EnglandTh2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.WalesNew England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Great BritainTh1-Th2 Balance: Homeostatic control of the immune system by secretion of different cytokines by the Th1 and Th2 cells. The concentration dependent binding of the various cytokines to specific receptors determines the balance (or imbalance leading to disease).Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.ScotlandRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Ethiopia: An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.West Indies: Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.MaineTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Suburban Health: The status of health in suburban populations.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Czechoslovakia: Created as a republic in 1918 by Czechs and Slovaks from territories formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia 1 January 1993.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Northern IrelandWater SofteningHealth Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.LondonHospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Interleukin-4: A soluble factor produced by activated T-LYMPHOCYTES that induces the expression of MHC CLASS II GENES and FC RECEPTORS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and causes their proliferation and differentiation. It also acts on T-lymphocytes, MAST CELLS, and several other hematopoietic lineage cells.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Interleukin-17: A proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T-LYMPHOCYTES or their precursors. Several subtypes of interleukin-17 have been identified, each of which is a product of a unique gene.AccidentsPrimary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)State Dentistry: Control, direction and financing of the total dental care of the population by a national government.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer: Subpopulation of CD4+ lymphocytes that cooperate with other lymphocytes (either T or B) to initiate a variety of immune functions. For example, helper-inducer T-cells cooperate with B-cells to produce antibodies to thymus-dependent antigens and with other subpopulations of T-cells to initiate a variety of cell-mediated immune functions.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.RestaurantsMass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.MassachusettsHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.JapanInterferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.USSRHospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Schools: Educational institutions.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Personnel Downsizing: Reducing staff to cut costs or to achieve greater efficiency.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Bed Occupancy: A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.Social Discrimination: Group behavior toward others by virtue of their group membership.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.IrelandLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Coroners and Medical Examiners: Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.VermontGreenlandCivil Disorders: Deliberate and planned acts of unlawful behavior engaged in by aggrieved segments of the population in seeking social change.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Venereology: A branch of medicine which deals with sexually transmitted disease.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Mice, Inbred BALB CEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.IndiaDrug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Dextropropoxyphene: A narcotic analgesic structurally related to METHADONE. Only the dextro-isomer has an analgesic effect; the levo-isomer appears to exert an antitussive effect.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.
  • Her research centers on Native American and European immigrant women in the 17th and 18th centuries and domestic life in early New England. (courant.com)
  • During the 17th and 18th centuries, the Masons began to take on a more religious and ritualistic role in their organization. (bigthink.com)
  • At the same time dissenting academies sprang up in the 17th and 18th centuries and gave a somewhat broader education than the basic teaching of reading, writing and the casting of accounts, their students sometimes going on to the Scottish universities or even to those overseas. (familysearch.org)
  • The Sri Lanka Rugby Football Union (SLRFU) has appointed former South African born England national sevens player Matt Turner as the coach of the Sri Lankan national Sevens team in preparation for the Asian 7's tournament which is due to take place in Bangkok and in Sri Lanka. (nation.lk)
  • Finally he decided to move to England in the end of 2008, where he represent the Premiership side Bristol the same year and played as a wing three quarter. (nation.lk)
  • Sprawling across endless, staggeringly blue coastline, and watched over by the iconic plane of Table Mountain, Cape Town is without doubt one of the world's most beautiful cities. (silversea.com)
  • Lancaster remains a major market centre, having one of the largest livestock markets in northwestern England. (britannica.com)
  • A smart, handsome market town, Kendal is the Lakes' arts and culture centre and is packed with independent cafés and pubs. (visitbritain.com)
  • Many towns with little or no experience in the Newfoundland trade, such as Cork, Liverpool, Chester, and Hull, took advantage of the post-war release of credit and labour to become involved in a variety of maritime trades, including that with Newfoundland. (heritage.nf.ca)
  • In practice, most New England towns have significant autonomy in managing their own affairs, with nearly all of the powers that cities typically have in most other U.S. states. (wikipedia.org)
  • After observing milkmaids in rural England who acquired immunity after exposure to an animal form of the disease, Jenner tested the practice first on his own son then a child in his town. (iupui.edu)
  • Evidence of prehistoric occupation in the area includes the Castlerigg stone circle on the eastern fringe of the town, which has been dated to between 3000 and 2500 BC . (wikipedia.org)
  • Leeds is one of a string of classic 'foothill towns' on the eastern fringe of the Pennines , established at significant river crossings at the interface between upland and lowland agricultural and economic systems. (conservapedia.com)
  • Passenger boats coming upriver from Westminster stop at Richmond , Kew , Chiswick , and Putney en route for Kingston and Hampton Court In Central London you will find a wide choice of passenger boats plying the piers between Westminster and the Thames Barrier. (riverthames.co.uk)
  • A short train ride from Central London (20 miles), Windsor is one of the tourism highlights of southern England, a privileged enclave of ancient architecture, closed corridors, and riverside strolls. (cvent.com)
  • United Nations' first meeting is held in London England and then Long Island United States. (thepeoplehistory.com)
  • The fifty-one original member states met at the Westminster Central Hall in London, England. (thepeoplehistory.com)
  • Greenwich is a district of south London, England, located in the London Borough of Greenwich.Greenwich is best known for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian and Greenwich Mean Time. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • London, July 18 (IANS) Thousands of British steelworkers and their families are holding a protest march Saturday in a town in northeast England where the looming closure of a Corus steel plant threatens to throw families into poverty. (thaindian.com)
  • These difficult times also saw the bank to open branches of its own in provincial towns. (everything2.com)
  • First chartered as a city in 1155, it became a separate county by order of Edward III in 1373, the first provincial town to receive this honor, and it remains a ceremonial county under the Lieutenancies Act. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The parish figures do not fully reflect the growth of the town of Grays, which by c . 1900 had begun to spread eastwards into Little Thurrock. (british-history.ac.uk)
  • This site contains information regarding the Dustin/Duston, Cheney and select kindred families of early New England. (17thc.us)
  • In the United States, early New England towns, formally disposed along wide elm-lined central roadways or commons, exhibit a conscious planning. (questia.com)
  • The town appears as 'Darby' or 'Darbye' on early modern maps, such as that of Speed (1610). (thefullwiki.org)
  • By a common consent, the people of New England, for a few years past, as the second centennial anniversary of each of its early settlements arrived, have seen fit to observe the day. (rwe.org)
  • Historically, a town house was the city residence of a noble or wealthy family, who would own one or more country houses in which they lived for much of the year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lancaster , urban area (from 2011 built-up area) and city (district), administrative and historic county of Lancashire , northwestern England , at the head of the estuary of the River Lune , 7 miles (11 km) from the Irish Sea . (britannica.com)
  • In addition to the town of Lancaster, the city (district) includes a substantial rural and agricultural area and the seaside resort of Morecambe. (britannica.com)
  • The city flourished through the cloth industry, becoming the fourth largest English town in the 15th cent. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This article is about the city in England. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The largest city in New England, Boston is regarded as the unofficial "Capital of New England" for its economic and cultural impact on the entire New England region. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • The town grew around these institutions and was granted its first charter in 1193. (britannica.com)
  • The series will end with a panel discussion of 1965 through 2015 that will feature Tolland teachers who grew up in town during that period. (courant.com)
  • Along the way, enjoy literary connections to a few other great British writers and the iconic towns of Stratford-Upon-Avon, Salisbury and Bath . (literarytraveler.com)
  • A town almost always contains a built-up populated place (the " town center ") with the same name as the town. (wikipedia.org)
  • The place has a story to tell, as do the docents stationed in each room - talk to them, and learn what you can about this side of England. (ricksteves.com)
  • Filling Stow's historic church rectory with lots of old English charm, and with its own sprawling and peaceful garden, this lavish old place facing the town square offers 21 large, thoughtfully appointed rooms with soft beds, stately public spaces, and a cushy-chair lounge. (ricksteves.com)
  • I can vouch for the town of Sandwich, in Kent, England, which is a beautiful place, full of old buildings and more importantly pubs selling good beer and guess what? (chemistry-blog.com)
  • New England is the best place in the world, she said. (telegram.com)
  • Our tour will visit some highlights of the English counties of Hampshire and Heart of England , the region famous for the Cotswolds villages and some of the countries' best gardens. (literarytraveler.com)
  • The average age of first-time motherhood is rising in England and Wales and across most of Europe . (medicalxpress.com)
  • She had hidden her secret from all but that close family for two decades, before seeing a South Wales Echo report about retired town planner Keith Gasson, 67, being brought from his Egham, Surrey , home to South Wales to face allegations from another woman. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • by Josie Cohen, Head of Policy & Campaigns (18th July 2017) The movement to end the use of pesticides in the UK's towns and cities enjoyed its first foray into Scotland a few weeks ago. (pan-uk.org)
  • Stamford was the first area in England to be deemed a conservation area, and as such includes the vast majority of buildings which have been preserved in the County of Lincolnshire. (serenataflowers.com)
  • There's still some abandoned asbestos production buildings and a huge asbestos waste pile at the west end of the town that perpetually pops up in the media. (oldhouseweb.com)
  • Matt Turner got the qualification to represent England as his mother is English.Matt Turner had the opportunity of representing Sri Lankan side Central Kings in 2013/14 Carlton International 7s tournament. (nation.lk)
  • The original town ( 'Old Sarum' ) had long been deserted, and was the most notorious of the 'rotten boroughs' until disfranchised in 1832. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Somerville, Texas, a sleepy, one--stoplight town 90 miles northwest of Houston, is home to a massive wood-treatment facility, which for more than 100 years churned toxic chemicals into the atmosphere while manufacturing phone poles and bridge supports. (houstonpress.com)
  • Residents have long suspected that Somerville has a greater incidence of cancer and other severe illnesses than would be expected for a town with just 1,700 people. (houstonpress.com)
  • Officials with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and the Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR) have confirmed that the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been detected in a number of locations in Massachusetts, the 18th state in the country to detect EAB. (somervillema.gov)
  • The best friend the Massachusetts colony had, though much against his will, was Archbishop Laud in England. (rwe.org)
  • The government charter until 1835 was that of Charles I (1639), incorporating the town under the title of the mayor, aldermen, and burgesses. (britannica.com)
  • History of Veterans Day World War I - known at the time as "The Great War" - officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, outside the town of Versailles, France. (issuu.com)
  • Only a small minority of them, generally the largest, were detached, but even aristocrats whose country houses had grounds of hundreds or thousands of acres often lived in terraced houses in town. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wander through the picturesque gardens, ornamental lakes, scenic trails, and one of the largest collections of birds of prey in all of England. (serenataflowers.com)
  • While the summer is, undoubtedly, a lovely time to visit, savvy travellers will find the Lakes and their towns and villages an equally beautiful destination in the autumn. (visitbritain.com)
  • The north of the county is rich in archaeological evidence from the period, but nothing is known that suggests any Roman habitation in the Keswick area, other than finds that point to the existence of one or more Roman highways passing the vicinity of the present-day town. (wikipedia.org)
  • It originated with an Iron Age hill-fort which housed successively a Roman, Anglo-Saxon, and Norman town. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The town, in the Lake District National Park , just north of Derwentwater , and 4 miles (6.4 km) from Bassenthwaite , had a population of 4,821 at the time of the 2011 census. (wikipedia.org)
  • his musical ideas were revolutionary, and it was some time before his works made their way in England (1813-1883). (wikisource.org)