Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)South Australia: A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Victoria: A state in southeastern Australia, the southernmost state. Its capital is Melbourne. It was discovered in 1770 by Captain Cook and first settled by immigrants from Tasmania. In 1851 it was separated from New South Wales as a separate colony. Self-government was introduced in 1851; it became a state in 1901. It was named for Queen Victoria in 1851. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1295 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p574)Northern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Tasmania: An island south of Australia and the smallest state of the Commonwealth. Its capital is Hobart. It was discovered and named Van Diemen's Island in 1642 by Abel Tasman, a Dutch navigator, in honor of the Dutch governor-general of the Dutch East Indian colonies. It was renamed for the discoverer in 1853. In 1803 it was taken over by Great Britain and was used as a penal colony. It was granted government in 1856 and federated as a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1190 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p535)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Australasia: Australia, New Zealand and neighboring islands in the South Pacific Ocean. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Ross River virus: A species of ALPHAVIRUS associated with epidemic EXANTHEMA and polyarthritis in Australia.Melioidosis: A disease of humans and animals that resembles GLANDERS. It is caused by BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI and may range from a dormant infection to a condition that causes multiple abscesses, pneumonia, and bacteremia.Burkholderia pseudomallei: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes MELIOIDOSIS. It has been isolated from soil and water in tropical regions, particularly Southeast Asia.Australian Capital Territory: A territory of Australia consisting of Canberra, the national capital and surrounding land. It lies geographically within NEW SOUTH WALES and was established by law in 1988.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Pacific Islands: The islands of the Pacific Ocean divided into MICRONESIA; MELANESIA; and POLYNESIA (including NEW ZEALAND). The collective name Oceania includes the aforenamed islands, adding AUSTRALIA; NEW ZEALAND; and the Malay Archipelago (INDONESIA). (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p910, 880)Hepatitis B Antigens: Antigens of the virion of the HEPATITIS B VIRUS or the Dane particle, its surface (HEPATITIS B SURFACE ANTIGENS), core (HEPATITIS B CORE ANTIGENS), and other associated antigens, including the HEPATITIS B E ANTIGENS.New Guinea: Originally an island of the Malay Archipelago, the second largest island in the world. It divided, West New Guinea becoming part of Indonesia and East New Guinea becoming Papua New Guinea.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Marsupialia: An infraclass of MAMMALS, also called Metatheria, where the young are born at an early stage of development and continue to develop in a pouch (marsupium). In contrast to Eutheria (placentals), marsupials have an incomplete PLACENTA.Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Myrtaceae: The myrtle plant family of the order Myrtales. It includes several aromatic medicinal plants such as EUCALYPTUS.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Hendra Virus: A species of HENIPAVIRUS first identified in Australia in 1994 in HORSES and transmitted to humans. The natural host appears to be fruit bats (PTEROPUS).EuropeRain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.North AmericaCanada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Proteaceae: A plant family of the order Proteales, subclass Rosidae class Magnoliopsida. Cluster roots, bottlebrush-like clusters of rootlets which form in response to poor soil, are common in this family.Alphavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by members of the ALPHAVIRUS genus of the family TOGAVIRIDAE.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Henipavirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus HENIPAVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE.Phascolarctidae: A family of marsupials in the order Diprotodontia, native to Australia and possessing vestigial tails. There is a single living genus and species: Phascolarctos cinereus, the koala.Great BritainGeneral Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Melanesia: The collective name for the islands of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia, including NEW CALEDONIA; VANUATU; New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, FIJI, etc. Melanesia (from the Greek melas, black + nesos, island) is so called from the black color of the natives who are generally considered to be descended originally from the Negroid Papuans and the Polynesians or Malays. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p748 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p344)Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
  • crashed at Rabbit Hill Auxiliary Field, OK 13Apr45 503 (MSN 9364) to reclamation at Kansas City Jul 3, 1948 505 (MSN 9366) converted to spares for Civil Air Patrol Feb 27, 1951 508 (MSN 9369) registered N5956V, current [Nov510 (MSN 9371) to Civil Air Patrol at Olmstead AF, PA Apr 4, 1950. (joebaugher.com)
  • Between 1948 and 1950, the Australian Zionist leaders, particularly Max Freilich and Horace Bonheim Newman in Sydney and Jack Skolnik in Melbourne, were fully aware of Israel's precarious position following the immediate invasion of Israel by five Arab armies after the declaration of independence. (jwire.com.au)
  • burned during welding repair at Chanute Field Aug 5, 1942 518 (MSN 9379) to reclamation at Tinker, OK as L-4K May 18, 1948 519 (MSN 9380) to reclamation at Phoenix, AZ Oct 15, 1948 520 (MSN 9381) to Civil Air Patrol Nov 12, 1949 521 (MSN 9382) to Civil Air Patrol Apr 1950 522 (MSN 9383) post-war conversion to L-4K. (joebaugher.com)
  • Guibé, 1950 '1948', Cat. (amnh.org)
  • They survived in the truest sense of the word,' says Aaron Grodsky, who was deputy director for the Far East operations of the committee from 1946 to 1948. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Photo gallery of the strikes and riots at Port Adelaide in Australia which began in 1928 when the employers introduced new working conditions. (libcom.org)
  • The National Library of Australia acknowledges First Australian peoples as the Traditional Custodians of this country and their continued connection to land, sea, and culture. (nla.gov.au)
  • 7 - 13 The most recent Australian report comprised a cluster of 11 cases that were associated with mouldy hay in Western Australia. (mja.com.au)
  • The phenotype can be Australia profit ranking (APR), Australian selection index (ASR), protein yield (PROT), protein percent (PROT %), milk volume (MILK), fat yield (FAT), fat percent (FAT %), breeding value overall type (Overall Type), somatic cell count (SCC), and/or breeding value cow fertility (Cow Fertility). (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Pam Brown's recent gigantic feature for Jacket2 titled "51 Contemporary Poets from Australia" had a ghostly foreshadowing a year or so ago, in Pam's "Rewriting Australia" feature in Jacket 39, where some Australian poets wrestle with their poetic forebears. (jacket2.org)
  • on interactions between both ENSO and IOD and patterns of Australian rainfall, and Murphy and Timbal (2008) and Nicholls (2009) on processes contributing to the recent drought in southeastern Australia. (ametsoc.org)
  • Geraldton is a coastal city in the Mid West region of the Australian state of Western Australia , 424 kilometres (263 mi) north of the state capital, Perth . (wikipedia.org)
  • Baehr, M. 2005: A revision of the Australian odacanthine ground beetles, including checklists for Australia and the Papuan subregion. (wikimedia.org)
  • Blackburn, who has US and Australian citizenship, was born in Hobart, Australia in November 1948. (hindustantimes.com)
  • It is held on the first Monday of October in Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, and South Australia. (timeanddate.com)
  • East of Time received the 2006 New South Wales Premier's Award for the Best Book of Non-Fiction and was short-listed for the 2006 Australian Literary Society's Gold Medal and the South Australia Arts Festival Award for Innovation in Literature. (ua.edu)
  • Further to the history, in 1948, pathologist Peter MacCallum first described the clinical features for 6 patients from Victoria, Australia, each with an ulcer with undermined edges on an arm or a leg, and the characteristic histopathologic findings, including extensive necrosis and abundant acid-fast bacilli without granuloma formation ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • In the state of Victoria in Australia, M. ulcerans disease was first observed in the Bairnsdale District in the 1930s and is now established on the Bellarine Peninsula ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Clinicians from Barwon Health, a tertiary hospital in Geelong, Victoria, Australia, which is adjacent to the Bellarine Peninsula, manage a large proportion of reported case-patients in Victoria ( 10 ), and have recently observed an increasing number of severe cases of M. ulcerans disease with devastating consequences for patients. (cdc.gov)
  • 2006. "Verified Bites By Yellow Sac Spiders (Genus Cheiracanthium ) in the United States and Australia: Where Is the Necrosis? (psu.edu)
  • Although it was ignored in the United States Army volumes on internal medicine in World War II, it accounted for significant morbidity and mortality during that war, with more than 1,500 cases described in Burma (Wellcome Trust 1971, pp. 13-23) and 1,069 cases reported among Italian prisoners of war in India (Stefanini 1948). (army.mil)
  • The Governor of Western Australia is the representative in Western Australia of the Queen of Australia , Elizabeth II . (wikipedia.org)
  • The Governor of Western Australia is styled Her Excellency during her term in office (or His Excellency, for a male governor). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stirling was in fact only commissioned as Governor of Western Australia from 4 March 1831, rectifying the absence of a legal instrument providing the authority detailed in Stirling's Instructions of 30 December 1828. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Geraldine mine was subsequently established, named after the County Clare family home of Charles FitzGerald , the 4th Governor of Western Australia . (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, all Bills passed by the Parliament of Western Australia require the Governor's signature before they become Acts and pass into law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Until the appointment of Sir James Mitchell in 1948, all governors of Western Australia had been British officials. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a list of Governors and Lieutenant-Governors of Western Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hydrothermal simulations are used to provide insight into the subsurface thermal regime of the Perth metropolitan area (PMA) in Western Australia. (springer.com)
  • Archives of previous monthly summaries for Western Australia are also available, as are summaries for other states and many other climate summaries and diagnostics , in particular the new online version of the Monthly Weather Review . (bom.gov.au)
  • The Western Australia Museum at the marina in Geraldton hosts a permanent exhibit on Yamatji/Wajarri culture and history of the region. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bunbury is a coastal city in Western Australia , situated approximately 175 kilometres (109 mi) south of the state capital, Perth . (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 1948, Labour Day in Western Australia has been observed on the first Monday in March. (timeanddate.com)
  • This paper traces the development of postwar Japanese educational resistance (1948 to 1975) and questions the ability of western resistance-based theory to embrace the notions of collectivity inherent within the Japanese context. (sociology.org)
  • The paper then moves on to provide an account of the major postwar student movement in Japan from 1948 to 1975. (sociology.org)
  • books.google.com.au - The postwar period has seen radical changes in Australia. (google.com.au)
  • The Official History of Australia's Involvement in Southeast Asian Conflicts 1948-1975 covers Australia's involvement in the Malayan Emergency, Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation and Vietnam War. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clear evidence has established indigenous people living on the west coast of Australia for at least 40,000 years, though at present it is unclear when the first indigenous people may have originally explored and lived in and around Geraldton. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Australia was beating everyone in the late 90s and early 2000 people told me it was the coaches and the academies that made the team strong. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Maternal overweight and obesity has increased in Australia, as it has in other developed countries, 10 from 34% in the 1998-2002 calendar years 11 to 50% in 2008. (mja.com.au)
  • There-equipment of the fleet with these aircraft will change en- tirely the Corporation's financial prospects, and with theeconomies made possible by the reorganization now in pro- gress, the Corporation should be self-supporting on its commer-cial routes within three or four years. (flightglobal.com)
  • There are still two difficult years to face in 1948-49 and1949-50, as exceptional efforts and costs will be involved in bringing into service the new types of aircraft. (flightglobal.com)
  • The Northern Territory is home to some of the most incredible natural attractions in Australia and a cultural history stretching back over 50,000 years that still thives today. (trailfinders.com)
  • Our study presents national birthweight percentiles for all male and female singleton infants born in Australia over the 10-year period between 1998 and 2007. (mja.com.au)
  • South Australia also had the fewest affluent families, then defined as those earning over $26000 a year. (google.com.au)
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/StPetersburgCollege SPC Study Abroad - Australia Video Montage About St. Petersburg College: In 1927, St. Petersburg College (then known as St. Petersburg Junior College) became Florida's first private, non-profit, two-year school of higher learning located in downtown St. Petersburg. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Des simulations sont utilisées pour fournir une représentation du régime des circulations hydrothermales de subsurface dans la région métropolitaine de Perth (AMP) en Australie de l'Ouest. (springer.com)
  • Las simulaciones hidrotermales son usadas para proveer una visión sobre el régimen termal subsuperficial del área metropolitana de Perth (PMA) en Australia Occidental. (springer.com)
  • He has been instructed as an expert witness in complex, high-value litigations in Europe and Australia. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • edited for gramarlingus also i m shocked that such a thing can happen in europe, australia beeing near to germany, i fear the censorshipwave might swap into my own country. (springrts.com)
  • When the war broke out in May 1948, Israel did not have an air force, yet was facing the full brunt of her neighbours, particularly from the Egyptian bombing raids. (jwire.com.au)
  • Most people know that Czechoslovakia secretly sold planes, arms and ammunition to the nascent state, clearly with Soviet support, but much less is known about how the Jewish communities in the US, South Africa, Britain and even Australia sent both planes with their pilots and armaments to Israel. (jwire.com.au)
  • 2003. "Effects of envenoming by combfooted spiders of the genera Steatoda and Achaearanea (Family Theridiidae: Araneae) in Australia. (psu.edu)