Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Retinal Ganglion Cells: Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate: Specialized PHOTOTRANSDUCTION neurons in the vertebrates, such as the RETINAL ROD CELLS and the RETINAL CONE CELLS. Non-visual photoreceptor neurons have been reported in the deep brain, the PINEAL GLAND and organs of the circadian system.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Retinal Degeneration: A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304)Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Eye ProteinsAmacrine Cells: INTERNEURONS of the vertebrate RETINA. They integrate, modulate, and interpose a temporal domain in the visual message presented to the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS, with which they synapse in the inner plexiform layer.Retinal DiseasesRetinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located in the peripheral retina, with their density increases radially away from the FOVEA CENTRALIS. Being much more sensitive to light than the RETINAL CONE CELLS, the rod cells are responsible for twilight vision (at scotopic intensities) as well as peripheral vision, but provide no color discrimination.Pigment Epithelium of Eye: The layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA; the CILIARY BODY; and the IRIS in the eye.Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Rod Opsins: Photosensitive proteins expressed in the ROD PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of rod photoreceptor pigments such as RHODOPSIN.Retinal Bipolar Cells: INTERNEURONS of the vertebrate RETINA containing two processes. They receive inputs from the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS and send outputs to the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS. The bipolar cells also make lateral connections in the retina with the RETINAL HORIZONTAL CELLS and with the AMACRINE CELLS.Retinal Neurons: Nerve cells of the RETINA in the pathway of transmitting light signals to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. They include the outer layer of PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS, the intermediate layer of RETINAL BIPOLAR CELLS and AMACRINE CELLS, and the internal layer of RETINAL GANGLION CELLS.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Retinal Horizontal Cells: NEURONS in the inner nuclear layer of the RETINA that synapse with both the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS and the RETINAL BIPOLAR CELLS, as well as other horizontal cells. The horizontal cells modulate the sensory signal.Retinal Pigment Epithelium: The single layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA, situated closely to the tips (outer segments) of the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. These epithelial cells are macroglia that perform essential functions for the photoreceptor cells, such as in nutrient transport, phagocytosis of the shed photoreceptor membranes, and ensuring retinal attachment.Goldfish: Common name for Carassius auratus, a type of carp (CARPS).Rhodopsin: A purplish-red, light-sensitive pigment found in RETINAL ROD CELLS of most vertebrates. It is a complex consisting of a molecule of ROD OPSIN and a molecule of 11-cis retinal (RETINALDEHYDE). Rhodopsin exhibits peak absorption wavelength at about 500 nm.Retinal Pigments: Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.Neuroglia: The non-neuronal cells of the nervous system. They not only provide physical support, but also respond to injury, regulate the ionic and chemical composition of the extracellular milieu, participate in the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER and BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER, form the myelin insulation of nervous pathways, guide neuronal migration during development, and exchange metabolites with neurons. Neuroglia have high-affinity transmitter uptake systems, voltage-dependent and transmitter-gated ion channels, and can release transmitters, but their role in signaling (as in many other functions) is unclear.Retinal Detachment: Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).Retinal Neovascularization: Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina.Opsins: Photosensitive proteins in the membranes of PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS such as the rods and the cones. Opsins have varied light absorption properties and are members of the G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS family. Their ligands are VITAMIN A-based chromophores.Diabetic Retinopathy: Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.Adaptation, Ocular: The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Rod Cell Outer Segment: The portion of a retinal rod cell situated between the ROD INNER SEGMENT and the RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM. It contains a stack of photosensitive disk membranes laden with RHODOPSIN.Blood-Retinal Barrier: A specialized transport barrier, in the EYE, formed by the retinal pigment EPITHELIUM, and the ENDOTHELIUM of the BLOOD VESSELS of the RETINA. TIGHT JUNCTIONS joining adjacent cells keep the barrier between cells continuous.Mice, Inbred C57BLChick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Retinitis Pigmentosa: Hereditary, progressive degeneration of the neuroepithelium of the retina characterized by night blindness and progressive contraction of the visual field.Ambystoma: A genus of the Ambystomatidae family. The best known species are the axolotl AMBYSTOMA MEXICANUM and the closely related tiger salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. They may retain gills and remain aquatic without developing all of the adult characteristics. However, under proper changes in the environment they metamorphose.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Retinitis: Inflammation of the RETINA. It is rarely limited to the retina, but is commonly associated with diseases of the choroid (CHORIORETINITIS) and of the OPTIC DISK (neuroretinitis).Urodela: An order of the Amphibia class which includes salamanders and newts. They are characterized by usually having slim bodies and tails, four limbs of about equal size (except in Sirenidae), and a reduction in skull bones.Darkness: The absence of light.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Ophthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein: An intermediate filament protein found only in glial cells or cells of glial origin. MW 51,000.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Radiation Injuries, Experimental: Experimentally produced harmful effects of ionizing or non-ionizing RADIATION in CHORDATA animals.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Uveal Diseases: Diseases of the uvea.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Light Signal Transduction: The conversion of absorbed light energy into molecular signals.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Recoverin: A neuronal calcium-sensor protein that is found in ROD PHOTORECEPTORS and CONE PHOTORECEPTORS. It interacts with G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASE 1 in a Ca2+ dependent manner and plays an important role in PHOTOTRANSDUCTION.Cyprinidae: A family of freshwater fish comprising the minnows or CARPS.Macula Lutea: An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Retinopathy of Prematurity: A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)In Situ Nick-End Labeling: An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.Nerve Tissue ProteinsFovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Arrestin: A 48-Kd protein of the outer segment of the retinal rods and a component of the phototransduction cascade. Arrestin quenches G-protein activation by binding to phosphorylated photolyzed rhodopsin. Arrestin causes experimental autoimmune uveitis when injected into laboratory animals.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Aminobutyrates: Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID that contain one or more amino groups attached to the aliphatic structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobutryrate structure.Rats, Mutant Strains: Rats bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Retinal Photoreceptor Cell Outer Segment: The light sensitive outer portion of a retinal rod or a cone photoreceptor cell. The outer segment contains a stack of disk membranes laden with photoreceptive pigments (RETINAL PIGMENTS). The outer segment is connected to the inner segment by a PHOTORECEPTOR CONNECTING CILIUM.Macular Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.Ion-Selective Electrodes: Electrodes which can be used to measure the concentration of particular ions in cells, tissues, or solutions.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Perches: A common name for fish of the family Percidae, belonging to the suborder Percoidei, order PERCIFORMES.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)S100 Calcium Binding Protein G: A calbindin protein found in many mammalian tissues, including the UTERUS, PLACENTA, BONE, PITUITARY GLAND, and KIDNEYS. In intestinal ENTEROCYTES it mediates intracellular calcium transport from apical to basolateral membranes via calcium binding at two EF-HAND MOTIFS. Expression is regulated in some tissues by VITAMIN D.Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Retinal Dysplasia: Congenital, often bilateral, retinal abnormality characterized by the arrangement of outer nuclear retinal cells in a palisading or radiating pattern surrounding a central ocular space. This disorder is sometimes hereditary.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Injections, Intraocular: The administration of substances into the eye with a hypodermic syringe.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)TurtlesCone Opsins: Photosensitive proteins expressed in the CONE PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of cone photopigments. Cone opsins are classified by their peak absorption wavelengths.Albinism: General term for a number of inherited defects of amino acid metabolism in which there is a deficiency or absence of pigment in the eyes, skin, or hair.Receptors, GABA: Cell-surface proteins that bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID with high affinity and trigger changes that influence the behavior of cells. GABA-A receptors control chloride channels formed by the receptor complex itself. They are blocked by bicuculline and usually have modulatory sites sensitive to benzodiazepines and barbiturates. GABA-B receptors act through G-proteins on several effector systems, are insensitive to bicuculline, and have a high affinity for L-baclofen.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Rats, Inbred BNVisual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Dendrites: Extensions of the nerve cell body. They are short and branched and receive stimuli from other NEURONS.Optic Disk: The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.cis-trans-Isomerases: Enzymes that catalyze the rearrangement of geometry about double bonds. EC 5.2.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Pineal Gland: A light-sensitive neuroendocrine organ attached to the roof of the THIRD VENTRICLE of the brain. The pineal gland secretes MELATONIN, other BIOGENIC AMINES and NEUROPEPTIDES.Intravitreal Injections: The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
The focal length of an early lobopod with lens-containing simple eyes focused the image behind the retina, so while no part of ... These photoreceptor cells form part of the retina, a thin layer of cells that relays visual information, including the light ... Lamb TD, Collin SP, Pugh EN (December 2007). "Evolution of the vertebrate eye: opsins, photoreceptors, retina and eye cup". Nat ... heavily pigmented retina cells, which shield the light-sensitive cells from exposure in all directions except for the single ...
Much of his early research concerned ocular pathologic findings in retinoblastoma and laser effects on the retina. Dr. Mark OM ... 1976 Visiting Staff of Retina Clinics of George Washington University Hospital, D.C., General Hospital & Freedmen Hospital 1973 ... Mark O.M. Tso, MD, (born 19 October 1936) is an American and Chinese ophthalmologist who served as Professor and Founding ...
... to a teaching post at the University of Durham but was forced to resign as eye surgery was required on a detached retina, ...
... retina Chou & Li 1988 (China) Neopanorpa salai Navás 1929 (India) Neopanorpa sauteri (Esben-Petersen) 1912 (Taiwan) ... Neopanorpa pielina Navás 1936 (China: Jiangxi) Neopanorpa pulchra Carpenter 1945 (China: Hainan Island) Neopanorpa puripennis ...
The first Kodak Retina camera was a Typ 117. The 35 mm Kodak Retina camera line remained in production until 1969. Kodak also ... Pre loaded cassettes and Kodak Retina cameras. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by ... namely the Kodak Retina camera. The Retina camera and this daylight loading cassette were the invention of Dr. August Nagel of ... August Nagel's company in December, 1931, and began marketing the Kodak Retina in the summer of 1934. ...
The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue, lining the inner surface of the eye. Retina may also refer to: Kodak Retina, a ... for screens with a high pixel density Retina (or More Fun Than a Vat of Love), a 2010 album by How to Swim Retina (software), a ... series of cameras made from 1936 to 1969 Retina Display, brand names used by Apple Inc. ...
The medical diagnosis was a detached retina resulting in significant loss of vision in the eye. The fight was supposed to be a ... Luftspring was named to Canada's Olympic team for the 1936 Berlin Olympics. At the encouragement of his parents, he refused to ... Luftspring began to box professionally in the fall of 1936. A year later, he fought Gordon Wallace for the Canadian ... 1933 - Ontario Amateur Lightweight Boxing Champion 1936 - Named to the Canadian Olympic Boxing Team (ELECTED NOT TO COMPETE) ...
Lindau A (1927). "Zur Frage der Angiomatosis Retinae und Ihrer Hirncomplikation". Acta Ophthalmol. 4: 193-226. doi:10.1111/j. ... Other uncommon names are: angiomatosis retinae, familial cerebello-retinal angiomatosis, cerebelloretinal hemangioblastomatosis ... of patients presenting with VHL disease and usually occurs in the retina. As a result, loss of vision is very common. However, ... The term von Hippel-Lindau disease was first used in 1936, however its use became common only in the 1970s. Some descendants of ...
Retina 1892 - Cynisca 1891 - Cynisca 1890 - Cynisca 1889 - Dudu 1888 - Beresford 1887 - Pasha 1886 - Nelson 1885 - Tasman 1884 ... Ponty 1936 - Queen of Song 1935 - Vintage 1934 - Grand Jury 1933 - Royal Artist 1932 - Compris 1931 - Stanchion 1930 - ...
The team of Cibis, Brown and John E. Pickering utilized Rhesus monkeys to study the effect of gamma radiation on the retina. ... Cibis became an international authority for the treatment of disease of the vitreous and retina. The surgical techniques he ... Yamashita, Tsuyoshi, & Cibis, P. A. (1959). Staining of the retina with saccharated iron oxide. AMA archives of ophthalmology. ... Effects of Gamma Radiation on the Retina. AMA archives of ophthalmology. 54(2): 249-256. Byrnes, V. A., Brown, D. V., Rose, H. ...
In 1947, due to a combination of glaucoma and detachment of a retina Henry Gilman became blind in one eye and lost most of his ... In 1936, the Journal of Organic Chemistry was created by Gilman with the help of M.S. Kharasch. In 1938, he published a two- ...
... retina pigmentation, Nobel Prize (1967). Gerald Edelman, biologist, Nobel Prize (1972) Gertrude Elion, drug development, Nobel ... 1936) Otto Meyerhof, glycolysis, Nobel Prize (1922) Paul Berg, recombinant DNA, Nobel Prize (1980) Paul Greengard, ...
World Retina Day, Pink Ribbon Day and the National Breast Cancer Foundation. The Australian Securities and Investments ... Friday 10 January 1936 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36210157 The Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday 19 September 1935 http:// ...
Stone, L.S., Steinitz, H. (1957) Regeneration of neural retina and lens from retina pigment cell grafts in adult newts. Journal ... O. Hecht, he founded in 1936 the Zoological Society of Israel. In the 1940s plans were advanced to drain Lake Hula and its ... Animal species named after Heinz Steinitz include Aphanogmus steinitzi (Priesner, 1936); Albunea steinitzi (Holthuis, 1958) ( ... became a member of the teaching and research staff of the Department of Zoology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1936, ...
After an accident in his teens, in which he sustained a detached retina, he lost the sight in his left eye. He underwent an ... He had three daughters: Anne (b. 1936), (Leader of the Milton Mountaineers from 1992 to 2005); Jane (b. 1940) and Susan (b. ...
Kaminaga retired from competitive judo in 1965 after suffering a detached retina. Kaminaga become the head coach of the Meiji ... Akio Kaminaga (神永 昭夫, Kaminaga Akio, December 22, 1936 - March 21, 1993) was a Japanese judoka who won a silver medal in the ...
At some point he had surgery for a detached retina, which the doctors were unable to "glue back again". His father suffered ... McCollum was blind in his left eye because of a detached retina that doctors were unable to repair. McCollum expressed the wish ... March 21, 1936. Retrieved June 17, 2016. "Links Mother-Love to Chemical". The New York Times. December 16, 1937. Retrieved June ... in 1936 he asked an audience of four hundred doctors at the Kings County Medical Society in Brooklyn to help investigate the " ...
He suffered a detached retina in his good eye during a fall off a horse, but his sight was saved by successful surgery. He was ... In 1936, Forrester-Wood was elected to the senior staff of the Royal Sussex County Hospital, and was a consulting surgeon to ...
It's every bit as stunning as the Retina Display on the third and fourth generation iPads. It really has to be seen to be ... 1936 resolution images with features such as autofocus, face detection and geotagging, and a secondary 1.9-megapixel, front- ...
Suffuses the veins of the eyes Till the retina, mooncoloured, Sees the sideways motion of the cretin crab Hued thus like a ... 1936) People of Florence (Allen & Unwin, 1968) The New Soviet Theatre (Allen & Unwin, 1943) Actors Cross the Volga (Allen & ... Macleod became director of the highly experimental Cambridge Festival Theatre in 1933 and remained so until 1936. In 1937 he ...
Bowman, William (1849), Lectures on the parts concerned in the operations on the eye, and on the structure of the retina: ... 1936 May; 24(4): 205-208. Scanned pages of the original article, at PubMed Central. Thomas, K.B. The manuscripts of Sir William ...
"The Thermal Effect on Ocular Tissues of Surgical Diathermy Currents with Frequencies Used in Treatment of Detached Retina". ... In 1936 he completed his ophthalmology residency at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. After residency, he joined his ... gained a great deal of practical experience working with Colonel Wright at the British Government Hospital in Madras from 1936 ...
The "eye" has a retina, lens, and nerve endings, but is not used for seeing. It is visible under young tuataras' skin but after ... Ditmars, Raymond L., "Reptiles of the World" The MacMillan Co., New York, 1936, p. xii Reynoso, V. H. (2000). "An unusual ... Ditmars, 1936, p. xiv http://animals.sandiegozoo.org/animals/tuatara Lutz 2005, p. 42. Lutz 2005, p. 43. Fraser, Nicholas; Sues ...
The large eyes of the crocodile shark, equipped with a reflective green or yellow retina and lacking an expanded iris, suggest ... Matsubara K. (1936). "A new carcharoid shark found in Japan". Zoological Magazine (Tokyo) (in Japanese). 48 (7): 380-382. ... The crocodile shark was first described as Carcharias kamoharai in a 1936 issue of Zoological Magazine (Tokyo) by ichthyologist ... Melendez, R.; Lopez, S.; Yanez, E. (2006). "New data of Pseudocarcharias kamoharai (Matsubara, 1936) (Chondrichthyes: ...
... whereas visual entrainment passes from the retina into the thalamus via the lateral geniculate nucleus. Eyes-closed AVE at 18.5 ... Jasper, H.H. (1936) Cortical excitatory state and synchronism in the control of bioelectric autonomous rhythms. Cold Spring ...
Sun, Yifan (1992). "Rhodopsin regeneration in the normal and in the detached/replaced retina of the skate". Experimental Eye ... As such, they can fully regenerate their limbs, tail, jaws, and retina via epimorphic regeneration leading to functional ... After complete photo-bleaching, rhodopsin can completely regenerate within 2 hours in the retina. White bamboo sharks can ... Hosker, Anne (1936). "Regeneration of Feathers after Thyroid Feeding". Journal of Experimental Biology. Seifert, Ashley (2012 ...
In any case, the structure of the retina in mammals and in human beings is the same as in amphibians. The phenomenon of ... As a result the image of the object on the retina is constantly in motion, slowly drifting and jumping back to the point of ... distortion of perception of an image stabilized on the retina gives some idea of the concepts of the subsequent levels of the ... 1848-1936). Koffka was also a student of Stumpf's, having studied movement phenomena and psychological aspects of rhythm. In ...
... retina, cerebral subcortex and cortex), interaction of macular and peripheral spheres of the retina, induction of retina, ... Since 1936 Kravkov had headed the Laboratory of Physiological Optics at the State Central Helmholtz Institute of Ophtalmology ( ... June 1936, pp. 348-360 Kravkov S.V. Effect of indirect light stimulation as a function of the intensity of a direct stimulus / ...
The retina is involved in the photic entrainment of the circadian clocks in the retina itself in vertebrates and in the ... Northern blot analysis for the ayu rhodopsin mRNA in the retina and brain of ayu. Total RNA (10 μg) from the retina and poly(A) ... Tomohiro Masuda, Masayuki Iigo, Kanta Mizusawa, and Katsumi Aida "Retina-Type Rhodopsin Gene Expressed in the Brain of a ... Thus, the retina-type and pineal-specific rhodop-sins had diverged at the very early stage in the course of molecular evolution ...
1) Retina IIIC, Type 028, no. 51707, top model, Retina-Xenon C 2,0/50 mm. With case. - 2) Retina-Curtar-Xenon C 4/35 mm in ... 1) Retina IIIC, Type 028, Nr. 51707, Top-Modell, Retina-Xenon C 2,0/50 mm. Mit Tasche. - 2) Retina-Curtar-Xenon C 4/35 mm in ... 8) Kodak Tischstativ für Retina I und II, mit Karton. - 9) Retina Stereovorsatz, mit Karton, Anleitung und Etui. - 10) Retina ... 3) Retina-Longar-Xenon C 4/80 mm in container. - 4) Optical multiple finder 35/80, with case and instructions. - 5) Retina ...
... a unit to deck out the Apple iPad mini with a Retina display of 2,048 by 1536; right now, the low resolution on the 7.9 inch ... A retina display will need a much bigger battery and the a6 processor is much newer than the a5 chip......so, the newer iPad ... A retina display would require higher dots per inch (DPI) and the brightness of the backlight modules would have to be higher. ... More LEDs would be needed and all of the changes could lead to a 30% hike in the production cost to build a Retina display ...
The focal length of an early lobopod with lens-containing simple eyes focused the image behind the retina, so while no part of ... These photoreceptor cells form part of the retina, a thin layer of cells that relays visual information, including the light ... Lamb TD, Collin SP, Pugh EN (December 2007). "Evolution of the vertebrate eye: opsins, photoreceptors, retina and eye cup". Nat ... heavily pigmented retina cells, which shield the light-sensitive cells from exposure in all directions except for the single ...
results. In the detached retina, the Po 2 at the border between the retina and the fluid layer under the retina decreased; ... outer retina (determined as described in the text and Fig. 2 ); IR, inner retina; FL, fluid layer under the retina. ... outer retina (determined as described in the text and Fig. 2 ); IR, inner retina; FL, fluid layer under the retina. ... outer retina (determined as described in the text and Fig. 2 ); IR, inner retina; FL, fluid layer under the retina. ...
In the vertebrate retina, phototransduction, the conversion of light to an electrical signal, is carried out by the rod and ... The rodent retina is perhaps the most accessible mammalian system in which to investigate neurovascular interplay within the ... Vision impairment and blindness due to the loss of the light-sensing cells of the retina, i.e. photoreceptors, represents the ... In vivo Electroporation of Morpholinos into the Adult Zebrafish Retina. Authors: Ryan Thummel, Travis J. Bailey, David R. Hyde. ...
... retina provides indirect support for this hypothesis. In the so-called "red area" of the pigeon retina, the red-sensitive ... Similar to the avian retina described above, the cone oil droplets of the turtle retina are pigmented with carotenoids. For ... Roaf, H. (1929). The absorption of light by the coloured globules in the retina of the domestic hen. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol ... Ali, M. A., and Anctil, M. (1973). Retina of the South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa Fitzinger. Can. J. Zool. 51, 969 ...
Schwartz EA (2002) Transport-mediated synapses in the retina. Physiol Rev 82: 875-891. ... Release of endogenous excitatory amino acids from ON-type bipolar cells isolated from the goldfish retina. J Neurosci 11: 2199- ...
It is composed of three layers the sclera (white), the choroid (pink) and the retina (yellow). The vitreous humor (orange) is ... an aqueous solution that fills the space between the lens and the retina . - Stock Image F002/1936 ... It is composed of three layers the sclera (white), the choroid (pink) and the retina (yellow). The vitreous humor (orange) is ... retina, sclera, side view, structure of the eye, suspensory ligament, vitreous humor, white background, with skin ...
B. The human eye weighs about 7.5 g. (Statistic from R.F. Spaide, Diseases of the Retina and Vitreous, 1999.) C. The barbituate ... E. The first lobotomy in the United States was performed by Walter Freeman in 1936. ...
... cause a serous detachment of the neurosensory retina. Recurrence occurs in about 31% patients with CSCR,[3] though the ... The PED may touch the posterior aspect of the retina and there is usually a leak at this site.[23] The inner surface of retina ... Retina. 2013;33(10):2096-2102. doi:10.1097/IAE.0b013e318297a07a. *↑ 41.0 41.1 Chin EK, Almeida DR, Roybal CN, et al. Oral ... Retina. 2015;35(12):2505-2515. *↑ 60.0 60.1 Rahimy E, Pitcher J, Fineman M, Hsu J. Oral Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists ...
Preparation of developing and adult Drosophila brains and retinae for live imaging. J. Vis. Exp. 10.3791/1936 [PMC free article ...
http://vocal-buzz.ning.com/profiles/blogs/retin-a-gel-au-rabais-internet-site-fiable-acheter-retin-a-gel-0. http://bygda. ... http://network-marketing.ning.com/profiles/blogs/buy-retin-a-cream-0-01-mg-online-retin-a-cream-samples-before. http://www. ... http://tnfdjs.ning.com/profiles/blogs/comprar-retin-a-gel-tretinoin-0-01-mg-de-confianza-m-xico. ... brooklynne.net/profiles/blogs/site-seguro-para-comprar-gen-rico-retin-a-cream-0-05-mg-sem http://augasthya-plus.ning.com/ ...
The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue, lining the inner surface of the eye. Retina may also refer to: Kodak Retina, a ... for screens with a high pixel density Retina (or More Fun Than a Vat of Love), a 2010 album by How to Swim Retina (software), a ... series of cameras made from 1936 to 1969 Retina Display, brand names used by Apple Inc. ...
A-F) Individual photomicrographs taken from a control P30 SD rat (A-C) and a P540 P23H-1 rat (D-F) flat-mounted retina. In ... A-F) Individual photomicrographs taken from a control P30 SD rat (A-C) and a P540 P23H-1 rat (D-F) flat-mounted retina. In ... A-F) Individual photomicrographs taken from a control P30 SD rat (A-C) and a P540 P23H-1 rat (D-F) flat-mounted retina. In ... A-F) Individual photomicrographs taken from a control P30 SD rat (A-C) and a P540 P23H-1 rat (D-F) flat-mounted retina. In ...
The proximal retina is composed of rhabdomeric photoreceptors that depolarize in response to light whereas the distal retina ... Self-screening also affects the absorption spectrum of the distal retina more than the proximal retina. ... the proximal retina of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians (λmax=502 nm), and (D) the distal retina of A. irradians (λmax=526 ... receptors of the proximal retina maximally absorbed shorter wavelengths than those of the distal retina. ...
Expression of ephrin-A2 in the superior colliculus and EphA5 in the retina following optic nerve section in adult rat. Eur J ... Expression of ephrin-A2 in the superior colliculus and EphA5 in the retina following optic nerve section in adult rat. Eur J ...
Electrophysiological recordings from the retina. To determine whether the reindeer retina detects UV and, if so, by what ... 1987). The grey squirrel lens protects the retina from near-UV radiation damage. Prog. Clin. Biol. Res. 247, 571-585. ... 1995). Regional variations in the relative sensitivity to UV light in the mouse retina. Vis. Neurosci. 12, 463-468. ... Here we show that the cornea and lens in Arctic reindeer do not block all UV and that the retina responds ...
Playing a critical role in biological optics, ganglion cells are the final output neurons of the vertebrate retina, in which ... In 1936, Sir Henry Hallett Dale received the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for his pioneering work describing the ...
The first Kodak Retina camera was a Typ 117. The 35 mm Kodak Retina camera line remained in production until 1969. Kodak also ... Pre loaded cassettes and Kodak Retina cameras. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by ... namely the Kodak Retina camera. The Retina camera and this daylight loading cassette were the invention of Dr. August Nagel of ... August Nagels company in December, 1931, and began marketing the Kodak Retina in the summer of 1934. ...
The role of neuronal connexins 36 and 45 in shaping spontaneous firing patterns in the developing retina. J Neurosci 2011;31: ... as has been postulated to occur in the retina (38) and kidney (39). Alternatively, recent evidence that uncoupled hemichannels ...
Yamada E (1969) Some structural features of the fovea centralis in the human retina. Arch Ophthalmol 82:151-159 CrossRefPubMed ... The results of this study have been partially presented in the 16th EURETINA (European Society of Retina Specialists) Congress ... Olsen TW, Adelman RA, Flaxel CJ, Folk JC, et al (2014). American Academy of ophthalmology retina/vitreous panel. Preferred ... Yu DY, Cringle SJ (2001) Oxygen distribution and consumption within the retina in vascularised and avascular retinas and in ...
2005 Temporal shifts in visual pigment absorbance in the retina of Pacific salmon. J. Comp. Phys. A 191, 37-49. (doi:10.1007/ ... 1957 The photosensitive pigments in the retinae of deep-sea fish. J. Mar. Biol. Assoc. UK 36, 651-662. (doi:10.1017/ ... 1936 On the depth at which fish can see. Ecology 17, 452-456. (doi:10.2307/1931845). ...
  • pierces the optic nerve close to the eyeball, sending branches over the internal surface of the retina , and these terminal branches are the only blood supply to the larger part of it. (wikiwix.com)
  • Podoleanu, George M. Dobre, David A. Jackson, and Fred W. Fitzke, "Topography and volume measurements of the optic nerve using en-face optical coherence tomography," Opt. (osapublishing.org)
  • Using this instrument we illustrate for the first time the application of en-face OCT imaging to produce topography and perform area and volume measurements of the optic nerve. (osapublishing.org)
  • This tritan deficiency is consistent with other optic nerve diseases, F. Retina. (luxbar-starway.ru)
  • The retina is the sensory epithelial surface that lines the posterior aspect of the eye, receives the image formed by the lens, transduces this image into neural impulses and conveys this information to the brain by the optic nerve. (google.com)
  • Because behavioral evidence indicates that fishes can perceive e -vector direction in plane polarized light, intracellular recordings were made on bipolar cells, ganglion cells, amacrine cells and horizontal cells in the goldfish retina. (springer.com)
  • Retrograde labeling of ganglion cells demonstrated that the residual crossed projection originated from cells in a widespread region in nasal retina and not solely from the peripheral nasal region, as might be expected of an anti-albino. (nervenet.org)
  • Although our analysis does not rule out the retina as a site of mutant gene action, the modest differences between mutant and normal retinas suggest that the mutation either acts outside the retina or exerts a highly specific effect on ganglion cell trajectories alone. (nervenet.org)
  • Dacey DM, Liao HW, Peterson BB et al (2005) Melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells in primate retina signal colour and irradiance and project to the LGN. (springermedizin.de)
  • The retina comprises a number of layers, namely, the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, outer nuclear layer, photoreceptor inner segments and outer segments. (google.com)
  • Shuey 1936) and colour vision tests are necessary for different professions(Squire et al, 2005). (scribd.com)
  • The human eye's key features include: a highly-corrected optical design, repeatable geometry of materials, control by the brain, processing of retina information, interfacing with the brain from six different levels of sensor cells in the retina, colour vision, compression of data going to the brain, and the highly specific make up and orientation which enable each eye to function and memory of scenes to take place (Deckert 2008). (scribd.com)
  • It was at that time that he took up the study of the inhibitory interaction in the Limulus retina, begun briefly several years before. (nobelprize.org)
  • The strict reciprocity relation fails for exposures longer than a 'critical duration' beyond which, in the Limulus eye and probably in the human eye (Karn, 1936), the relation I. t = Constant is superseded by the relation I = Constant. (hobbydocbox.com)
  • The results of this study have been partially presented in the 16th EURETINA (European Society of Retina Specialists) Congress in Copenhagen the 9th September 2016. (springermedizin.de)
  • Morphologic changes and cell death occur in the detached retina, 1 2 3 4 5 6 but these changes can be alleviated with supplemental O 2 at the onset of RD in detached feline and ground squirrel retinas. (arvojournals.org)
  • Retina close-up/copy Attachment 370 views Kodak close-up/copy Attachment, the field frames, and distance gauges, fit in a camera platform, with the Ia,IIa cameras, and the older model Retinas, for placing the older model camera at the correct distance to the subject and framing it. (camerasdownunder.com)
  • In the structure of the eye retina (nervous tunic of the eyeball) is one of the thinnest layers, being the most complex and highly differentiated tissue. (khavinson.info)
  • I carry three chemical offspring of this blue-sensitive sensor in my retina - they recognise blue, green and red. (signandsight.com)
  • A retina display would require higher dots per inch (DPI) and the brightness of the backlight modules would have to be higher. (phonearena.com)
  • The name retina display' is based on the idea of 300dpi at 10 inch distance from ones eye is the maximum resolution the retina can understand. (wikiwix.com)
  • Vitamin E activity was first identified in the year 1936 from a dietary fertility factor in rats. (hindawi.com)
  • Position of the retina behind other optic structures, direct ingress of sun rays, peculiarities of the blood supply make it vulnerable to both external (sun rays, light striking, radiation) and internal factors. (khavinson.info)
  • Tasaki, K., Karita, K.: Discrimination of horizontal and vertical planes of polarized light by the cephalopod retina. (springer.com)
  • It should be noted that any damage of the retina can lead to the impaired vision or even to complete blindness. (khavinson.info)
  • Retina is as a rule damaged in case of the following diseases: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency etc. (khavinson.info)
  • For people with diabetes, small, barely detectable changes in the retina may predict the onset of vision and may allow early treatment, if a study beginning this summer at the School of Optometry is successful. (berkeley.edu)
  • This method has several major advantages over classical histological sectioning of the retina: it can be used for high-throughput screening and has proved an effective method for identifying the factors regulating PR survival and function. (jove.com)
  • These results indicate that the rhodospin gene is expressed in the retina and brain and mediates not only visual but also nonvisual functions such as photoperiodism and entrainment of the circadian clock. (bioone.org)
  • The optics of the eye create an image of the visual world on the retina , which serves much the same function as the film in a camera. (wikiwix.com)
  • 2 He investigates visual hallucination in blind adults, concluding that the retina is not active during dreaming, instead studying the associative cortex, thalamus, and glial cells for evidence of activation. (nautil.us)
  • One of Nagel's earlier standout cameras was the Kodak Duo Six-20, introduced before the Retina. (wordpress.com)
  • Southern and Northern blots and reverse-transcription PCR analyses indicate that the same rhodopsin gene is expressed in the retina and the brain but not in the pineal organ of ayu. (bioone.org)
  • STV and the LBC team were there to witness Mr Scott seeing a 3D print of his living brain, taken from MRI data captured as part of the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) study. (ed.ac.uk)
  • One key issue we are trying to resolve is whether the retina or the chiasm is the principal site of mutant gene action. (nervenet.org)
  • Both the new 135 film cartridge and the Retina camera were invented by Dr. August Nagel of the Kodak AG Dr. Nagel Werk company that had been purchased by Kodak in 1931. (wordpress.com)
  • As part of Wave 5, we'll also be taking a retina photograph with the same kind of camera as opticians use. (ed.ac.uk)
  • 2. Theoretical Background The optics of the eye bear a general resemblance to a camera system, but the way in which the retina image is processed into a mental image and stored for later use in the memory is almost infinitely complicated. (scribd.com)
  • The optical system of the eye focuses light on the retina much like light is focused on the film in a camera. (wikiwix.com)
  • Models 2.1 Folding 2.2 Non-folding 2.3 SLR 3 References [ edit ] History The first Retina , a compact folding camera which pioneered the 135 format, was followed by two new models in 1936. (wikiwix.com)
  • The results showed that UV light was transmitted through the anterior eye and that the retina responded electrophysiologically to this transmission. (biologists.org)
  • Results of recent observations by Smith (1936) and Steinhardt (1936) lend support to the hypothesis. (hobbydocbox.com)
  • In 1936, Sir Henry Hallett Dale received the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for his pioneering work describing the chemical transmission of nerve impulses, as studied with acetylcholine in the mammalian sympathetic ganglia. (fsu.edu)
  • A special imaging instrument was developed which can acquire optical coherence tomography (OCT) en-face images from the eye fundus, and simultaneously a confocal image. (osapublishing.org)
  • The aim of the present study was to evaluate the infection levels of the eye flukes Sphincterodiplostomum musculosum Dubois, 1936 (metacercariae) in Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernádez-Yépez, 1948) from three ecosystems under the influence of the Jurumirim reservoir (Paranapanema, Taquari and Veados Rivers). (bvsalud.org)
  • They are focused by the austrian- born british psychologist hans j( rgen) eysenck (1936 77) for people with cp is not strictly parallel to the that serial peak ow readings. (bigsurlandtrust.org)