Flavins: Derivatives of the dimethylisoalloxazine (7,8-dimethylbenzo[g]pteridine-2,4(3H,10H)-dione) skeleton. Flavin derivatives serve an electron transfer function as ENZYME COFACTORS in FLAVOPROTEINS.Flavin Mononucleotide: A coenzyme for a number of oxidative enzymes including NADH DEHYDROGENASE. It is the principal form in which RIBOFLAVIN is found in cells and tissues.Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide: A condensation product of riboflavin and adenosine diphosphate. The coenzyme of various aerobic dehydrogenases, e.g., D-amino acid oxidase and L-amino acid oxidase. (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p972)FMN Reductase: An enzyme that utilizes NADH or NADPH to reduce FLAVINS. It is involved in a number of biological processes that require reduced flavin for their functions such as bacterial bioluminescence. Formerly listed as EC 1.6.8.1 and EC 1.5.1.29.FlavoproteinsRiboflavin: Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE and FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Spectrophotometry: The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.Flavodoxin: A low-molecular-weight (16,000) iron-free flavoprotein containing one molecule of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and isolated from bacteria grown on an iron-deficient medium. It can replace ferredoxin in all the electron-transfer functions in which the latter is known to serve in bacterial cells.NADH, NADPH Oxidoreductases: A group of oxidoreductases that act on NADH or NADPH. In general, enzymes using NADH or NADPH to reduce a substrate are classified according to the reverse reaction, in which NAD+ or NADP+ is formally regarded as an acceptor. This subclass includes only those enzymes in which some other redox carrier is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p100) EC 1.6.4-Hydroxybenzoate-3-Monooxygenase: A flavoprotein that catalyzes the synthesis of protocatechuic acid from 4-hydroxybenzoate in the presence of molecular oxygen. EC 1.14.13.2.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)NADP: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)DinitrocresolsElectron Transport: The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)Dithionite: Dithionite. The dithionous acid ion and its salts.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Mixed Function Oxygenases: Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.NAD: A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (Cytochrome): A cytochrome form of lactate dehydrogenase found in the MITOCHONDRIA. It catalyzes the oxidation of L-lactate to PYRUVATE with transfer of electrons to CYTOCHROME C. The enzyme utilizes FMN and PROTOHEME IX as cofactors.Coenzymes: Small molecules that are required for the catalytic function of ENZYMES. Many VITAMINS are coenzymes.Nitroreductases: Enzymes which reduce nitro groups (NITRO COMPOUNDS) and other nitrogenous compounds.Potentiometry: Solution titration in which the end point is read from the electrode-potential variations with the concentrations of potential determining ions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oxygenases: Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.Cryptochromes: Flavoproteins that function as circadian rhythm signaling proteins in ANIMALS and as blue-light photoreceptors in PLANTS. They are structurally-related to DNA PHOTOLYASES and it is believed that both classes of proteins may have originated from an earlier protein that played a role in protecting primitive organisms from the cyclical exposure to UV LIGHT.Apoenzymes: The protein components of enzyme complexes (HOLOENZYMES). An apoenzyme is the holoenzyme minus any cofactors (ENZYME COFACTORS) or prosthetic groups required for the enzymatic function.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation and reduction of FERREDOXIN or ADRENODOXIN in the presence of NADP. EC 1.18.1.2 was formerly listed as EC 1.6.7.1 and EC 1.6.99.4.Carbohydrate Dehydrogenases: Reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of carbohydrates to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2.; and 1.1.99.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Deoxyribodipyrimidine Photo-Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reactivation by light of UV-irradiated DNA. It breaks two carbon-carbon bonds in PYRIMIDINE DIMERS in DNA.Veillonellaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria, in the phylum FIRMICUTES.Sarcosine Oxidase: A FLAVOPROTEIN, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of SARCOSINE to GLYCINE; FORMALDEHYDE; and HYDROGEN PEROXIDE (H2O2).Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet: Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Xanthine Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of XANTHINE in the presence of NAD+ to form URIC ACID and NADH. It acts also on a variety of other purines and aldehydes.NitroparaffinsAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Pyruvate OxidaseHydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Quinone Reductases: NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductases. A family that includes three enzymes which are distinguished by their sensitivity to various inhibitors. EC 1.6.99.2 (NAD(P)H DEHYDROGENASE (QUINONE);) is a flavoprotein which reduces various quinones in the presence of NADH or NADPH and is inhibited by dicoumarol. EC 1.6.99.5 (NADH dehydrogenase (quinone)) requires NADH, is inhibited by AMP and 2,4-dinitrophenol but not by dicoumarol or folic acid derivatives. EC 1.6.99.6 (NADPH dehydrogenase (quinone)) requires NADPH and is inhibited by dicoumarol and folic acid derivatives but not by 2,4-dinitrophenol.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on carbon-carbon bonds. This enzyme group includes all the enzymes that introduce double bonds into substrates by direct dehydrogenation of carbon-carbon single bonds.Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenases: Enzymes that catalyze the first step in the beta-oxidation of FATTY ACIDS.PhotochemistryNADPH Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein that reversibly oxidizes NADPH to NADP and a reduced acceptor. EC 1.6.99.1.Spectrometry, Fluorescence: Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reduction of lipoamide by NADH to yield dihydrolipoamide and NAD+. The enzyme is a component of several MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.NADPH-Ferrihemoprotein Reductase: A flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of heme-thiolate-dependent monooxygenases and is part of the microsomal hydroxylating system. EC 1.6.2.4.Glutathione Reductase: Catalyzes the oxidation of GLUTATHIONE to GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE in the presence of NADP+. Deficiency in the enzyme is associated with HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA. Formerly listed as EC 1.6.4.2.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Alcohol Oxidoreductases: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).Glucose Oxidase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the conversion of beta-D-glucose and oxygen to D-glucono-1,5-lactone and peroxide. It is a flavoprotein, highly specific for beta-D-glucose. The enzyme is produced by Penicillium notatum and other fungi and has antibacterial activity in the presence of glucose and oxygen. It is used to estimate glucose concentration in blood or urine samples through the formation of colored dyes by the hydrogen peroxide produced in the reaction. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.1.3.4.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Oxidoreductases, N-DemethylatingShewanella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods. It is a saprophytic, marine organism which is often isolated from spoiling fish.Vibrio: A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Ferricyanides: Inorganic salts of the hypothetical acid, H3Fe(CN)6.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dimethylglycine Dehydrogenase: A FLAVOPROTEIN enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of dimethylglycine to SARCOSINE and FORMALDEHYDE.Riboflavin Deficiency: A dietary deficiency of riboflavin causing a syndrome chiefly marked by cheilitis, angular stomatitis, glossitis associated with a purplish red or magenta-colored tongue that may show fissures, corneal vascularization, dyssebacia, and anemia. (Dorland, 27th ed)Proline Oxidase: The first enzyme of the proline degradative pathway. It catalyzes the oxidation of proline to pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid in the presence of oxygen and water. The action is not reversible. The specific activity of proline oxidase increases with age. EC 1.5.3.-.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Photobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are common in the marine environment and on the surfaces and in the intestinal contents of marine animals. Some species are bioluminescent and are found as symbionts in specialized luminous organs of fish.Cytochrome ReductasesBrevibacterium: A gram-positive organism found in dairy products, fresh and salt water, marine organisms, insects, and decaying organic matter.Phosphorus-Oxygen Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of a phosphorus-oxygen bond by means other than hydrolysis or oxidation. EC 4.6.Rhodotorula: A red yeast-like mitosporic fungal genus generally regarded as nonpathogenic. It is cultured from numerous sources in human patients.Sarcosine Dehydrogenase: A LIVER mitochondrial matrix flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of SARCOSINE to GLYCINE and FORMALDEHYDE. Mutation in the enzyme causes sarcosinemia, a rare autosomal metabolic defect characterized by elevated levels of SARCOSINE in BLOOD and URINE.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Succinate Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of SUCCINATE to fumarate. In most eukaryotic organisms this enzyme is a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex II.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.2,6-Dichloroindophenol: A dye used as a reagent in the determination of vitamin C.Cytochrome-B(5) Reductase: A FLAVOPROTEIN oxidoreductase that occurs both as a soluble enzyme and a membrane-bound enzyme due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of a single mRNA. The soluble form is present mainly in ERYTHROCYTES and is involved in the reduction of METHEMOGLOBIN. The membrane-bound form of the enzyme is found primarily in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and outer mitochondrial membrane, where it participates in the desaturation of FATTY ACIDS; CHOLESTEROL biosynthesis and drug metabolism. A deficiency in the enzyme can result in METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.
He was consecrated on the following September 30 by Bishop Victor Reed, with Bishops Stephen Leven and Glennon Flavin serving ... On August 8, 1959, Buswell was appointed the second Bishop of Pueblo, Colorado, by Pope John XXIII. ... was an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church who served as Bishop of Pueblo from 1959 to 1979. At the time of his death ...
Hastings, J.W.; Gibson, Q.H. (1963). "Intermediates in the bioluminescent oxidation of reduced flavin mononucleotide". J. Biol ... and that flavin is a substrate in bacterial luminescence. In 1953 he joined the faculty in the Department of Biological ... the discovery of a flavin to be a substrate in its luciferase reaction, the determination of gene regulation of the luciferases ... Hastings, J.W. (1959). "Unicellular clocks". Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 13: 297-312. doi:10.1146/annurev.mi.13.100159.001501. ...
Todd also successfully synthesized adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) . He was awarded the ... Kornberg and Ochoa were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1959 for this work. 1957/1958: Robert W. Holley, Marshall Nirenberg, Har ...
Martin Flavin, Journey in the Dark 1945: Jo Sinclair, Wasteland 1947: Joseph Hitrec, Son of the Moon 1949: Max Steele, Debby ... 1955: Don Mankiewicz, Trial 1957: Frank Norris, Tower in the West 1959: Robin White, Elephant Hill 1963: Richard McKenna, The ...
... actress James Flavin (1906-1976), actor Joe Flynn (1924-1974), actor and comedian George J. Folsey (1898-1988), cinematographer ... 1926-1969), business executive and TWA director, heir of Hilton Hotel chain Taylor Holmes (1878-1959), actor Stan Hough (1918- ... Mack Sennett (1880-1960), mogul Frank Shannon (1874-1959), actor Diane Sherbloom (1942-1961), figure skater Robert Six (1907- ... 1901-1959), actress and dancer Robert Greig (1879-1958), actor Jack Haley (1898-1979), actor and comedian best known for his ...
It includes works by 52 modern artists, including: Carl Andre, Arman, Walter de Maria, Dan Flavin, Michael Heizer, Yves Klein, ... The works have gone on display for the exhibition, "From Los Angeles to New York: The Dwan Gallery 1959-1971," National Gallery ... She is the former owner and executive director of Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles (1959-1967) and Dwan Gallery New York (1965-1971), ... NGA.gov Virginia Dwan Collection National Gallery of Art: "Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959-1971" - exhibit at ...
Martin Flavin (1885-1940) DuBose Heyward (1885-1942) William Alexander Percy (1886-1958) Zoë Akins (1887-1961) George S. ... born 1959) Zillur Rahman John (born 1961) Vittorio Rossi (born 1964) David Gow See also: List of Czech writers (1884-1968) Max ... 1873-1959) T. C. Murray (1874-1949) Tadhg Ó Donnchadha (1876-1913) Fred Ryan (1877-1963) George Fitzmaurice (1878-1916) Thomas ... born 1959) Richard Frankland (born 1960) Jane Harrison (1964-1989) Bill Neskovski (born 1969) Wesley Enoch (born 1978) Van ...
James Flavin ("A Passage for Trumpet" and "Once Upon a Time") Harry Fleer ("Once Upon a Time" and "The Obsolete Man") Lester ... The following is a list of guest stars that appeared on the 1959 anthology television series The Twilight Zone. Rod Serling ...
Journey in the Dark by Martin Flavin 1945: A Bell for Adano by John Hersey 1946: no award given 1947: All the King's Men by ... 1959: The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters by Robert Lewis Taylor 1960: Advise and Consent by Allen Drury 1961: To Kill a ...
Neue Pinakothek Dan Flavin (b.1933), Pinakothek der Moderne Frans Francken the Younger (1581-1642), Alte Pinakothek Caspar ... 1893-1959), Pinakothek der Moderne Matthias Grünewald (1470/80-1528), Alte Pinakothek Francesco Guardi (1712-1793), Alte ...
Cook RJ, Misono KS, Wagner C (October 1985). "The amino acid sequences of the flavin-peptides of dimethylglycine dehydrogenase ... "www.jbc.org" (PDF). HUENNEKENS FM, WHITELEY HR, OSBORN MJ (December 1959). "Mechanisms of formylation and hydroxymethylation ...
... and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). It also has functions in protein synthesis and as a chemical component of DNA and RNA. ... and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), respectively. Hermann Emil Fischer was one of the early scientists to study adenine. It ... Nonapyrimine tubercidin Adenosine BWA78U Dawson, R.M.C., et al., Data for Biochemical Research, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1959. ...
Martin Flavin (1883-1967, United States) Harvey Fierstein (born 1952, United States) James Elroy Flecker (1884-1915, England) ... 1959-1992, United States) Mark Medoff (born 1940, United States) Charles L. Mee (born 1938, United States) Leonard Melfi (1932- ... born 1959, Costa Rica) Antón Arrufat (born 1935, Cuba) Antonin Artaud (1896-1948, France) Sholem Asch (1880-1957, Poland/United ... born 1959, Germany) Jurek Becker (1937-1997, Poland/Germany) Samuel Beckett (1906-1989, Ireland) in English and French Henry ...
He was unopposed in a special election in 2005 to succeed Republican Dan Flavin, a real estate agency owner who resigned early ... Charles Edward "Chuck" Kleckley (born December 1959) is a businessman in Lake Charles, Louisiana, who is a Republican former ...
Also during the 1960s and 1970s artists as diverse as Stephen Antonakis, Chryssa, Walter De Maria, Dan Flavin, Robert Smithson ... Minimalists include Tony Smith, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Larry Bell, Anne Truitt, and Dan Flavin; Site specific and ... Henry Moore, Three Piece Reclining figure No.1, 1961, Yorkshire John Chamberlain, S, 1959, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture ...
His important contributions to the chemistry of the flavins led to identification of lactoflavin as part of the complex ... The prestigious Paul Karrer Gold Medal and lecture was established in his honour in 1959 by a group of leading companies such ...
Tim Flavin as Busboy, Dan O'Sullivan as Postman, Franco Spoto as Ciccio, Joe McGrath as Doctor, Lawrence Asher as Priest, ... 1959. The West End production, directed by Jerome Eskow, opened at the London Coliseum on April 21, 1960, and ran for 288 ...
Bamigboye, Baz (12 December 1986). "The taming of that wild man Flavin". Daily Mail. Wilkes, Angela (4 February 1987). "A ... Fiona Hendley (born 1959) is a British actress and latterly Christian speaker, married to the former Manfred Mann singer and ...
The Year of the French Martin Flavin (1883-1967), Journey in the Dark Paul Fleischman (born 1952), Whirligig Sid Fleischman ( ... born 1959), House of Sand and Fog Jaycee Dugard, (born 1980) A Stolen Life (novel) Contents: Top A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O ... born 1959), Europe Central Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007), Slaughterhouse-Five Contents: Top A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T ... born 1959), What the Dead Know Sam Lipsyte (born 1968), Home Land Atticus Lish, Preparation for the Next Life David Liss (born ...
That year, in company with Jack Flavin, they reached the All-Ireland senior doubles final only to be narrowly beaten. Matt had ... He played in 4 All-Ireland senior hurling finals (including one drawn game) winning in 1959. "Waterford GAA profile". www. ...
Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, Yves Klein, Louise Nevelson, Claes Oldenburg and Robert Rauschenberg. Christo Coetzee's ... On 17 March 1959, Coetzee joined Lucio Fontana in exhibiting his work at Galerie Stadler. On this occasion Solange de Noailles ... After his arrival in February 1959, he was quickly referred to the Gutai group of artists by professor J. Ijimi of Kyoto ... This work culminated in an exhibition of Informel works at the Minami Gallery, Tokyo in October 1959. In Tokyo he also met ...
Dan Flavin, Carl Andre, and John Safer who added motion and monumentality to the theme of purity of line. During the 1960s and ... 1959, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC. Henry Moore, Three Piece Reclining figure No.1, 1961, Yorkshire ...
Welcomes many artists into his home including Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Bruce Nauman (a former student), Vito Acconci, Ree ... 1959: Daughter, Katherine Elizabeth (Cici) born. Look Magazine commissions him to do a photographic "human story" about his ...
In addition, light-activated WCC is shown to induce the transcription of VIVID, a small flavin-binding blue-light photoreceptor ... In functional Neurospora, the WC-1 LOV domain binds to the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) chromophore, which is responsible ... Pittendrigh CS, Bruce VG, Rosensweig NS, Rubin ML (Jul 1959). "Growth Patterns in Neurospora: A Biological Clock in Neurospora ... The Neurospora circadian clock was discovered in 1959, when Pittendrigh et al. first described timing patterns in the asexual ...
Larry Poons and Dan Flavin. Although Bellamy did not represent Andy Warhol, Green was the first American gallery to exhibit one ... The genesis of the Green Gallery was Robert Scull's interest around 1959 in discovering and securing works by new artists ...
The permanent collection consists of large-scale works by Judd, sculptor John Chamberlain, light-artist Dan Flavin and select ... Judd married dancer Julie Finch in 1964 (later divorced) and fathered two children, son Flavin Starbuck Judd and daughter ... Dan Flavin, George Earl Ortman and Lee Bontecou. The works that Judd had fabricated inhabited a space not then comfortably ... He supported himself by writing art criticism for major American art magazines between 1959 and 1965. In 1968 Judd bought a ...
"for his investigations on carotenoids, flavins and vitamins A and B2" ... 1959 جاروسلیو ہیروسکی Czechoslovakia "for his discovery and development of the polarographic methods of analysis"[51] ... "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1959"۔ Nobelprize.org۔ مورخہ 26 دسمبر 2018 کو اصل سے آرکائیو شدہ۔ اخذ شدہ بتاریخ 2008-10-06۔. ...
Michael O'Brien and Mick Flavin. Farry's songwriting talent received its greatest exposure to date in 1997, when Marc Roberts ... John Farry (born in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland in 1959) is an Irish singer/songwriter from Garrison, ...
Dan Flavin Werke in der Ausstellung. Werkbeschreibung * 1933 in New York [USA]. † New York [USA] Biographische Daten , ... Dan Flavin Art Institute als permanenete Ausstellung eröffnet in der Dia Art Foundation in Bridgehampton, New York ^ ... Dan Flavin: A Retrospective Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago 01.06.05 - 07.08.05. The Shape of Colour Art Gallery of Ontario ... Dan Flavin Retrospective Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth 24.02.05 - 26.03.05. COLOR Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York 04.02.05 - ...
Dan Flavin (1933 - 1996); Ralph Fleck (1951); Lutz Fleischer; Helge Flemming; Sylvie Fleury (1961); Jochen Flinzer (1959); ... 1959); Tim Maul (1951); Ph. Maurus-Bujard; Dietrich Maus; Almir da Silva Mavignier (1925); Hans-Jörg Mayer (1943); Ilse Mayer; ... 1959); Guiseppe Guidotti (1929); Trude von Güldenstubbe; Mehmet Güler (1944); Rose Gums; F.C. Gundlach (1926); Irmgard von ... 1959); Christoph Rihs (1957); Bridget Riley (1931); N. N. Rimzon (1957); Klaus Rinke (1939); José Rios Pinto (1926); Simon ...
Dan Flavin (1933 - 1996); Ralph Fleck (1951); Lutz Fleischer; Helge Flemming; Sylvie Fleury (1961); Jochen Flinzer (1959); ... 1959); Tim Maul (1951); Ph. Maurus-Bujard; Dietrich Maus; Almir da Silva Mavignier (1925); Hans-Jörg Mayer (1943); Ilse Mayer; ... 1959); Guiseppe Guidotti (1929); Trude von Güldenstubbe; Mehmet Güler (1944); Rose Gums; F.C. Gundlach (1926); Irmgard von ... 1959); Christoph Rihs (1957); Bridget Riley (1931); N. N. Rimzon (1957); Klaus Rinke (1939); José Rios Pinto (1926); Simon ...
A SIMPLIFIED PREPARATION METHOD OF P,sup,32,/sup,- LABELED FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE AND FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE AND THEIR ...
Walczak T., Gabrys H., Haupt W. (1984) Flavin-Mediated Weak-Light Chloroplast Movement in Mougeotia. In: Senger H. (eds) Blue ... Hartmann KM, Cohnen-Unser I (1973) Carotenoids and flavins versus phytochrome as the controlling pigment for blue-UV-mediated ... Sarkar HK, Song P-S (1982) Blue light induced phototransformation of phytochrome in the presence of flavin. Photochem Photobiol ... Haupt W (1959) Die Chloroplastendrehung bei Mougeotia I. Über den quantitativen und quali-tativen Lichtbedarf der ...
He was consecrated on the following September 30 by Bishop Victor Reed, with Bishops Stephen Leven and Glennon Flavin serving ... On August 8, 1959, Buswell was appointed the second Bishop of Pueblo, Colorado, by Pope John XXIII. ... was an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church who served as Bishop of Pueblo from 1959 to 1979. At the time of his death ...
Nevertheless, mitochondrial redox status can also be monitored measuring NADH/flavin ratio through their autofluorescence, an ... technological advances in this field led to the development of devices for the measurement of NADH/flavin ratio and tissue ... Chance, B., and Jobsis, F. (1959). Changes in Fluorescence in a frog sartorius muscle following a twitch. Nature 184, 195-196. ... approach based on the pioneering work by Britton Chance in the 50s (Chance and Baltscheffsky, 1958; Chance and Jobsis, 1959). ...
Hastings, J.W.; Gibson, Q.H. (1963). "Intermediates in the bioluminescent oxidation of reduced flavin mononucleotide". J. Biol ... and that flavin is a substrate in bacterial luminescence. In 1953 he joined the faculty in the Department of Biological ... the discovery of a flavin to be a substrate in its luciferase reaction, the determination of gene regulation of the luciferases ... Hastings, J.W. (1959). "Unicellular clocks". Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 13: 297-312. doi:10.1146/annurev.mi.13.100159.001501. ...
"The difference with Flavin is that Cruz-Diez is interested in projecting the light into space, whereas Flavins work is more ... The monumental scale of his works and his use of colored light has led to comparisons with Olafur Eliasson and Dan Flavin. " ... And three-dimensional." Then, in 1959, when he applied a series of colored strips of cardboard to wood, he discovered that he ... "The real breakthrough," says Pérez-Barreiro, came in 1959, when Cruz-Diez "started to relate geometry to color." That year, he ...
Ke Bacon: Polarography of flavine mononucleotide and flavine adenine dinucleotide. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 1957 ... Hartley A. M., Wilson G. S.: Unusual Adsorption Effects in the Electrochemical Reduction of Flavin Mononucleotide at Mercury ... J. Chem. 1959, 37, 315. ,https://doi.org/10.1139/v59-040,. *ZUMAN P., CHODKOWSKI J., POTĚŠILOVÁ H., ŠANTAVÝ F.: Polarographic ... Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry (1959) 1966, 12, 547. ,https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-0728(66)80134-1, ...
Section 3.5) and of FAD (flavin-adenine dinucleotide).. 3.10 Analytical Chemistry and Separation Science. Inorganic chemists, ... Another prize in analytical chemistry was given to Jaroslav Heyrovsky from Prague in 1959 for his development of polarographic ...
Use of artificial electron acceptors for abbreviated phosphorylating electron transport: flavin-cytochrome c LEE CP. ...
David Robinson, son of Jackie Robinson, will join Red Sox Hall of Famer Tommy Harper, raconteur Dick Flavin and club officials ... The Red Sox were the last major league team to integrate with Pumpsie Green in 1959, a dozen years after the Brooklyn Dodgers ...
Dan Flavin. b. 1933, Jamaica, N.Y.; d. 1996, Riverhead, N.Y.. Daniel Flavin was born in Jamaica, New York, on April 1, 1933. He ... In 1967, Flavin was a guest instructor of design at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro. By 1968, he had developed ... Among Flavins numerous exhibitions in Europe were solo shows in Cologne in 1974 and Basel in 1975. He has executed many ... A retrospective of Flavins work was organized by the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, in 1969; the exhibition traveled to ...
1944 Journey in the Dark by Martin Flavin 1945 A Bell for Adano by John Hersey 1946 (No Award) 1947 All the Kings Men by ... 1959 The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters by Robert Lewis Taylor 1960 Advise and Consent by Allen Drury 1961 To Kill A Mockingbird ...
... flavins, merocyanine 540; photoactive compounds, such as bergapten; and SE peptide. In addition, atoms which bind to prions, ... 1959; May, et al., J. Biol. Standardization, 10:249-259, 1982; Centers for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Docket No. ...
No cofactors were required to produce this flavine adenine dinucleotide-containing enzyme. High-contrast fast Fourier transform ... Dynamics of the clinical forms of cutaneous tuberculosis in the Moscow region (1949-1959) ...
Warburg, Otto Heinrich (1883-1970) German biochemist; discovered the role of flavins and nicotinamide coenzymes in oxidative ... first crystallization of a flavin, "luminoflavin" (1932); discovery of nicotinamide as the active group of hydrogen- ... isolation and crystallization of flavin adenine dinucleotide (1938); crystallization of the oxidizing fermentation enzyme and ... 1959-1969); facultative anaerobiosis of cancer cells (1962-1965); prime cause and prevention of cancer (1966-1969); chlorophyll ...
Birmingham, M. C., Rayner, C. R., Meagher, A. K., Flavin, S. M., Batts, D. H. & Schentag, J. J. (2003) Linezolid for the ... Lowbury, E. J. & Hurst, L. (1959) The sensitivity of staphylococci and other wound bacteria to erythromycin, oleandomycin, and ...
Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism. Pharmacol ... by flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) (9, 17). Although bacteria can metabolize various substrates to TMA, studies in ... 1959. Anaerobic degradation of choline. I. Fermentation of choline by an anaerobic, cytochrome-producing bacterium, Vibrio ...
The nature and functioning of cytochromes P450 and flavin-containing-monooxygenases, p. 70-121. In B. Testa, and J. Caldwell ( ... Activation of molecular oxygen by flavins and flavoproteins. J. Biol. Chem. 269:22549-22562.. ... 50. Margerum, D. W. 1959. Coordination kinetics of ethylenediaminetetraacetate complexes. J. Phys. Chem. 63:336-339.. ...
2011) Bacterial flavin-containing monooxygenase is trimethylamine monooxygenase. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(43):17791-17796. ... In humans, TMA is further processed to TMAO by the liver enzyme flavin-dependent monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) (15). This microbe-host ... 2005) Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: Structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism. ... Trimethylamine and Trimethylamine N-Oxide, a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3)-Mediated Host-Microbiome Metabolic Axis ...
Photocycle of the flavin-binding photoreceptor AppA, a bacterial transcriptional anti-repressor of photosynthesis genes ... J. 88, 2005, p. 1959-1969 [pdf]. K. Gibasiewicz, A. Szrajner, J.A. Ihalainen, M. Germano, J.P. Dekker, R. van Grondelle ...
The flavin free derivatives, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenin dinucleotide (FAD), exhibit very similar excitation/ ... This could be the case of NAD(P)H and flavins when studying energetic metabolism,34-44,53-56,80,84 or metabolism of ... NAD(P)H, flavins and energetic metabolism. Starting from the already reminded pioneering works by Britton Chance,34-39 NAD(P)H ... Granule-associated flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is responsible for eosinophil autofluorescence. J Leukoc Biol. 1992; 51: ...
  • David Robinson, son of Jackie Robinson , will join Red Sox Hall of Famer Tommy Harper, raconteur Dick Flavin and club officials today at Rogers Middle School in Hyde Park, then McCormack Middle School in Dorchester to celebrate the life of the barrier-breaking pioneer. (bostonherald.com)
  • THE CURRENT UNDERSTANDING OF ADDICTIVE DISEASE The American Society of Addiction Medicine (Morse and Flavin, 1992) defined alcoholism as follows: Alcoholism is a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. (docplayer.net)
  • In humans, TMA is further processed to TMAO by the liver enzyme flavin-dependent monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) ( 15 ). (pnas.org)
  • Hamid MA, Wang X, and Zhao X. ( 2012) Genotyping of flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 (FMO3) gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA-PCR) in chickens. (the-coop.org)
  • Haupt W (1959) Die Chloroplastendrehung bei Mougeotia I. Über den quantitativen und quali-tativen Lichtbedarf der Schwachlichtbewegung. (springer.com)
  • He then joined the lab of William D. McElroy, another student of Harvey's, at Johns Hopkins University where he discovered both the stimulatory effects of coenzyme A and gating control by oxygen of firefly luminescence, and that flavin is a substrate in bacterial luminescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Luminescent Bacteria: Hastings' investigations of luminous bacteria acted as a catalyst for the discoveries of the biochemical mechanisms involved in their light production, the discovery of a flavin to be a substrate in its luciferase reaction, the determination of gene regulation of the luciferases, and the first evidence for quorum sensing, a form of bacterial communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Red Sox were the last major league team to integrate with Pumpsie Green in 1959, a dozen years after the Brooklyn Dodgers brought up Robinson. (bostonherald.com)
  • The monumental scale of his works and his use of colored light has led to comparisons with Olafur Eliasson and Dan Flavin. (artnews.com)
  • The difference with Flavin is that Cruz-Diez is interested in projecting the light into space, whereas Flavin's work is more about the tube itself," says Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, director of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, a private scholarly art research organization based in New York and Caracas. (artnews.com)
  • Dan Flavin was an American artist best known for his Minimalist constructions of color and light. (theartstory.org)