Spectrometry, Mass, Fast Atom Bombardment: A mass spectrometric technique that is used for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules, such as glycoalkaloids, glycoproteins, polysaccharides, and peptides. Positive and negative fast atom bombardment spectra are recorded on a mass spectrometer fitted with an atom gun with xenon as the customary beam. The mass spectra obtained contain molecular weight recognition as well as sequence information.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Oxygen Isotopes: Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Hydrogen: The first chemical element in the periodic table. It has the atomic symbol H, atomic number 1, and atomic weight [1.00784; 1.00811]. It exists, under normal conditions, as a colorless, odorless, tasteless, diatomic gas. Hydrogen ions are PROTONS. Besides the common H1 isotope, hydrogen exists as the stable isotope DEUTERIUM and the unstable, radioactive isotope TRITIUM.Sulfur: An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has an atomic symbol S, atomic number 16, and atomic weight [32.059; 32.076]. It is found in the amino acids cysteine and methionine.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.Chemistry: A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.Quantum Theory: The theory that the radiation and absorption of energy take place in definite quantities called quanta (E) which vary in size and are defined by the equation E=hv in which h is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the radiation.Chemical Phenomena: The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.Deuterium: Deuterium. The stable isotope of hydrogen. It has one neutron and one proton in the nucleus.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Spectrophotometry: The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.Crystallography: The branch of science that deals with the geometric description of crystals and their internal arrangement. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Copper: A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Chemistry, Physical: The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.Molybdenum: A metallic element with the atomic symbol Mo, atomic number 42, and atomic weight 95.94. It is an essential trace element, being a component of the enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and nitrate reductase. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Physicochemical Phenomena: The physical phenomena describing the structure and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.Ferredoxins: Iron-containing proteins that transfer electrons, usually at a low potential, to flavoproteins; the iron is not present as in heme. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Protons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Bromine: A halogen with the atomic symbol Br, atomic number 36, and atomic weight 79.904. It is a volatile reddish-brown liquid that gives off suffocating vapors, is corrosive to the skin, and may cause severe gastroenteritis if ingested.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Alkanes: The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Sulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent sulfur bonds -S-. The sulfur atom can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Isotope Labeling: Techniques for labeling a substance with a stable or radioactive isotope. It is not used for articles involving labeled substances unless the methods of labeling are substantively discussed. Tracers that may be labeled include chemical substances, cells, or microorganisms.Catalytic Domain: The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.Cysteine: A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Isomerism: The phenomenon whereby certain chemical compounds have structures that are different although the compounds possess the same elemental composition. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Heme: The color-furnishing portion of hemoglobin. It is found free in tissues and as the prosthetic group in many hemeproteins.Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet: Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Static Electricity: The accumulation of an electric charge on a objectProtein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Neutron Diffraction: The scattering of NEUTRONS by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. It is useful in CRYSTALLOGRAPHY and POWDER DIFFRACTION.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Myoglobin: A conjugated protein which is the oxygen-transporting pigment of muscle. It is made up of one globin polypeptide chain and one heme group.Halogenation: Covalent attachment of HALOGENS to other compounds.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular: NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.X-Rays: Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.Nitrogen Isotopes: Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.Rubredoxins: A class of iron-sulfur proteins that contains one iron coordinated to the sulfur atom of four cysteine residues. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Fluorine: A nonmetallic, diatomic gas that is a trace element and member of the halogen family. It is used in dentistry as flouride (FLUORIDES) to prevent dental caries.Halogens: A family of nonmetallic, generally electronegative, elements that form group 17 (formerly group VIIa) of the periodic table.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Alkenes: Unsaturated hydrocarbons of the type Cn-H2n, indicated by the suffix -ene. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p408)Oxygenases: Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Fullerenes: A polyhedral CARBON structure composed of around 60-80 carbon atoms in pentagon and hexagon configuration. They are named after Buckminster Fuller because of structural resemblance to geodesic domes. Fullerenes can be made in high temperature such as arc discharge in an inert atmosphere.Cobalt: A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.Spectrum Analysis, Raman: Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light.Spectroscopy, Mossbauer: A spectroscopic technique which uses the Mossbauer effect (inelastic scattering of gamma radiation resulting from interaction with heavy nuclei) to monitor the small variations in the interaction between an atomic nucleus and its environment. Such variations may be induced by changes in temperature, pressure, chemical state, molecular conformation, molecular interaction, or physical site. It is particularly useful for studies of structure-activity relationship in metalloproteins, mobility of heavy metals, and the state of whole tissue and cell membranes.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Coordination Complexes: Neutral or negatively charged ligands bonded to metal cations or neutral atoms. The number of ligand atoms to which the metal center is directly bonded is the metal cation's coordination number, and this number is always greater than the regular valence or oxidation number of the metal. A coordination complex can be negative, neutral, or positively charged.Spectrophotometry, Infrared: Spectrophotometry in the infrared region, usually for the purpose of chemical analysis through measurement of absorption spectra associated with rotational and vibrational energy levels of molecules. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sulfurtransferases: Enzymes which transfer sulfur atoms to various acceptor molecules. EC 2.8.1.Fourier Analysis: Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Tungsten: Tungsten. A metallic element with the atomic symbol W, atomic number 74, and atomic weight 183.85. It is used in many manufacturing applications, including increasing the hardness, toughness, and tensile strength of steel; manufacture of filaments for incandescent light bulbs; and in contact points for automotive and electrical apparatus.Iron-Sulfur Proteins: A group of proteins possessing only the iron-sulfur complex as the prosthetic group. These proteins participate in all major pathways of electron transport: photosynthesis, respiration, hydroxylation and bacterial hydrogen and nitrogen fixation.Free Radicals: Highly reactive molecules with an unsatisfied electron valence pair. Free radicals are produced in both normal and pathological processes. They are proven or suspected agents of tissue damage in a wide variety of circumstances including radiation, damage from environment chemicals, and aging. Natural and pharmacological prevention of free radical damage is being actively investigated.Carbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.Ions: An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Alcohols: Alkyl compounds containing a hydroxyl group. They are classified according to relation of the carbon atom: primary alcohols, R-CH2OH; secondary alcohols, R2-CHOH; tertiary alcohols, R3-COH. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Chromatography, Gas: Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Analysis of the energy absorbed across a spectrum of x-ray energies/wavelengths to determine the chemical structure and electronic states of the absorbing medium.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.EstersWhales: Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission: The spectrometric analysis of fluorescent X-RAYS, i.e. X-rays emitted after bombarding matter with high energy particles such as PROTONS; ELECTRONS; or higher energy X-rays. Identification of ELEMENTS by this technique is based on the specific type of X-rays that are emitted which are characteristic of the specific elements in the material being analyzed. The characteristic X-rays are distinguished and/or quantified by either wavelength dispersive or energy dispersive methods.Molybdoferredoxin: A non-heme iron-sulfur protein isolated from Clostridium pasteurianum and other bacteria. It is a component of NITROGENASE, which is active in nitrogen fixation, and consists of two subunits with molecular weights of 59.5 kDa and 50.7 kDa, respectively.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Manganese: A trace element with atomic symbol Mn, atomic number 25, and atomic weight 54.94. It is concentrated in cell mitochondria, mostly in the pituitary gland, liver, pancreas, kidney, and bone, influences the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides, stimulates hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and is a cofactor in many enzymes, including arginase and alkaline phosphatase in the liver. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1992, p2035)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Neutrons: Electrically neutral elementary particles found in all atomic nuclei except light hydrogen; the mass is equal to that of the proton and electron combined and they are unstable when isolated from the nucleus, undergoing beta decay. Slow, thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons refer to the energy levels with which the neutrons are ejected from heavier nuclei during their decay.Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization: A mass spectrometry technique used for analysis of nonvolatile compounds such as proteins and macromolecules. The technique involves preparing electrically charged droplets from analyte molecules dissolved in solvent. The electrically charged droplets enter a vacuum chamber where the solvent is evaporated. Evaporation of solvent reduces the droplet size, thereby increasing the coulombic repulsion within the droplet. As the charged droplets get smaller, the excess charge within them causes them to disintegrate and release analyte molecules. The volatilized analyte molecules are then analyzed by mass spectrometry.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Flavins: Derivatives of the dimethylisoalloxazine (7,8-dimethylbenzo[g]pteridine-2,4(3H,10H)-dione) skeleton. Flavin derivatives serve an electron transfer function as ENZYME COFACTORS in FLAVOPROTEINS.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Organic Chemistry Phenomena: The conformation, properties, reaction processes, and the properties of the reactions of carbon compounds.Hemerythrin: A non-heme iron protein consisting of eight apparently identical subunits each containing 2 iron atoms. It binds one molecule of oxygen per pair of iron atoms and functions as a respiratory protein.PhenanthrolinesCyclization: Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Sulfhydryl Compounds: Compounds containing the -SH radical.Cyanides: Inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE containing the -CN radical. The concept also includes isocyanides. It is distinguished from NITRILES, which denotes organic compounds containing the -CN radical.Carbohydrate Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.Dithionite: Dithionite. The dithionous acid ion and its salts.Chemistry, Organic: The study of the structure, preparation, properties, and reactions of carbon compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)IminesGraphite: An allotropic form of carbon that is used in pencils, as a lubricant, and in matches and explosives. It is obtained by mining and its dust can cause lung irritation.Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship: A quantitative prediction of the biological, ecotoxicological or pharmaceutical activity of a molecule. It is based upon structure and activity information gathered from a series of similar compounds.Nitrogen Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain nitrogen as an integral part of the molecule.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Drug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Optical Rotation: The rotation of linearly polarized light as it passes through various media.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Indicators and Reagents: Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)Hydrogenase: An enzyme found in bacteria. It catalyzes the reduction of FERREDOXIN and other substances in the presence of molecular hydrogen and is involved in the electron transport of bacterial photosynthesis.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Deuterium Oxide: The isotopic compound of hydrogen of mass 2 (deuterium) with oxygen. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed) It is used to study mechanisms and rates of chemical or nuclear reactions, as well as biological processes.Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Benzene DerivativesNucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Biocatalysis: The facilitation of biochemical reactions with the aid of naturally occurring catalysts such as ENZYMES.Hydroxylation: Placing of a hydroxyl group on a compound in a position where one did not exist before. (Stedman, 26th ed)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Apoproteins: The protein components of a number of complexes, such as enzymes (APOENZYMES), ferritin (APOFERRITINS), or lipoproteins (APOLIPOPROTEINS).Desulfovibrio: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria capable of reducing sulfur compounds to hydrogen sulfide. Organisms are isolated from anaerobic mud of fresh and salt water, animal intestines, manure, and feces.Isotopes: Atomic species differing in mass number but having the same atomic number. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Flavin Mononucleotide: A coenzyme for a number of oxidative enzymes including NADH DEHYDROGENASE. It is the principal form in which RIBOFLAVIN is found in cells and tissues.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Palladium: A chemical element having an atomic weight of 106.4, atomic number of 46, and the symbol Pd. It is a white, ductile metal resembling platinum, and following it in abundance and importance of applications. It is used in dentistry in the form of gold, silver, and copper alloys.2,2'-Dipyridyl: A reagent used for the determination of iron.Disulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Hemeproteins: Proteins that contain an iron-porphyrin, or heme, prosthetic group resembling that of hemoglobin. (From Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p480)Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Thiosulfates: Inorganic salts of thiosulfuric acid possessing the general formula R2S2O3.Ferrous Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Nitrogenase: An enzyme system that catalyzes the fixing of nitrogen in soil bacteria and blue-green algae (CYANOBACTERIA). EC 1.18.6.1.Electron Transport: The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)Clostridium: A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of one of the three ester bonds in a phosphotriester-containing compound.Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.Alkylation: The covalent bonding of an alkyl group to an organic compound. It can occur by a simple addition reaction or by substitution of another functional group.Iron Isotopes: Stable iron atoms that have the same atomic number as the element iron, but differ in atomic weight. Fe-54, 57, and 58 are stable iron isotopes.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Carboxylic Acids: Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.Apoenzymes: The protein components of enzyme complexes (HOLOENZYMES). An apoenzyme is the holoenzyme minus any cofactors (ENZYME COFACTORS) or prosthetic groups required for the enzymatic function.Gases: The vapor state of matter; nonelastic fluids in which the molecules are in free movement and their mean positions far apart. Gases tend to expand indefinitely, to diffuse and mix readily with other gases, to have definite relations of volume, temperature, and pressure, and to condense or liquefy at low temperatures or under sufficient pressure. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Chromatography, Ion Exchange: Separation technique in which the stationary phase consists of ion exchange resins. The resins contain loosely held small ions that easily exchange places with other small ions of like charge present in solutions washed over the resins.PhotochemistryAmines: A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Rhodococcus: A bacterial genus of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.Nickel: A trace element with the atomic symbol Ni, atomic number 28, and atomic weight 58.69. It is a cofactor of the enzyme UREASE.Cations: Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.Structural Homology, Protein: The degree of 3-dimensional shape similarity between proteins. It can be an indication of distant AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and used for rational DRUG DESIGN.S-Adenosylmethionine: Physiologic methyl radical donor involved in enzymatic transmethylation reactions and present in all living organisms. It possesses anti-inflammatory activity and has been used in treatment of chronic liver disease. (From Merck, 11th ed)Hydrocarbons, HalogenatedNonheme Iron Proteins: Proteins, usually acting in oxidation-reduction reactions, containing iron but no porphyrin groups. (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1993, pG-10)Cobalt Isotopes: Stable cobalt atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cobalt, but differ in atomic weight. Co-59 is a stable cobalt isotope.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.ButanesMixed Function Oxygenases: Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.HydrocarbonsPlatinum: Platinum. A heavy, soft, whitish metal, resembling tin, atomic number 78, atomic weight 195.09, symbol Pt. (From Dorland, 28th ed) It is used in manufacturing equipment for laboratory and industrial use. It occurs as a black powder (platinum black) and as a spongy substance (spongy platinum) and may have been known in Pliny's time as "alutiae".Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Selenium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain selenium as an integral part of the molecule.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Metmyoglobin: Myoglobin which is in the oxidized ferric or hemin form. The oxidation causes a change in color from red to brown.PeroxidasesIron Compounds: Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.
Portland Beavers History of baseball in Portland, Oregon Tri-City Atoms "Tri-City Dust Devils Mascot Appearance Request Form". ... a former manager and the general manager of the Atoms at the time of his death at age 64 in 1968. The ballpark was demolished ... Atoms 1965-68; A's 1969; Padres 1970-72; Triplets 1973; Ports 1974). In 1974, the Ports were an independent team and went 27-57 ... June 24, 1970. p. 10. "Rainbows take lead in NW standings". The Bulletin. Bend, Oregon. June 26, 1970. p. 7. "Park name change ...
"Visibility of single atoms". Science. 168 (3937): 1338-40. Bibcode:1970Sci...168.1338C. doi:10.1126/science.168.3937.1338. PMID ... In 1975 he was successful in obtaining the first motion pictures of atoms, providing new insight into atomic interaction and ... He won the Man of the Year Award for Industrial Research in 1970 and was awarded the Albert A. Michelson Medal from the ... In 1970 his field emission scanning transmission electron microscope succeeded in taking images individual atom (though not the ...
That year she was an American delegate at the Atoms for Peace Conference in Geneva. She was secretary of the General Advisory ... "Jane Hall to Receive AEC Citation" (PDF). The Atom. 7 (7). July-August 1970. Retrieved 12 July 2016. "David Hall's Interview". ... She retired from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. In October of that year, the chairman of the AEC, Glenn Seaborg, ...
"materials database". Atom Work. Retrieved 2 July 2015. "Materials Database". Atom Work. Retrieved 2 July 2015. Ananthanarayanan ... "materials database". Atom Work. Retrieved 2 July 2015. Krebs, Robert E. (2006-01-01). The History And Use of Our Earth's ... "Materials database". Atom Work. Lim, Ae Ran (2011). "Thermodynamic properties and phase transitions of Tutton salt (NH4)2Co(SO4 ... Swanson, H. E.; H. F. McMurdie; M. C. Morris; E. H. Evans (September 1970). "Standard X-ray Diffraction Powder Patterns" (PDF ...
Atoms in their ionic state may have a different colour from neutral atoms, and thus light absorption by metal ions gives the ... Atoms will gain or lose electrons depending on which action takes the least energy. For example, a sodium atom, Na, has a ... The process of gaining or losing electrons from a neutral atom or molecule is called ionization. Atoms can be ionized by ... in an atom. The inner shells of an atom are filled with electrons that are tightly bound to the positively charged atomic ...
Baker, Mark Raphael (2002). The atoms of language. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-860632-X. OCLC ... Brown, Roger; Camile Hanlon (1970). "Derivational complexity and order of acquisition in child speech". In J. R. Hayes. ...
"Atom Heart Mother". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 22 July 2017. Tan, Irving (18 September 2010). "Review: Pink Floyd - Atom Heart ... Atom Heart Mother is, consequently, unrepresented on Echoes. "Fat Old Sun" is perhaps best described as a pastoral, a hymn of ... In a review for the Atom Heart Mother album, Alec Dubro of Rolling Stone gave "Fat Old Sun" a negative review, calling the song ... It's soft and silly." Dubro said the same for "If". In another review for the Atom Heart Mother album, Irving Tan of Sputnik ...
"Atom Heart Mother". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 22 July 2017. Deusner, Stephen (6 October 2011). "Pink Floyd: Atom Heart Mother (" ... In a review for the Atom Heart Mother album on release, Alec Dubro of Rolling Stone gave "If" a negative review, calling the ... Tan, Irving (18 September 2010). "Review: Pink Floyd - Atom Heart Mother , Sputnikmusic". www.sputnikmusic.com. Retrieved 23 ... "If" is a song by Pink Floyd on their 1970 album Atom Heart Mother. This song was one of several to be considered for the band's ...
"Atom Heart Mother". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 22 July 2017. Deusner, Stephen (6 October 2011). "Pink Floyd: Atom Heart Mother (" ... and was disappointed Pink Floyd ended Atom Heart Mother with this track. In another review for the Atom Heart Mother album, ... In a review for the Atom Heart Mother album, Alec Dubro of Rolling Stone described "Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast" as "the only ... Tan, Irving (18 September 2010). "Review: Pink Floyd - Atom Heart Mother , Sputnikmusic". www.sputnikmusic.com. Retrieved 23 ...
"M. Stanley Livingston; Atom-Smasher Builder". The New York Times. September 20, 1986. Retrieved September 28, 2014. "Science ... Livingston retired in 1970, and moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. He continued to occasionally work as a consultant at the nearby ... May 3, 1970. Retrieved September 28, 2014. "Courant and Livingston Win 1986 Fermi Awards" (PDF). Brookhaven Bulletin. 40 (47). ... He was Associate Director of the National Accelerator Laboratory from 1967 to 1970. Milton Stanley Livingston was born in ...
Louis most physicists seemed to reject atoms and he was not even invited to the physics section. Rather, he was stuck in a ... Much of the physics establishment did not share his belief in the reality of atoms and molecules - a belief shared, however, by ... His solution was to use Hertz's theory that atoms were Bilder, that is, models or pictures. Atomists could think the pictures ... With millions of dice, like the millions of atoms involved in thermodynamic calculations, the probability of their all being ...
New Atoms - Progress and some memories. Edited by W. Gaade. Elsevier Inc., New York-Amsterdam-London-Brussels. 1966. A ... At Farm Hall, the German scientists learned of the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the American ... arose when uranium atoms were bombarded with neutrons. The German chemist Ida Noddack proposed an exception. She anticipated ... 1970. My Life. Preface by Sir James Chadwick. Translated by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Macdonald & Co., London. American ...
If n i {\displaystyle n_{i}} is the number density of atoms in state i , then the change in the number density of atoms in ... An emission line is formed when an atom or molecule makes a transition from a particular discrete energy level E2 of an atom, ... is the density of atoms in the upper energy state for the line, and n 1 {\displaystyle n_{1}} is the density of atoms in the ... The change in the number density of atoms in state 1 per unit time due to induced emission will be ( d n 1 d t ) neg. absorb ...
The electronegativity difference between the two atoms in these bonds is 0.3 to 1.7. A single bond between two atoms ... The electron density within a bond is not assigned to individual atoms, but is instead delocalized between atoms. In valence ... The bond then results from electrostatic attraction between atoms and the atoms become positive or negatively charged ions. ... of how atoms were reasoned to attach to each other, i.e. "hooked atoms", "glued together by rest", or "stuck together by ...
"Sabotage Probed on Atom Ship". The Pittsburgh Press. UPI. p. 20. "Sabotage Hinted on Third Ship". The Miami News. UPI. 11 ... 1 July 1970 - Long Beach begins refueling at Mare Island Naval Shipyard. 28 March 1972 - Fourth West Pacific deployment. 1 May ... As Long Beach had been refueled during her 1970 refit, her third refueling was due in the early to mid-1990s. As a consequence ... Blackman, Raymond V. B. Jane's Fighting Ships (1970/71) p.425 Polmar, Norman "The U.S. Navy: Shipboard Radars" United States ...
He demonstrated the ability to image atoms using an annular dark field detector. Crewe and coworkers at the University of ... 2008). "Detection of Single Atoms and Buried Defects in Three Dimensions by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope with 0.5-Å ... Boyes, Edward D.; Ward, Michael R.; Lari, Leonardo; Gai, Pratibha L. (2013). "ESTEM imaging of single atoms under controlled ... an X-ray spectrometer is used to detect the characteristic X-rays that are emitted by atoms in the sample as they are ionized ...
... as it allows to reduce damage by the beam and increase the image contrast for light atoms. As a result, single atom ... Heavy metal atoms such as osmium (Z=76), iridium (Z=77), gold (Z=79), or uranium (Z=92) can then form metal-metal bonds with ... The technique has been used to image atoms as light as boron, nitrogen, and carbon; however, the signal is very weak for such ... Thus, it is theoretically possible to obtain direct images of the atoms in the DNA chain; however, the structure of DNA is much ...
Fellow Phiadelphia artist Atom and His Package incorporated a cover of the chorus into the end of his 1997 song "Goalie" off ... "Goalie-Atom and His Package". Retrieved April 15, 2017. "WDDF Radio". Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970-1992. St ...
Atoms Sign Veteran Players Philadelphia Atoms roster NASL stats. ... In 1974, Paletta signed with the Philadelphia Atoms of the NASL ... On March 23, 1976, Paletta rejoined the Atoms but saw no playing time that season. The Year in American Soccer - 1970 Phil. ... In 1970, he tied Willie Mfum for the league scoring title. ... American Soccer League who shared the ASL scoring title in 1970 ...
These borazoles can have one, two or three methyl groups substituted on the bron atoms. Under normal conditions ... which has two methyl groups on one boron atom. Other methylated versions of diborane including methyldiborane, ... Carpenter, J.H.; Jones, W.J.; Jotham, R.W.; Long, L.H. (June 1970). "The Raman spectra of the methyldiboranes-I 1, 1- ... James, B. D.; Wallbridge, M. G. H. (1970). "Metal Tetrahydroborates". In Lippard, Stephen J. Progress in Inorganic Chemistry, ...
Atoms and Molecules: An Introduction for Students of Physical Chemistry. W. A. Benjamin, New York 1970. Charles L. Brooks III( ...
He managed the Sankei Atoms from 1968 until mid-1970. From then he give commentaries at Fuji TV, Bunka Hōsō and Nikkan Sports. ...
"Atom") 1965 >> Terry Carr 1966 << Thomas Schlück 1968 >> Steve Stiles 1969 << Eddie Jones 1970 >> Elliot K Shorter 1971 << ...
In practice, a Rydberg wave packet is created by a laser pulse on a hydrogenic atom and thus populates a superposition of ... The ionization energy threshold is the energy required to completely liberate an electron from the ionic core of an atom or ... Although the energy formula of Rydberg series is a result of hydrogen-like atom structure, Rydberg states are also present in ... The Rydberg states of an atom or molecule are electronically excited states with energies that follow the Rydberg formula as ...
ISBN 0-521-57572-9. Mark P Silverman (2002). A universe of atoms, an atom in the universe (2 ed.). Springer. p. 249. ISBN 0-387 ... Cornelius Lanczos (1986). The Variational Principles of Mechanics (Reprint of Fourth Edition of 1970 ed.). Dover Publications. ... For an introduction, see for example Cornelius Lanczos (1986). The variational principles of mechanics (Reprint of 1970 ...
Because the oxygen atom that is replaced by F-18 to generate FDG is required for the next step in glucose metabolism in all ... Each tracer atom has been chemically incorporated into a biologically active molecule. There is a waiting period while the ... The first applications of PC-I in tomographic mode as distinguished from the computed tomographic mode were reported in 1970.[ ...
Notable players with the Atoms included Doyle Alexander, Ron Cey, Joe Ferguson, and Ted Sizemore, the National Leagues Rookie ... a former manager and the general manager of the Atoms at the time of his death at age 64 in 1968. The ballpark was demolished ... Atoms 1965-68; As 1969; Padres 1970-72; Triplets 1973; Ports 1974). In 1974, the Ports were an independent team and went 27-57 ... Tri-City Atoms players (1961, 1965-1968) Tri-City Angels players (1963-1964) Tri-City Braves players (1950-1960, 1962) "Tri- ...
... go out and play Atom Heart Mother, Id say you must be fucking joking."[5] Alec Dubro of Rolling Stone gave Atom Heart Mother a ... Select albums in the Format field. Select Gold in the Certification field. Enter Atom Heart Mother in the search field and then ... Atom Heart Mother (gatefold). Pink Floyd. Harvest Records. SHVL 781.. *^ "Interview with David Gilmour". The Sun. 26 September ... Enter Atom Heart Mother in the field Titel. Select album in the field Format. Click Suchen. ...
The 10-cm Atom Probe has been called the progenitor of later atom probes including the commercial instruments. The Imaging Atom ... "new and simple atom probe which permits rapid, in depth species identification or the more usual atom-by atom analysis provided ... Modern day atom probe tomography (APT) uses a position-sensitive detector to deduce the lateral location of atoms. The idea of ... It incorporated the features of the 10-cm Atom-Probe yet "... departs completely from [previous] atom probe philosophy. Rather ...
Atom-maskinen (Table of Contents: 5) B-Gjengen [Beagle Boys] / comic story / 7 pages (report information) Script:. Osvaldo ... 1970-09-01 Indicia / Colophon Publisher: A/S Hjemmet Editing:. Ernst Gervin (redaktør). Color: farger Dimensions: ca 25,4cm x ... Egmont, 1949 series) #35/1970 (1. september 1970). Indexer Notes Redrawn version of Disney Studio (US) story S 66165. Original ... Egmont, 1949 series) #35/1970 (1. september 1970). Indexer Notes Scrip credit from Inducks. ...
Sorbello R.S. (1982) Macroscopic and microscopic fields in electron and atom transport. In: Burridge R., Childress S., ...
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn • A Saucerful of Secrets • Soundtrack from the Film More • Ummagumma • Atom Heart Mother • ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn • A Saucerful of Secrets • Ummagumma • Atom Heart Mother • Meddle • The Dark Side of the Moon • ... V tomto článku byl použit překlad textu z článku Atom Heart Mother na anglické Wikipedii. ... Atom Heart Mother je páté album anglické skupiny Pink Floyd. Bylo vydáno v říjnu 1970 (viz 1970 v hudbě) a stalo se prvním ...
complex - a compound described in terms of the central atom to which other atoms are bound or coordinated. coordination ... or ions are attached to a central metal atom, esp a transition metal atom, by coordinate bonds ... Examples: complex of doctrine, 1862; of fluid atoms, 1652; of planets, 1672; of psychoanalysts-Lipton, 1970. ... a chemical compound in which independently existing molecules or ions of a nonmetal form coordinate bonds with a metal atom or ...
make (an atom or compound) form a complex with another. ∎ [intr.] form a complex. DERIVATIVES: com·plex·a·tion / kämˌplekˈsāsh ... denoting an ion or molecule in which one or more groups are linked to a metal atom by coordinate bonds. • n. / ˈkämˌpleks/ 1. a ... an ion or molecule in which one or more groups are linked to a metal atom by coordinate bonds. ∎ any loosely bonded species ... Examples: complex of doctrine, 1862; of fluid atoms, 1652; of planets, 1672; of psychoanalysts-Lipton, 1970. ...
Phosphorus Phosphorus Atom Conjugation System Compound Effect Phosphazo Translated from Teoreticheskaya i Éksperimentalnaya ... Anion-radicals of phosphazo compounds effects of substituents on the phosphorus atom on the formation of a single conjugation ...
Atom Heart Mother. (1970). Meddle. (1971). Atom Heart Mother je jeden z albumov v štýle progresívneho rocku od skupiny Pink ... Najdlhšia skladba, „Atom Heart Mother Suite", ktorá sa nachádzala na celej jednej časti vinylového albumu je kompozične ... Atom Heart Mother Suite" (Gilmour/ Waters/ Wright/ Mason/ Geesin) - 23:44 *I. - „Fathers Shout" ... Zdroj: „https://sk.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Atom_Heart_Mother&oldid=6433775" ...
Atom Heart Mother er det fjerde studiealbum af det engelske progressive rock-band Pink Floyd, udgivet i 1970 af Harvest og EMI ... Chart Stats - Pink Floyd - Atom Heart Mother. www.chartstats.com. Arkiveret fra originalen 2012-05-27. Hentet 2009-07-02.. ... Atom Heart Mother er det tidlige Pink Floyds hovedværk. Det er her David Gilmore finder sin endelige form, der tilfører hans ... "Atom Heart Mother" Gilmour, Waters, Wright, Mason, Ron Geesin. (Instrumental). 23:44. ...
He demonstrated the ability to image atoms using an annular dark field detector. Crewe and coworkers at the University of ... 2008). "Detection of Single Atoms and Buried Defects in Three Dimensions by Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope with 0.5-Å ... Boyes, Edward D.; Ward, Michael R.; Lari, Leonardo; Gai, Pratibha L. (2013). "ESTEM imaging of single atoms under controlled ... an X-ray spectrometer is used to detect the characteristic X-rays that are emitted by atoms in the sample as they are ionized ...
Yakult Atoms. 130. 33. 92. 5. 0.273. 45.5. 336. 552. 0.215. 3.78. Takehiko Bessho, Yoshiharu Ogawa ... The winner of the 1970 Sawamura Award was Masaji Hiramatsu of the Taiyo Whales. He had a 25 - 19 win-loss record, 182 ... The 1970 All-Japan University Baseball Championship Series featured 15 schools competing in the tournament at Meiji-Jingu ... The San Francisco Giants toured Japan in the spring of 1970. The touring team went 3 - 6 - 0 against Japanese competition. ...
Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides ... Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides ... Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides ... Ruthenium-catalyzed insertion of adjacent diol carbon atoms into C-C bonds: Entry to type II polyketides ...
A simple explanation of Bohrs theory of Hydrogen Atom and useful java applet which illustrates a hydrogen atom according to ... A simple explanation of Bohrs theory of Hydrogen Atom and useful java applet which illustrates a hydrogen atom according to ... Bohrs Theory of the Hydrogen Atom. Mar. 15, 2009. by Java Applets on Physics ...
Theoretical Studies of Hot-Atom Reactions. II. Yields for Exchange Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Hydrogen and Deuterium ... Theoretical Studies of Hot-Atom Reactions. II. Yields for Exchange Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Hydrogen and Deuterium ... Theoretical Studies of Hot-Atom Reactions. II. Yields for Exchange Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Hydrogen and Deuterium ...
Molecular Beam Kinetics: Reactions of K Atoms with Alkyl Iodides. Title. Molecular Beam Kinetics: Reactions of K Atoms with ...
Few-body physics of spin-orbit coupled cold atom systems. This talk considers selected aspects of spin-orbit coupled few-atom ... Experiments with ultracold atoms in which the scattering length is tuned through Feshbach resonances have also shown that the ... Interactions between atoms often introduce large amounts of complexity into many-particle systems, but they can also lead to ... Atom. Nucl. \textbf{12}, 1080 (1970); Phys. Lett. B \textbf{33}, 563 (1970)\\ $[2]$ E.A. Kolganova, A.K. Motovilov and W. ...
This page includes Atom Heart Mothers : cover picture, songs / tracks list, members/musicians and line-up, different releases ... Atom Heart Mother is a music studio album recording by PINK FLOYD (Psychedelic/Space Rock/Progressive Rock) released in 1970 on ... Atom Heart Mother represents the Nebulus of the 1970s Floyd sound - when you hear th band, that is. The "Orchestral" (read: ... anyway... atom heart mother. if you thought interstellar and saucerful were epic tracks then you aint seen nothing yet. atom ...
Exact solution for two interacting electrons on artificial atoms and molecules in solids. Phys. Rev. B61, 5452-5456 (2000). ... The damped degenerate level atom. Ann. Phys. (NY) 62, 343-360 (1970) ...
Schwartz began working on porphyrins (macrocycle, or macromolecule with rings of atoms) and bile pigments while washing ...
Collinear Collisions of an Atom and Harmonic Oscillator, with F. E. Heidrick and K. R. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys., 54, 3885, 1971. ... Variational Bounds on the 1s Charge Exchange Amplitude in Proton-Hydrogen Atom Scattering, with D. Storm, Phys. Re. Letters, ... Electron Capture and Excitation in Alkali Ion-Atom Collisions Using an Atomic Eigenfunction Expansion, with C. Chang, J. Chem ... The Impact Parameter Method for Proton-Hydrogen Atom Collisions. III. Use of Non-Hydrogenic Expansion Functions, with D. Storm ...
Projet: Atom, 1967-1968 AP144.S2.D71 * Projet: Shantasea Development, 1967-1970 AP144.S2.D72 ... Projet: Inter-Action Centre, 1964-1992, predominant 1970-1981 AP144.S2.D82 ...
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn · A Saucerful of Secrets · Music from the Film More · Ummagumma · Atom Heart Mother · Meddle · ... Atom Heart Mother är ett musikalbum av Pink Floyd som släpptes 1970. Det innehåller bland annat den drygt 23 minuter långa, ... "Atom Heart Mother" (David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters, Richard Wright, Ron Geesin) - 23:39 *a) "Fathers Shout" ... Rubriken löd "The Atom Heart Mother is Named". Roger Waters fattade tycke för den namnet. Det hade ingenting att göra med vare ...
The structure of the γ-monohydrate Zr(SO4)2.H2O, a layer compound with the zirconium atom in sevenfold coordination. ... Refinement and location of the hydrogen atoms in the nitroxide 2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-4-piperidinol-1-oxyl. ... Acta Cryst. (1970). B26, 1049-1058. https://doi.org/10.1107/S0567740870003606 ... Acta Cryst. (1970). B26, 1058-1062. https://doi.org/10.1107/S0567740870003618 ...
  • Notable players with the Atoms included Doyle Alexander, Ron Cey, Joe Ferguson, and Ted Sizemore, the National League's Rookie of the Year in 1969. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crewe and coworkers at the University of Chicago developed the cold field emission electron source and built a STEM able to visualize single heavy atoms on thin carbon substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present invention relates to a method of polymerizing normal mono-l-alkenes of to about 25 carbon atoms, especially with one or more dissimilar ethylenically-unsaturated monomers. (google.com)
  • Relatively long-chain normal monol-alkenes, i.e., those having at least 5 carbon atoms, are generally characterized as possessing slow addition polymerization rates. (google.com)
  • By the polymerization method of the present invention normal alpha-olefins of 5 to about 25 carbon atoms will homopolymerize or react with one or more dissimilar olefinically-unsaturated polymerizable monomers, including fast-acting monomers, to form viscous copolymeric oils which are useful, for example, in forming detergent additives for mineral lubricating oils. (google.com)
  • The normal mono-l-alkenes to be polymerized by the method of the present invention have 5 to about 25 carbon atoms, preferably about 12 to 20- carbon atoms. (google.com)
  • Preferably, such mixtures are homologous and primarily span a range of about 4 to 8 carbon atoms. (google.com)
  • The dissimilar monomer may have, say, about 3 to 26 carbon atoms and can generally be employed with the alpha-olefin hydrocarbon in amounts up to about preferably no more than about 50% of the total monomer on a molar basis. (google.com)
  • Fats have a string of 3 to 22 carbon atoms. (lewrockwell.com)
  • The atom probe was introduced at the 14th Field Emission Symposium in 1967 by Erwin Wilhelm Müller and J. A. Panitz. (wikipedia.org)
  • En 1967, baseándose na definición da velocidade da luz de Einstein como a dimensión máis constante do universo , o Sistema Internacional de Unidades illou dúas emisións de ondas específicas do espectro do cesio-133 para definir as medidas do segundo e do metro . (wikipedia.org)
  • In our experiment, we implemented a quantum walk on the line with single neutral atoms by deterministically delocalizing them over the sites of a one-dimensional spin-dependent optical lattice. (sciencemag.org)
  • μ + , in almost complete consonance with the ensemble theorem at 0 K. The electrodonating and electroaccepting powers of neutral atoms in the Periodic Table are evaluated and used to explain how the values of these indexes will distribute in the electrodonating-electroaccepting powers plane. (scielo.org.mx)
  • The 238 U atoms remain neutral and pass through the product collector section and are deposited on a tails collector. (globalsecurity.org)
  • The field was aligned to the northeast and named for Harry Sanders, a Connell farmer, and Tom Jacobs, a former manager and the general manager of the Atoms at the time of his death at age 64 in 1968. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heavy atom isotope effects generated by substituting 13 C, 15 N or 18 O are important tools for probing the mechanisms and transition states of chemical reactions [ 1 ], including enzyme-catalyzed reactions [ 2 - 7 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Instead, heavy atom isotope effects are generally measured by internal competition methods that compare the isotopic composition of the reactant and product [ 3 , 8 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process is based on the fact that 235 U atoms and 238 U atoms absorb light of different frequencies (or colors). (globalsecurity.org)
  • Atom probes are unlike conventional optical or electron microscopes, in that the magnification effect comes from the magnification provided by a highly curved electric field, rather than by the manipulation of radiation paths. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on an analysis of the results of integrated experimental and theoretical investigations, modern concepts are described of the kinetics of excited atoms and optical radiation under conditions of the wave mechanism of breakdown in inert gases. (springer.com)
  • The nitrogen atom of the scissile peptide bond was found close to the imidazole ring of histidine-159, suggesting a role for this ring in protonating the N atom of the leaving group (Lowe, 1970). (rcsb.org)
  • Although the absorption frequencies of these two isotopes differ only by a very small amount (about one part in a million), the dye lasers used in AVLIS can be tuned so that only the 235 U atoms absorb the laser light. (globalsecurity.org)
  • Alpha decay Alpha decay is a type of radioactive decay in which an atom emits an alpha particle (two protons and two neutrons bound together into a particle identical to a helium nucleus) and transforms (or decays) into an atom with a mass number 4 less and atomic number 2. (statemaster.com)
  • By contrast, the knowledge of atoms that is now taken for granted in modern science is not established by a priori philosophical argument but by appeal to quite specific experimental results interpreted and guided by a quite specific theory, quantum mechanics. (stanford.edu)
  • Since atoms lie far beyond the domain of observation, should hypotheses concerning them form part of empirical science? (stanford.edu)
  • Tonks und Langmuir entdecken kollektive Schwingungen in Gasentladung en und führen den Begriff Plasma ein. (dpg-physik.de)
  • Traditionally, experimental phasing of macromolecular structures involves heavy-atom soaks and the collection of two or more data sets: the diffraction intensities of the native crystal and those of the derivative(s). (iucr.org)
  • This entry gives an account of the key developments in atomism from the seventeenth century until the time, early in the twentieth century, when the existence of atoms ceased to be a contentious issue. (stanford.edu)
  • Because the observed effects for isotopic substitution of heavy atoms are extremely small, typically a few percent, they cannot be determined by direct comparison of experimentally determined rate constants. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The main object of this study was to determine by the difference-Fourier technique the binding mode for the substrate in the groove in order to explain the substrate specificity of the enzyme (P2 should have a hydrophobic side chain (Berger and Schechter, 1970) and to contribute to an elucidation of the catalytic mechanism. (rcsb.org)
  • Album byl nahráno v Abbey Road v Londýně mezi březnem a srpnem 1970 . (wikipedia.org)
  • Schwartz began working on porphyrins (macrocycle, or macromolecule with rings of atoms) and bile pigments while washing glassware dishes in his freshman year at the University of Minnesota in 1934 under Dr. Cecil. (uchicago.edu)
  • Although 1970 is their baseline year and seems long ago, life in the sea has been in decline for much longer. (desdemonadespair.net)
  • The fusion technology was classified till the year 1958's Atoms for Peace Conference in Geneva happened. (solarfeeds.com)
  • The application of the pulse to the sample allows for individual atoms at the sample surface to be ejected as an ion from the sample surface at a known time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atom Bergstrom is a Body & Organ Language specialist and promoter of Time Conscious Eating and Longevity Lifestyles, Gosta Ingvar "ATOM" Bergstrom was raised in New Jersey and the San Fernando Valley of Southern California. (oneradionetwork.com)
  • É un metal alcalino brando de cor prateada-dourada, cun punto de fusión de 28,44 °C (301,59 K), un dos únicos cinco metais elementais que se poden atopar en estado líquido a temperatura ambiente . (wikipedia.org)
  • The wavelength of visible light, however, is around 500 nanometers (billionths of a meter), whereas the spacing of atoms in a crystal is on the order of a few tenths of a nanometer. (skullsinthestars.com)
  • The Treaty of Almelo was signed on 4 March 1970 ‒ an agreement between the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and West Germany on setting up a company with the aim of enriching uranium: Urenco. (laka.org)