FinlandEstoniaScandinaviaBaltic States: The collective name for the republics of ESTONIA; LATVIA; and LITHUANIA on the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p111)EuropeIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.LatviaLithuaniaFounder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.SwedenCohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Medicine, Korean Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.Constitution and Bylaws: The fundamental principles and laws adopted by an organization for the regulation and governing of its affairs.Supreme Court Decisions: Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.Puberty, Delayed: The lack of development of SEXUAL MATURATION in boys and girls at a chronological age that is 2.5 standard deviations above the mean age at onset of PUBERTY in a population. Delayed puberty can be classified by defects in the hypothalamic LHRH pulse generator, the PITUITARY GLAND, or the GONADS. These patients will undergo spontaneous but delayed puberty whereas patients with SEXUAL INFANTILISM will not.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Sheltered Workshops: Protective places of employment for disabled persons which provide training and employment on a temporary or permanent basis.Genealogy and HeraldryDiagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.ReadingFeedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Track and Field: Sports performed on a track, field, or arena and including running events and other competitions, such as the pole vault, shot put, etc.Peptostreptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, coccoid bacteria that is part of the normal flora of humans. Its organisms are opportunistic pathogens causing bacteremias and soft tissue infections.Golf: A game whose object is to sink a ball into each of 9 or 18 successive holes on a golf course using as few strokes as possible.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Martinique: An island in the Lesser Antilles, one of the Windward Islands. Its capital is Fort-de-France. It was discovered by Columbus in 1502 and from its settlement in 1635 by the French it passed into and out of Dutch and British hands. It was made a French overseas department in 1946. One account of the name tells of native women on the shore calling "Madinina" as Columbus approached the island. The meaning was never discovered but was entered on early charts as Martinique, influenced by the name of St. Martin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p734 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p339)Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Mupirocin: A topically used antibiotic from a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. It has shown excellent activity against gram-positive staphylococci and streptococci. The antibiotic is used primarily for the treatment of primary and secondary skin disorders, nasal infections, and wound healing.Africa, Northern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ALGERIA; EGYPT; LIBYA; MOROCCO; and TUNISIA. It includes also the vast deserts and oases of the Sahara. It is often referred to as North Africa, French-speaking Africa, or the Maghreb. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p856)Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.WashingtonHealth Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.RussiaMilitary Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Photogrammetry: Making measurements by the use of stereoscopic photographs.Maxillary Osteotomy: Surgery of the upper jaw bone usually performed to correct upper and lower jaw misalignment.Orthognathic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with correcting conditions related to malposition of the jawbones and other related MAXILLOFACIAL ABNORMALITIES (e.g., CLEFT PALATE; RETROGNATHISM).Analog-Digital Conversion: The process of converting analog data such as continually measured voltage to discrete, digital form.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.
1916 Historisk Tidskrift för Finland (Finland, published in Swedish). *1918 Hispanic American Historical Review (US) ... 1918), published by the Conference on Latin American History; The Americas, (est. 1944); Journal of Latin American Studies ( ...
Kaukoranta, Antti (1981). Sulphite alcohol industry in Finland in 1918-1978. Finland: Paino Polar OY. p. 7. ISBN 951-9479-25-2. ...
... via Finland. The Belarusian Committee petitioned the administration to allow the book to be printed. Finally, the first edition ... even moving from the tumultuous Petrograd of 1917 to the relative calm of Finland in order to be able to complete it ... Ян Станкевіч (2002). "Правапіс і граматыка [1918]". Ян Станкевіч. Збор твораў у двух тамах. Т. 1. Мн.: Энцыклапедыкс. ISBN 985- ... The modern Belarusian form was defined in 1918, and consists of thirty-two letters. Before that, Belarusian had also been ...
2013). "Finland". Yearbook of Muslims in Europe. 5. Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-25586-9. Don Rubin; et al., eds. (1994). "Finland". ... "Finland Profile: Timeline", BBC News, retrieved 30 September 2015 "Garden Search: Finland". London: Botanic Gardens ... The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Helsinki, Finland. 1550 - Trading town established by Gustav I of ... 1616 - "Diet of Finland held in Helsinki." 1640 - Helsinki relocated across Kluuvinlahti (fi) bay to Vironniemi" 1654 - Fire. ...
The only exception, Finland, bought one L-182 and armed it with a 13.2 mm L-35/36 machine gun. (See Operators) In the same way ... Finland The L-182 was bought for testing in 1936, it was used by the armored unit of the Ratsuväkiprikaati (English: Cavalry ... "Finland". Tanks!. Retrieved 2012-05-20. "Lithuania". Tanks!. Archived from the original on 2012-06-26. Retrieved 2012-05-20. " ... JAEGER PLATOON:FINNISH ARMY 1918 - 1945 WEBSITE - Site about the Finnish Army. "Landsverk L-180". Landsverk. Archived from the ...
"Kulonen, Eino". Uppslagsverket Finland. Svenska folkskolans vänner. Retrieved November 6, 2016. ... "Helsingin yliopiston opettaja- ja virkamiesluettelo 1918-2000. Lääketieteellinen tiedekunta/Lääketieteellinen kemia". Helsingin ...
1912, from thereafter known as Taiwan since 1949.) Finland (est. 1917) Russian Republic (est. 1917) Ukrainian People's Republic ... Republic of Finland (since 1919) Republic of Formosa (1895) Republic of the Gambia (since 1970) Republic of Ghana (since 1960) ... 28 May 1918; lost independence to Soviet Russia on 28 April 1920), first democratic parliamentary republic in the Muslim world ... 1918) Lithuania (est. 1918) Democratic Republic of Georgia (est. 26 May 1918; lost independence to Soviet Russia on 25 April ...
"The New Baltic Republics: (I) Esthonia and Latvia: (II) Lithuania and Finland". The Youth's Companion (7 October, 28 October ... Finland". The New Europe 12 (1919): 77-82, 127-32, 155-59, 200-205, 270-75. "The Property of Harrison Gray Otis, Loyalist". ... "Ephraim Eliot's Private Report of the Class of 1780". Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts 19 (1918): 290-95 ... "Harvard in the Colonial Wars, 1675-1748". Harvard Graduates' Magazine 26 (1918): 554-74. "The Eastern Baltic: (I) The Peace ...
Statistics Finland. Retrieved 28 April 2009. "List of municipal and parish tax rates in 2011". Tax Administration of Finland. ... Statistics Finland's PX-Web databases. Statistics Finland. Retrieved 29 March 2009. "Population according to age and gender by ... Kökar is an island municipality to the south-east of the Åland archipelago, Finland. It is also one of the municipalities of ... It is reachable by boat from Långnäs on Åland or from Galtby with access to mainland Finland. The municipality has a population ...
The victory was important for the Whites, all of Northern Finland was now under their control. The battle is best known of its ... It was led by the local farmer and lawyer Elias Sopanen who later in the 1920s became the Minister of Justice of Finland. ... ISBN 978-900-42436-6-8. "Kuohunta kasvoi kapinaksi Varkaudessa ja Leppävirralla" (in Finnish). Suomi Finland 100. 2015. ... the frontline soon formed in the southern part of Finland and Varkaus became the last remaining Red spot behind the White lines ...
"Finland". Hs.fi. Retrieved 2015-07-09. "The Order of the Cross of Liberty - The President of the Republic of Finland: Position ... She is buried in Hietaniemi Cemetery in Finland. The Finnish Civil War ended in 1918 with the White victory over the Reds, ... "Germans capture Helsinki, Finland - Apr 13, 1918". HISTORY.com. Retrieved 2015-07-09. ... was an icon of White Finland. This picture was taken in the spring of 1918, in the middle of the Finnish Civil War, when ...
Wall, Denise (29 March 2014). "Story of children lost in Finland's civil war". Finland Times. Retrieved 22 March 2017. Lumme, ... Most of them were fleeing Reds from the southwest part of Finland on their way to east. The refugees included Red Guard ... The present memorial was finally erected after the World War II in 1946, as the political situation in Finland had changed. ... Siltala, Juha (2015). "Dissolution and Reintegration in Finland, 1914-1932: How did a Disarmed Country Become Absorbed into ...
"Story of children lost in Finland's civil war". Finland Times. 29 March 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2015. Tepora & Roselius, p. ... Prison camps in Finland Pala Suomen historiaa. Retrieved 9 February 2015. Tepora & Roselius, p. 108-110. Fellmanin pelto 1918 ( ... The first prison camps were established at the early stages of war in the White controlled Northern part of Finland. These ... The most lethal was the Spanish influenza which caught Finland in July. Viljo Sohkanen, who was held at the Suomenlinna prison ...
Finland (excepting Vyborg) restored to Sweden. 1743 - Peace of Åbo: part of Finland ceded to Russia. 1808 - War between Sweden ... 1581 - Finland a Grand Duchy. 1634 - Swedish Constitution. The islands formed part of the Government of Åbo (Finland) 1714 - ... to Finland, Germany, and Sweden (March); to United States, France, and Great Britain (November 9); to Finland (November 18). ... 1284 - Finland (including the islands) constituted a duchy. 1300 to 1600 AD: Kastelholm Castle was a focal point for a number ...
"John Reed". Books and Writers (kirjasto.sci.fi). Finland: Kuusankoski Public Library. Archived from the original on 27 March ... March 10, 1918. Retrieved 2009-04-08. Lansford, Tom (2005). Theodore Roosevelt in perspective. Nova Publishers. p. 133. ISBN 1- ... In 1918, the New York postmaster was told to be on his guard for issues of the magazine commenting on Wilson's foreign policy. ...
After beating the Reds by the Kämärä station, the Whites ambushed a Red train on its way from Saint Petersburg to Finland. The ... The Red units were composed of the Red Guards from Vyborg area and further from the Uusimaa region of Southern Finland from ... Therefore, the battles in Ahvola were called as the ″Verdun of Finland″, after the famous 1916 Battle of Verdun, although its ... It was fought by the Vyborg-Joensuu railroad between Vyborg, the Red capital in Eastern Finland, and Antrea, an important ...
Alternative Finland Baker, Chris. ""The Tank Corps of 1914-1918"". The Long Long Trail. Retrieved 31 March 2017. Fuller, J.F.C ... Of a revised order for 700 tanks (150 Females and 550 Males) only 25 were built and only one of those by the end of 1918. See: ... It was first deployed in 1918, used in action during the closing months of World War I, and in the Allied intervention in the ... Issued to Company A, US 301st Heavy Tank Battalion and hit by a 57 mm (2 in) shell round on 27 September 1918 during the attack ...
At the time, Finland was an autonomous part of the Russian Empire. Vähä had five brothers, who all followed him to Russia after ... The battalion was sent to Finland, where Vähä fought in the Battle of Kämärä, and later served as a courier in the Battle of ... Antikainen was later captured in Finland, where he received a life in prison for the murders. After his graduation in March ... As the Red front fell in the Northern Tavastia region, the Saint Petersburg Reds retreated to Eastern Finland. After the ...
Maier W.D., Lahtinen R. & O'Brien H. (2015). Minerals Deposits of Finland. Elsevier. p. 302. ISBN 9780124104761. Glikson A.Y. ( ... Finland Kimberlite: Kimberley, Northern Cape, South Africa Komatiite: Komati River, South Africa Labradorite: Paul's Island, ... 1918. p. 191. Middlemost E.A.K. (1985). Magmas and magmatic rocks: an introduction to igneous petrology. Longman. p. 89. ISBN ...
Arndt Juho Pekurinen (29 August 1905 in Juva, Finland - 5 November 1941 in Kalevala district, Soviet Union, now Russia) was a ... On 14 April 1931, the Lex Pekurinen, Finland's first alternative to military service, was passed. However, its provisions ... Conscientious objection in Finland. Peace Review, 16 (2), 207-209. Brock, Peter (1999). Challenge to Mars: Essays on Pacifism ... from 1918 to 1945. University of Toronto Press. pp. ix. ...
Majority of the ships and boats used by the Finns were evacuated overland to Finland after the Moscow Armistice. Listing (not ... The Winter War began on 30 November 1939 when the Soviet Union attacked Finland, nullifying the Treaty of Tartu. The Finns ... Initial Finnish naval assets however consisted of small motor boats which had been small enough to be transported from Finland ... Auvinen, Visa (1983). Leijonalippu merellä [Lion flag at sea] (in Finnish). Pori, Finland: Satakunnan Kirjapaino Oy. ISBN 951- ...
Both regiments were composed of men who came from other parts of Finland but were in the Vyborg area. The local White Guards ... With 49,000 inhabitants, Vyborg was the second largest town in Finland. It was also the most diverse Finnish town, in 1910 ... Prime Minister's Office of Finland. ISBN 952-5354-45-8. Westerlund (2004), p. 162 Westerlund (2004), p. 104 Schweitzer, Robert ... 98-99 Keskisarja, Teemu (2013). Viipuri 1918. Helsinki: Siltala. ISBN 978-952-23418-7-7. Westerlund (2004), p. 163 Westerlund ( ...
Since 9 April, Vyborg was the capital of Red Finland as the Red Government and the Red Guard general staff left Helsinki. The ... At the time of the Finnish Civil War, Vyborg was the second-largest city in Finland, with about 80,000 people. The surrounding ... About 10,000 were refugees who had fled from the western parts of Finland. The combat units had up to 5,000 fighters, including ... During the following evening, his troops took the villages of Terijoki and Kuokkala by the Bay of Finland. Terijoki Red Guard, ...
Eventually, after hard fighting, Finland was forced to cede Käkisalmi and the whole of Finnish Karelia to the Soviet Union by ... There is suburban and long-distance service to Finland Station in Saint Petersburg. The town is connected by roads with Saint ... In 1812, as the Grand Duchy of Finland three years earlier had been formed within the Russian Empire, Tsar Alexander I ... During the Continuation War in 1941-1944, Finland gained back Keksgolm and other territories ceded to the Soviets in 1940. The ...
Soviet Russia was the only nation to recognize the Delegation as Finland's lawful government. At the final stages of the war at ... "The Red Finland was led by the People's Delegation". Itsenäisyys 100. Helsingin Suomalainen Klubi. Retrieved 2 November 2017. " ... "The revolutionary government of Finland". histdoc. Retrieved 28 December 2016. "Ehdotus Suomen valtiosäännöksi". hlstdoc (in ... "Finland's workers' executive committee", whose members represented the most radical wing of the labor movement. On the night of ...
... following Jonathan Johansson's opening goal for Finland, the bird left the scene.[59] Finland's national football team have had ... Finland, the southern Kola Peninsula, and Arkhangelsk where it ranges north to about latitude 640 30' N., southward to the ... in Sweden and Finland the clutch size averages 1.56 and 1.87, respectively. While variation based on climate is not unusual for ... adult owls from western Finland were about the same size, averaging 2.65 kg (5.8 lb).[34] The subspecies seems to follow ...
The Kurds in Finland celebrate the new year as a way of demonstrating their support for the Kurdish cause.[126] Also in London ... 1918-05-28. Retrieved 2010-04-06.. *^ Marshall, Bonnie C.: Tashjian, Virginia A, The Flower of Paradise and Other Armenian ...
... purchased from Finland) EVA 316 (1995-; ex-Lonna; purchased from Finland) Botnica (2012-; purchased from Finland) Murtaja (1890 ... purchased from Finland) Tor (2000-; purchased from Sweden) Dudinka (2006-; ex-Apu; purchased from Finland) Project 21900/21900M ... 1918-1922; handed over to Estonia) Ilmarinen (1918-1922; handed over to the Soviet Union) Voima (1924-1945; handed over to the ... 1914-1918, 1940-1985; ex-Tsar' Mikhail Fyodorovich, ex-Wäinämöinen, ex-Suur Tõll; sold to Estonia in 1987) Fyodor Litke (1914- ...
188-189 "Why Finland deserves to celebrate its independence". Finland Politics. Nash, Michael L (2012) The last King of Finland ... Finland portal Monarchy portal Finnish Civil War Finnish crown jewels Grand Duchy of Finland Kingdom of Finland (1742) Monarchy ... Konungariket Finland) was an abortive attempt to establish a monarchy in Finland following Finlands independence from Russia. ... In July 1919, Finlands first president Kaarlo Juho Ståhlberg replaced Mannerheim. Finland became a republic. During World War ...
Southern Finland*. Western Finland*. Eastern Finland*. Oulu*. Lapland*Åland. These provinces are merely administrative ... Finland is bounded by the Baltic Sea with the Gulf of Finland to the south and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. The Åland ... The Republic of Finland (. Finnish: Suomi, Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland ), is one of the Nordic countries. ... Kingdom of Finland. Frederick Charles of Hesse, a German prince, was elected King, putatively with the name Väinö I of Finland ...
Swedish Ambulances Leave For Finland (1940). Swedish emergency personel are dispatched to Finland ... RAMC Volunteers In Training (1914-1918). Men of the Royal Army Medical Corps in training. ... Ambulance And Emergency Response (1918). Ambulance motorcycle and medic respond to victim ...
Finland had been a grand duchy in the Russian empire since 1809 but proclaimed independence in December 1917, after the ... After Civil War compares reconstruction projects in Bosnia, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, the Republic of ... The Church of England and the Home Front, 1914-1918: Civilians, Soldiers and Religion in Wartime Colchester by Robert Beaken ( ... Chapter 1. The Legacy of the Civil War of 1918 in Finland. Risto Alapuro ...
The Centre Party of Finland (Finnish: Suomen Keskusta, Kesk; Swedish: Centern i Finland) is a centrist,[3] liberal,[4][5][6] ... Urho Kekkonen was the President of Finland from 1956 to 1982 and became a symbolic figure of a statesman in Finland. Graffiti ... literally Centre of Finland). Despite urbanisation of Finland and a temporary nadir in support, the party managed to continue ... Liberalism and centrism in Finland. Sources[edit]. *. Vares, Vesa; Mikko Uola; Mikko Majander (2006). Demokratian haasteet 1907 ...
Finland returned to New York on 24 April, and was delivered to the U.S. Navy the same day. Finland was commissioned on 26 April ... Finland was scrapped in 1928. Finland was launched on 21 June 1902 by W. Cramp and Son, Philadelphia, for the Red Star Line of ... Finland and Manchuria both returned to New York on 30 May. Finland next left New York on 15 June with DeKalb, Kroonland, George ... Finland and President Lincoln arrived back at New York on 16 March. Finland made one more crossing under Army charter. Leaving ...
Occupation in Finland: Farm worker, single. Passenger record from Finland not found. Entry to the US not found yet. Marjamäki ... Occupation in Finland: Tenant farmer´s daughter, single. Passenger record from Finland not found. Entry to the US not found yet ... Occupation in Finland: Farmer´s son. Passenger record from Finland not found. Mattsson Kaarlo Kustaa. Passport record 3.7.1902 ... Occupation in Finland: Lodger, single. Passenger record from Finland not found. Mettomäki Anton. Parkano church records. b. ...
Image:Finland Portal Picture.jpg,thumb,right,260px]],br, +. [[Image:Finland Portal Picture.jpg,thumb,right,260px. ,Finland ... Through the Finland page you can learn how to find, use, and analyze Finnish records of genealogical value. The content is ... To add your knowledge and help expand the wiki [[FamilySearch Wiki:Help wanted on the Finland pages,click here:]] To add your ... The Finland Page is a work in progress, your contributions and feedback are essential! ...
Germans capture Helsinki, Finland. As part of Germanys support of Finland and its newly declared parliamentary government, ... Finland, under Russian control since 1809, took the opportunity of the upheaval in Russia... ...
1916 Historisk Tidskrift för Finland (Finland, published in Swedish). *1918 Hispanic American Historical Review (US) ... 1918), published by the Conference on Latin American History; The Americas, (est. 1944); Journal of Latin American Studies ( ...
U16 European Championship Women 2010 Box Score: Final statistics and game report from Sweden vs. Finland 67-48 played on 14.08.2010
Trivium Power Trip Venom Prison - Nosturi Helsinki Finland * Venom Inc + Suffocation + Nervosa + Aeternam @ O2 Islington ... Judas Priest Firepower Signing at Sony Square Store NYC 3/19/18 posted on March 20, 2018 ... Judas Priest Firepower Signing at Sony Square Store NYC 3/19/18. March 20, 2018 ...
Trivium Power Trip Venom Prison - Nosturi Helsinki Finland * Venom Inc + Suffocation + Nervosa + Aeternam @ O2 Islington ... Judas Priest Firepower Signing at Sony Square Store NYC 3/19/18 posted on March 20, 2018 ... Judas Priest Firepower Signing at Sony Square Store NYC 3/19/18. March 20, 2018 ...
I admire Finland - did my masters thesis on their small debarking machine. Source of Linux, NOKIA cell phone - and most of all ... We lived in the U.S. as my husband is from there but moved to my home country, Finland, when Bush got re-elected. People gladly ... And cost of US medical schools - again profit - why is tuition free in Finland - was example here.. I have a son - professional ... And Finland is tundra behind the Arctic Circle. Society is much more important than natural resources. ...
Tilghman RC, Finland M. Clinical significance of bacteremia in pneumococcal pneumonia. Arch Intern Med. 1937;59:602-19. ... However, pneumococcal bacteremia was associated with most of the pneumonia deaths reported by Tilghman and Finland (4), and ... we examined data collected by Tilghman and Finland (4) from the pre-antimicrobial drug era of the 1920s and 1930s. The Figure ... Deaths from bacterial pneumonia during 1918-19 influenza pandemic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14:1193-9. DOIPubMed ...
Finland declares its independence.. 1918. Russian Empire. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania declare independence in 1918. The three ... 1918. Austria-Hungary. Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Poland become independent.. 1919. United Kingdom. End of the protectorate ...
Finland has approximately 188,000 lakes (about 10% of the country) and a similar number of islands. In the northernmost part of ... Finland is a thoroughly modern welfare state with well-planned and comfortable small towns and cities, but still offers vast ... Thus Finland fought three separate wars during World War II. In the end, Finland lost much of Karelia and Finlands second- ... If you enter Finland in your own car, note that all petrol in Finland contains ethanol. If your car should not be run on ...
Finland has approximately 188,000 lakes (about 10% of the country) and a similar number of islands. In the northernmost part of ... Finland is a thoroughly modern welfare state with well-planned and comfortable small towns and cities, but still offers vast ... Thus Finland fought three separate wars during World War II. In the end, Finland lost much of Karelia and Finlands second ... Finland (Finnish: Suomi, Swedish: Finland) is in Northern Europe and has borders with Russia to the east, Norway to the north, ...
In the west, the Germans occupied the Ukraine, White Russia, Finland and the Baltic States as well as threatening Petrograd. To ... The Russian Government passed a decree giving independence to Finland at the end of 1917. Momentum gathered in 1918 and by ... After November there was a general strike in Finland. This was largely victorious but there was no revolutionary workers party ... The demand to withdraw the Red Guards from Finland led to a German-backed counter-revolution of considerable ferocity. ...
Kirkkonummi, Finland.. 2009. Alho, P., Hyyppä H., and J. Hyyppä, 2009. Consequence of DTM Precision for Flood Hazard Mapping: A ... Photogrammetric Journal of Finland, 19(1):37-46.. Maltamo, M., Mustonen, K., Hyyppä, J., Pitkänen, J. and X. Yu, 2004. The ... Photogrammetric Journal of Finland, Vol. 21(2), 13-25.. Holopainen, M., Vastaranta, M., Yu, X., Hyyppä, J., Kaartinen, H., and ... Photogrammetric Journal of Finland, 20(2): 33-42.. Yu, X., 2007. Methods and techniques for forest change detection and growth ...
"The Womens Liberation Movement in Finland. The Social and Political Mobilisation of Women in Finland 1880-1910." Scandinavian ... See also: Civil Rights Movement in the United States; Democracy; Finland; New Zealand; Voting Rights. ... In 1906 Finland was the first country to introduce universal suffrage and many countries have since followed suit. Thus, during ... Finland and Norway, pioneering countries in Europe, were also little affected by demographical unbalances linked to male ...
Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis and serum cholesterol levels in Eastern Finland. Arteriosclerosis. 1988;8:788-792. ...
... get settled and enjoy life in Finland by facilitating access to relevant information. Finland Forum has been online since April ... Finland Forums aims to help people to move, ... Board index Finland Forum Assistance Families in Finland * ... Families in Finland. Family life in Finland from kindergartens, child education, language schooling and everyday life. Share ... Finland Forum. Find information about moving to, living in and life in Finland. ...
  • We observed a similar 10-day median time to death among soldiers dying of influenza in 1918 ( 2 ), a finding consistent with the time to death for a bacterial superinfection, specifically pneumococcal bacteremic pneumonia ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • We address unresolved questions of why the 1918 influenza H1N1 virus was more virulent than other influenza pandemics and why some people survived the 1918 pandemic and others succumbed to the infection. (frontiersin.org)
  • Lack of pre-existing virus-specific and/or cross-reactive antibodies and cellular immunity in children and young adults likely contributed to the high attack rate and rapid spread of the 1918 H1N1 virus. (frontiersin.org)
  • Co-infections with bacterial pathogens, and possibly measles and malaria, co-morbidities, malnutrition or obesity are also known to affect the severity of influenza disease, and likely influenced 1918 H1N1 disease severity and outcomes. (frontiersin.org)
  • A DNA sequence encoding an N-terminal segment of Influenza A virus H1N1 hemagglutinin (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (H1N1)) (AAD17229.1) (Met 1-Arg 344), termed as HA1 subunit, was fused with a polyhistidine tag at the C-terminus. (sinobiological.com)
  • Recombinant HA1 subunit of Influenza A virus H1N1 hemagglutinin (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (H1N1)) comprises 338 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.5 kDa. (sinobiological.com)
  • A sharp increase in the number of narcolepsy diagnoses in children was noticed shortly after immunization campaigns for the pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccines in Finland and Sweden. (vaccinesafety.edu)
  • Increased incidence and clinical picture of childhood narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign in Finland. (vaccinesafety.edu)
  • Brundage and Shanks ( 1 ) have studied time to death from the onset of influenza symptoms during the 1918 pandemic in military and civilian populations and found a median time to death of 7-11 days. (cdc.gov)
  • Mills CE , Robins JM , Lipsitch M . Transmissibility of 1918 pandemic influenza. (cdc.gov)
  • Here, we review the viral, genetic and immune factors that contributed to the severity of the 1918 pandemic and discuss the implications for modern pandemic preparedness. (frontiersin.org)
  • While current studies suggest that viral factors such as haemagglutinin and polymerase gene segments most likely contributed to a potent, dysregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine storm in victims of the pandemic, a shift in case-fatality for the 1918 pandemic toward young adults was most likely associated with the host's immune status. (frontiersin.org)
  • The 1918 pandemic of influenza infection was associated with an illness consistent with narcolepsy. (vaccinesafety.edu)
  • Most Finns are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland (81.7 percent). (conservapedia.com)
  • To the north, in the area of Finland and Karelia, on the other hand, the population remained sparse, and no Finnish state emerged, though three loose unities apparently crystallized: the Finns proper, the Tavastlanders (or Tavastians), and the Karelians, each of whom had their own chiefs and all of whom waged war on the others. (britannica.com)
  • The increasing fascination Finns appear to have with their past is proven by the facts that since 1970s the number of family reunions have multiplied, and that at the end of the 1990s Finland is the only country in the world to preserve its church registers in Internet (Spoof 1994: 7-9). (folklore.ee)
  • The Finnish Airforce's second aircraft was given to the Finns 6th March 1918 by a a Swedish count and he had painted a blue swastika on it for good luck. (thethinkingatheist.com)
  • In March 2016 the Finnish Broadcasting Company Yle asked Finns to share their family memories of the year 1918. (yle.fi)
  • Distribution of days of illness before death from influenza-related pneumonia, 1918, and from untreated pneumococcal pneumonia, 1920s and 1930s. (cdc.gov)
  • The major bacterial pathogen associated with influenza-related pneumonia in 1918 was Streptococcus pneumoniae ( 1 , 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • To further analyze the time course of death from influenza in relation to that of pneumococcal pneumonia in 1918, we examined data collected by Tilghman and Finland ( 4 ) from the pre-antimicrobial drug era of the 1920s and 1930s. (cdc.gov)
  • The Figure shows the distribution of time from onset of illness to death due to influenza-related pneumonia in 1918 compared with time to death due to untreated pneumococcal pneumonia in the 1920s and 1930s. (cdc.gov)
  • However, pneumococcal bacteremia was associated with most of the pneumonia deaths reported by Tilghman and Finland ( 4 ), and most 1918 influenza-related deaths were due to bacterial pneumonia ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Also, up to 50% of patients dying from pneumonia in 1918 had pneumococcal bacteremia ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Tilghman RC , Finland M . Clinical significance of bacteremia in pneumococcal pneumonia. (cdc.gov)
  • When the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company lost twenty-four million dollars in excess death benefits during the influenza epidemic of 1918, it established an Influenza Commission, which would soon focus its attention upon pneumonia and its treatment with antipneumococcal antiserum (Podolsky 2006). (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • However, none of the pneumonia investigators - who included such eventual luminaries as Russell Cecil (at Bellevue Hospital in New York) and Maxwell Finland (at Boston City Hospital) - would so explicitly advocate the methodology of the controlled clinical trial as would Jesse Bullowa. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • The conflicting beliefs of overseas revolution and collective defense got here into being with Lenin and Wilson in 1918. (chinatowncoffee.com)
  • Describing Lenin as he appeared to give a speech to Russian troops at the Mikaihulovosky Manege on January 1, 1918, Bessie Beatty, a reporter with a San Francisco newspaper wrote: "At last he [Lenin] came, and a mighty cheer went up. (factsanddetails.com)
  • In 1918, Lenin lived in Suite 107 of the National Hotel, a luxurious place with stained glass, iron-work staircases and oak paneling. (factsanddetails.com)
  • The Reds assumed control of the towns and industrial centres of southern Finland, while the Whites ruled central and northern rural areas. (yle.fi)
  • The National Board of Survey and Topografikunta (the Finnish corps of topographical engineers) produced topographic maps in scale 1:20 000 during 1918 - 1944 on two-colour or four-colour map sheets covering an area of 10 km x 10 km. (maanmittauslaitos.fi)
  • From its first years, the government in what became the Soviet Union was based on the one-party rule of the communists, as the Bolsheviks called themselves beginning in March 1918. (factsanddetails.com)
  • During World War II, Finland was attacked by the Soviet Union in the Winter War , but fought them to a standstill that saw the USSR conquer 12% of Finnish territory. (wikitravel.org)
  • After the collapse of the USSR, Finland joined the European Union on 1 January 1995, and was the only Nordic state to adopt the euro currency at its initiation on 1 January 2002. (wikitravel.org)
  • Discussions on the Winter War and Continuation War, the wars between Finland and the USSR. (axishistory.com)
  • The USSR insisted having land areas from Finland to secure Leningrad's safety in 1939. (moddb.com)
  • Finland's President Ryti gave Hitler his word about Finland not signing peace treaties with USSR when he is President. (moddb.com)
  • Department of Statistics, FIN-20014 University of Turku, Finland. (nih.gov)
  • Kirsi Lehto of the University of Turku in Finland studies plant viruses with an eye toward their role in the origin and evolution of life. (astrobio.net)
  • The adoption of a new monarchist constitution had been delayed because it did not get the required qualified majority (the legitimacy of the royal election was based upon the Instrument of Government of 1772, adopted under King Gustav III of Sweden, when Finland had been a part of the Kingdom of Sweden. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1912, Finland was chartered by the American Olympic Committee to take the U.S. team to the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finland ) is in Northern Europe and has borders with Russia to the east, Norway to the north, and Sweden to the west. (wikitravel.org)
  • Finland stayed an integral part of Sweden until the nineteenth century, although there was near-constant warfare with Russia on the eastern border and two brief occupations. (wikitravel.org)
  • Unlike craggy Norway and Sweden, Finland consists mostly of low, flat to rolling plains interspersed with lakes and low hills, with mountains (of a sort) only in the extreme north, while Finland's highest point, Fell Halti, rises only to a modest 1,328m. (wikitravel.org)
  • At the beginning of its recorded history, in the eleventh century A.D., Finland was conquered by its powerful neighbor, Sweden. (allrefer.com)
  • The Scandinavian countries, Norway and Sweden, and Finland to the north of the Sea, are still blanketed in snow. (cia.gov)
  • A civil war followed, and afterwards, while the pro-republic Social Democratic Party was excluded from the Parliament and before a new constitution was adopted, Frederick was elected to the throne of Finland on 9 October 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • After Civil War compares reconstruction projects in Bosnia, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Spain, and Turkey in order to explore how former combatants and their supporters learn to coexist as one nation in the aftermath of ethnopolitical or ideological violence. (jhu.edu)
  • Similarly, there is difference between the official opinions of the 1918 Civil War and the recollections of soldiers of white and red forces (see Peltonen 1996: 242). (folklore.ee)
  • Only after the long and bloody Civil War of 1918-21, which included combat between government forces and foreign troops in several parts of Russia, was the new communist regime secure. (factsanddetails.com)
  • When the Russian Civil War broke out, on 12 February 1918 Yuzovka was part of the Donetsk-Krivoy Rog Soviet Republic. (glacierjazzstampede.com)
  • The 1918 Civil War infiltrated Finnish children's lives as well. (yle.fi)
  • The Civil War broke out as Finland was transitioning from its former status as a Grand Duchy of the Russian Empire to new-found sovereignty as an independent state. (yle.fi)
  • The vertical files at the Maki Library consist of ephemeral collections on the following three subjects: Suomi College, Finland and Finlandia University. (finlandia.edu)
  • Over the centuries, Russia has exerted an especially persistent and powerful pressure on Finland. (allrefer.com)
  • When all Russian diplomatic efforts to prevent the First World War (1914-1918) failed, Nicholas approved the Imperial Russian Army mobilization on 30 July 1914 which gave Imperial Germany formal grounds to declare war on Russia on 1 August 1914. (wikipedia.org)
  • Launched on November 7, October Revolution in Russia enabled the separation of Finland from Russia. (moddb.com)
  • Finn Wars is a mod that tells the story of World War 2 in Finland against Russia. (moddb.com)
  • It would be very embarrassing to us if history should record that, the Russian republic was overthrown and the Czar restored by aid of the Allies and America or that Finland, having gained its freedom by German arms, should by Allied and American arms be restored to Russia, which never had any right to it. (jfredmacdonald.com)
  • Revolutions in Russia and Finland further intensified the anxieties and confirmed the fears that truly war had begun to be poured out upon all nations (see D&C 87:2). (byu.edu)
  • We know more or less all there is to know about the way the hostilities of the 1914-1918 war developed. (wuj.pl)
  • World War I (WWI or WW1 or World War One), also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. (fouman.com)
  • Khoramshahi, E., Eija Honkavaara and Tomi Rosnell (Finland): An Automatic Method for Adjustment of a Camera Calibration Room, FIG Working Week 2017 Surveying the world of tomorrow - From digitalisation to augmented reality Helsinki, Finland, May 29-June 2, 2017. (maanmittauslaitos.fi)
  • Turku University Hospital in Turku, cornaviruses was also emphasized by Finland. (cdc.gov)
  • Died: Naval Hospital No. 5, September 17, 1918. (ahgp.org)
  • The social turmoil of World War I in Europe filtered into Finland, and disagreements broke out about how the new state should be run. (yle.fi)
  • In the end, Finland lost much of Karelia and Finland's second-largest city Vyborg , but Soviets paid a heavy price for them with over 300,000 soldiers killed. (wikitravel.org)
  • My grandfather's father died in the prison camp on the fortress island of Suomenlinna in 1918, leaving five children for his wife to rise alone. (yle.fi)
  • Finland is a sparsely populated country and, if heading out into the wilderness, it is imperative that you register your travel plans with somebody who can inform rescue services if you fail to return. (wikitravel.org)
  • Finland currently numbers 5,302,778 inhabitants and has an average population density of 17 inhabitants per square kilometer. (conservapedia.com)
  • With a population of just over five million inhabitants in Finland, there are more than three million saunas in the country, which include those built into homes or free-standing cabins dotted all over the country - usually positioned just adjacent to lakes, shorelines, ponds, and rivers. (coinupdate.com)
  • Finnic peoples , descendants of a collection of tribal peoples speaking closely related languages of the Finno-Ugric family who migrated to the area of the eastern Baltic, Finland, and Karelia before ad 400-probably between 100 bc and ad 100, though some authorities place the migration many centuries earlier. (britannica.com)
  • After the end of World War II, Finland was forced to cede most of the province of Karelia to the Soviet Union. (maanmittauslaitos.fi)
  • It shows Finland before the cession of Karelia and other areas as well as Eastern Karelia. (maanmittauslaitos.fi)
  • Republican parties won three quarters of the parliament's seats in the election of 1919 and Finland adopted a republican constitution. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relentless opposition to the monarchy was rewarded in the parliamentary election 1919 and the party became the biggest non- socialist party in Finland with 19.7% of the votes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1918, H.D. and Aldington separated, and in 1919, she gave birth to her first and only child, Perdita. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Wilhelmshaven Revolt - a chapter of the revolutionary movement in the German navy, 1918-1919, by 'Ikarus' - real name Ernst Schneider. (libcom.org)
  • Below I intend to introduce the 20th century history of Finland on the very basis of these responses. (folklore.ee)
  • The battles took place mostly in Lapland and so the war between Finland and Germany was called Lapland War. (moddb.com)
  • In 1945 Lapland War was fought and Finland was finally free from wars. (moddb.com)
  • His phenomenal influence in the world's music landscape is best demonstrated by the number of countries that have their own annual Bob Marley Day celebrations Jozy Altidore USA Jersey , which includes Germany, Belgium, Finland, Italy and Denmark to name a few. (agrowbook.com)
  • Northern Finland is home to a culture called the Sami people , or Laplanders , which are known for wearing red clothing and herding reindeer. (conservapedia.com)
  • Excavations undertaken in 1996 have led to a radical reconsideration of how long people have inhabited Finland. (britannica.com)
  • Although Finland was originally an agricultural country, only one-third of its people now earn a living from agriculture and forestry. (britannica.com)
  • Some viruses do more than create temporary discomfort: it is estimated the influenza virus of 1918 killed somewhere between 50 to 100 million people around the world. (astrobio.net)
  • This download Краткие сообщения о докладах и полевых исследованиях института is means at young speakers of featuring with the service of the color, from China, Mongolia, Indonesia and the Baltic States, where Quranic people of distance and author accordingly make, to Finland, where the such generation of 1918 is n't advised represented as a Cognitive first project. (compositesinnovation.ca)
  • After her Navy service ended, she was returned to International Mercantile Marine, resumed her original name of SS Finland, and served on New York to Europe routes until 1923, when she returned to New York-San Francisco service. (wikipedia.org)
  • under Patronage of His Excellency Urho K. Kekkonen, President of the Republic of Finland). (finlandia.edu)
  • 2017) Effect of forest structure and health on the relative surface temperature captured by airborne thermal imagery - Case study in Norway Spruce-dominated stands in Southern Finland. (maanmittauslaitos.fi)
  • THE SIGNAL ACHIEVEMENT OF FINLAND has been its survival against great odds--against a harsh climate, physical and cultural isolation, and international dangers. (allrefer.com)
  • Poland under an Austrian sovereign and Finland under a German sovereign are not the lands for whose freedom Kosciusko fell and Svinhufvud was sent to Siberia. (jfredmacdonald.com)
  • He continued to Russify his lands, offending the subject races in Finland, Poland, Turkistan and the Ukraine. (rpfuller.com)
  • Finland, under the German control, is being forced into a war against the Allies and America, and Poland is likely soon to be forced into the same situation. (jfredmacdonald.com)
  • After the war, Finland lay in the grey zone between the Western countries and the Soviet Union. (wikitravel.org)
  • Despite close relations with the Soviet Union, Finland managed to be a democracy and remained a Western European market economy, building close ties with it's Nordic neighbours. (wikitravel.org)
  • FinnWars is about Finland fighting against The Soviet Union in WWII. (moddb.com)
  • In the summer 1941 Germany attacked The Soviet Union and asked some assistance from Finland. (moddb.com)
  • I minored in military history, specializing in the technology and tactics of warfare, and even I didn't know that about Finland and the Buffalo. (thethinkingatheist.com)
  • Derek Gunby provides an analysis and balance sheet of 1918: the first year of the Russian Revolution. (marxist.com)
  • Operation Michael, which marked the first sizeable German offensive against Allied positions on the Western Front in more than a year, began on March 21, 1918, with a five-hour-long bombardment of Allied positions near the Somme River from more than 9,000 pieces of German artillery, in the face of which the poorly prepared British 5th Army was rapidly overwhelmed and forced into retreat. (forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl)