Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.
Parasitic infestation of the human lymphatic system by WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI or BRUGIA MALAYI. It is also called lymphatic filariasis.
A white threadlike worm which causes elephantiasis, lymphangitis, and chyluria by interfering with the lymphatic circulation. The microfilaria are found in the circulating blood and are carried by mosquitoes.
An anthelmintic used primarily as the citrate in the treatment of filariasis, particularly infestations with Wucheria bancrofti or Loa loa.
Pharmacological agents destructive to nematodes in the superfamily Filarioidea.
The prelarval stage of Filarioidea in the blood and other tissues of mammals and birds. They are removed from these hosts by blood-sucking insects in which they metamorphose into mature larvae.
A species of parasitic nematode causing Malayan filariasis and having a distribution centering roughly on the Malay peninsula. The life cycle of B. malayi is similar to that of WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI, except that in most areas the principal mosquito vectors belong to the genus Mansonia.
A filarial worm of Southeast Asia, producing filariasis and elephantiasis in various mammals including man. It was formerly included in the genus WUCHERERIA.
Accumulation of serous fluid between the layers of membrane (tunica vaginalis) covering the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.
A superfamily of nematodes of the suborder SPIRURINA. Its organisms possess a filiform body and a mouth surrounded by papillae.
A genus of filarial nematodes.
A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)
Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.
A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).
A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Port-au-Prince. With the Dominican Republic it forms the island of Hispaniola - Haiti occupying the western third and the Dominican Republic, the eastern two thirds. Haiti belonged to France from 1697 until its rule was challenged by slave insurrections from 1791. It became a republic in 1820. It was virtually an American protectorate from 1915 to 1934. It adopted its present constitution in 1964 and amended it in 1971. The name may represent either of two Caribbean words, haiti, mountain land, or jhaiti, nest. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p481 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p225)
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
A species of parasitic nematode found in man and other mammals. It has been reported from Malaya and East Pakistan and may produce symptoms of tropical eosinophilia.
A country consisting of the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and adjacent islands, including New Britain, New Ireland, the Admiralty Islands, and New Hanover in the Bismarck Archipelago; Bougainville and Buka in the northern Solomon Islands; the D'Entrecasteaux and Trobriand Islands; Woodlark (Murua) Island; and the Louisiade Archipelago. It became independent on September 16, 1975. Formerly, the southern part was the Australian Territory of Papua, and the northern part was the UN Trust Territory of New Guinea, administered by Australia. They were administratively merged in 1949 and named Papua and New Guinea, and renamed Papua New Guinea in 1971.
A republic in the north of South America, east of VENEZUELA and west of SURINAME. Its capital is Georgetown.
A genus of parasitic nematodes found in the peritoneal cavity of wild or domestic cattle or equines.
An island group and constitutional monarchy in the southwest central Pacific Ocean. The capital is Apia. The islands were jointly administered by England, the United States, and Germany 1889-99, with the chief islands of Savai'i and Upolu recognized as German until 1919. Western Samoa gained independence in 1962 and assumed its present formal name in 1997.
Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.
The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)
The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.
Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.
Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.
A parasitic infection caused by the nematode Loa loa. The vector in the transmission of this infection is the horsefly (Tabanus) or the deerfly or mango fly (Chrysops). The larvae may be seen just beneath the skin or passing through the conjunctiva. Eye lesions are not uncommon. The disease is generally mild and painless.
A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)
A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.
A group of islands in the southwest central Pacific, divided into AMERICAN SAMOA and the INDEPENDENT STATE OF SAMOA (Western Samoa). First European contact was made in 1722 by Jacob Roggeveen, a Dutchman. In 1768 they were named Navigators Islands by Louis de Bougainville. The present name may derive from that of a local chieftain or from a local word meaning place of the moa, a now-extinct island bird. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1061 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p481)
Infection with nematodes of the genus ONCHOCERCA. Characteristics include the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, PRURITUS, and ocular lesions.
A filarial parasite primarily of dogs but occurring also in foxes, wolves, and humans. The parasite is transmitted by mosquitoes.
Termination of all transmission of infection by global extermination of the infectious agent through surveillance and containment (From Porta, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 5th ed).
The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.
Infection with nematodes of the genus Setaria. This condition is usually seen in cattle and equines and is of little pathogenic significance, although migration of the worm to the eye may lead to blindness.
A group of islands of SAMOA, in the southwest central Pacific. Its capital is Pago Pago. The islands were ruled by native chiefs until about 1869. An object of American interest beginning in 1839, Pago Pago and trading and extraterritorial rights were granted to the United States in 1878. The United States, Germany, and England administered the islands jointly 1889-99, but in 1899 they were granted to the United States by treaty. The Department of the Interior has administered American Samoa since 1951. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p44)
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.
A genus of filarial nematodes. Various immature species have been found to infect the eyes or subcutaneous tissue in humans.
A genus of parasitic nematodes found throughout the rain-forest areas of the Sudan and the basin of the Congo. L. loa inhabits the subcutaneous tissues, which it traverses freely.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.
A type of affinity chromatography where ANTIBODIES are used in the affinity capture reaction on the solid support, in the mobile phase, or both.
Infections with nematodes of the genus DIPETALONEMA.
Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.
A republic of southeast Asia, northwest of Thailand, long familiar as Burma. Its capital is Yangon, formerly Rangoon. Inhabited by people of Mongolian stock and probably of Tibetan origin, by the 3d century A.D. it was settled by Hindus. The modern Burmese state was founded in the 18th century but was in conflict with the British during the 19th century. Made a crown colony of Great Britain in 1937, it was granted independence in 1947. In 1989 it became Myanmar. The name comes from myanma, meaning the strong, as applied to the Burmese people themselves. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p192 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p367)
The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.
A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Port-Vila. It was called New Hebrides until 1980. It was discovered in 1606 by the Portuguese, forgotten for 160 years, then visited by Bougainville in 1768 and Captain Cook in 1774. It was under joint British and French administration from 1906 until it became independent in 1980 under the name of Vanuatu. The name is native, meaning our land. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p833 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p570)
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.
A genus of parasitic nematodes whose organisms are distributed in Central and South America. Characteristics include a smooth cuticle and an enlarged anterior end.
A filarial nematode parasite of mammalian blood with the vector being a tick or small fly.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.
A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.
An opaque, milky-white fluid consisting mainly of emulsified fats that passes through the lacteals of the small intestines into the lymphatic system.
Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.
A genus of parasitic nematodes whose organisms live and breed in skin and subcutaneous tissues. Onchocercal microfilariae may also be found in the urine, blood, or sputum.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
A republic in western Africa, south of GUINEA and west of LIBERIA. Its capital is Freetown.
A plant family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. The leaves of Sterculiaceae are alternate and simple or palmately compound. Flowers have three to five sepals and five or no petals.
A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.
Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.
A country in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula Its capital is Cairo.
The systematic surveying, mapping, charting, and description of specific geographical sites, with reference to the physical features that were presumed to influence health and disease. Medical topography should be differentiated from EPIDEMIOLOGY in that the former emphasizes geography whereas the latter emphasizes disease outbreaks.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.
Proteins found in any species of helminth.
Infection with nematodes of the genus MANSONELLA. Symptoms include pruritus, headache, and articular swelling.
A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.
An archipelago in Polynesia in the southwest Pacific Ocean, comprising about 150 islands. It is a kingdom whose capital is Nukualofa. It was discovered by the Dutch in 1616, visited by Tasman in 1643, and by Captain Cook in 1773 and 1777. The modern kingdom was established during the reign of King George Tupou I, 1845-93. It became a British protectorate in 1900 and gained independence in 1970. The name Tonga may be of local origin, meaning either island or holy. Its other name, Friendly Islands, was given by Captain Cook from the welcome given him by the natives. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1219 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p549)
Bites and stings inflicted by insects.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.
A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.
The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.
A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
The collective name for the islands of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia, including NEW CALEDONIA; VANUATU; New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, FIJI, etc. Melanesia (from the Greek melas, black + nesos, island) is so called from the black color of the natives who are generally considered to be descended originally from the Negroid Papuans and the Polynesians or Malays. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p748 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p344)
Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.
Lightweight meshwork fabric made of cotton, silk, polyester, nylon (polyamides), or other material impregnated with insecticide, having openings too small to allow entry of mosquitoes or other insects, thereby offering protection against insect bite and insect-borne diseases.
The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A plant genus of the family PAPAVERACEAE that contains isoquinoline alkaloids.
Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE).
A genus of parasitic nematodes widely distributed as intestinal parasites of mammals.
A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.
A large superfamily of cell surface membrane proteins characterized by their four transmembrane domains. They play a role in a variety of processes such as cellular adhesion and motility. They may be involved in the organization of cell surface MEMBRANE MICRODOMAINS that regulate the activation of LEUKOCYTES.
The geographical area of Africa comprising BENIN; BURKINA FASO; COTE D'IVOIRE; GAMBIA; GHANA; GUINEA; GUINEA-BISSAU; LIBERIA; MALI; MAURITANIA; NIGER; NIGERIA; SENEGAL; SIERRA LEONE; and TOGO.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. Members contain anethole and CARBAZOLES.
The status of health in rural populations.
The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.
The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.
Infection with nematodes of the genus STRONGYLOIDES. The presence of larvae may produce pneumonitis and the presence of adult worms in the intestine could lead to moderate to severe diarrhea.
Metaphors of Human Biology. In: Science and Civilization, 1949, pp. 169-194. Science and Society in the Age of Copernicus. In: ... A Report on the Medical Treatment of Filariasis Bancroft. Washington, DC: National Research Council, Division of Medical ...
... in treating River blindness and Lymphatic filariasis, among other parasitic diseases affecting animals and humans. Campbell ... Thiabendazole is also used to treat trichinosis in humans. Campbell is best known for his work on parasitic diseases. Japanese ... Campbell realised that similar treatments might be useful against related types of worms that affect humans. In 1981, Merck ... From 1957 to 1990 Campbell worked at Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, and from 1984 to 1990 he was a Senior Scientist ...
Iyengar, M. O. T.; Rook, H. De; Dijk, W. J. O. M. Van (1959). "Interruption of transmission of Anopheles-borne filariasis by ... These include notes on adult coprid beetles emerging from human intestines with faeces. The Dr M.O.T. Iyengar Memorial Award ... He worked under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation for the Travancore State between 1931 and 1934 studying filariasis on ... Res.,13:697-702,1926 Infestation of the human intestines by coprid beetles. Indian Med. Gaz., 63, 365-369, 1928. The larva of ...
Specifically, of the three species known, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori cause lymphatic filariasis in humans; and Brugia ... Humans (for B. malayi and B. timori), and animals (for B. pahangi and B. patei) acts as the definitive hosts in which the adult ... Mosquitos are the intermediate host in which the young larvae develop, and thus they are also the vectors of filariasis. ... Shenoy, RK; Rakesh, PG; Baldwin, CI; Denham, DA (1996). "The sheath of the microfilaria of Brugia malayi from human infections ...
... one of the three causative agents of lymphatic filariasis in humans. Lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, is a ... of Health and Human Services / Center for Disease Control: Filariasis Brugia_life_cycle_and_adults_in_lymphatics video by R. ... Human: B. malayi undergoes further development in the human as well as sexual reproduction and egg production. 1-2 The ... 4. The mosquito takes a human blood meal and ingests microfilariae (worm-like sheathed eggs) that circulate in the human blood ...
Females readily enter human habitations. In a survey on Pate Island in Kenya in 1956, 98 percent of mosquitoes collected in ... Arch Inst Pasteur Madagascar 51, 161-202." "Heisch, R.B., Goiny, H.H., Ikata, M., 1956, A new vector of filariasis in East ... Lumbo virus has been found in the mosquitoes in Mozambique, but this virus does not appear to be pathogenic in humans. In ... Adults feed readily on humans. Parasites of dogs, cats, and donkeys have also been found in female Aedes pembaensis. Females ...
10(4). Mackerras, M. J., & Ercole, Q. N. (1948). Observations on the development of human malarial parasites in the mosquito; ... Mackerras, M. J. (1958). The Decline of Filariasis in Queensland. Medical Journal of Australia. 1(21): 702-4. Lee, P. E., & ... Mackerras, M. J., & Ercole, Q. N. (1948). Observations on the development of human malarial parasites in the mosquito; factors ... Mackerras, M. J., & Ercole, Q. N. (1948). Observations on the development of human malarial parasites in the mosquito; ...
ISBN 1-84593-053-3.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link) Rohde, Klaus (ed.) (2013). The Balance of Nature and Human Impact ... filariasis, hookworms, cysticercus). From 1960-1967, Rohde was a lecturer at the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, conducting ... Subsequently, (1957-1959), he did scientific work at ASTA-Werke, Brackwede/Westfalen (pharmaceutical industry) on the ...
List of parasites of humans. *Toxocariasis: A helminth infection of humans caused by the dog or cat roundworm, Toxocara canis ... Filarial nematodes cause filariasis. Soil ecosystems[edit]. About 90% of nematodes reside in the top 15 cm of soil. Nematodes ... Baylisascaris usually infests wild animals, but can be deadly to humans, as well. Dirofilaria immitis is known for causing ... Nematodes commonly parasitic on humans include ascarids (Ascaris), filarias, hookworms, pinworms (Enterobius), and whipworms ( ...
Oliver-Gonzalez, José; Rose, Harry M.; Culbertson, James T. (May 1, 1945). "Chemotherapy of Human Filariasis by the ... human rights activist; President of Puerto Rico Para [email protected], which strives for inclusion of LGBT community and for social ... expert on cell makeup of the human eye lens; developed laboratory methods to study the histology of ocular tissue, which ... Department of Health and Human Services; Admiral in the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Mario García ...
"How is Lymphatic Filariasis Treated?". Archived from the original on 14 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-17. "Lymphatic Filariasis ... McKenna ML, McAtee S, Bryan PE, Jeun R, Ward T, Kraus J, Bottazzi ME, Hotez PJ, Flowers CC, Mejia R (November 2017). "Human ... also reduces the transmission of lymphatic filariasis. In the Americas, 95% of the burden of lymphatic filariasis is on the ... Lymphatic filariasis is an infection of the lymph system by mosquito-borne microfilarial worms which can cause elephantiasis. ...
Filariasis was increasingly of concern in the colonial East Africa du jour. The two men would subsequently foster a close ... He was a supporter of health care as a basic human right long before the 1978 Alma Ata Declaration proclamation. In 1960 he ... The Filariasis Research Unit was established in the British colonial East Africa in 1949. 1950 the British colonial East Africa ... In 1951 Sir Manson-Bahr invited him to attend the "Conference of Specialists on infectious tropical diseases: Filariasis in the ...
It was later realised that only a small number of species of mosquitoes were responsible for the vast majority of human malaria ... who showed that a Culex species could transmit filariasis in 1878. This was then followed in 1897 by Ronald Ross, who showed ... Six species in the subgenus Kerteszia can carry human malaria. Of these, only An. bellator and An. cruzii are of importance. ... Species that have been shown to be vectors of human malaria are marked with a star (*) after the name. Anopheles anthropophagus ...
In French: 1, 2, 3) PMF 5416 (1967) - Filariasis; With Dr Donald L. Price, MD.. ... Mathematical explanations relating human electrocardiogram to Einthoven's hypothesis (10 min; color). PMF 5167(1952) - Heat ... 1957) - Debridement- Part I- Multiple Soft Tissue Wounds; Adequate and minimal skin incision, incision of fascia, excision of ... 1957) - Animals for Research: Establishing and Maintaining a Disease-Free Animal Colony; Methods and factors in maintaining a ...
McMath was stricken with malaria and filariasis and hospitalized for several months in New Zealand and San Diego. He then ... such as detailed models of accident scenes and the human anatomy. In 1976, he was elected president of the International ... As a former governor, McMath led the opposition to segregationist Governor Orval Faubus following the 1957 Little Rock school ... during the 1957 Little Rock Central High School desegregation turmoil and throughout Faubus's subsequent nine years in office, ...
Karlsson U, Bjöersdorff A, Massung RF, Christensson B (2001). "Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis--a clinical case in Scandinavia ... November 2003). "Doxycycline as a novel strategy against bancroftian filariasis-depletion of Wolbachia endosymbionts from ... Affolter K, Samowitz W, Boynton K, Kelly ED (August 2017). "Doxycycline-induced gastrointestinal injury". Human Pathology. 66: ... Weinstein RS (November 1996). "Human ehrlichiosis". American Family Physician. 54 (6): 1971-6. PMID 8900357. ...
Lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic disease contracted through the bite of an infected mosquito. It causes swelling of body ... but also teach them about their basic human rights, and find opportunities for them to directly meet with government ... As a result of this and the high population density, half the population of Bangladesh is at risk of lymphatic filariasis. ... People with leprosy or other diseases such as lymphatic filariasis don't just face physical challenges - they often also have ...
Drug discovery and development are very expensive; of all compounds investigated for use in humans only a small fraction are ... the elimination of lymphatic filariasis worldwide. In 2006, Novartis committed US$755 million in corporate citizenship ... Shah K, Nathanson N (January 1976). "Human exposure to SV40: review and comment". Am. J. Epidemiol. 103 (1): 1-12. doi:10.1093/ ... Following IND approval, three phases of progressively larger human clinical trials may be conducted. Phase I generally studies ...
... and in eradicating filariasis in Kumbakonam, an area long infected with the dreaded disease[citation needed]. The sense of ... and he continues to inspire good behavior and more idealism from millions of his fellow human beings on this Earth. For that, ... Can we replicate the single greatest period of food production in all human history?" about the cultural and social foundations ... but tempered by a concern for ecology and human values 1979 Padma Bhushan 1972 Ramon Magsaysay Award for Community Leadership ...
Frequency Distribution of Lymphatic Filariasis Microfilariae in Human Populations: Population Processes and Statistical ... "Frequency Distribution of Lymphatic Filariasis Microfilariae in Human Populations: Population Processes and Statistical ... Filariasis and Vector Control; WHO Steering committee of TDR (Tropical Diseases Research) on Filariasis and Biological Control ... Rajagopalan P.K. Filariasis in India. National Medical Journal of India 3, no. 1 (1990): 1-4. Grenfell B. T, P. K Das, P. K ...
It is one of the five major schistosomes that account for all human infections, the other four being S. haematobium, S. mansoni ... This trematode causes schistosomiasis in humans. Freshwater snail Neotricula aperta serves as an intermediate host for ... Schistosomiasis was first reported in the Mekong river basin region in 1957.[2] It was believed that the cause of these cases ... Filariasis). *Onchocerca volvulus *Onchocerciasis. *Loa loa *Loa loa filariasis. *Mansonella *Mansonelliasis. *Dirofilaria ...
Humans are subject to infection by several species of tapeworms if they eat undercooked meat such as pork (Taenia solium), beef ... The adult Taenia saginata lives in the gut of a primate such as a human, but more alarming is Taenia solium, which can form ... This is usually done by the definitive host eating a suitably infected intermediate host, e.g., a human eating raw or ... 1957-04-08.. *^ Hargis, William J. (1985). "Parasitology and pathology of marine organisms of the world ocean". NOAA Tech. Rep ...
Laurence R. Helfer; Graeme W. Austin (7 March 2011). Human Rights and Intellectual Property: Mapping the Global Interface. ... GSK's commitment to give free albendazole tablets to the WHO for, and until, the elimination of lymphatic filariasis worldwide. ... Shah K, Nathanson N (January 1976). "Human exposure to SV40: review and comment". Am. J. Epidemiol. 103 (1): 1-12. doi:10.1093/ ... Drug discovery and development is very expensive; of all compounds investigated for use in humans only a small fraction are ...
Interaction with humans[edit]. Parasitism[edit]. Magnetic resonance image of a patient with neurocysticercosis demonstrating ... but can pass to humans who eat raw or lightly cooked seafood. Infection of humans by the broad fish tapeworm Diphyllobothrium ... The threat to humans in developed countries is rising as a result of social trends: the increase in organic farming, which uses ... The disease is caused by several flukes of the genus Schistosoma, which can bore through human skin. The people most at risk ...
Human polyomavirus 2 Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. RNA virus. MeV Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. LCV ... and myopathic human muscle". Annals of Neurology. 21 (5): 481-9. doi:10.1002/ana.410210512. PMID 3296947. S2CID 13102779.. ... PV infects and causes disease in humans alone.[17] Its structure is very simple, composed of a single (+) sense RNA genome ... Human trials of Sabin's vaccine began in 1957,[57] and in 1958 it was selected, in competition with the live vaccines of ...
Metaphors of Human Biology. In: Science and Civilization, 1949, pp. 169-194. Science and Society in the Age of Copernicus. In: ... A Report on the Medical Treatment of Filariasis Bancroft. Washington, DC: National Research Council, Division of Medical ...
... in treating River blindness and Lymphatic filariasis, among other parasitic diseases affecting animals and humans. Campbell ... Thiabendazole is also used to treat trichinosis in humans. Campbell is best known for his work on parasitic diseases. Japanese ... Campbell realised that similar treatments might be useful against related types of worms that affect humans. In 1981, Merck ... From 1957 to 1990 Campbell worked at Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, and from 1984 to 1990 he was a Senior Scientist ...
Human Intraocular Filariasis Caused by Pelecitus sp. Nematode, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011;17(5):867-869. doi: ... Human Intraocular Filariasis Caused by Pelecitus sp. Nematode, Brazil On This Page ... We report a case of human intraocular filariasis caused by a Pelecitus sp., briefly describe the main morphologic features for ... Human Intraocular Filariasis Caused by Pelecitus sp. Nematode, Brazil. ...
Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a debilitating disease overwhelmingly caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, which is transmitted by ... Aping Jane Goodall: insights into human lymphatic filariasis. Trends Parasitol 19 : 105-109. ... Increasing Incidence of Human Melioidosis in Northeast Thailand Direk Limmathurotsakul, Surasakdi Wongratanacheewin, Nittaya ... Elimination of lymphatic filariasis: a public-health challenge. Ann Trop Med Parasitol 96 (Suppl. 2): S3-S13. ...
Ivermectin is used to treat conditions such as river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, improving human lives especially in ... It was chemically modified, and the resulting ivermectin turned out to kill parasite larvae in humans, leading to an entirely ... William C. Campbell, born 1930 in Ramelton, Ireland, gained his PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA, in 1957 ... During his career, he worked at several institutes and from 1957-1990 at Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp. (MSD), USA. Currently, he ...
192 school children in a filariasis-endemic area of Haiti underwent physical and ultrasonographic examinations and testing for ... Live adult worms detected by ultrasonography in human Bancroftian filariasis. Am J Trop Med Hyg 50 : 753-757.. ... The ICT filariasis test: a rapid-format antigen test for the diagnosis of Bancroftian filariasis. Parasitol Today 13 : 401-404. ... Fungal flora of human toe webs. Mycoses 45 : 488-491.. * Lestringant GG, Saarinen KA, Frossard PM, Bener A, Ameen AM, 2001. ...
... which proved vital to the control of certain parasitic infections in humans and other animals. For his discoveries, Campbell ... the major causes of lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis). Both river blindness and lymphatic filariasis were significant ... Of particular consequence was its ability to clear infections in humans involving the microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus, the ... Alphonse Laveran, French physician, pathologist, and parasitologist who discovered the parasite that causes human malaria. For ...
Formation of Charcot-Leyden crystals by human eosinophils. J Exp Med 1982; 155: 1597-1609.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Filariasis without microfilaremia. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1970; 19: 181-189.PubMedGoogle Scholar ... Formation of Charcot-Leyden crystals by human eosinophils. J Exp Med 1982; 155: 1597-1609.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Human eosinophil lysophospholipase: the sole protein component of Charcot-Leyden crystals. J Immunol 1982; 128: 1346-1349. ...
In particular, parasitic diseases affect the worlds poorest populations and represent a huge barrier to improving human health ... the derivatives of which have radically lowered the incidence of River Blindness and Lymphatic Filariasis, as well as showing ... The consequences in terms of improved human health and reduced suffering are immeasurable. ... From 1957-1990 he was with the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, from 1984-1990 as Senior Scientist and Director for ...
Humans are infected via the bite of a type of sandflies, which breed in forest areas, caves, or the burrows of small rodents. ... Description: Lymphatic filariasis is one of the most debilitating neglected tropical diseases. It is caused by three species of ... Half the people infected with lymphatic filariasis in the world live in nine countries of the South-East Asia Region. This ... FAQs: Frequently asked questions on Lymphatic Filariasis (‎elephantiasis)‎  World Health Organization, Regional Office for ...
Professor Campbell was also involved in the development of several drugs used in human and veterinary medicine. ... have radically lowered the incidence of river blindness and lymphatic filariasis. The drug has also shown efficacy against a ... humans and their environment. This integrated view of zoology is very much in keeping with the training that we give to ... parasites and microbes interact and by using that knowledge to develop new ways to tackle human and animal diseases. ...
Human endometrium synthesises pgs locally and orally (350-680 mcg/day as tablets). P.800 key points some surgeons switch to a ... Are the carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms associated with obstruction of lymphatic filariasis (w. A loading dose of 230 mg p ... Treatment by cheap has which country doxycycline carbon dioxide liberated during neutralisation of human judges to overweight ... but it is used widely in personnel psychology and psychiatry in 1957, a century makes. [from the sound of sea water contains ...
When used in humans with parasitic infections, Ivermectin safely and effectively kills parasite larvae, or microfilaria. This ... Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), and other parasitic diseases. Tu discovered Artemisinin, a drug that has lowered ... The consequences in terms of improved human health and reduced suffering are immeasurable." ... William Campbell, who received his PhD from University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1957, explored Ōmuras Streptomyces bacterial ...
Sasa, M. Human filariasis. Tokyo, University of Tokyo Press. 1976, 819 pp.. Tanaka, K., Mizusawa, K. & Saugstad, E.S. A ... Human lymphatic filariasis occurs in humid tropical foci in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and numerous islands in the Pacific ... 2. LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS. G. B. White. Pathogens: Brugian filariasis Brugia malayi--periodic and subperiodic forms Brugia timori ... Lymphatic filariasis: fourth report of the WHO Expert Committee on Filariasis). Geneva, World Health Organization, 112 pp.. WHO ...
We live in a biologically complex world, which is populated not only by humans and other large animals, but also by a plethora ... Lymphatic Filariasis, afflicting more than 100 million people, causes chronic swelling and leads to life-long stigmatizing and ... Avermectin was further modified to Ivermectin, which turned out to be highly effective in both animals and humans against a ... River Blindness and Lymphatic Filariasis are two diseases caused by parasitic worms. As the name implies, River Blindness ( ...
... female fever filaria Filariasis fleas flies fluke forms frequently genital genus glands helminths histolytica hookworm human ... The Epidemiology and Geographical Distribution of Human Diseases of Animal Causation Climate and Its Effects on Man ...
List of parasites of humans. *Toxocariasis: A helminth infection of humans caused by the dog or cat roundworm, Toxocara canis ... Filarial nematodes cause filariasis. Soil ecosystems[edit]. About 90% of nematodes reside in the top 15 cm of soil. Nematodes ... Baylisascaris usually infests wild animals, but can be deadly to humans, as well. Dirofilaria immitis is known for causing ... Nematodes commonly parasitic on humans include ascarids (Ascaris), filarias, hookworms, pinworms (Enterobius), and whipworms ( ...
The disease is transmitted to humans by the black fly (Simulium spp.) and its pathology is linked to the death of the ... Multidimensional complexities of filariasis control in an era of large-scale mass drug administration programmes: a can of ... Progress report on the elimination of human onchocerciasis, 2015-2016. Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 2016;43:501-16.Google Scholar ... Lymphatic filariasis mapping by immunochromatographic test cards and baseline microfilaria survey prior to mass drug ...
The number of cases of human African trypanosomiasis has reduced by 90%, and lymphatic filariasis may be eliminated in six ... Both the adults and nymphs, male and female, are blood-feeders and so search for human hosts to feed on, especially exposed ... Human infection is most likely during natural die-offs of mice or after pest control when the mites seek new hosts for a blood ... Human infection has three routes of entry:. *pulmonary - inhalation of spores mainly from infected animal hides and other ...
... that is the cause of a human disease (filariasis, which occurs when the worms ... filariasis: …caused by Acanthocheilonema perstans and Mansonella ozzardi and are not in most cases associated with specific ... In the two previous volumes, The Hamlet (1940) and The Town (1957), Faulkner had described the ascent of ruthless Flem ...
Human Infection Caused by Clostridium hathewayi [PDF - 348 KB - 3 pages] S. Elsayed and K. Zhang View Abstract. Cite This ... In countries where bancroftian filariasis is endemic, lymphedema of the leg is a public health problem, particularly for women ... Evaluating Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs [PDF - 347 KB - 9 pages] A. V. Taira et al. View Abstract. Cite This ... Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer E. R. Unger and E. Barr Cite This Article. Email this Article. ...
Studies on impact of construction activities on mosquito fauna and incidence of human malaria in Federal Capital Territory, ... Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis and Dracunculiasis. Helminthic infections. Principles of control of parasitic ...
Professor Winston is also an excellent communicator and has presented a number of very successful TV series including The Human ... on to call for a low-cost but highly effective public health programme that would target diseases like lymphatic filariasis, ... His book On Human Communication (1957) was very influential, especially among the young. ... In 1957 he became Professor of Organic Chemistry at Imperial, a position he retained until 1972. During his Imperial years he ...
5] and filariasis, [6] can cause chylous ascites. Chylous ascites has also been reported in adults in association with hepatoma ... 33] Experimental work in humans has shown that somatostatin can significantly decrease postprandial increases in triglyceride ...
However, Edinburghs humanistic education, which stressed close observation of the human body as it reacted to illness and its ... Joseph Bancroft on the mature parasite in filariasis (1876); John Davies Thomas on hydatid disease (1884); and John Ashburton ... Proc R Soc Med 1957; 50: 591-598.. *8. Lewis M, MacLeod R. Medical politics and the professionalisation of medicine in New ...
The indirect cost estimates were calculated using the human capital approach. A combination of four wage sources was used to ... Lymphatic filariasis (LF), also known as elephantiasis, is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) targeted for elimination through ... Reduction in acute filariasis morbidity during a mass drug administration trial to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in Papua New ... Purnomo: towards a filariasis-free community: evaluation of filariasis control over an eleven year period in Flores, Indonesia ...
Nelson, G. S., Heisch, R. B. & Furlong, M. (1962). Studies in filariasis in East Africa. II. Filarial infections in man, ... gambiae species B Human Blood Indices were 97·5%, 91·2% and 60·9% indoors and 24%, 2% and 7% outdoors, respectively. Respective ... Jordan, P. (1956). Filariasis in the Eastern, Tanga and Northern Provinces of Tanganyika.-E. Air. med. J. 33, 225-233. ... White, G. B. (1971 a). Studies on transmission of Bancroftian filariasis in north-eastern Tanzania.-Trans. R. Soc. trop. Med. ...
  • He helped to discover a class of drugs called ivermectins, whose derivatives have been shown to have "extraordinary efficacy" in treating River blindness and Lymphatic filariasis, among other parasitic diseases affecting animals and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) elimination: a public health success and development opportunity. (ajtmh.org)
  • Of particular consequence was its ability to clear infections in humans involving the microfilariae of Onchocerca volvulus , the cause of river blindness , and Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi , the major causes of lymphatic filariasis ( elephantiasis ). (britannica.com)
  • Campbell and Ōmura discovered the drug Avermectin, which has dramatically lowered incidences of River Blindness (Onchocerciasis), Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), and other parasitic diseases. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • Figure 1: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awards discoveries regarding novel therapies for some of the most devastating parasitic diseases: River Blindness, Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis) and Malaria. (nobelprize.org)
  • Lymphatic Filariasis, afflicting more than 100 million people, causes chronic swelling and leads to life-long stigmatizing and disabling clinical symptoms, including Elephantiasis (Lymphedema) and Scrotal Hydrocele (Figure 1). (nobelprize.org)
  • Lymphatic filariasis (LF), also known as elephantiasis, is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) targeted for elimination through a Global Programme to Eliminate LF (GPELF). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, is a condition characterized by swelling of the lower limbs. (meddic.jp)
  • Ivermectin is used to treat conditions such as river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, improving human lives especially in the poorest regions of the world. (chemistryviews.org)
  • Both river blindness and lymphatic filariasis were significant sources of debilitating illness in tropical regions of the world. (britannica.com)
  • William C. Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura discovered a new drug, Avermectin, the derivatives of which have radically lowered the incidence of River Blindness and Lymphatic Filariasis, as well as showing efficacy against an expanding number of other parasitic diseases. (ki.se)
  • The drug, Avermectin, the derivatives of which, have radically lowered the incidence of river blindness and lymphatic filariasis. (tcd.ie)
  • River Blindness and Lymphatic Filariasis are two diseases caused by parasitic worms. (nobelprize.org)
  • Controlling morbidity and interrupting transmission: twin pillars of lymphatic filariasis elimination. (ajtmh.org)
  • Progress towards lymphatic filariasis elimination in Ghana from 2000-2016: Analysis of microfilaria prevalence data from 430 communities. (infontd.org)
  • The threat of lymphatic filariasis elimination failure in Pasaman Barat District, West Sumatra Province. (leprosy-information.org)
  • Half the people infected with lymphatic filariasis in the world live in nine countries of the South-East Asia Region. (who.int)
  • Description: Lymphatic filariasis is one of the most debilitating neglected tropical diseases. (who.int)
  • Anesvad is an international NGO whose goal is to fight against the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) in sub-saharan Africa from a human rights approach and in coherence with the Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy. (ntd-ngdonetwork.org)
  • Socioeconomic benefit to individuals of achieving 2020 targets for four neglected tropical diseases controlled/eliminated by innovative and intensified disease management: Human African trypanosomiasis, leprosy, visceral leishmaniasis, Chagas disease. (infontd.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Ivermectin (IVM) plus albendazole (ALB), or IA, is widely used in mass drug administration (MDA) programs that aim to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Africa. (bvsalud.org)
  • Elimination of lymphatic filariasis: a public-health challenge. (ajtmh.org)
  • Strategies and tools for the control/elimination of lymphatic filariasis. (ajtmh.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) is recommending three drug treatment to accelerate the global elimination of lymphatic filariasis. (iasabhiyan.com)
  • Innovative surveillance strategies to support the elimination of filariasis in Africa. (infontd.org)
  • Elimination within reach: A cross-sectional study highlighting the factors that contribute to persistent lymphatic filariasis in eight communities in rural Ghana. (leprosy-information.org)
  • The main human filarial parasites are Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi , whose adults live in the lymphatic system, and Loa loa , which infects subcutaneous tissues. (cdc.gov)
  • Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a debilitating disease overwhelmingly caused by Wuchereria bancrofti , which is transmitted by various mosquito species. (ajtmh.org)
  • To assess clinical findings associated with Wuchereria bancrofti infection, 192 school children in a filariasis-endemic area of Haiti underwent physical and ultrasonographic examinations and testing for circulating filarial antigen (CFA). (ajtmh.org)
  • The main human fi larial parasites are Wuchereria saline solution. (cdc.gov)
  • The two other filarial causes of lymphatic filariasis are Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia timori , which differ from B. malayi morphologically, symptomatically, and in geographical extent. (meddic.jp)
  • Wuchereria contains W. bancrofti , which so far has only been found to infect humans, and the Brugia genus contains B. malayi , which infects humans and animals, as well as other zoonotic species. (meddic.jp)
  • We report a case of human intraocular filariasis caused by a Pelecitus sp. (cdc.gov)
  • We report posterior extremity (Figure 2, panel B). The head was a case of human intraocular fi lariasis caused by a Pelecitus bluntly rounded and contained 4 externolabial papillae, 4 sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Since the first decades of the present century the worldwide extent of human malaria has receded, especially in temperate areas, as a result of socio-economic progress and through local control programmes, which developed into the global eradication campaign. (ciesin.org)
  • In the latter case, the principal weapon for the control of malaria transmission has been the use of residual insecticides on the interior surfaces of human dwellings. (ciesin.org)
  • Studies on impact of construction activities on mosquito fauna and incidence of human malaria in Federal Capital Territory, FCDA Abuja, Nigeria. (docsbay.net)
  • Based on sensitivity analysis of the MacDonald-Ross model, it has long been argued that the best way to reduce malaria transmission is to target adult female mosquitoes with insecticides that can reduce the longevity and human-feeding frequency of vectors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • to adjust their host-seeking behaviour to bite humans despite bednet protection, accounting for the maintenance of high rates of mosquito infectivity and malaria transmission. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Vector control, through the use of insecticides, plays a key role in the prevention and control of infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, and filariasis [1] . (prolekare.cz)
  • Cumulative exposure and its relationship with chronic filarial disease in Bancroftian filariasis. (ajtmh.org)
  • Acute attacks in the extremities of persons living in an area endemic for Bancroftian filariasis: differentiation of two syndromes. (ajtmh.org)
  • This study compared the efficacy and safety of three years of semiannual treatment with ALB to annual IA in persons with bancroftian filariasis. (bvsalud.org)
  • The nematode periorbital region of humans worldwide ( 1-4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • about 35 nematode species occur in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brugia malayi is a nematode (roundworm), one of the three causative agents of lymphatic filariasis in humans. (meddic.jp)
  • By disease, I mean communicable or infectious diseases i.e. those caused by infection with microorganisms (viruses, bacteria and parasites) that can pass directly or indirectly from one human to another. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • Filarial nematodes have been found in the eyes and periorbital region of humans worldwide ( 1 - 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Setaria cervi is a bovine filarial parasite and serves as a good parasite model for the studies in lymphatic filariasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Recently, a 175 kDa collagenase and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) have been purified and characterized from the bovine filarial parasite S. cervi and shown to be potential vaccine candidate and diagnostic marker, respectively for human lymphatic filariasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The data obtained on their immunological characterizations and their presence in important parasite organs give strong indication that they are critical for the survival of filarial parasite and thus can be good vaccine candidates and/or diagnostic markers for human lymphatic filariasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The prevention of filariasis relies heavily on insecticides and insect repellents. (britannica.com)
  • Adult vectors, however, can avoid many commonly used insecticides [ 17 ], so effective coverage may not necessarily be equivalent to the absolute coverage of humans but may be considerably less if vectors evade it. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Insecticide resistance, including resistance to multiple types of insecticides, has arisen in all the insect species that are the major vectors of human diseases ( Table 1 ). (prolekare.cz)
  • Campbell worked at the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research 1957-1990, and is currently a research fellow emeritus at Drew University. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1957 to 1990 Campbell worked at Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, and from 1984 to 1990 he was a Senior Scientist and Director with Assay Research and Development. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1957, after completing a Ph.D. at Wisconsin, Campbell took a position as a research assistant at the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research in New Jersey . (britannica.com)
  • From 1957-1990 he was with the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, from 1984-1990 as Senior Scientist and Director for Assay Research and Development. (ki.se)
  • He went on to receive a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1957, following which he worked with the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research until 1990. (tcd.ie)
  • During his career, he worked at several institutes and from 1957-1990 at Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp. (MSD), USA. (chemistryviews.org)
  • William Campbell , (born June 28, 1930, Ramelton, Ireland), Irish-born American parasitologist known for his contribution to the discovery of the anthelmintic compounds avermectin and ivermectin , which proved vital to the control of certain parasitic infections in humans and other animals. (britannica.com)
  • When used in humans with parasitic infections, Ivermectin safely and effectively kills parasite larvae, or microfilaria. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • It is one of the five major schistosomes that account for all human infections, the other four being S. haematobium , S. mansoni, S. japonicum, and S. intercalatum . (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthropods such as ticks , mites , fleas , and lice , can also cause human disease, which conceptually are similar to infections, but invasion of a human or animal body by these macroparasites is usually termed infestation . (googleweblight.com)
  • Larval stages of mosquitoes are of relatively low mobility compared with flying adults and it is the humans that must bring the control to them rather than vice versa . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Adults born during or after 1957 who haven't had measles or have never been vaccinated should get at least one dose of measles vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • Renal disease in lymphatic filariasis: evidence for tubular and glomerular disorders at various stages of the infection. (ajtmh.org)
  • Clinical manifestations in malayian filariasis infection with special reference to lymphoedema grading. (ajtmh.org)
  • Estimation of ASO titer as an indicator of streptococcal infection precipitating acute adenolymphangitis in Brugian lymphatic filariasis. (ajtmh.org)
  • Filariasis Caused zoonotic infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Here, we isolate and characterize anti-PvRBP2b human monoclonal antibodies from two individuals in Cambodia with natural P. vivax infection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ascomycota , including yeasts such as Candida , filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus , Pneumocystis species, and dermatophytes , a group of organisms causing infection of skin and other superficial structures in humans. (googleweblight.com)
  • Possible explanations include transmission of the virus to extra-human reservoirs (pigs, horses, birds) latent infection in humans or continuous transfer from one human to another. (aarogya.com)
  • Prevention of acute adenolymphangitis in Brugian filariasis: comparison of the efficacy of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine, each combined with local treatment of the affected limb. (ajtmh.org)
  • and all Culex species reported during the current study are vectors of human diseases. (beds.ac.uk)
  • 1. Insecticide resistance mechanisms reported to date in natural populations of the main insect vectors of human diseases. (prolekare.cz)
  • 1967 Zenaida Nisce became the nursing program supervisor and consultant on the six special diseases (TB, leprosy, V.D., cancer, filariasis, and mental health illness). (scribd.com)
  • German Leprosy and TB Relief Association was founded as Deutsches Aussätzigen-Hilfswerk (German Leprosy Relief Association) in 1957. (ntd-ngdonetwork.org)
  • Beyond tsetse--Implications for research and control of human African trypanosomiasis epidemics. (infontd.org)
  • Human Intraocular Filariasis Caused by Pelecitus sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Such flies move constantly from one person to the next and in so doing may at times transfer disease-causing ( human disease ) organisms. (academic.ru)
  • Citing the center's achievements in conflict resolution, human rights, election observation, and disease control, as well as President Carter's negotiation of the Camp David accords between Egypt and Israel during his presidency, the Nobel Peace Prize Committee named him the 2002 Nobel Peace Laureate. (georgiaencyclopedia.org)
  • It was chemically modified, and the resulting ivermectin turned out to kill parasite larvae in humans, leading to an entirely new class of drugs against parasitic worms. (chemistryviews.org)
  • In 1978, having identified a successful treatment for a type of worms affecting horses, Campbell realised that similar treatments might be useful against related types of worms that affect humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third drug being used in this therapy will help control adult worms of lymphatic filariasis. (iasabhiyan.com)
  • Micro filariasis, which is produced by adult worms, is the cause of swollen leg. (iasabhiyan.com)
  • This award to Bill underscores the impact that zoologists can have upon the world by understanding how animals, parasites and microbes interact and by using that knowledge to develop new ways to tackle human and animal diseases. (tcd.ie)
  • The third edition of the Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence will bring readers up to date on the latest events in the ongoing battle between humans and microbes. (b-ok.org)
  • Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is a drug of choice to treat lymphatic filariasis (LF) either used alone or in combination as mass drug administration (MDA) preventive strategies. (bvsalud.org)
  • 38. Whitehouse, P. observed LTP in the visual cortex of adult humans by measuring the ampli- tude of event-related potentials recorded from gl ass scalp before and after a visual conditioning protocol (checker- board stimulation presented at an average rate of approxi- mately 1 Hz) (Clapp et al. (politvolga.ru)
  • Recently a pilot project to administer triple drug therapy with the long term aim of eradicating lymphatic filariasis was recently launched in Nagpur, Maharashtra. (iasabhiyan.com)
  • Prevalence of lymphatic filariasis in a tribal area of Maharashtra. (leprosy-information.org)
  • Similar cycles of species A and B were observed outdoors, although the relative numbers outdoors/indoors averaged 2·3 times more for species B than for species A. In A. funestus, A. gambiae species A and A. gambiae species B Human Blood Indices were 97·5%, 91·2% and 60·9% indoors and 24%, 2% and 7% outdoors, respectively. (cambridge.org)
  • They reported the occurrence of a species of human filariae in North Sumatra that was both physiologically and morphologically distinct from the W. bancrofti microfilariae commonly found in Jakarta and named the pathogen Filaria malayi . (meddic.jp)
  • The first description of twinkling artifact was by the French radiologist Alain Rahmouni (1957-2018) 7 et al in 1996 5 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • William Campbell, who received his PhD from University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1957, explored Ōmura's Streptomyces bacterial samples further, and discovered that one was particularly effective against parasites in domestic and farm animals. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • Flies are beneficial, too, functioning as scavengers, predators, or parasites of certain insect pests, as pollinators of plants, and as destroyers of weeds noxious to humans. (academic.ru)
  • Suppression of transmission over large areas depends upon population-level exposure of vectors to the intervention and this, in turn, depends upon the level of coverage within the human community. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While vectorial capacity does not take into account parasite availability in the human (intermediate host) population, it is considered to be analogous to the environmental-biological driving force underpinning the transmission potential in an area. (hindawi.com)
  • In moving towards these goals, emphasis has been placed on the importance of human resource development, increasing the country's competitiveness in high value-added export goods and services (notably information technology) and industrial diversification, private/public sector partnerships, furthering open trade, enhancing the financial sector and sharing the benefits of growth equitably among the population. (who.int)
  • About one-sixth of all the human beings on Earth live in India, the world's most populous democracy . (britannica.com)
  • He then attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison on a Fulbright Scholarship, earning his PhD degree in 1957 for work on the liver fluke, a parasite affecting sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • These mosquitoes tend to bite at night and appear to only infect humans. (meddic.jp)
  • Among all the barcoded insect groups, mosquitoes are the most intensely barcoded [ 2 ], probably because of their importance as vectors of many life threatening human diseases. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Recent pandemics occurred in 1957-58 owing to the Influenza A (H2N2), in 1968 owing to the Influenza A (H3N2)and in 2009 owing to influenza A (H1N1). (aarogya.com)
  • Many of the most dangerous human diseases are transmitted by insect vectors. (prolekare.cz)
  • Humans are infected via the bite of a type of sandflies, which breed in forest areas, caves, or the burrows of small rodents. (who.int)
  • Professor Campbell was also involved in the development of several drugs used in human and veterinary medicine. (tcd.ie)