History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.TurkeyHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Famous PersonsMedicine in ArtHistoryPaintingsPersia: An ancient civilization, known as early as 2000 B.C. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus the Great (550-529 B.C.) and for 200 years, from 550 to 331 B.C., the Persians ruled the ancient world from India to Egypt. The territory west of India was called Persis by the Greeks who later called the entire empire Persia. In 331 B.C. the Persian wars against the Greeks ended disastrously under the counterattacks by Alexander the Great. The name Persia in modern times for the modern country was changed to Iran in 1935. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p546 & Asimov, Words on the Map, 1962, p176)Leper Colonies: Residential treatment centers for individuals with leprosy.History of MedicineCivilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Nobel PrizePaleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Scurvy: An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)History of NursingAnthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Books, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)Literature, MedievalPlague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.SculptureEuropeBooksMummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.United StatesPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Magic: Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals.ArtManuscripts, MedicalPhilosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Philosophy, MedicalPolitics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Engraving and EngravingsReligion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Fur Seals: A group comprised of several species of eared seals found in two genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to SEA LIONS, they have an especially dense wooly undercoat.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Communicable DiseasesSmallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Periostitis: Inflammation of the periosteum. The condition is generally chronic, and is marked by tenderness and swelling of the bone and an aching pain. Acute periostitis is due to infection, is characterized by diffuse suppuration, severe pain, and constitutional symptoms, and usually results in necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)ItalyTheft: Unlawful act of taking property.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Th1-Th2 Balance: Homeostatic control of the immune system by secretion of different cytokines by the Th1 and Th2 cells. The concentration dependent binding of the various cytokines to specific receptors determines the balance (or imbalance leading to disease).Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Citrus aurantiifolia: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar lime fruit. Its common name of lime is similar to the limetree (TILIA).Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Developmental Biology: The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.HungaryPopulation Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.North AmericaFrance: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Genealogy and HeraldryCrops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Awards and PrizesTerminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.GermanyGreeceConservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.EnglandAgriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Ovomucin: A heterogeneous mixture of glycoproteins responsible for the gel structure of egg white. It has trypsin-inhibiting activity.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Suntan: An induced skin pigment (MELANIN) darkening after exposure to SUNLIGHT or ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. The degree of tanning depends on the intensity and duration of UV exposure, and genetic factors.PortugalGreat BritainCercopithecinae: A subfamily of the Old World monkeys, CERCOPITHECIDAE. They inhabit the forests and savannas of Africa. This subfamily contains the following genera: CERCOCEBUS; CERCOPITHECUS; ERYTHROCEBUS; MACACA; PAPIO; and THEROPITHECUS.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.South AmericaEurope, EasternEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.RussiaPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Yersinia pestis: The etiologic agent of PLAGUE in man, rats, ground squirrels, and other rodents.PolandMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Pacific OceanPopulation Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Black Sea: An inland sea between Europe and Asia. It is connected with the Aegean Sea by the Bosporus, the Sea of Marmara, and the Dardanelles.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.SwitzerlandNutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Air Sacs: Thin-walled sacs or spaces which function as a part of the respiratory system in birds, fishes, insects, and mammals.LondonAge Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Pneumovirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PNEUMOVIRINAE) where the human and bovine virions have neither hemagglutinin nor neuraminidase activity. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN is the type species.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Cholera: An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and Southeast Asia whose causative agent is VIBRIO CHOLERAE. This condition can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Avastrovirus: A genus of ASTROVIRIDAE infecting avian species and often involving extra-intestinal manifestations. The type species is Turkey astrovirus.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Bordetella avium: A species of BORDETELLA isolated from the respiratory tracts of TURKEYS and other BIRDS. It causes a highly contagious bordetellosis.Herpesvirus 1, Meleagrid: A species in the genus MAREK'S DISEASE-LIKE VIRUSES, in the family HERPESVIRIDAE, infecting turkeys.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.MexicoHerpesvirus 2, Gallid: The type species of the genus MARDIVIRUS in the family HERPESVIRIDAE. It is the etiologic agent of MAREK DISEASE, infecting domestic fowl and wild birds.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Herpesviridae: A family of enveloped, linear, double-stranded DNA viruses infecting a wide variety of animals. Subfamilies, based on biological characteristics, include: ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE; BETAHERPESVIRINAE; and GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Brazil
Carpet Turkey (Kurdish) 18th century". MathForum. 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2016. Thompson, Jon (1988). Carpets from the Tents ... The Eastern Carpet in the Western World, From the 15th to the 17th century, Arts Council of Great Britain, London, 1983, ISBN 0 ... These guls often contain star or (hooked) dragon motifs as found on 15th century Konya carpets. The presence of the hooked ...
19th century, Ottoman Turkey. Black-and-white reproduction. Hilye in free form (18th century). Hilye in free form (18th century ... In 17th-century Ottoman Turkey, hilyes developed into an art form with a standard layout, often framed and used as a wall ... Because of their supposed protective effect, a practice developed in Ottoman Turkey of the 17th century of carrying Muhammad's ... 18th century). There are several reasons given for the popularity of graphic hilyes. Islam prohibits the depiction of graphic ...
The Creation of Color in 18th Century Europe. Gutenberg-E.org. ISBN 9780231503693.. Additional 18th century history at "Turkey ... In the 18th century the most valued color was a bright red known as "Turkey Red". The combination of mordants and overall ... This general method of preparing lakes has been known for centuries[7] but was simplified in the late 18th and early 19th ... Madder was widely used as a dye in Western Europe in the Late Medieval centuries.[4] In 17th century England, alizarin was used ...
He played an 18th-century Matteo Goffriller cello from Venice, Italy. Young cellist Benyamin Sonmez died on December 1, 2011, ... He was living in istanbul, Turkey. His repertoire included modern composers including Dmitri Shostakovich, Alfred Schnittke, ... RNCM Manchester International Cello Festival in the United Kingdom and Istanbul International Music Festival in Turkey. His ...
It was founded in the late 18th century. Karaözü resimleri Karaözü Istanbul Dernegi Karaözü iletisim agi Coordinates: 39°12′N ... Karaözü is a village in the Sarıoğlan district of Kayseri Province, Turkey. The villages is located at the corner of Kayseri, ...
The disease was first recorded in the 18th century. However it was not until the 1880s that Louis Pasteur first isolated and ... Besides chickens, the disease also concerns turkeys, ducks, geese, raptors, and canaries. Turkeys are particularly sensitive, ...
1818), 18th Century chief and member of the Wolf Clan. *Shingas (fl. 1740-1763)), Turkey clan war leader ... As the 18th century progressed, many surviving Lenape moved west-into the (relatively empty)[d] upper Ohio River basin. ... Beginning in the 18th century, the Moravian Church established missions among the Lenape.[50] The Moravians required the ... The Lenape who fled United States in the late 18th century settled in what is now Ontario. Canada recognizes three Lenape First ...
... was an Ottoman grand vizier in the 18th century. He was a Turk from Reşadiye, today in Tokat Province, Turkey. He attended the ... He became the governor of the island of Rhodes (now in Greece), İçel (modern Mersin Province, Turkey), and Diyarbakır. He died ...
The Randolph family was the wealthiest and most powerful family in 18th Century Virginia. In 1663, Henry Randolph I built Swift ... He made his home at Turkey Island along the James River. Because of their numerous progeny, William Randolph and his wife, Mary ... Bremo was the name for a tract between Turkey Island and Curles plantations The name comes from a Germanic word meaning "edge ... The root also occurs in the English word "brim". The extant Bremo Plantation was established in the early 19th century in ...
Official U.S. representation in Mauritius dates from the end of the 18th century. An American consulate was established in 1794 ... Mauritius is represented in Turkey by its embassy in Berlin, Germany. Turkey is represented in Mauritius by its embassy in ... Both were governed by both Dutch and British rulers and gained their independence in the second half of the twentieth century. ...
... the originals provide a rich and unique insight into 18th-century rural English life. A World War II airfield located in the ... parish is now a turkey farm. Weston Hall and Park, also in the parish, have a golf course and a tourist attraction, the ... The village was home to the 18th-century clergyman and diarist, Parson Woodforde, in whose honour the village pub is named [1 ... Its name is derived from the Manor of Longaville in Normandy, France, which owned the local land in the 12th century. It covers ...
By the late 18th century, the combat ability of Zaporozhia was greatly reduced, especially after the Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca ... Following Turkey's defeat, some Cossacks retreated with the Turkish Army across the Danube River, where the Sultan allowed them ... ISBN 978-5-699-20121-1. . Cossacks and military settlers on Dniester and Bug 18th-19th centuries by I.A.Antsupov. First ... "The Danube Territory-land of the traditions of the Ukrainian Cossacks 18th-19th centuries". First published in Наукових записок ...
... is an 18th-century mosque in Safranbolu of Karabük Province, Turkey. The mosque is in the market ... The mosque is a part of the historic places of the city which are included in the List of World Heritage Sites in Turkey. The ...
... (Turkish: İncekaya Su Kemeri) is an 18th-century aqueduct in Karabük Province, Turkey. The aqueduct is to the ...
The bird is named after the 18th century Italian zoologist, Francesco Cetti. This species is very difficult to see because of ... The populations in Italy and Turkey are known to be stable or increasing. The exception to the general positive European ...
A leading Arab-origin Christian figure in the 18th and 19th century India was named Sumru. Her husband, Walter Reinhard, who ... Sumru is a given name used for females in Turkey. The version of Sumru in Azerbaijani language is the name of Egemen. The word ...
Until the early 18th century, the khanate maintained a massive slave trade with the Ottoman Empire. Captives were sold to ... Turkey and the Middle East. In Crimea, about 75% of the population consisted of slaves. The Crimean city of Caffa was the main ... The borderland area to the south-east was in a state of semi-permanent warfare until the 18th century. Some researchers ... The Crimean Khanate was one of the strongest powers in Eastern Europe until the 18th century. The Russian population of the ...
The road at Enfield Wash, and the settlement, was known as ''Horsepoolstones' until the 18th century. Turkey Brook was also ... The road crosses Turkey Brook at the Woolpack Bridge, where there was a footbridge from the 17th century, but it was not until ... These events became one of the most celebrated English criminal mysteries of the 18th century, and a cause célèbre at the time ... It is approximately located in the area either side of Hertford Road between Ordnance Road/Turkey Street and Bell Lane/Hoe Lane ...
During the 17th and 18th centuries, merchants and clerics from around the world came to India. Various groups such as the Arabs ... The ancestors of the clan, were from Eastern Turkey and was named Et'tin. Although they were traders at first, land grants ( ... The Munshibari (Bengali: মুন্সীবাড়ী) estate established in the 18th century was held by a landed, Anglo-Indian family of ... In the 19th century, the family traded jute with the British East India Company. They built mosques, schools and other ...
The synagogue was constructed in the 18th Century. However, it underwent repairs during the end of the 19th Century thus the ... History of the Jews in Turkey Ahrida Synagogue of Istanbul List of synagogues in Turkey "Yambol Synagogue". Chief Rabbinate of ... Turkey Shalom Newspaper - The main Jewish newspaper in Turkey. ... Bulgarian town of Yambol to Istanbul during the 15th century. ...
History of the Balkans, 18th and 19th Centuries. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1983. ISBN 0-521-27458-3. Paroulakis, ... History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey: Volume I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977. Vacalopoulos, Apostolis ... the position of educated and privileged Greeks within the Ottoman Empire improved greatly in the 17th and 18th centuries. From ... After the 16th century, many Greek folk songs (dimotika) were produced and inspired from the way of life of the Greek people, ...
These relations date back 250 years and actually started in the field of trade in the 18th century. On 14 October 1756, an ... Denmark-Turkey relations refer to current and historical relations between Denmark and Turkey. Denmark has an embassy in Ankara ... and Turkey has an embassy in Copenhagen. Both countries are members of NATO. Diplomatic relations between Denmark and Turkey ... There should be a limit of freedom of press." Turkey claims the channel is a mouthpiece for the Kurdistan Workers Party, whom ...
Between 16th and 18th centuries a part of nomadic Teke people migrated to the present location. The village was founded in 1864 ... Tekeli is a town in Mersin Province, Turkey. Tekeli is a part of Bozyazı district which itself is a part of Mersin Province. It ... But during the Turkish War of Independence the town became a part of Turkey on 21 May 1921. In 1987, it was declared a township ... The Teke Turkmens migrated from Turkestan to South West Anatolia (Antalya region) in the 13th century. ...
Turkey red is a color that was widely used to dye cotton in the 18th and 19th century. It was made using the root of the Rubia ... It originated in India or Turkey, and was brought to Europe in the 1740s. In France it was known as rouge d'Andrinople. The ... Lowengard, Sarah (2006). The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe. Columbia University Press. Thom Poole (2017). Life ... Displayed at right is the color Turkey red. ...
At the end of 18th century Caucasian conflict erupted once again with participation of Iran, Turkey and Russia. Turkish ... Surkhay-khan I demanded from Turkey to hand Shirvan over to his rule. Turkey refused. Surkhay-khan I, Ahmed-khan and Nutsal of ... swords and not given to him by Turkey as a gift, and that neither Sultan of Turkey nor Ahmed of Baghdad have the right to ... Sufism, as a sect of Shia, spread in the Sunni world in the 10th century. Unlike Muslims, Shites and Sufis in the worship of ...
The 18th century economist Adam Smith noted the imbalance in the rights of workers in regards to owners (or "masters"). In The ... Turkey. 2016. 8.2 Uganda. 2005. 1.5 Ukraine. 2015. 43.8 United Kingdom. 2016. 23.5 ... The origins of trade unions can be traced back to 18th century Britain, where the rapid expansion of industrial society then ... Zieger, Robert H., and Gilbert J. Gall, American Workers, American Unions: The Twentieth Century(3rd ed. 2002) excerpt and text ...
OTTOMAN TURKEY, 18TH CENTURY. The first treatise on quadrants, possibly titled Risala hidayat al-muluk, Ottoman Turkish ... In the late 19th century Emile Gallés vibrant glassware helped to transform ideas of what art could be. Specialist Carina ...
AN INSCRIBED OTTOMAN ENAMELLED TOMBAK EWER, EASTERN TURKEY, 18TH CENTURY. Of baluster form, with applied strap handle and ... these wares have been collectable since the early days of production in the 15th century, says our specialist Sara Plumbly ...
18th Century Variolation is introduced into England by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the British ambassador to Turkey. ... 20th Century Smallpox is widespread in Africa, Asia, and South America in the early 1900s, while Europe and North America have ... 11th Century Entrance into Europe. Crusades further contribute to the spread of smallpox in Europe with the European Christians ... 15th Century Smallpox is widespread in many European countries, and Portuguese expeditions to African west coast and new trade ...
The Creation of Color in 18th Century Europe. Gutenberg-E.org. ISBN 9780231503693.. Additional 18th century history at "Turkey ... In the 18th century the most valued color was a bright red known as "Turkey Red". The combination of mordants and overall ... This general method of preparing lakes has been known for centuries[7] but was simplified in the late 18th and early 19th ... Madder was widely used as a dye in Western Europe in the Late Medieval centuries.[4] In 17th century England, alizarin was used ...
Knotted Pile Wool Rug Fragment Turkey 17 18th Century Berlin Museum Of Islamic Art No89 286 F Spuhler Oriental Carpets In The ... This Knotted Pile Wool Rug Fragment Turkey 17 18th Century Berlin Museum Of Islamic Art No89 286 F Spuhler Oriental Carpets In ... Home » Knotted Pile Wool Rug Fragment Turkey 17 18th Century Berlin Museum Of Islamic Art No89 286 F Spuhler Oriental Carpets ... Knotted Pile Wool Rug Fragment Turkey 17 18th Century Berlin Museum Of Islamic Art No89 286 F Spuhler Oriental Carpets In The. ...
Into 18th century Poland new "messiah" arrives from Turkey. He promises eternal life on earth to everone who joins him. 25 ...
Carpet Turkey (Kurdish) 18th century". MathForum. 2012. Retrieved 28 January 2016. Thompson, Jon (1988). Carpets from the Tents ... The Eastern Carpet in the Western World, From the 15th to the 17th century, Arts Council of Great Britain, London, 1983, ISBN 0 ... These guls often contain star or (hooked) dragon motifs as found on 15th century Konya carpets. The presence of the hooked ...
19th century, Ottoman Turkey. Black-and-white reproduction. Hilye in free form (18th century). Hilye in free form (18th century ... In 17th-century Ottoman Turkey, hilyes developed into an art form with a standard layout, often framed and used as a wall ... Because of their supposed protective effect, a practice developed in Ottoman Turkey of the 17th century of carrying Muhammads ... 18th century). There are several reasons given for the popularity of graphic hilyes. Islam prohibits the depiction of graphic ...
Russia and Turkey agree to create buffer zone in Syrias Idlib. *French actor Gerard Depardieu wants to acquire Turkish ... The property has stood on the shores of the Bosphorus Strait since the 18th century and is used to host weddings and concerts, ... Tanker veers off course and completely destroys an 18th century coastal manor in Istanbul after rudder locks and it crashes ... This is the shocking moment a tanker crashed into an 18th century coastal mansion, causing heavy damage to the waterfront ...
1818), 18th Century chief and member of the Wolf Clan. *Shingas (fl. 1740-1763)), Turkey clan war leader ... As the 18th century progressed, many surviving Lenape moved west-into the (relatively empty)[d] upper Ohio River basin. ... Beginning in the 18th century, the Moravian Church established missions among the Lenape.[50] The Moravians required the ... The Lenape who fled United States in the late 18th century settled in what is now Ontario. Canada recognizes three Lenape First ...
Apart from a local man who breeds the birds as a hobby, the nearest commercial turkey f... ... ONE traditional dish that is unlikely to grace the Christmas dinner table of many locavores in KwaZulu-Natal is roast turkey. ... French Jesuits reportedly transported turkeys from North America to Britain in the mid-18th century. Until then, peacock, boar ... The last turkey farmer of any size who we are aware of recently shut up shop. We do not have a strong turkey-eating habit, ...
In the 18th century Manisa was ruled by the virtually independent Karaosmanoğlu governors until their power was broken in 1822 ... Dick Osseman , profile , all galleries >> Manisa in Western Turkey tree view , thumbnails , slideshow , map ... Manisa in Western Turkey. Bütün Türkiye resimleri için buraya basınız This gallery is in the Izmir topic. Click here for my ... It was taken by Cyrus II the Great of Persia in the 6th century BC, and in 190 BC it was the scene of a Roman victory over ...
View charming 17th and 18th century architecture and stop in a local museum to learn about the citys rich history. From there ... and golden works spanning from the 14th to the 20th centuries.Visit the three-story Maritime Museum with its unique collection ...
"In the 18th century, it was common for employers to reward their workers with gift turkeys at Christmas." ... Big into turkeys. The National Wild Turkey Federation is, as youd expect, all about turkeys. ... According to the states 2005-2010 turkey management plan there have "been many wild turkey studies" showing that wild turkeys ... The turkeys we see in town, in sharp contrast to the turkeys hunters are currently stalking in the woods of Washington and ...
... by Carl von Linné in the 18th century. ... Turkey. Wild Turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Painting by John ... The first use in English of the word "turkey" to describe the bird dates back to 1555. By 1575 , turkey was already becoming ... "Turkey merchants". Turkey merchants are believed to have introduced the guinea fowl, a native of Madagascar, to European dinner ... Did you know? The Thanksgiving and Christmas turkey originated in Mexico. Tony Burton Did You Know...? ...
PhD, 1989, fund grp: ia, document title: Architecture as a Theater of Life: Profile of the 18th Century Bosphorus (Stanford ... SMArchS 1987, subgrp: hi, Waterfront Developments in the Middle East Case Study: the Golden Horn Project, Istanbul, Turkey ( ... Administrator, Rockland 21st Century Collaborative for Children and Youth. … SMArchS 1988, subgrp: ht, From the Cheney House to ... PhD, 1991, fund grp: rt, document title: Adolf Loos and Theories of the Practical Arts in 19th Century Austria and Germany ( ...
They are already balancing on the edge, by acting like its the 18th century in some area instead of catch up.. Stop trying to ... on Turkeys Political Leaders Reprise Roles In Spat Over Whether Or Not To Ban YouTube And Facebook ... Dec 18th, 2013 @ 9:24am. Re: So... Windowing is bad? (as McGreed). on Upset About Beyonce Going Digital, Target Refuses To ...
Check out our country profile, full of essential information about Turkeys geography, history, government, economy, population ... Infoplease has everything you need to know about Turkey. ... By the 18th century, Russia was seeking to establish itself as ... About 12 million Kurds, roughly 20% of Turkeys population, live in the southeast region of Turkey. Turkey, however, does not ... Turkey in Europe comprises an area about equal to the state of Massachusetts. Turkey in Asia is about the size of Texas. Its ...
Someone Stole the Bones of an 18th-Century Witch. Scottish Authorities Want Them Back Live Science. *August 24th to August ... Neolithic site in Turkey includes possible worlds oldest sewer system Anadolu Agency*New season at early empires site in Iran ... 6th century BCE bronze statuette found on Bulgarias Cyricus island Sofia Globe*2,600-year-old Hebrew seal found near Western ... August 18th to August 23th, 2019 Edition *An Archaeological Puzzle on the Danube New York Times*Inscription found in ...
When European travelers came to visit Anatolia in the 18th century, they also visited Mastaura and shared information about it ... Turkey to support Azerbaijan with all its means against Armenias attacks. * EU sanctions on Turkey would be irrational, says ... Colosseum-like structure unearthed in western Turkey. AYDIN - İhlas News Agency. A structure similar to Romes Colosseum, ... 712 executions carried out in six decades in Turkey, says parliament report. ...
Article: New information on earthquake history of the Aksehir-Afyon Graben System, Turkey, since the second half of 18th ... century. N. Ozer. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 6, 1017-1023. SRef: 1684-9981/nhess/2006-6-1017. ... Turkey. Naside Ozer, Yildiz Altinok and Savas Ceylan. Nat. Hazards, Volume 40, Number 3 / March, 2007, 553-562. DOI: 10.1007/ ...
The first major empire in the area was the Hittites (from the 18th century to the 13th century BC). The Hittites, who spoke one ... Turkey is a republic. There are 81 provinces in Turkey. The money of Turkey is called Turkish Lira. The capital city is Ankara ... Main article: Education in Turkey. Turkeys literacy rate is currently 95%. People in Turkey have to go to school for 12 years ... Republic of Turkey[change , change source]. Mustafa Kemal Atatürk was the first President of Turkey. He made many changes that ...
The turkey was very closely associated with America: Benjamin Franklin even proposed that it should become the symbol of ... Waltons image of a cookmaid plucking a turkey is an example of the kind of lowly subject-matter denigrated by Sir Joshua ... Plucking the Turkey, Henry Walton, exhibited 1776 This painting was exhibited in London in 1776, during the early stages of ... Angels and Urchins: The Fancy Picture in 18th-Century British Art, Djanogly Art Gallery, Nottingham, 28 March - 4 May 1998 and ...
SUPPER IN COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG FOR 12 White Onion Soup Baked Country Ham Roast Turkey or Beef Vegetable Salads Bath Cakes ... Creating Festive Meal From 18th-Century Cookbooks in Williamsburg. July 02, 1987,ANNE WILLAN , Willan, a cooking teacher and ... Roast quail jostled a tower of marzipan candies illustrating the 18th-Century habit of mixing dozens of dishes on the table at ... The following festive supper is based on recipes taken from 18th-Century cookbooks and tested by researchers from the ...
Turkey is trying to join the European Union. Perhaps they should consider moving a few centuries forward to the 18th century ... First, theres Turkey. Remember that Turkey is officially constituted as a secular state. Well that may be so, but the powers ... of being several centuries behind Christians in the climb towards civilisation. Read the bizarre details here. ...
  • Variolation is introduced into England by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the British ambassador to Turkey. (cdc.gov)
  • Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the British ambassador, learned about variolation during their appointment in Turkey. (cdc.gov)
  • It had been introduced in about 1718 by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who was the English Ambassadress to Turkey," says Chrisman-Campbell. (pri.org)
  • Second, the background of these writers is varied from the aristocratic Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who accompanied her husband to Turkey when he took up his ambassadorial post in 1716, to the intrepid Alexander David-Neel, who honed her traveling skills by repeatedly running away from home as a child and went on to become the first Western woman to enter Lhasa, the forbidden city of Tibet. (gmu.edu)
  • The first text I use is an extract from the letters written by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1786) in Turkey. (gmu.edu)
  • In the 21st century, most Lenape now reside in the Oklahoma , with some communities living also in Wisconsin and Ontario . (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 20th and very early 21st centuries, when full-on warfare has become rarer and remoter for Westerners, disease is now the area where we experience the feelings of emotional intensity associated with war, the crushing communal defeat, sudden personal loss, plodding hardship and hysterical relief at victory. (lrb.co.uk)
  • This updated third edition brings the history into the 21st century and incorporates recent fashion scholarship on Paris, along with lavish photos, paintings and full-color fashion plates from different eras. (shelf-awareness.com)
  • In the early 21st century the pro-European Democratic Party (DS) and its offshoot, the centre-right Democratic Party of Serbia (DSS), emerged as leading parties. (britannica.com)
  • He views relativism 's denial of objective truth , and the denial of moral truths in particular, as the central problem of the 21st century. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 17th-century Ottoman Turkey, hilyes developed into an art form with a standard layout, often framed and used as a wall decoration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of their supposed protective effect, a practice developed in Ottoman Turkey of the 17th century of carrying Muhammad's description on one's person. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ottoman Turks first appeared in the early 13th century, subjugating Turkish and Mongol bands pressing against the eastern borders of Byzantium and making the Christian Balkan states their vassals. (factmonster.com)
  • Before that, Turkey was the core of the Ottoman Empire . (wikipedia.org)
  • During the 14th century, after the fall of the Mongol Empire , Lord Osman built a new empire named after himself: the Ottoman Empire . (wikipedia.org)
  • Located in Sultanahmet, this 19th century, wooden hotel adds a little Ottoman flavour to your stay in Istanbul. (travelnotes.org)
  • By the 18th century, prostitution increased in Ottoman society. (heavensat.ru)
  • In spite of the developed institutions and the detailed bureaucracy of the Ottoman State, physicians continued to be within the frame of a wise physician and were not able to develop a scientist's meditating mind of the New Age until the second half of the 19th century. (muslimheritage.com)
  • This choice allows me to raise the question of the Ottoman Empire and its relations to the West, to draw attention to the views of an 18th-century aristocratic woman on the Ottoman Empire, and to discuss the importance of letter-writing as a means of private and public communication. (gmu.edu)
  • In the Ottoman period, the female patients were treated either at their homes or at the residences of the medical practitioners until the 19th century. (muslimheritage.com)
  • 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of what a number of international organizations, countries, and even some U.S. states formally recognize as the Armenian Genocide of 1915, the Ottoman government's planned extermination of minority Armenians inside present-day Turkey. (adst.org)
  • As late as the middle of the 16 century, the Ottoman ceramic industry was producing more utensils than architectural tiles. (amazonaws.com)
  • The Habsburgs and Romanovs beat the Turks back in the Balkans, Ukraine, and Caucasus through the 18th century, though the Turks besieged Vienna in 1529 and 1683 and almost gained control of the Mediterranean at Lepanto in 1571. (nationalreview.com)
  • At the dawn of the nineteenth century, Russian Tsar Nicholas I commanded a years-long invasion of the Caucasus region. (harvard.edu)
  • Visitors to Turkey, arriving in Istanbul, will probably cross the Bosphorus and enter Asia Minor. (travelnotes.org)
  • Istanbul may not be the capital of Turkey, which is Ankara, but it is the historic centre that bridges the two continents of Europe and Asia , at Galata. (travelnotes.org)
  • Many charter tourists to Turkey head to the Mediterranean and Aegean coasts, and often miss out on a visit to Istanbul. (travelnotes.org)
  • This report is based on an analysis of new data collected from 603 child care service providers in 5 provinces across Turkey (Istanbul, Denizli, Eskisehir, Samsun and Gaziantep), as well as a household survey and focus groups discussions with working and non-working mothers and fathers of children ages 0-6 in districts selected, representing different socioeconomic groups in each of the Anatolian cities. (weforum.org)
  • Istanbul is no longer the capital but it is still the economic, cultural and historical center of Turkey, an enticing blend of East and West, straddling the Bosphorus strait, which separates Europe and Asia. (shelf-awareness.com)
  • ONE traditional dish that is unlikely to grace the Christmas dinner table of many locavores in KwaZulu-Natal is roast turkey. (news24.com)
  • Including traditional roast turkey, roasted pig and stuffing, pulled pork and chipolatas. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • Turkeys (Meleagris Gallopavo) are native to North America, where they have been traditional Thanksgiving and Christmas food since the Pilgrims hunted wild turkeys to serve on the first Thanksgiving Day. (news24.com)
  • The turkey was very closely associated with America: Benjamin Franklin even proposed that it should become the symbol of independent America, instead of the eagle. (tate.org.uk)
  • It s widely known that Benjamin Franklin privately championed the turkey as the proper symbol of our country because compared to the bald eagle, a turkey is a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America. (theoaklandpress.com)
  • Although the turkey is tied to the American character and sense of national identity, traditionally the bird has not been a respected figure in America. (upc-online.org)
  • Imagine how surprised Adkins would be if he were to drive through Spokane's South Hill neighborhood today, decades later, only to have to stop and wait for a haughty flock to cross the road - turkeys that, in all likelihood, are the distant descendants of the wary birds he tried to net all those years ago. (spokesman.com)
  • Exactly how that taming happened isn't known, but it's possible a rafter of turkeys - the technical term for a group of the birds - were hanging out by a village eating garbage and never left. (spokesman.com)
  • The Turkey merchants capitalized on the new opportunity, and began to supply the new birds instead of the guinea fowls to the English market, and the rest is history. (mexconnect.com)
  • Although, to be fair to turkeys, these truly American birds were discovered in the New World and imported to England. (theoaklandpress.com)
  • Things seem to be lagging a bit on the turkey front this year, with activity coming in fits and spurts Cool temperatures have been hanging on so far this month and that certainly seems to have slowed the birds movements and normal spring antics. (delmarvanow.com)
  • Turkeys, he said, are "the wildest and the tamest, the most cunning and wary, and the most stupid and foolish of all birds" (146-147). (upc-online.org)
  • At RC Organic Farms, formerly a dairy farm owned by Jackie Good s father, Ronald Campau, turkeys have always been the centerpiece for the family s Thanksgiving dinner. (theoaklandpress.com)
  • On the west side, Hartland Farms in Hartland offers free-range turkeys fed a vegetarian, drug-free diet. (theoaklandpress.com)
  • An 18th-century Russian shipwreck has been found in the Aegean Sea off the city of Didim in western Turkey. (divernet.com)
  • I'm drinking chartreuse, the 'Vieillissement Exceptionnellement Prolongé' aged in oak barrels, drunk out of one of my 18th century glasses that I found walled up in a house in Maine. (blogspot.com)
  • The turkey DNA shows Native American people in the Rio Grande Valley of northern New Mexico raised and ate the same genetic strain of bird as the Mesa Verde people, and that the turkeys arrived in New Mexico about the same time Mesa Verde was abandoned, the researchers said. (spokesman.com)
  • Russian rule over Georgia was eventually acknowledged in various peace treaties with Iran and the Ottomans and the remaining Georgian territories were absorbed by the Russian Empire in a piecemeal fashion through the course of the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • کورد / Kurd ) are an Ethnic-Iranian ethnolinguistic group mostly inhabiting a region known as Kurdistan , which includes adjacent parts of Iran , Iraq , Syria , and Turkey . (thefullwiki.org)
  • The top countries in strawberry production are the USA followed by Turkey, Spain, Egypt and South Korea which demonstrates the global appeal through the different continents of this beneficial fruit. (hubpages.com)
  • New information that they could then incorporate and use in the emerging Islamic society, during the 9th century particularly, that would be the 2nd or the 3rd century of the Hijra or Muslim era, Arab scholars translated into Arabic a large number of Greek medical writings that had been composed in earlier centuries in the Greek speaking areas of what is now modern Turkey and Egypt. (muslimheritage.com)
  • We do not have a strong turkey-eating habit, unlike our chicken-eating habit. (news24.com)
  • Roast quail jostled a tower of marzipan candies illustrating the 18th-Century habit of mixing dozens of dishes on the table at once--sweet and savory, fish, meat, fruit and vegetable. (latimes.com)
  • Their aim is for the Kurds in the southeast of Turkey to have autonomy , with a government of their own. (wikipedia.org)
  • city, western Turkey. (pbase.com)
  • He was the leading general of the armed resistance against the British-sponsored Greek occupation of Western Turkey in the 1920s and founded the RPP which became the single ruling party of the country between 1923 and 1950. (wsm.ie)
  • Turkey Run, a working replica of a Colonial farm, was to have closed last month under a plan by the National Park Service to implement cutbacks of more than $3 million in Washington-area programs. (washingtonpost.com)
  • About the battle you speak off will be fought in 'Middle East regions of Syria, Northern parts of SA and Turkey' at the same time as predicted by our last Prophet (P.B.U.H), whether you believe it or not. (military-quotes.com)
  • The company has started a manufacturing collaboration with its local partner to transfer the manufacturing of the nebulizer technology used in respiratory treatment and of its patented product in the field of HIV to Turkey with an investment of GBP 25 million in 2018. (invest.gov.tr)
  • It is hardly surprising that it developed this symbolic significance, given the numbers of its victims during the epidemics which erupted periodically throughout the late Middle Ages, initially in both its pneumonic and bubonic forms, but by the 17th century pneumonic plague seems to have disappeared and it was the bubonic form of the disease which was prevalent. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • Archaeologists believe turkeys were first domesticated in south-central Mexico in 800 BCE by pre-Aztecan people and again in the southwest of the United States in 200 BCE. (spokesman.com)
  • But some people did not like some of the changes that made life in Turkey more secular . (wikipedia.org)
  • John Styles, The Dress of the People: Everyday Fashion in Eighteenth-Century England , New Haven and London 2007, p.276, reproduced. (tate.org.uk)
  • Last year, more than 39,000 people visited Turkey Run Farm, including many area school children who participated in the farm's weekend camping program. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Providing contributions to the future of Turkey not only with its healthcare solutions but also with social responsibility projects, GSK has contributed to the health literacy training of about 100,000 young people since 2013 in collaboration with Community Volunteers Foundation through the Healthy Youth Movement project. (invest.gov.tr)
  • We offer both mixed dorm and female dorms up to 7 people all en-suite shower and toilet in our newly renovated attached modern building also private rooms all en-suite shower and toilets for 1-3 people on our 18th century freshly renovated main building. (gomio.com)
  • Its strategic position meant that over the centuries it suffered many invaders, but although they had to adapt to these difficult circumstances their culture and people endured. (medium.com)
  • Fruity flavoring - If Italians have bergamot marmalade, people in Sweden and Norway enjoy bergamot-flavored snus, a smokeless, sugar-free tobacco from the 18th century. (mercola.com)