinners, gasoline, etc. Benzene causes central nervous system damage acutely and bone marrow damage chronically and is carcinogenic. It was formerly used as parasiticide.Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.South CarolinaRisk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Talc: Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic: A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.FinlandRadiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Threshold Limit Values: Standards for limiting worker exposure to airborne contaminants. They are the maximum concentration in air at which it is believed that a particular substance will not produce adverse health effects with repeated daily exposure. It can be a time-weighted average (TLV-TWA), a short-term value (TLV-STEL), or an instantaneous value (TLV-Ceiling). They are expressed either as parts per million (ppm) or milligram per cubic meter (mg/m3).NorwayInfectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Styrene: A colorless, toxic liquid with a strong aromatic odor. It is used to make rubbers, polymers and copolymers, and polystyrene plastics.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.PrintingStyrenes: Derivatives and polymers of styrene. They are used in the manufacturing of synthetic rubber, plastics, and resins. Some of the polymers form the skeletal structures for ion exchange resin beads.Lead: A soft, grayish metal with poisonous salts; atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19, symbol Pb. (Dorland, 28th)Blood-Borne Pathogens: Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.Respiratory Tract NeoplasmsNational Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Carbon Disulfide: A colorless, flammable, poisonous liquid, CS2. It is used as a solvent, and is a counterirritant and has local anesthetic properties but is not used as such. It is highly toxic with pronounced CNS, hematologic, and dermatologic effects.Carcinoma, Large Cell: A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Rubber: A high-molecular-weight polymeric elastomer derived from the milk juice (LATEX) of HEVEA brasiliensis and other trees and plants. It is a substance that can be stretched at room temperature to at least twice its original length and after releasing the stress, retract rapidly, and recover its original dimensions fully.Pleural Effusion: Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Pleural Effusion, Malignant: Presence of fluid in the PLEURAL CAVITY as a complication of malignant disease. Malignant pleural effusions often contain actual malignant cells.Coke: A residue of coal, left after dry (destructive) distillation, used as a fuel.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Gas Scavengers: Apparatus for removing exhaled or leaked anesthetic gases or other volatile agents, thus reducing the exposure of operating room personnel to such agents, as well as preventing the buildup of potentially explosive mixtures in operating rooms or laboratories.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Toluene: A widely used industrial solvent.Beauty CultureChromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Respiratory Tract DiseasesLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Respiratory Protective Devices: Respirators to protect individuals from breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors.Plastics: Polymeric materials (usually organic) of large molecular weight which can be shaped by flow. Plastic usually refers to the final product with fillers, plasticizers, pigments, and stabilizers included (versus the resin, the homogeneous polymeric starting material). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Tetrachloroethylene: A chlorinated hydrocarbon used as an industrial solvent and cooling liquid in electrical transformers. It is a potential carcinogen.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Trichloroethylene: A highly volatile inhalation anesthetic used mainly in short surgical procedures where light anesthesia with good analgesia is required. It is also used as an industrial solvent. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of the vapor can lead to cardiotoxicity and neurological impairment.JapanFumigation: The application of smoke, vapor, or gas for the purpose of disinfecting or destroying pests or microorganisms.
Exposure to substances like flock and silica can cause fibrosing lung disease, whereas exposure to carcinogens like asbestos ... in the 1950s-1980s. Workers are frequently exposed to asbestos during demolition and renovation work, which can cause ... 15% of the cases of COPD in the United States can be attributed to occupational exposure, including exposure to silica and coal ... Occupational lung diseases are occupational diseases affecting the respiratory system, including occupational asthma, black ...
... and raised mortality from chronic lung disease and pneumoconiosis associated with increasing dust exposure. In the 1980s the ... It specializes in asbestos surveys and services, occupational hygiene services, nanotechnology safety, laboratory analysis and ... The occupational exposure limits for crystalline silica continue to be a major international concern and from its previous ... Through the 1980s the consultancy work developed to include ergonomics and occupational medicine. By the time IOM became ...
Every occupational exposure to asbestos can cause injury or disease; every occupational exposure to asbestos contributes to the ... During the 1980s and again in the 1990s it was suggested at times that the process of making asbestos cement could "neutralize ... According to OSHA, "there is no 'safe' level of asbestos exposure for any type of asbestos fiber. Asbestos exposures as short ... Airborne occupational exposure limits for asbestos are based on using the PCM method. The American Conference of Governmental ...
Health released a revised study which found that all deaths related to the asbestos mine were caused by occupational exposure. ... This trend reversed in the mid-1980s. The asbestos mine in Lowell was of economic importance from the 1940s to the mid-1980s. ... Several tons of asbestos were mined in 1870. By 1910, Lowell produced half the asbestos mined in the United States. Lumber ... Since the 1980s, the population has expanded. A number of the residents are in agriculture. Most commute to work. A few are ...
Occupational and environmental exposure to asbestos. In: Victor L. Roggli, Tim D. Oury and Thomas A. Sporn (Eds). Pathology of ... In the early 1980s when the Medical School of Ioannina was established, a group of pneumonologists headed by S.H. ... The possibility of this exposure being occupational seemed very unlikely, as there are no asbestos mines or factories near ... Malignant pleural mesothelioma from non-occupational asbestos exposure in Metsovo (North West Greece); slow end of an epidemic ...
Sometimes the fiber in the cement material was asbestos which has been banned for health reasons since the 1980s. Removal of ... "The Bitumen Roofing Industry - A Global Perspective: Production, Use, Properties, Specifications and Occupational Exposure" ( ... asbestos shingles requires extra precautions and disposal methods. Metal shingles are extremely fire resistant, so are used in ...
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. NIOSH [2015]. Reducing hazardous dust exposure when cutting fiber-cement ... Early fiber cement panels used asbestos fibers to add strength. Fiber cement products came about as a replacement for the ... widely used "asbestos cement sheeting" or "fibro", manufactured until the 1980s. The external cladding products require very ... Results showed that exposure to silica dust was controlled below the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) for respirable ...
Orris is also certified in Occupational Medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Orris has held a number of ... Peter Orris to Present Keynote Address at 3rd Annual Asbestos Awareness Day Conference". www.businesswire.com. Retrieved 28 May ... An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s Through the 1980s". Random House Publishing Group. Retrieved 28 May ... where he studied the relationship between chemical exposure and illness within the neighborhood. Orris was an attendee of every ...
... from occupational exposures during manufacture of these materials, and inadequate evidence overall of any cancer risk." The ... It has been found that asbestos can cause cancer when in friable form (that is, when likely to release fibers into the air - ... Most states outlawed it in the early 1980s after dangers to building occupants were discovered. However emissions are highest ... Older mineral wool can contain asbestos, but normally this is in trace amounts. Cellulose insulation. Cellulose, is denser and ...
... by the US EPA Inhalation disorders Institution of Occupational Safety and Health Toolkit Trends in inhalation exposure: mid ... Particles such as asbestos have the ability to become permanently enlodged into the alveoli causing cancer in some cases. ... 1980s till present by K Creely and others. Health and Safety Executive Research Report RR460/2006. ... Exposure to carbon monoxide is dangerous because of its toxic, odorless nature. Since the gas takes time to build up in the ...
International Labor Office, Geneva (1980). Occupational exposure to airborne substances harmful to health (PDF). p. 28. ISBN 92 ... the mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis following exposure to a wide range of toxins, including asbestos, silica, mica, wood dust ... even in the 1980s. He subsequently chaired the Environmental Research Committee of the Ministry of Environment of the ... Early detection of health impairment in occupational exposure to health hazards (571 ed.). WHO Technical Report Series, Report ...
Occupational Exposure to Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite and Actinolite. U.S. Department of Labor. 1992 "Asbestos" (PDF). U. ... blue asbestos) were formerly used in many products until the early 1980s.[citation needed] Tremolite asbestos constituted a ... Chrysotile asbestos Asbestos fibers Asbestos Asbestos Blue asbestos (crocidolite). The ruler is 1 cm. Blue asbestos, teased to ... They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos. Asbestos mining ...
... the Occupational Safety and Health Administration promulgated the first national standards for workplace exposure to asbestos.[ ... Mazzocchi spent much of the early 1980s agitating for more aggressive organizing and stronger stands on occupational health and ... In speaking about the exposure of hundreds of workers to asbestos in Tyler, Texas, during the 1960s, he said: I wanted the ... Numerous studies had documented the health hazards of long-term exposure to asbestos beginning in the 1930s.[12] After becoming ...
IS 11451: Safety and Health Requirements related to Occupational Exposure to Asbestos contaminated Products. IS 11768: Waste ... and culminating in the 1980s and 1990s. A massive multi-district litigation (MDL) complex filing has remained pending in the ... "The Asbestos Epidemic in America". EWG. Retrieved 2010-09-27. Craighead, John E.; Gibbs, Allen R. (2008). Asbestos Exposure and ... revised asbestos-related material to promote a consistent approach to controlling exposure to workplace asbestos and to ...
During the early 1980s Lioy recognized that the public health metric for defining exposure of the general population to ... Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) rutgers.edu NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and ... EPA Science Advisory Board panel on asbestos, 2008-Present Member, Advisory Board of University of Pittsburgh Academic ... He was Deputy Director of Government Relations and Director of Exposure Science, at the Rutgers Environmental and Occupational ...
In environmental and occupational health regulation, it has been argued that if modern cost-benefit analyses had been applied ... Shortly thereafter, in the 1980s, academic and institutional critiques of CBA started to emerge. The three main criticisms were ... 1975). Hazardous wastes: A Risk-Benefit Framework Applied to Cadmium and Asbestos. Menlo Park, CA: Stanford Research Institute ... exposure to vinyl chloride, these measures would not have been implemented even though they are considered to be highly ...
a b Occupational Exposure to Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite and Actinolite. U.S. Department of Labor. 1992 ... blue asbestos) were formerly used in many products until the early 1980s.[citation needed] Tremolite asbestos constituted a ... History of Asbestos, Asbestos.com, retrieved 2016-04-07. *^ a b "Asbestos in the home booklet. Wrekin housing trust" (PDF). ... brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos.[3]. Asbestos mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale ...
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set the legal limit (permissible exposure limit) for graphite ... In the mid-1980s, the carbon-magnesite brick became important, and a bit later the alumina-graphite shape. As of 2017[update] ... and became important with the need to substitute for asbestos. This use has been important for quite some time, but nonasbestos ... The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of TWA 2.5 mg/m3 ...
This monument is dedicated to workers who have perished due to occupational death or illness on the job. It serves as a ... The park, built around a quarry, has 100 trees that were donated by labor unions, to honor local asbestos workers and others ... The resulting publicity over their court case led to stricter industrial exposure laws. The memorial is located in front of the ... Illinois had no public employee collective bargaining law until the 1980s. Seeking union recognition, Normal Fire Fighters ...
"The risk of lung cancer with increasing time since ceasing exposure to asbestos and quitting smoking". Occupational and ... New research indicates that private research conducted by cigarette company Philip Morris in the 1980s showed that second-hand ... the risk of developing lung cancer from asbestos exposure is twice as likely for smokers than for non-smokers.[155] ... "Everyday exposures to radiation". Front Line. Public Broadcasting System.. *^ "Radiation fears after Japan blast". BBC. 2011-07 ...
The principle implies that there is a social responsibility to protect the public from exposure to harm, when scientific ... International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health. 17 (1): 153-61. PMID 15212219.. ... is generally considered to have arisen in English from a translation of the German term Vorsorgeprinzip in the 1980s. In 1988, ... Persistent or acute pollution (e.g., asbestos, endocrine disruptors). *Food safety (e.g., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) ...
A 2005 Lancet review stated that occupational DDT exposure was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in 2 case ... The program switched to malathion, but despite initial successes, malaria continued its resurgence into the 1980s.[36][106] ... In general, incidental human exposure to DDT has been considered relatively non-toxic, but prolonged exposure has long been ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).. *^ "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0174". National ...
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has designated a recommended exposure limit of 0.5 ppm over 15 ... In diaphragm cell electrolysis, an asbestos (or polymer-fiber) diaphragm separates a cathode and an anode, preventing the ... and stress corrosion cracking caused widespread failures in the US in the 1980s and 1990s. The adjacent picture shows a ... In the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set the permissible exposure limit for ...
All types of asbestos fibers are known to cause serious health hazards in humans. Amosite and crocidolite are considered the most hazardous asbestos fiber types;[citation needed] however, chrysotile asbestos has also produced tumors in animals and is a recognized cause of asbestosis and malignant mesothelioma in humans, and mesothelioma has been observed in people who were ...
... (ACL) is an independent Canadian corporation established to mine asbestos. ACL mainly open pit mined chrysotile asbestos in the eponymously named town, Asbestos, Quebec, Canada. It currently does not operate as a mine, but exists primarily to respond to legal actions by persons injured by asbestos. "Company Profile for Asbestos Corporation Ltd (CA;AB)". Retrieved 2008-10-10. http://openjurist.org/18/f3d/1349/adkins-v-asbestos-corporation-ltd ...
Many buildings contain asbestos, which was used in spray-applied flame retardant, thermal system insulation, and in a variety of other materials. Asbestos was sometimes "flocked" above false ceilings, inside technical ducts, and in many other small spaces where firefighters would have difficulty gaining access. Structural components like asbestos panels were also used. In residences, ...
The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) is the largest independent nonprofit in the U.S. dedicated to preventing asbestos exposure, eliminating asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma, and protecting asbestos victims' civil rights through education, advocacy and community initiatives.[1] (ADAO) was founded by Linda Reinstein and Doug Larkin in 2004 and is headquartered in Redondo Beach, California. It is led by three boards ...
This article deals with the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 which came into force on 13 November 2006. For the later regulations that came into force on 6th April 2012, see Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 came into force in the United Kingdom on 13 November 2006 and brought together a number of other asbestos related pieces of legislation. The pieces of legislation the regulations revoked and replaced were the 'Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002', the ...
... is a set o sax naiturally occurrin silicate minerals,[1] which aw hae in common thair eponymous asbestiform habit: lang (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous creestals, wi each veesible feebre componed o millions o microscopic "fibrils" that can be released bi abrasion an ither processes.[2] Thay are commonly kent bi thair colours, as blue asbestos, broun asbestos, white asbestos, an green asbestos. ...
The Armley asbestos disaster is an ongoing health issue originating in Armley, a suburb of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. Described by Dr. Geoffrey Tweedale as a "social disaster", it involved the contamination with asbestos dust of an area consisting of around 1,000 houses in the Armley Lodge area of the city. The contamination was the result of the activities of a local asbestos factory, part of the Turner & Newall (T&N) group (often referred to by the name of its ...
... , 1986 is an International Labour Organization Convention, adopted at the 72nd session of the International Labour Conference. It was established in 1986, with the preamble stating: Having decided upon the adoption of certain proposals with regard to safety in the use of asbestos,... As of 2017[update], the convention has been ratified by 35 states from all continents. "Convention C162 - Asbestos Convention, 1986 (No. 162)". NORMLEX. ILO. Retrieved 2017-09-20. "Ratifications of C162 - Asbestos Convention, 1986 (No. 162)". NORMLEX. ILO. Retrieved ...
Les Sources is a regional county municipality in the Estrie region of Quebec, Canada. The seat is the city of Asbestos. Before April 22, 2006 it was known as Asbestos regional county municipality, and before August 1990 it was known as L'Or-Blanc regional county municipality (French: white gold). The Asbestos Strike, a critical part of Quebec's labour history, occurred in the region. There are 7 subdivisions within the RCM: Population trend: Mother tongue (2011) Highways and numbered routes that run through the municipality, ...
... is an American independent record label in Stratford, Connecticut, United States, founded in 1996 by Matt Flood. It was started as a vehicle to release albums and compilations for local bands, and to book DIY shows at the Newtown Teen Center. Over the next eight years, Asbestos Records released albums from notable CT bands, such as: Slackjaw, Grover Dill, and West Beverly, whose members went on to join bands such as Dropkick Murphys, In Pieces, Staring ...
Dr. Orson Karloff, better known as the Asbestos Man, is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by editor-plotter Stan Lee, writer Ernest Hart and artist Dick Ayers, the character first appeared in Strange Tales #111 (August 1963). The character made his official debut in Strange Tales #111 (August 1963). The plot was developed by editor Stan Lee and the story was written by Ernest Hart, under the pen name H. Huntley, with illustrations by Dick Ayers. ...
... is the seat of one of the world's largest chrysotile asbestos mines. The Cana Brava mine, located on the left bank of the Tocantins River, occupies a total area of 45 kmª. Asbestos has made Minaçu one of the richest municipalities in the state of Goiás. The industrial zone has capacity to produce ten percent of all the chrysotile asbestos fiber sold in the world. It is the largest mine in Brazil and the third in the world, after mines in Russia and Canada. On the Seplan ...
en ladijski vijaksingle shaft, 2 × parni kotel na nafto, 1 trikratno povečevalni recipročni parni stroj, 2.750 ihp (2.050 kW ...
This cancer is usually associated with asbestos exposure, and patients have a median life expectancy of only 13-15 months. All ... This cancer is associated with occupational exposure to asbestos, which causes chronic inflammation. It typically takes 30 to ... 40 years from asbestos exposure to development of MPM.. The peak of asbestos use was between the 1960s and the 1980s. Although ... This cancer is usually associated with asbestos exposure, and patients have a median life expectancy of only 13-15 months. All ...
Exposure-response analysis of risk of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos. Occup ... However, x-ray films taken before the 1980s were of poor quality. In addition, the ILO classification24 1/0 is not classified ... Results 54% of cases had high exposure and 24% low exposure, while 24% of controls had high exposure and 44% low exposure. ... Occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos and cancer risk: a review of the amphibole hypothesis. Am J Public Health 1996;86: ...
Diffuse pleural mesothelioma and asbestos exposure in the North Western Cape Province. Br J Ind Med. 1960;17:260-71.Google ... There are special challenges in researching the history of asbestos mining, gold mining, and occupational disease in Southern ... The NIOH Papers come from the now defunct library and cover the period from 1955 until the mid-1980s. They include suppressed ... In 2003, the British asbestos company, Cape PLC, settled out of court in London with former miners suffering from asbestos ...
Learn more about the serious health risks that steel mill workers may have due to asbestos exposure while on the job. ... Unfortunately, introducing one material in steel mills proved highly dangerous, and that material was asbestos. ... Steel mills used asbestos materials from the 1920s until the 1980s. Every steel mill in America utilized asbestos-containing ... The U.S. Environmental Agency (EPA) along with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cooperated to eradicate ...
Production declined rapidly in the 1980s, and all production and importation of asbestos were prohibited from 31 December 2003. ... Pattern of malignant mesothelioma incidence and occupational exposure to asbestos in Western Australia. ... Australia had the highest per capita asbestos consumption in the world,2 mostly to manufacture asbestos cement, and there was ... an increasing number of MM cases in workers using these asbestos products. ...
Asbestos-related lung diseases have been primarily reported after long-term exposures to asbestos in occupational settings. ... Asbestos was removed from the Bracket School in the mid 1980s. Was there any risk to students and staff? ... However, when asbestos containing materials (ACM) are in a crumbling or deteriorated condition ("friable asbestos"), asbestos ... Since the mid-1980s, federal law has required that public school buildings be periodically inspected and monitored for asbestos ...
Aircraft mechanics are at high-risk for mesothelioma because of the amount of asbestos used in commercial and U.S. military ... Questions About Asbestos Exposure?. Our Patient Advocates can answer your questions about occupational asbestos exposure and ... These mechanics were exposed to different types of asbestos products such as:. * Aircraft Components: Prior to the 1980s, ... Occupational Exposure. Commercial and U.S. military aircraft mechanics exposure to asbestos was usually the result of direct ...
45 years after initial occupational exposure to asbestos (6), this upward trend reflects past exposure to asbestos fibers. ... steep decrease beginning in the 1980s (7). Given the temporal pattern of usage and latency and survival considerations, ... Because occupational fiber exposures were predominantly to asbestos, the net effect of this change probably is small; the trend ... Guidelines and limits for occupational exposure to crystalline silica. In: Castranova V, Vallyathan V, Wallace WE, eds. Silica ...
Anyone who worked at high-risk worksites in occupations that required direct handling of asbestos could develop asbestos- ... Occupational Asbestos Exposure Risks. Anyone working in industrial capacities up until the 1980s is at major risk of workplace ... Levels of Occupational Exposure. Workers exposed to asbestos on the job may wonder how much exposure puts them at risk of ... Occupational Asbestos Exposure. Anyone working in industrial, blue-collar, or military jobs during the 20th century may have ...
The first national regulations to minimize occupational exposure to asbestos were passed in the UK in 1931. The failure of ... There were few if any controls on exposure levels until the 1980s. Workers most at risk included insulators, pipe fitters and ... Anthony said that CUPE, many of whose 500,000 members have experienced occupational exposure to asbestos, was happy to be ... "The asbestos cancer epidemic may take as many as 10 million lives before asbestos is banned worldwide and exposure is brought ...
Asbestos exposure is the main cause of mesothelioma. Learn what factors contribute to being exposed to this cancer-causing ... a retrospective study on a series of subjects with occupational and non-occupational exposure to asbestos during the activity ... Until the 1980s, many worksites, including refineries, construction sites and power plants, were heavily contaminated with ... Military Asbestos Exposure. Some veterans have a history of asbestos exposure from living on a ship or other vessels, and ...
... health hazards and legal implications of asbestos related diseases like asbestosis, mesothelioma, etc. ... First in a series of articles on asbestos: Its history, chemical and physical properties, uses, ... Documents reveal that asbestos manufacturers were aware of the health risks related to exposure to asbestos from the 1940s and ... Unfortunately, legislation cannot undo the damage that was done to those who worked in asbestos related jobs prior to 1980s. ...
Coast Guard veterans were exposed to asbestos and put at risk of developing mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. ... In the 1980s, the Coast Guard implemented the Occupational Medical Monitoring Program, which was designed to evaluate ... Asbestos Exposure in Coast Guard Veterans. Asbestos had many uses in the United States Military. It was utilized in various ... Asbestos exposure in shipyards occurred when ships were in construction or repairs were made to broken parts. Asbestos use in ...
Turner and Newall is an asbestos product manufacturer and mine operator founded in Rochdale, England in 1871 by brothers John, ... "The Way from Dusty Death: Turner & Newall and the Regulation of Occupational Health in the British Asbestos Industry, 1980s - ... Asbestos ExposureAsbestos Companies › Turner & Newall Turner & Newall. Company History. Turner & Newall, an asbestos product ... Occupations at Risk for Asbestos Exposure. People who worked at Turner & Newalls factories up until the 1970s recall being ...
Asbestos use was banned in Iceland, Sweden and Norway during the early 1980s, but in Finland its use continued until 1993. ... Digestive cancers and occupational asbestos exposure: incidence study in a cohort of asbestos plant workers. Occup Environ Med ... Finally, the occupational exposure to asbestos was quantified based on a job-exposure matrix that was created without any ... Exposure assessment. The exposure to asbestos for each subject was estimated by applying the NOCCA job-exposure matrix (JEM) to ...
Articles developing international methods of quantifying asbestos exposure in the 1970s and 1980s ... proteomics and a wide range of exposure biomarkers are being developed, but need application in the occupational exposure realm ... Editors note: From 1st January 2017, the Annals of Occupational Hygiene has been renamed the Annals of Work Exposures and ... And of course, to meet these needs, emerging technologies for assessing exposures are expanding the tool kit for occupational ...
Carpenters who made buildings or structures before the 1980s are at an increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases ... Most asbestos-made carpentry materials were phased out of production in the 1980s as a result, but the damage was already done. ... Thanks to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) efforts to increase safety awareness, carpenters are now ... Asbestos / High-Risk Occupations / Carpenters & Asbestos Exposure. Carpenters & Asbestos Exposure. ® Quick Summary Throughout ...
Concerns have been voiced about occupational and potential public health risks from exposure to vermiculite contaminated with ... asbestos, including potential risks to former miners and to residents of Libby, Montana, and to workers and consumers who come ... In the 1980s, NIOSH conducted research about job-related exposures and health effects among workers employed in mining and ... Through carefully designed sampling, we will be better able to define the extent of potential occupational exposure. We are ...
... that have reduced occupational exposure to hazards such as asbestos, lead, vinyl chloride, and other industrial agents and have ... As the U.S. economy moved from its predominantly manufacturing base towards a more service-providing economy in the 1980s and ... Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health( Book ). 2 editions ... Occupational exposure to diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione by Lauralynn Taylor McKernan( Book ). 2 editions published in 2016 in ...
... a telltale sign of asbestos exposure that is environmental, rather than occupational.. Brenda Buck: Even if the EPA banned all ... Miles OBrien: In the 1980s, schools across the country scrambled to remove asbestos insulation from pipes and boilers. Then, ... But scientists say there is no evidence there is any safe level of exposure to asbestos, which is why Linda Reinstein keeps ... The EPA says it is committed to protecting the public from asbestos exposures. And it says, the statute gives discretion to the ...
"Theres very little investment in occupational health research or looking at exposure to toxics," said Monforton, who has never ... claims of asbestos exposure. "Suppression of an accepted paper is a direct assault on academic freedom," the board members ... Most of whats known about toxics comes from original research funded by the federal government in the 1970s and 1980s, when ... which simulated historical exposures to conclude that the workers who manufactured Bakelite (an asbestos-containing plastic) ...
... and raised mortality from chronic lung disease and pneumoconiosis associated with increasing dust exposure. In the 1980s the ... It specializes in asbestos surveys and services, occupational hygiene services, nanotechnology safety, laboratory analysis and ... The occupational exposure limits for crystalline silica continue to be a major international concern and from its previous ... Through the 1980s the consultancy work developed to include ergonomics and occupational medicine. By the time IOM became ...
Asbestos testing services provided by LA Testing protect people and the environment from potentially deadly asbestos exposures ... mesothelioma and asbestosis resulting from occupational exposures. One in every three deaths from occupational cancer is ... The use of asbestos was banned from most products in the United States in the 1980s, but many older materials still remain.. ... Asbestos testing services provided by LA Testing protect people and the environment from potentially deadly asbestos exposures. ...
This cancer is associated with occupational exposure to asbestos, which causes chronic inflammation. It typically takes 30 to ... 40 years from asbestos exposure to development of MPM.. The peak of asbestos use was between the 1960s and the 1980s. Although ... This cancer is usually associated with asbestos exposure, and patients have a median life expectancy of only 13-15 months. All ... use of asbestos has been banned in the United States and many European countries, asbestos is still being used and extracted in ...
  • The study delivers a strong message to policy makers that exposure to chrysotile is dangerous. (bmj.com)
  • Many countries, including Japan, have banned the production and use of asbestos, whereas some other countries, including China, continue to produce and use huge amounts of chrysotile asbestos in construction materials. (bmj.com)
  • The region has also produced chrysotile (white asbestos) from mines in Swaziland, Botswana, and Zimbabwe. (springer.com)
  • Between 1900 and 2000, mines in Québec, Newfoundland, British Columbia and the Yukon produced a total of 61 million tons of chrysotile (white asbestos). (ibasecretariat.org)
  • In recent years, Canada has exported more than 95% of all the asbestos it has produced, making it the 2nd biggest chrysotile exporter in the world. (ibasecretariat.org)
  • Such civic concern does not, however, prevent asbestos stakeholders from promoting Canadian chrysotile for sale abroad, claiming it can be used "safely under controlled conditions. (ibasecretariat.org)
  • The three-day conference entitled Canadian Asbestos: A Global Concern was the first international meeting to be held at which Canadian workers and asbestos victims were free to speak publicly about the damage done by the mining and use of Canadian chrysotile, the agendas and attendance at previous gatherings having been dictated by asbestos stakeholders. (ibasecretariat.org)
  • 1 News of this event clearly unsettled the industry which responded in a variety of ways, including an orchestrated fax campaign to Members of Parliament (MPs) 2 , a fanfare of publicity for the release of yet another discredited report "exonerating chrysotile" and the mass transportation of protesting workers and residents from Thetford, one of Québec's asbestos communities, to Ottawa to "defend our product. (ibasecretariat.org)
  • steps taken by the pro-chrysotile lobby include personal attacks on public health campaigners, pressure on international organizations such as the World Health Organization and the International Labor Organization by asbestos-industry linked "experts" and legal threats by industry representatives such as the Asbestos Cement Products Manufacturers' Association (India). (ibasecretariat.org)
  • The name of chrysotile, one of the most common forms of asbestos, is derived from the Greek words "chrysos" (gold) and "tilos" (fiber) or "gold fiber. (environmentalchemistry.com)
  • In regions with laws to prohibit the new use of asbestos, such as GB (where crocidolite and amosite were formally banned in 1985, and chrysotile in 1999), and regulations to control exposures arising from asbestos-containing materials in existing buildings [ 5 ], there is evidence that exposures have reduced substantially following the period of peak use (the 1960s for GB) [ 6 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • An ongoing research effort designed to reconstruct the character of historical exposures associated with use of chrysotile‐containing joint compounds naturally raised questions concerning how the character (e.g. particle size distributions) of dusts generated from use of recreated materials compares to dusts from similar materials manufactured historically. (elcosh.org)
  • Russia, Kazakhstan and Brazil continue to mine and export chrysotile (white) asbestos, the only type of asbestos still being commercially used. (theconversation.com)
  • Currently, chrysotile is the only type of asbestos in commercial use which accounts for 95% of the asbestos in use globally . (medcraveonline.com)
  • Chrysotile asbestos, a form of serpentine, is the chief commercial asbestos. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Up until the 1990s, the U.S. Navy operated naval shipyards and marine repair facilities that were teeming with asbestos-containing materials. (simmonsfirm.com)
  • As the U.S. economy moved from its predominantly manufacturing base towards a more service-providing economy in the 1980s and 1990S, NIOSH kept pace with its research to address issues such as indoor air quality, latex allergy, musculoskel-etal disorders, and workplace violence. (cdc.gov)
  • There has been a substantial decline in the occurrence of the disease since the 1990s, and the duration of exposure was typically shorter than that observed in a study conducted in the United States. (scielo.br)
  • Much of the use of asbestos in the United States was diminished in the 1970s and 1980s with the development of suitable alternatives for certain applications, and asbestos has not been mined or otherwise produced in the U.S. since 2002. (exponent.com)
  • Reporting of occupational fatal accidents has been mandatory since the mid-1950s and the number of deaths has decreased from about 400 in 1955 to approximately 50 per year during the last years (ie, 40 cases in 2009 and 54 cases in 2010). (sjweh.fi)
  • Young men who began their working lives in the 1950s and 60s could find they were regularly and frequently exposed to asbestos-containing materials in many types of industries, from shipbuilding, building and construction, railcoach and vehicle assembly to textile factories, power plants, paper mills and oil refineries. (asbestosvictimadvice.com)
  • The case proceeded to trial beginning on September 7, 2018 against Reynolds and Phillip Morris (the companies who manufactured and sold the cigarettes Mr. Summerlin smoked) as well as Hampden Automotive Sales Corporation ("Hampden"), a manufacturer of asbestos-containing brakes that Mr. Summerlin used in the late 1950s through early 1960s. (massachusettsnewswire.com)
  • After a 5 week trial, the jury deliberated for over 23 hours during the course of 4 days, before rendering a verdict against Reynolds, the maker of the menthol cigarettes (Kool and Salem) that Mr. Summerlin smoked from the late 1950s through the mid-1980s. (massachusettsnewswire.com)
  • These include exposure to radiation - both from radioactive materials and the sun - infection by certain viruses, a genetic defect, a weakened immune system, age, bad diet, and exposure to chemical carcinogens. (scribd.com)
  • The Court found that such testimony would be sufficient to show that Decedent was exposed to smoke and ash while working for Employer, but it was insufficient to show exposure to asbestos or any other specific Group 1 carcinogens within the smoke. (paworkerscompensation.law)
  • After World War II, Turner & Newall became involved in other areas of asbestos product manufacturing: The company acquired the Zimbabwe-based Porters Cement Industries in 1953 and renamed it Turnall Fibre Cement Ltd. - "Turnall" being a combination of the two names "Turner" and "Newall. (mesothelioma.com)
  • The company also manufactured Tafford Tile asbestos cement sheets, a product used in the walls and roofing of industrial and agricultural buildings. (mesothelioma.com)
  • It was reported in the Geelong Advertiser last week that Barwon Water is currently replacing 'antiquated infrastructure', with roughly 1270 kilometres worth of asbestos cement pipes still to be replaced, equivalent to 33 per cent of the main water network. (ohsrep.org.au)
  • The strength of asbestos, combined with its resistance to heat made it a popular material of choice in products such as roofing shingles, floor tiles, ceiling materials, cement products and automotive parts. (e-verde.eu)
  • In Nashua, New Hampshire the Johns-Manville Company, which owned a large manufacturing plant, used asbestos fiber and Portland Cement to produce a variety of asbestos cement products for construction and industrial. (e-verde.eu)
  • Here the Eternit asbestos cement factory was shuttered in 1993 and demolished in 1995 after 54 years of operation. (publicintegrity.org)
  • More than two million metric tons of asbestos were mined worldwide in 2009 - led by Russia , China , and Brazil - mostly to be turned into asbestos cement for corrugated roofing and water pipes. (publicintegrity.org)
  • Backing them are interests ranging from mining companies like Brazil's SAMA to manufacturers of asbestos cement sheets like India's Visaka Industries. (publicintegrity.org)
  • Conclusions Our results indicate that preventive measures to decrease occupational mortality should consider factors associated with myocardial infarction such as job strain, shift work and exhaust gases from vehicles and combustion products. (sjweh.fi)
  • Differences in the carcinogenic potency of different asbestos fibre types are debated in the scientific community. (bmj.com)
  • It is wise to contact an experienced asbestos-related illnesses attorney who can review your case and recommend the best steps to take. (asbestosnetwork.com)
  • As that population ages and overall asbestos use in the United States has declined, it was expected that these life -threatening illnesses would also decrease over time. (gpwlaw.com)
  • During the twentieth century, South Africa produced most of the world's gold and virtually all of its crocidolite (blue) and amosite (brown asbestos). (springer.com)
  • In June 2017, EPA provided new rules, guidance, and scoping documents for risk evaluation of these chemicals , including for asbestos. (exponent.com)
  • A large amount of asbestos still remains in buildings and other infrastructure, and thousands of different products containing asbestos are still in use today. (aihw.gov.au)
  • Asbestos is not the first material used by human civilization which is harmful, many chemicals used in industries are even more harmful, for example methyl isocyanate used in chemical plants, is extremely toxic and was cause of thousands of death when it leaked in India (Bhopal gas tragedy, 1984). (theresearchpedia.com)
  • Military veterans experience a range of service-related health conditions, including hearing damage, traumatic brain injury, PTSD and toxic exposure to asbestos and burn pits. (drugwatch.com)
  • Pending the outcome of the epidemiologic study, you must communicate the risk of adverse reproductive and developmental effects due to toxic exposures. (nap.edu)