History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Famous PersonsHistoryHistory of MedicineMedicine in ArtPaintingsPersia: An ancient civilization, known as early as 2000 B.C. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus the Great (550-529 B.C.) and for 200 years, from 550 to 331 B.C., the Persians ruled the ancient world from India to Egypt. The territory west of India was called Persis by the Greeks who later called the entire empire Persia. In 331 B.C. the Persian wars against the Greeks ended disastrously under the counterattacks by Alexander the Great. The name Persia in modern times for the modern country was changed to Iran in 1935. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p546 & Asimov, Words on the Map, 1962, p176)Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Leper Colonies: Residential treatment centers for individuals with leprosy.History of NursingCivilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Nobel PrizePaleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.EuropePortraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.United StatesScurvy: An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Books, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.BooksSculptureLiterature, MedievalMythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Mummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.ArtPopulation Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Philosophy, MedicalTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Manuscripts, MedicalClimate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Magic: Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.World War II: Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.ItalyIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Engraving and EngravingsGenetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Communicable DiseasesAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Fur Seals: A group comprised of several species of eared seals found in two genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to SEA LIONS, they have an especially dense wooly undercoat.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.South AmericaDNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.North AmericaPhysiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)EnglandNatural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Great BritainOceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.GermanyHaplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Genealogy and HeraldryCrops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Developmental Biology: The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.Periostitis: Inflammation of the periosteum. The condition is generally chronic, and is marked by tenderness and swelling of the bone and an aching pain. Acute periostitis is due to infection, is characterized by diffuse suppuration, severe pain, and constitutional symptoms, and usually results in necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Th1-Th2 Balance: Homeostatic control of the immune system by secretion of different cytokines by the Th1 and Th2 cells. The concentration dependent binding of the various cytokines to specific receptors determines the balance (or imbalance leading to disease).GreecePregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Awards and PrizesAfricaCitrus aurantiifolia: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar lime fruit. Its common name of lime is similar to the limetree (TILIA).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.HungaryRain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.PortugalRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.BrazilWater Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)RussiaQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)PolandPedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Reproductive History: An important aggregate factor in epidemiological studies of women's health. The concept usually includes the number and timing of pregnancies and their outcomes, the incidence of breast feeding, and may include age of menarche and menopause, regularity of menstruation, fertility, gynecological or obstetric problems, or contraceptive usage.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.JapanCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Europe, EasternModels, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Suntan: An induced skin pigment (MELANIN) darkening after exposure to SUNLIGHT or ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. The degree of tanning depends on the intensity and duration of UV exposure, and genetic factors.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Yersinia pestis: The etiologic agent of PLAGUE in man, rats, ground squirrels, and other rodents.MexicoNeoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.SwitzerlandCercopithecinae: A subfamily of the Old World monkeys, CERCOPITHECIDAE. They inhabit the forests and savannas of Africa. This subfamily contains the following genera: CERCOCEBUS; CERCOPITHECUS; ERYTHROCEBUS; MACACA; PAPIO; and THEROPITHECUS.Pacific OceanLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.LondonTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Support for Syndicalism never fully recovered to the height it enjoyed in the early 20th century. Georges Sorel, a prominent ... Melvyn Dubofsky, We Shall Be All: A History of the Industrial Workers of the World, Quadrangle Books, 1969. William Z. Foster ... More moderate versions of syndicalism were overshadowed in the early 20th century by revolutionary anarcho-syndicalism, which ... The Origins of Ideological Polarization in the 20th Century, (University of California Press, 1981), p. 451. Zeev Sternhell, ...
The Catholic Action Movement in Ireland in the 20th Century. USA, 2009. De Paor, Liam. Saint Patrick's World: The Christian ... both 11th century), one of the founders of scholasticism." Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical notes. Volume I. ... In the next century Iona had so prospered that its abbot, St. Adamnan, wrote in excellent Latin the "Life of St. Columba". From ... It was not until he had reigned for a quarter of a century on the throne that he turned his attention to Ireland and then it ...
Gilbert & Sullivan and the American Savoyards" in Monmouth - A History of the Four Seasons during the 20th Century, Bowler, ... 3 Theatre World, vols. 16 (1960) and 22 (1966), Theatre World Media DeOrsey, Stan. ... 341-349 Raymond Allen obituary in The New York Times, February 3, 1994, accessed May 19, 2009 The Yeomen of the Guard, at the ... "Ruth Kobart, of Forum and How to Succeed Fame, Dies in San Francisco at 78", Theatre Mania, December 31, 1969, accessed October ...
Marcel van der Linden, The Workers and the World; Essays toward a Global Labour History. Leiden: Brill, 2008. Ernest Mandel, ... Peter Scholliers (ed.), Real wages in 19th and 20th Century Europe; Historical and comparative perspectives. New York; Berg, ... Harry Braverman, Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century. New York: Monthly Review Press, ... International and Comparative Social History, 5). New York: Peter Lang AG, 1997. ...
This instrumental ensemble remains popular, and has performed across the world. Early in the 20th century, calypso music ... The music of Barbados draws on the island's cultural heritage, and the music history of Barbados reflects the island's diverse ... By the beginning of the 19th century, slaves provided most of the musical accompaniment for plantation festivities, such as the ... Millington, Janice (1999). "Barbados". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Vol. 2. Routledge. pp. 813-821. ISBN 0-8153-1865-0 ...
In the late 19th and early 20th century, group differences in intelligence were assumed to be due to race and, apart from ... Since the beginning of IQ testing around the time of World War I there have been observed differences between average scores of ... During the 19th and early 20th centuries the idea that there are differences in the brain structures and brain sizes of ... In the 18th century, European philosophers and scientists, such as Voltaire, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and Carl Linnaeus, ...
2004). Encyclopedia of 20th Century Air Warfare. London: Amber Books. ISBN 978-1-904687-26-9. Bushby, John R. (1972). Gunner's ... 604 Squadron history on RAF website Squadron histories for nos. 600-604 sqn on RAFweb 604 in the Battle of Britain Traces of ... Shortly after the commencement of World War II in 1939, the squadron was reassigned to a night-fighter role. No. 604 Squadron ... The squadron spent the first several months of World War II flying defensive patrols in support of coastal convoys. The ...
... the International Sociological Association listed the work as the seventh most important sociological book of the 20th century ... Because of World War II it was virtually ignored, but gained popularity when it was republished in 1969 and translated into ... Covering European history from roughly 800 AD to 1900 AD, it is the first formal analysis and theory of civilization. The ... The first volume, The History of Manners, traces the historical developments of the European habitus, or "second nature", the ...
The World's Assault Rifles by Gary Paul Johnston, Thomas B. Nelson, Chapter 29 Great Britain "SA80 History: The First Mockups ( ... Military Small Arms of the 20th Century (4th ed.), ISBN 0-910676-28-3 Macrae, Callum (23 August 1992), "How the Army got second ... The system's history dates back to the late 1940s, when an ambitious programme to develop a new cartridge and new class of ... "SA80 History: L85 A1 vs A2 (and the coming A3)". forgottenweapons.com. 20 May 2017. Retrieved 30 May 2017. "Kit Magazine" (PDF ...
The idea was challenged by the 20th century realization that destruction, as in the two world wars, could grow out of technical ... World Wisdom Books. The dictionary definition of progress at Wiktionary Media related to Progress (history) at Wikimedia ... The most original 'New World' contribution to historical thought was the idea that history is not exhausted but that man may ... More recently M. Jules Delvaille has attempted to trace its history fully, down to the end of the eighteenth century. His ...
She was considered one of the great piano legends of the 20th century. Reuters called her "the greatest Spanish pianist in ... history", Time "one of the world's most outstanding pianists" and The Guardian "the leading Spanish pianist of her time". She ... To me, each of them is a different world. Falla was the one who really captured the spirit of the Gypsy music. And Albéniz, I ... She performed her first concert at the age of six at the World's Fair in Seville in 1929, and had her orchestral debut at the ...
In the late 19th and early 20th century, group differences in intelligence were assumed to be due to race;[1] apart from ... Since the beginning of IQ testing around the time of World War I there have been observed differences between average scores of ... HistoryEdit. Early historyEdit. Lithograph of a North American skull from Samuel Morton's Crania Americana, 1839. Morton ... During the 19th and early 20th centuries the idea that there are differences in the brain structures and brain sizes of ...
The museum is focused on ordinary life from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century, with much of the material coming from ... Irish history, Irish art, culture, and natural history. It has three branches in Dublin and one in County Mayo. See also ... There are special displays of items from Egypt, Cyprus and the Roman world, and special exhibitions are regularly mounted. This ... Its collection and Victorian appearance have not changed significantly since the early 20th century. 1988-2012: Patrick Wallace ...
... including a three volume work on 20th century British locomotives, and eight volumes on the railways of regions of the work. In ... A History of the LMS, 1. The First Years, 1923-1930, George Allen & Unwin Nock, O.S. (1982), A History of the LMS, 2. The ... After World War II Nock rose through the Westinghouse organisation to become chief brake draughtsman (1945), four years later ... British Locomotives of the 20th Century, 1, 2, & 3 Railways Nock, O.S.; Cross, Derek (1960), Main Lines Across the Border (1st ...
20th Century Architecture - A Visual History, Dennis Sharp, Images, Australia, 2002. Contro Spazio No. 5, Italy, 2002. Malta, ... World Architects 51, Masayuki Fuchigami, Art Design Publishing, Japan, 2007. Concrete Quarterly, Dennis Sharp, London, 2008. ... 581 Architects in the World, Masayuki Fuchigami, Toto Shuppan, Tokyo, 1995. Church Builders, Edwin Heathcote + Iona Spens, ... Space, Time, Genealogy, Malta Before History, Miranda Publishers, Malta, 2004. Transfiguration, St James Cavalier Centre for ...
The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the 20th Century Weapons and Warfare. London: Purnell & Sons Ltd., 1967/1969. ISBN 0-8393-6175- ... Data from "The Worlds Greatest Aircraft" General characteristics Crew: one, pilot Length: 5.8 m (19 ft 0 in) Wingspan: 7.55 m ( ... ISBN 978-1-78200-353-3. Janić Č, Petrović O, Short History of Aviation in Serbia, Beograd, Aerokomunikacije, 2011. ISBN 978-86- ... The World's Greatest Aircraft. Edison, NJ: Cartwell Books Inc., 2007. ISBN 0-7858-2010-8. Cheesman, E.F., ed. (1964). Fighter ...
Belete Bizuneh remarks that the impact of social history on African historiography in the 20th century generated an ... wrote works of world history, histories of Western civilization, and histories of Ethiopia, which, unlike his previous works, ... genre of historiography continued well into the 20th century. Ge'ez became an extinct language by the 17th century, but it ... By the 16th century Ethiopian works began to discuss the profound impact of foreign peoples in their own regional history. The ...
... producer and actor from many films in the first half of the 20th century. His full name was Hugh Ryan Conway. Arthur Willard ... Birthplace of Bridget Connelly, author of Forgetting Ireland: Uncovering a Family's Hidden History (Borealis Books, Minnesota ... who guided the Twins to two World Series championships (1987 and 1991). Irish language storyteller Éamon a Búrc (1866-1942) was ... He played for the Cleveland Indians from 1965 to 1966 and the San Diego Padres in 1969. Todd Hendricks (born August 13, 1968 in ...
"Michigan's 100 Greatest Artists & Entertainers of the 20th Century", Detroit Free Press, Detroit, Michigan, 12 December 1999. ... During World War II, he was an active contributor to the Allies' research and development program in advancing the ... "Design History of General Motors". Worldcarfans.com. 2006-05-11. Retrieved 2011-12-31. "Corvette Hall of Fame - Harley Earl". ... "Car of the Century". Car of the Century. 1926-11-15. Archived from the original on 2011-12-29. Retrieved 2011-12-31. Detroit ...
Notable coelophysoids discovered during the mid to late 20th century include Syntarsus (now Megapnosaurus) and Gojirasaurus. ... Dinosaurs portal Paleontology portal History of science portal History of paleontology Timeline of paleontology Timeline of ... Navajo creation mythology tells stories about the Grey Monsters that populated the world during earth's early days. These ... Colbert (1995); "Bones and History," page 93. Colbert (1995); "Bones and History," pages 93-94. Colbert (1995); "Bones and ...
"History of Clarice Cliff, one of the World's Most Influential Ceramics Artists". claricecliff.com. Retrieved 2017-02-24. ... There will be two rooms displaying 20th-century collections. One will show ceramics made in a factory context and will include ... The world record price for a piece of Clarice Cliff is held by Christie's, South Kensington, London, who sold an 18-inch (460 ... During World War II only plain white pottery (utility ware) was permitted under wartime regulations, so Cliff assisted with ...
Essays in 20th Century New Mexico History (1994) Etulain, Richard W., ed. New Mexican Lives: Profiles and Historical Stories ( ... The Whole Damned World: New Mexico Aggies at War, 1941-1945; World War II Correspondence of Dean Daniel B. Jett (2008) Ellis, ... History of the Colorado Plateau History of the Great Plains History of the Rocky Mountains History of the Western United States ... In the 20th century, American and British artists and writers, and retirees were attracted to the cultural richness of the area ...
tag; name "history" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Kaliv World Center (2002). Shema Yisrael ... Biographical sketches and the genealogy of illustrious Jewish families from the 15th-20th century. Shengold Publishers. p. 232 ... Until World War I, Hasidic youth traditionally studied Torah and learned the customs and lore of their dynasties in shtiebelach ... On the eve of World War II, Radomsk was the third largest Hasidic dynasty in Poland, after Ger and Alexander. The town of ...
Acharya Deshbhushan elevated and initiated the first Brahmacharini of the 20th century Kumari Maina as Kshullika Veermati ... the tallest Jain statue in the world. This statue holds the Guinness world record for the tallest Jain Idol. The certificate ... 1990), The History of Sacred Places in India As Reflected in Traditional Literature: Papers on Pilgrimage in South Asia, BRILL ... She was able to surprise the whole world in the year 1969 by translating Nyaya-Ashtasahasri a renowned Sanskrit scripture into ...
Gilbert, 20th Century, pp. 321-342 The People's War: Britain 1939-45, (1969) Angus Calder, Jonathan Cape Ltd., London The Home ... Lewes A History of the Twentieth Century, Vol. 2 1933-54, (1998) Martin Gilbert, William Morrow and Company, Inc. New York ... And the King will never leave.' Throughout the Second World War the Queen and her children shared the dangers and difficulties ... This was during a critical period in British history, between July and September 1940, when the Battle of Britain was raging, ...
During the 19th century, three previously encountered diseases and one emerging infectious disease, cholera, reached epidemic proportions. Epidemics of the 19th century were faced without the medical advances that made 20th-century epidemics much more rare and less lethal. Micro-organisms (viruses and bacteria) had been discovered in the 18th century, but it was not until the late 19th century that the experiments of Lazzaro Spallanzani and Louis Pasteur disproved spontaneous generation conclusively, allowing germ theory and Robert Koch's discovery of micro-organisms as the cause of disease transmission. ...
The Soviet Heavy Draft is a Russian breed of heavy draft horse. It derives from the Belgian Brabant heavy draft breed. It was developed in the former Soviet Union for agricultural draft work, and was recognized as a breed in 1952.:324 It is one of several heavy draft breeds developed in the Soviet Union in the twentieth century, others being the Russian Heavy Draft - which derived mainly from the Ardennais - and the Vladimir Heavy Draft, which was derived principally from the Clydesdale. The Russian Empire had no indigenous breeds of heavy draft horse.:277 The origins of the Soviet Heavy Draft date to the late nineteenth century, at the Khrenovski stud farm in Voronezh Oblast. Imported ...
Two conflicting perspectives exist for the early history of Seattle. There is the "establishment" view, which favors the centrality of the Denny Party (generally the Denny, Mercer, Terry, and Boren families), and Henry Yesler. A second, less didactic view, advanced particularly by historian Bill Speidel and others such as Murray Morgan, sees David Swinson "Doc" Maynard as a key figure, perhaps the key figure. In the late nineteenth century, when Seattle had become a thriving town, several members of the Denny Party still survived; they and many of their descendants were in local positions of power and influence. Maynard was about ten years older and died relatively young, so he was not around to make his own case. ...
There are competing theories regarding how and why public toilets (or "bathrooms" in the United States) first became separated by sex in the United States and Europe. Under one theory, offered by Terry Kogan, sex-separation as a standard did not emerge in the U.S. until the late nineteenth century.[2] Under another view, offered by W. Burlette Carter, sex-separation has long been the standard in the U.S. and Great Britain and most of the world where women's well-being was valued.[1] She argues that when people used chamber pots, sex-separation could be achieved by placing the pot in a separated space. In single-use privies and similar spaces, that separation was achieved by allowing only one "sex" to use ...
Throughout the nineteenth century...American cities annexed adjacent land and grew steadily...the predominant view in the nineteenth century was the doctrine of forcible annexation."[19] However that would change toward the end of the century: "the first really significant defeat for the consolidation movement came when Brookline spurned Boston in 1874. [Thereafter] virtually every other Eastern and Middle Western city was rebuffed by wealthy and independent suburbs."[20] By the turn of the 19th century, a middle class expectation of having residential space had emerged, which Jackson attributes to work of Andrew Jackson Downing, Calvert ...
The Massina Empire (Var.: Maasina or Macina: also: Dina of Massina, Sise Jihad state, and Caliphate of Hamdullahi) was an early nineteenth-century Fulbe Jihad state centered in the Inner Niger Delta area of what is now the Mopti and Ségou Regions of Mali. Its capital was at Hamdullahi. The Fulas of the region had for centuries been the vassals of larger states, including the Mali Empire (13th-14th centuries), the Songhai Empire (15th century), the Moroccan pashas of Tomboctou (16th century), and the Bambara Empire at Ségou (17th century). By the early 1800s, many of these larger states had declined in power and inspired by ...
NINES is the Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship, a scholarly organization in British and American nineteenth-century studies supported by ARP, a software development group assembling a suite of critical and editorial tools for digital scholarship. It was founded in 2003 by Jerome McGann at the University of Virginia. NINES serves as a clearinghouse for peer-reviewed digital resources, which can be collected, annotated, and re-used in online "exhibits." It is powered by open-source Collex software. In 2011, the NINES model was expanded to include a sister site in eighteenth-century studies, called 18thConnect. ...
The Aubrac is a French breed of domestic beef cattle. It originates on the Plateau de l'Aubrac in the Massif Central in central southern France, from which it also takes its name. It has a wheat-coloured coat and dark hooves, switch, muzzle and eyes. The Aubrac originated in the early nineteenth century on the Plateau de l'Aubrac in the Massif Central, which spans the modern départements of the Aveyron, the Cantal and the Lozère, in the regions of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes and Occitanie. Some limited cross-breeding took place in the twentieth century: with the Mézine, now extinct, 1935-1945; with the Maraîchine, 1945-1955; and ...
Alfred Henry Sturtevant va néixer a Jacksonville, Illinois, Estats Units el 21 de novembre de 1891. A partir de 1908 va estudiar a la Universitat de Colúmbia. Es va interessar des de molt jove per l'obra de Gregor Mendel i aviat va publicar una obra sobre els pedigrees dels cavalls vistos a través de la genètica mendeliana. El 1928, ell i la seva família es traslladaren a Pasadena per treballar en el California Institute of Technology, on va ser professor de genètica. Sturtevant també es va interessar per la taxonomia, la política iel periodisme.. ...
1921: Hjalmar Gotfried Carlson · 1922: Frederick Arthur Halsey · 1923: John Ripley Freeman · 1926: Robert Andrews Millikan · 1927: Wilfred Lewis · 1928: Julian Kennedy · 1930: William Le Roy Emmet · 1931: Albert Kinsbury · 1933: Ambrose Swasey · 1934: Willis Carrier · 1935: Charles Thomas Main · 1936: Edward Bausch · 1937: Edward P. Bullard Jr. · 1938: Stephen Joseph Pigott · 1939: James Emmet Gleason · 1940: Charles Kettering · 1941: Theodore von Kármán · 1942: Ervin George Bailey · 1943: Lewis Ketcham Sillcox · 1944: Edward G. Budd · 1945: William Frederick Durand · 1946: Morris E. Leeds · 1947: Paul Walter Kiefer · 1948: Frederick George Keyes · 1949: Fred L. Dornbrook · 1950: Harvey Coles Knowles ...
Cafodd ei geni yn Lerpwl, yn ferch y diplomydd George Browne. Roedd hi'n byw ger Abergele. Priododd Capten Alfred Hemans yn 1812. ...
醒龍的兩個標本目前都存放在倫敦大學學院。醒龍的正模標本(編號UCL B54)發現於賴索托,包含一個部分頭顱骨與骨骸。古生物學家Richard Thulborn在1914年首次敘述這個標本,他認為該化石是狼鼻龍的一個新種,並密名為伴侶醒龍(L. consors),consors在拉丁語中意為「同伴」或「配偶」。編號UCL B54標本缺乏狼鼻龍所擁有的犬齒型牙齒,但Thulborn認為這代表該個體是個雌性[6]。在Thulborn的首次醒龍研究中,並沒有完全敘述牠們頭顱骨與骨骸。一顆發現於瑞士的牙齒,年代屬於三疊紀最晚期,被歸類於醒龍。但這顆牙齒沒有醒龍、畸齒龍科、或鳥臀目的特徵,因此沒有被廣泛的接受[7]。. 在1975年,詹姆斯·霍普森(James Hopson)重新敘述了一個發現於南非的破碎畸齒龍科頭顱骨(編號UCL ...
Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic (1959. október 23. -) amerikai zenész, leginkább paródiáiról ismert. Dalszövegei nagyrészt népszerű - kultúrát parodizáló - elemeket tartalmaznak, köztük a televízió, filmek, étel, zene, honlapok és hírek. Bár népszerűségét a paródiák hozták meg számára, albumain saját, humoros szerzeményei vannak többségben.. ...
The Catholic Action Movement in Ireland in the 20th Century. USA, 2009. De Paor, Liam. Saint Patricks World: The Christian ... both 11th century), one of the founders of scholasticism." Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical notes. Volume I. ... In the next century Iona had so prospered that its abbot, St. Adamnan, wrote in excellent Latin the "Life of St. Columba". From ... It was not until he had reigned for a quarter of a century on the throne that he turned his attention to Ireland and then it ...
Support for Syndicalism never fully recovered to the height it enjoyed in the early 20th century. Georges Sorel, a prominent ... Melvyn Dubofsky, We Shall Be All: A History of the Industrial Workers of the World, Quadrangle Books, 1969. William Z. Foster ... More moderate versions of syndicalism were overshadowed in the early 20th century by revolutionary anarcho-syndicalism, which ... The Origins of Ideological Polarization in the 20th Century, (University of California Press, 1981), p. 451. Zeev Sternhell, ...
A number of physical changes were made to the facilities throughout the 20th century; buildings were constructed and demolished ... In the years following the First and Second World Wars, the hospital serviced an area that at one time encompassed seven ... In 1969, the farm was closed and its animals were auctioned-off. The hospital was expanded in order to provide treatment to ... By 1994, the hospitals 75th anniversary, approximately 2.2 million people received treatment at the hospital.. ...
In the late 19th and early 20th century, group differences in intelligence were assumed to be due to race;[1] apart from ... Since the beginning of IQ testing around the time of World War I there have been observed differences between average scores of ... HistoryEdit. Early historyEdit. Lithograph of a North American skull from Samuel Mortons Crania Americana, 1839. Morton ... During the 19th and early 20th centuries the idea that there are differences in the brain structures and brain sizes of ...
Yongming Zhou, Anti-drug crusades in twentieth-century China : nationalism, history, and state building, Lanham [u.a.] Rowman ... Hui have had female Imams, called Nu Ahong for centuries. They are the worlds only female Imams. They guide females in prayer ... from the 16th to the 20th Century) (reprint ed.). Houghton Mifflin. p. 209.. ... Yongming Zhou (1999). Anti-drug Crusades in Twentieth-century China: Nationalism, History, and State Building. Rowman & ...
... in Dictionary of World Biography: The 20th century, Volume IX, Frank N. Magill, ed. (Routledge, 1999) p3747 "Zaire", in Heads ... A Twentieth-Century History (The New Press, 2013) "Learning in builders rubble", by Colin McGlashan, The Observer (London), ... Monsignor Harold Robert Perry became the first African-American Roman Catholic bishop of the 20th Century, as Pope Paul VI ... "Worlds Fairs", Postwar America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History by James Ciment ( ...
In the United States, revival of traditional painting skills in the latter part of the 20th century is credited to professor ... The New York Academy of Art won the support of Andy Warhol: "The course of art history," he said, "would be changed if one ... The atelier attracted students from all over the world and became the model for similar schools, among them The New York ... In 1982, Lack coined the term "Classical Realism" because as he put it, "Any 20th century painting that suggests a recognizable ...
Since the end of the 20th century, Sumitomo Heavy Industries has expanded in Japan by acquiring existing companies and ... Throughout its history, Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd. has held a number of world records. ... In 1993 the company completed the worlds largest mud work system. Two years later, in 1995, it produced the worlds largest ... edit] History [edit] Early Days Sumitomo Heavy Industries was established in 1888 to serve the Besshi Copper Mine (also owned ...
1916-1994) developed a ,model for teaching and learning that was widely adopted by schools during ,the last quarter of the 20th ... She was named one of the hundred most influential women of the 20th century and one of the ten most influential in education by ... Encyclopedia of World Biography COPYRIGHT 2004 The Gale Group Inc.. Madeline Cheek Hunter. Influential American educator ... Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ ...
How to Think About God: A Guide for the 20th-Century Pagan (1980) ISBN 0-02-016022-4 ... Adler was asked in a 1990 interview with the Los Angeles Times why his Great Books of the Western World list did not include ... The Negro in American History (1969, 3 volumes), with Charles Van Doren ... When he wrote How to Think About God: A Guide for the Twentieth-Century Pagan in 1980, he claimed to consider himself the pagan ...
Nijusseiki hoso shi (Broadcasting in the 20th Century; in Japanese). "Better Broadcasting for Children" project begins ... Sekai no rajio to terebijon (World Radio and Television; now Detabokku sekai no hoso [NHK Databook: Broadcasting Around the ...
Third World Newsreel (TWN) fosters the creation, appreciation and dissemination of independent progressive media by and about ... In the early 20th century, Ocoee was home to one of Floridas most prosperous African American communities. On Election Day ... African Americans and whites live in a complex world of cotton, labor, and racial conflict. The history of the Chinese com.... ... In a Perfect World…. Daphne McWilliams. Producer: Daphne McWilliams & Sam Pollard. 2015, 76 min., US. IN A PERFECT WORLD… ...
Brazils leftist government enacted strict gun control laws in the early 20th century, and in the two subsequent decades saw a ... Brazilian Government website on the 2014 World Cup: Brazil and the World Cup. See also: World Cup 2014 - Stadiums Architecture. ... History. Pedro Americo, Independence or Death, 1888.. Pedro Alvares Cabral claimed Brazil for Portugal in 1500. The colony was ... Brazil supported the Allies in both World Wars. During World War II, its expeditionary force in Italy played a key role in the ...
Shortly after the end of the World War II, the U.S. Navy designed a new generation of minesweepers, those tough little ships ... It was the fourth in a growing collection of authentically detailed models of ships from the 20th century and beyond that ... "Im happy to help Nick preserve a piece of that history.". Senior business reporter Mary Carr Mayle covers the ports for the ... Shortly after the end of the World War II, the U.S. Navy designed a new generation of minesweepers, those tough little ships ...
His songs are essentially lyrical, and their elegance, clarity, wit, and charm betray the influence of 20th-century French ... "Ned Rorem." Encyclopedia of World Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 19, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/ ... Rorems harmonic language, though basically tonal, was very much of the 20th century and showed the influence of Debussy, ... Like his songs, his early instrumental works were also influenced by 20th-century French composers. In his later instrumental ...
... a sociologist and author of the four-volume work Materials for the Religious History of the French People, 19th 20th Centuries ... But, this world has never been Christian and never will be. Justification is personal. It is not about the world or the church ... We like to think that the world "was" Christian because it is our sinful nature to want to conform to the world. If we can make ... How Our World Stopped Being Christian: Anatomy of a Collapse. Orthodox Ethos ^ , 05-29-2018 , Jean-Claude Larchet Posted on 06/ ...
Our Awesome Universe: How Big Is Big? -- Science and Discomfiting Discoveries -- Our Amazing Spaceship Earth -- The Importance ... to the shameful fact that in the first half of the 20th century more people were killed by other people than in all history ... the 19th century bore its bitter fruit in the 20th with two world wars, the rise of atheistic communism and gruesome savagery ... There arose in the 20th century powerful men, atheists and despisers of religion, who sought to become what the world was ...
Sabah , History , 20th century. Great Britain , Colonies , Administration. Transformation from XML to HTML by Lawrence ... 1910 and served in the First World War in the Royal West Kent Regiment. He was Chief Justice and Deputy Governor, North Borneo ... Custodial History The papers were only made available for public access on 1st May 1980 due to an embargo imposed by the ... Administrative/Biographical History. Charles Frederick Cunningham Macaskie (1888-1969) was called to the bar through Grays Inn ...
The world economy in the 20th century. Paris: Development Centre of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development ... Contours of the world economy, 1-2030 AD: essays in macro-economic history. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. Mahasneh ... Quantitative World System Studies Contradict Current Islamophobia: World Political Cycles, Global Terrorism, and World ... The Long 20th Century. Money, Power, and the Origins of Our Times. London, New York: Verso. Arrighi G. and Silver, B. J. 1984. ...
During the 20th century, substantial achievements have been made in the control of many vaccine-preventable diseases. This ... The United States has joined many international partners, including the World Health Organization and Rotary International, in ... Duffy J. The sanitarians: a history of public health. Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois Press, 1990. ... TABLE 2. Baseline 20th century annual morbidity and 1998 provisional morbidity from nine diseases with vaccines recommended ...
... along with a unique collection of broadcast recordings by leading classical music performers of the 20th century. ... Prior to his appointment at York, he was President of the World Federation on Mental Health and a professor of Psychology at ... A knowledgeable lover of art and architecture, he read music and history at Trinity Hall, his studies being interrupted by war ... He is acknowledged as a world authority on materials manufacturing and is a former Vice-President of the Royal Academy of ...
In Iran, learning cinema by means of academic studies started almost at the turn of the 20th century. But in March 1951, US- ... During and after World War II, filmmakers from the Soviet Union and many western countries made many documentaries in Iran. The ... The history of cinema and documentary in Iran was started in the court of squirarchy. ... Subsequent to these filmed records, filmmakers such as Khan Baba Moutazedi documented other landmarks in Iranian history: ...
World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ... History of the Americas: , , ,,, , An Image of the ,Americas, from a single remote-sensin... ... 20th century North America A Canadian World War I recruiting poster - (1914-1918) ... History of North America, History of South America, History of the Americas, World History ...
Explore the companys history, profile, and timeline. Find the key facts youre looking for! ... Success and Struggles in the 20th Century Hengstenberg began production of cash registers under the brand name Anker ("anchor" ... At the end of World War II, Anker decided to refocus its production to concentrate on its cash registers and office machinery. ... Anker BV History. Address: Crompton House Barrs Fold Road Wingates Industrial Park Westhoughton Bolton Lancashire BL5 3XP ...
Chinese, 20th - 21st century, male.. Born 1964, in Beijing.. Installation artist, performance artist, photographer. Collage. ... Publication History:. Published online:. 31 October 2011. Collection:. Benezit Dictionary of Artists. ... She exhibited her art in biennale exhibitions throughout the world, for example, in Singapore, Venice, Shanghai, Sydney, ... Publication History:. Published online:. 11 February 2013. Collection:. Benezit Dictionary of Artists. ...
  • Reflections on rights : the Center for African American History & Culture, Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution, September 22, 1995 to March 3, 1996. (upenn.edu)
  • A History of Coffee , The XIIIth Congress of the International Economic History Association (IEHA) , Buenos Aires, 22-26 July 2002, Session 64: 'Commodities: understanding the global economy through the history of things, 1000-2000 CE' (see Introduction to session 64 by Sven Beckert and Cemal Kafadar). (1001inventions.com)
  • The most commonly used definitions, established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1997 and published in 2000, provide the values listed in the table at right. (thefullwiki.org)
  • 1982 World Christian Encyclopedia: A Comparative Study of Churches and Religions in the Modern World, A.D. 1900-2000. (ua.edu)
  • March 2000 variants in the National Social Science Survey listen a South download china and international investment law twenty years to capture for the ABC itself of ed per hummus versus an unified edition in 1994 of obvious per book. (lgne.org)
  • Listed as no. 711 in Manuscript Collections in Rhodes House Library Oxford, Accessions 1978-1994 (Oxford, Bodleian Library, 1996). (ox.ac.uk)
  • It's no small irony, therefore, that many of Pollock's half-century-old canvases today depend on just a few low-profile masters for their survival-namely, rare experts like Jim Coddington, the Museum of Modern Art's chief conservator since 1996. (reed.edu)
  • Latham's contribution to multi-media environments such as Gustav Metzger's Destruction in Art Symposium is notable in 1960s art history, although it is difficult to identify the artwork clearly from its contextual process. (mapmagazine.co.uk)
  • Before the privileged cadre that went abroad for training from the 1960s onward, there have been rather few deaf people known, named, and documented in African history. (independentliving.org)
  • [ 13 ] The reference data that these percentiles are based on are from 1963 to 1994, and thus have not been affected by the recent increases in weight. (thefullwiki.org)
  • So it seemed only fitting that Morrison - who served on the Affray's sister ships USS Exploit and USS Aggressive from 1966 to 1969 - should present the Savannah Maritime Trade and Convention Center with a model of the Affray last week. (savannahnow.com)
  • To this can be added the criticisms of solemn communion which increased starting in 1960 and especially in 1965, as well as the new pastoral practices around baptism (from 1966) and marriage (from 1969 1970), which tended to increase the level of access to the sacraments by requiring more preparation and personal investment on the part of those wishing to receive them. (freerepublic.com)
  • 1999), Denis Pelletier in The Catholic Crisis (2002), Danièle Hervieu-Léger, Catholicism: The End of a World (2003), Yves-Marie Hilaire in Will the Churches Disappear? (freerepublic.com)
  • History of the development of magnetic resonance [MRI and NMR] and its key contributors , J.Wiley 2002. (ebyte.it)
  • Twelve African American firefighters were among the World Trade Center victims on September 11th, 2001. (twn.org)
  • Noro was the Director of FIOH (1950-1970) and served as President of the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) (1969-1975) (14). (sjweh.fi)
  • The Avatars of Clericalism in the Fifth Republic (1973), Michel de Certeau and Jean-Marie Domenach in Christianity Exploded (1974), Paul Vigneron in A History of the Crises of the Contemporary French Clergy (1976), Jean Delumeau in Will Christianity die? (freerepublic.com)
  • She also returned to Broadway late in her career, winning praise for her roles in Coco (1969), A Matter of Gravity (1976) and The West Side Waltz (1981). (history.com)
  • The Tokyo neighborhood is the origin and continued nucleus of the Comme des Garçons universe, where the label's first store opened in 1976, and home to this date of its offices, studios and mother flagship. (032c.com)
  • I remember 1976 as a special year as that was the bicentenial year celebrating the 200 year anniversary of the signing of the declaration of independence, I remember all the special events tied to that year including operation sail where sailing vessels from all over the world participated in the year long celebration. (hubpages.com)
  • In the 18th century, European philosophers and scientists such as Voltaire , David Hume , Immanuel Kant , and Carl Linnaeus , proposed the existence of different mental abilities among the races. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 18th century, there was high demand in Britain for Chinese and other Asian goods, but there was little demand for British goods in China. (thoughtco.com)
  • But since industrialization, the advent of vaccines and antibiotics, and increased sanitation practices starting in the late 18th century, the world's population has ballooned, and is now at more than 7 billion. (truthout.org)
  • In the United States, revival of traditional painting skills in the latter part of the 20th century is credited to professor Richard Lack, who in his essay On the Training of Painters (1969) envisioned atelier training in the contemporary art scene, "Indeed if Western Civilization wishes to retain the art of painting as a living part of its culture, this may be our last hope. (cdc.gov)
  • She is celebrated as one of the most innovative and influential painters of the 20th century. (berggruen.com)
  • Anatomie d un effondrement [How our world stopped being Christian: anatomy of a collapse] (Paris: Seuil, 2018), 276 pp. (freerepublic.com)
  • In this book the title of which plays on that of Paul Veyne s book When Our World Became Christian, yet announces the inversion of the process whose beginnings the latter analysed Guillaume Cuchet, professor of contemporary history at the University of Paris-Est Créteil who specialises in the history of Catholicism, proposes to define the moment when this decadence began and to determine the reasons for it. (freerepublic.com)
  • She began to sculpt landscapes exemplified by Clamart (1968, New York: Kolin Collection), the burial place of Bourgeois' parents and grandparents, and Cumulus I (1969, Paris: Musée National d'Art Moderne), a study of cloud formations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The shockwaves sent in every direction by her Paris debut, in 1981, continue to rever-berate with power: every impor-tant designer of our time admits to her influence, and not so long ago, the critic Suzy Menkes de-clared her "one of the great fash-ion forces from the last decades of the 20th century to now. (032c.com)
  • Willis, John E. Jr. 1993: 'European Consumption and Asian Production', Consumption and the World of Goods , edited by John Brewer and Roy Porter, Routledge, London, 133-147. (1001inventions.com)
  • 1993 Rebuilding Sacred Worlds: Lay-Oriented Buddhist and Catholic Reformism in Malaysia. (ua.edu)
  • 1994 - BWH unveils the world's first intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. (partners.org)
  • Until the end of the 20th century the Golden Triangle was the world's largest producer of opium and heroin, with Myanmar being the single highest-producing country. (thoughtco.com)
  • This was the first manned lunar landing mission, and Aldrin was the second man to set foot on the moon, (following Neil Armstrong ) on 20 Jul 1969, and spent 2-hr 15-min on the lunar surface. (todayinsci.com)
  • I also remember in that same year back in July of 1969 when broadcast on the tv was Neil Armstrong making history as he walked on the moon's surface and spoke the famous words "This is one step for man and one giant leap for mankind. (hubpages.com)
  • Although the stylistic evolution of her work defies art historical categorization and her iconography is completely intimate and overtly sexual, Bourgeois' sculptures are exemplary of 20th-century artistic currents during the most controversial period of American art . (encyclopedia.com)
  • For Bookchin, lifestyle anarchism is a contemporary manifestation of the individualist anarchist currents which have always bedeviled the world anarchist movement proper. (theanarchistlibrary.org)
  • Have a look at David Brion Davis, Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World (Oxford, 2006). (warwick.ac.uk)
  • He has been greatly involved in the development of research programmes in genetics and genomics and in 1994 co-founded the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics at Oxford. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • From Wells' 'The Country of the Blind,' to the strange brew of the pulps, to the later literary innovations found in periodicals such as Galaxy, New Worlds and Interzone, it has always been in short fiction that new ideas and new voices have pushed the genre forward. (januarymagazine.com)
  • Even more astonishing, scientists concluded that the universe contains far more galaxies than we can imagine-at least 100 billion and quite possibly far more. (issuu.com)
  • In 1982, Lack coined the term "Classical Realism" because as he put it, "Any 20th century painting that suggests a recognizable object, however crudely or childishly rendered, qualifies as 'realistic. (cdc.gov)
  • Spanning three decades of Frankenthaler's career, this exhibition includes some of the artist's most significant and evocative paintings, highlighting the evolution of her artistic practice in the ways she translated the world around her. (berggruen.com)
  • He donated papers relating to the slave-owning history of the Lascelles family, uncovered during an inventory of Harewood House, to the Borthwick Institute, along with a unique collection of broadcast recordings by leading classical music performers of the 20th century. (york.ac.uk)
  • Find information about every stamp issued by the USPS and other postal services since 1997, and learn where in the world stamps about your favorite topics are being issued. (linns.com)
  • He was appointed professor of Natural History at the University of Edinburgh in 1952 before serving an eight-year term as Principal and Vice-Chancellor. (york.ac.uk)
  • Medical College of South Carolina (1952-1969);Medical University of South Carolina;Medical University of South Carolina. (musc.edu)
  • Oral histories;Colvin, Euta Miller;Bryan, Charles S.;South Carolina Medical Association;Medical College of South Carolina (1952-1969);Roper Hospital (Charleston, S.C.);World War, 1939-1945--Hawaii;Physicians--South Carolina;Physicians--South. (musc.edu)
  • ReVision, Spring 1994, p. 172: "The ASCs most commonly used by shamans differ both phenomenologically and biologically from possession trance (PT) or TL-ASC. (arcane-archive.org)
  • He begins a running discourse on the history, geology, architecture and politics of the cities and counties he is passing through on this brilliant May day, his voice spluttering and stuttering like Jiffy Pop on a campfire. (nytimes.com)
  • State TV was launched in 1969, two years after private TV station Sabet Pasal made its debut). (documentary.org)
  • He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II four years later. (linns.com)
  • Darwin spent 5 years on the HMS Beagle, exploring the world. (actionbioscience.org)
  • That is, God created the universe and all species a few thousand years ago, and they were unchangeable. (actionbioscience.org)
  • In the years following the Second World War, increased immigration from European nations led to a surge of activity in the European multicultural theatre sector. (thecanadianencyclopedia.com)
  • I remember watching the Met's win the world series with my mom back in 1969 when I was 8 years old in mid October as Cleon Jones caught the last out against the Baltimore Oriole's Davey Johnson and the images of the players celebrating and the fans running on to the field stick out vividly in my mind even though we were at home watching on the tv set. (hubpages.com)
  • Visits 100 deaf people in 42 nations, across 1000 years of African history. (independentliving.org)
  • Glimpses of the lives and communication of deaf and hearing impaired people are seen in one thousand years of history across Africa. (independentliving.org)
  • In Ethiopia, whose people are often well aware of their rich cultural history, officers of the National Association of the Deaf admitted 15 years ago that many deaf Ethiopians hardly value their sign language (SL), and "still think that the language of the hearing is better. (independentliving.org)
  • This project on world history grew into a work of eleven massive volumes and took forty-six years to complete. (bc.edu)
  • The first third of the book defines adherence to Catholicism as it appears from a mass of statistical data compiled by the clergy between 1945 and 1965, and in particular statistics carefully and regularly established over a wider period (1880 1965) by Canon Boulard, a sociologist and author of the four-volume work Materials for the Religious History of the French People, 19th 20th Centuries. (freerepublic.com)
  • He used a narrative style he called 'integral' history that was different from the usual method of writing history in separate categories such as political history, economic history, religious history, history of philosophy, history of science. (bc.edu)
  • Sands Flowers, on this month's cover, first exhibited in the United States in 1994, is a characteristic still life. (cdc.gov)
  • Lord Clark was made a life peer in 1969. (york.ac.uk)
  • Lord Baker's published works include several poetry anthologies, his memoirs, a history of political cartoons, George IV: A Life in Caricature , 2005, and George III: A Life in Caricature , 2007. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • We fear that we may be setting up some reified image, in face of the changing forms of human life in history, that we may be prisoners of some insidious ethnocentrism' (vii). (bu.edu)
  • The life expectancy of people born in the United States has been rising throughout the past century. (nap.edu)
  • Yet without some real-life people, dates and deeds, any such cultural histories remain mythical, hypothetical, and ultimately not very convincing. (independentliving.org)
  • a popular and positive force in society, making all manner of new, chemically-derived goods - from plastics to pharmaceuticals - providing "the good life" and feeding the world. (pophistorydig.com)
  • During and after World War II, filmmakers from the Soviet Union and many western countries made many documentaries in Iran. (documentary.org)
  • Observations made during the voyage-a surveying trip around the world, which included a stop in the Galapagos Islands-made Darwin question the creation myth and immutability of species. (actionbioscience.org)
  • So in one sense, by drawing attention to his ineffectual polemic, Bookchin has made himself an excuse for the beginning of a much larger process of critique, a process that will undoubtedly continue to unfold with increasing militance into the coming century. (theanarchistlibrary.org)
  • Professor Bell sits on a wide range of advisory panels for public and private bodies involved in biomedical research across the world. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • His research interests include the social and cultural history of Ming China, law and punishment in Imperial China, collaboration during Japan's wartime occupation of China (1937-45), and war crimes trials in Asia: his publications range over the last six centuries. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • It contributes to current research on institutional histories by looking at the many ways in which the Kunsthalle Bern addresses the question of how exhibitionary practices take place. (lespressesdureel.com)
  • Natural history is the scientific research of plants or animals, leaning more towards observational rather than experimental methods of study, and encompasses more research published in magazines than in academic journals. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • In 1994, without obtaining prior approval from the WHO, the Russian government moved the repository from Moscow to the State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology "Vector" in the remote Siberian town of Koltsovo, near Novosibirsk. (armscontrol.org)
  • Reflection on our nature as human beings and our place in the cosmos has a long tradition in philosophy throughout the world and has surely been a central concern in the history of Western philosophy. (bu.edu)
  • Though largely forgotten today, they produced some of the most perceptive analyses of human nature in the history of philosophy. (bu.edu)
  • To like a philosophy or program case of a email and increase it to a world, lead question world art at 1800 461 951 for cathode. (lgne.org)
  • A similar debate among academics followed the publication in 1994 of The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray . (wikipedia.org)
  • Through numerous previously unpublished pictures and essays, this publication explores the history of the playground as it was shaped by education, architecture, art, and politics, and pays tribute to the most important figures, many of them forgotten today (second revised and expanded edition). (lespressesdureel.com)
  • What follows here - in this 50th anniversary year of Silent Spring's publication - is a partial recounting of the book's history, including pressures brought to bear on author and publisher, how society received Silent Spring , and how it helped change thinking and advance public understanding of ecology. (pophistorydig.com)
  • The company has traditionally served small industrial contractors and institutions but expanded in the late 20th century to serve specialty markets for general industrial, replacement parts, and safety and sanitary products, and to supply large corporations with multiple locations. (fundinguniverse.com)
  • In the second half of his book, the author precisely analyses the causes, related to the council, of the rupture and process of decadence which continues today throughout the world. (freerepublic.com)
  • He travelled widely, reaching underexplored parts of the world and writing his first book on the ecology of high-elevation lakes in India. (rug.nl)
  • a book that would have a profound impact on society, environmental science, and public understanding of the natural world. (pophistorydig.com)
  • Sweden became the first country in the world, in 2018, to offer compensation of 225,000 krona ($23,882) to hundreds of trans people who had to undergo sterilization to get their change of gender recognized - and it wants Germany to follow. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • The Canadian Encyclopedia http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/en/article/multicultural-theatre/ (accessed March 22, 2018). (thecanadianencyclopedia.com)
  • To the much-debated question of their cannibalism, the attribution it too closely associated from the earliest contacts with allegations as late as the eighteenth century, and the practice is so widespread all over the world, that there must have been some truth to the practice. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • 1 The exhibition concludes with work from the seventies, including Moveable Blue (1973), a large, panoramic painting that is distinguished by its impressive size and alluring rendition of the natural world. (berggruen.com)
  • Beyond victimhood, concurrent moves may occur to discover or invent valued histories recounting worthy roots, impressive deeds, minority ancestors who wore suits or at least found a niche in historical records. (independentliving.org)