Benin: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER and between TOGO and NIGERIA. Its capital is Porto-Novo. It was formerly called Dahomey. In the 17th century it was a kingdom in the southern area of Africa. Coastal footholds were established by the French who deposed the ruler by 1892. It was made a French colony in 1894 and gained independence in 1960. Benin comes from the name of the indigenous inhabitants, the Bini, now more closely linked with southern Nigeria (Benin City, a town there). Bini may be related to the Arabic bani, sons. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p136, 310 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p60)Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Mycobacterium ulcerans: A slow-growing mycobacterium that infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues, giving rise to indolent BURULI ULCER.Pyrethrins: The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.Insecticide Resistance: The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Anopheles gambiae: A species of mosquito in the genus Anopheles and the principle vector of MALARIA in Africa.Phenylcarbamates: Phenyl esters of carbamic acid or of N-substituted carbamic acids. Structures are similar to PHENYLUREA COMPOUNDS with a carbamate in place of the urea.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Africa, Western: The geographical area of Africa comprising BENIN; BURKINA FASO; COTE D'IVOIRE; GAMBIA; GHANA; GUINEA; GUINEA-BISSAU; LIBERIA; MALI; MAURITANIA; NIGER; NIGERIA; SENEGAL; SIERRA LEONE; and TOGO.Fenitrothion: An organothiophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide.MuseumsForehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Civilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Circumcision, Female: A general term encompassing three types of excision of the external female genitalia - Sunna, clitoridectomy, and infibulation. It is associated with severe health risks and has been declared illegal in many places, but continues to be widely practiced in a number of countries, particularly in Africa.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.Citrullus: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the edible fruit.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Sanitary Engineering: A branch of engineering concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of environmental facilities conducive to public health, such as water supply and waste disposal.Racism: Differential treatment or unequal access to opportunities, based on group membership such as origin or ethnicity.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Jews: An ethnic group with historical ties to the land of ISRAEL and the religion of JUDAISM.Mauritania: A republic in western Africa, southwest of ALGERIA and west of MALI. Its capital is Nouakchott.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Prince Edward Island: An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)PortraitsMedicine in ArtPaintingsArtFamous PersonsExpeditions: Usually refers to planned scientific data-gathering excursions.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Tricholoma: A large genus of gilled mushrooms in the family Tricholomataceae. They are most often found in mountain and northern forests.Cognitive Reserve: Capacity that enables an individual to cope with and/or recover from the impact of a neural injury or a psychotic episode.Awards and PrizesHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.
The proposal was rejected by Kosoko "on the technical reason that Lagos was under the Oba of Benin and that it was only that ... Notably, Lagos had hitherto been under Benin suzerainty up until the reign of Oba Kosoko who was dethroned by British forces in ... Benin and the Europeans: 1485-1897. Humanities Press, 1969 - Benin. pp. 241-242. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) Cole, ... In 1860, Kosoko persuaded the Oba of Benin to send messages to Dosunmu pressing him to allow Kosoko's return to Lagos. Dosunmu ...
Humanities Press, 1969 - Benin. pp. 241-242. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) Mann, Kristin. Slavery and the Birth of an ... However, Idewu Ojulari's reign was unpopular and at the behest of the Oba of Benin, to whom the people of Lagos had petitioned ... His chiefs reportedly communicated their displeasure with Idewu to the Oba of Benin, who sent him a skull, a sword, and a ... Notably, Lagos had hitherto been under Benin suzerainty up until the reign of Oba Kosoko who was dethroned by British forces in ...
The Benin Kingdom; Queen Amina Part I (The Seed); and Queen Amina Part II (The Warrior). Panaramic has plans to launch a ...
The Benin Empire (1440-1897; called Bini by locals) was a pre-colonial African state in what is now modern Nigeria. It should ... Benin exercised considerable influence on the western Igbo, who adopted many of the political structures familiar to the Yoruba ... Numerous ancient African civilizations settled in the region that is today Nigeria, such as the Kingdom of Nri, the Benin ... Benin region, but Asaba and its immediate neighbors, such as Ibusa, Ogwashi-Ukwu, Okpanam, Issele-Azagba and Issele-Ukwu, were ...
Great Benin: its customs, art and horrors. F. King, 1903 pp.139-140 Alan Frederick Charles Ryder. Benin and the Europeans, 1485 ... suggest that it was by this time accepted in Benin as a standard unit of value; from it are derived the pano, pagne, paan and ... 1897. Ibadan history series. Humanities Press, 1969. p. 57 "Pano is Portuguese for cloth... ...References to the yard measure ...
Eweka, E. B. (1992). Evolution of Benin Chieftaincy Titles. Benin City: Uniben Press. pp. 124-125. Wong, Cyril (November 2005 ... Eseohe was born in Zaria, Nigeria on 9 April 1981 and is descended from a royal family of the Benin Empire. Eseohe Arhebamen's ... Osadolor Osarhieme, Benson (23 July 2001). "The Military System of Benin Kingdom, c.1440 - 1897 (page 77)" (PDF). Department of ...
Bacon, R. H. S. Benin: City of Blood. London: Edward Arnold, 1897. OCLC 4454844 Bacon, R. H. S. The Dover Patrol. London, 2 ... Mackay (1973), p. 297 Dash (1990), p. 157 See a discussion Benin: The sack that was. "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times ... The Dreadnought Project - Reginald Hugh Spencer Bacon Reginal Bacon biography at firstworldwar.com Extract on Benin (PDF). ... and on his return from active service wrote the book Benin, the City of Blood (1897), describing the campaign. Promoted to ...
"Evolution of Benin chieftaincy titles (pages 124)".] Eweka, E. B. "The Military System of Benin Kingdom, c.1440 - 1897 (page 78 ... "Evolution of Benin chieftaincy titles (pages 124-125)".] Eweka, E. B. "The Military System of Benin Kingdom, c.1440 - 1897 ( ... Benin elders were panic-struck, and 'to appease Prince Idu, the kingdom was divided.' The whole of south east was ceded to him ... The Edo State is also called Benin, though it is not to be confused with the country. The Kingdom of Ugu originated out of the ...
Benin Expedition of 1897 British punitive action that led to the annexation of the Kingdom of Benin. The New York Times ... p. 5. "To Punish the Murderers; Great Britain Will Send Another Expedition to Benin City". The New York Times. January 13, 1897 ... "punish the murderers of the Benin City expedition." The Herero and Namaqua genocide in German South-West Africa by the German ... Daily News will to-morrow say that the Government has ordered that an expedition be formed to punish the murderers of the Benin ...
During this time she participated in the Benin Expedition. After spending two years in reserve she left Plymouth for Australia ... She served as part of the Cape and West Africa Station from 1893 until 1897. ...
13 March 1894 Benin River 1894 Naval expedition up the Benin River, August-September 1894 Brass River 1895 Operations against ... Recipients of the Benin 1897 clasp included three nursing sisters. The obverse bears a left-facing portrait of Queen Victoria ... 26 February 1897 Benin 1897 A punitive column to Benin City consisting of Royal Navy and locally recruited police, 6 February ... 7 August 1897 Dawkita 1897 The defence of Dawkita in the Gold Coast against Sofa tribe slavers, 28 March 1897 1897-98 ...
The Walls of Benin were a combination of ramparts and moats, called Iya, used as a defense of the capital Benin City in present ... The Benin Walls were ravaged by the British in 1897. Scattered pieces of the walls remain in Edo, with material being used by ... The Walls of Benin City were the world's largest man-made structure. Fred Pearce wrote in New Scientist: "They extend for some ...
He took part in the Benin Expedition to Nigeria in 1897. In late December 1905, the lieutenant was promoted to commander. He ...
... he held the title of Iyase of Benin. Obaseki was born to the family of Agho Obaseki, a Benin chief. He attended Benin City ... He was a leader of a group of educated Benin residents and contractors who sought representation and a voice in Benin's ... In the 1930s, some Benin elites established a Benin lodge of the Reformed Ogboni, an organization inspired by freemasonry and ... Obaseki was appointed Iyase of Benin in 1948 having earned the support of the Benin Community Taxpayers Association largely led ...
... located in the state now known as the Republic of Benin). Benin Empire (1440-1897), a pre-colonial African state of modern ...
Boisragon published his account of the incident as The Benin Massacre in 1897. He then rejoined the Royal Irish Regiment as a ... Captain Alan Boisragon, The Benin Massacre (London: Methuen, 1898) The London Gazette, 12 May 1891, p. 2543; 15 April 1898, p. ... The Benin Massacre (London: Methuen, 1897) Works by or about Alan Maxwell Boisragon at Internet Archive Artist's proofs and ... In January 1897 he was only one of two survivors of a small British expedition to Benin which was attacked and defeated, the ...
... and transferred the Major Seminary there to Benin in 1938. Bishop Taylor was succeeded in the Asaba-Benin Vicarite by Bishop ... When Benin City diocese celebrated their 100 - centenary year at Agenebode on May 2, 1984; amid other ceremonies in other parts ... It was at Agenebode that the first parish station was opened in the Archdiocese of Benin City with Peter Pioten as the first ... In the same 1973, Bishop Kelly retired and handed over the Diocese of Benin City to Bishop Patrick Ebosele Ekpu (now Archbishop ...
Whilst with the Forte he was involved in the Punitive Expedition of 1897 in Benin. Following promotion to sub-lieutenant on 15 ...
Additionally, the Oba of Benin deployed a group of Benin officers charged with preserving Benin's interests in Lagos. These ... Some Benin accounts of history have the Ashipa as son or grandson of the Oba of Benin. Other accounts note that Ashipa is a ... to Benin and rebuffed subsequent tribute requests from the Oba of Benin. Previous rulers of Lagos have used the titles of ... a war captain of the Oba of Benin. Ashipa was rewarded with title of Head War Chief/Oloriogun and received the Oba of Benin's ...
In the 15th century, indigenes from the Great Benin Empire moved to Esanland and renewed Edo-Esan cultural bonds as the Benin ... Esan nations often worked either in tandem or subordination towards the Benin Empire, sending soldiers to the Benin army and ... Benin's sovereignty over Esanland enabled it to send long-distant traders, or ekhen. Ekhen procured cloth, ivory, peppers and ... Fallen Benin chiefs like Ologbosere and Ebohon were still resistant to British rule inadvertently guarded Esan soil from the ...
Obaseki of Benin. Heinemann, 1972. pp. 1-5. ISBN 9780435944698. "Chief Agho Obaseki". THE OBASEKI FAMILY OF BENIN, EDO STATE OF ... Obaseki of Benin. Heinemann, 1972. pp. 31-32. ISBN 9780435944698. Igbafe, Philip Aigbona. Obaseki of Benin. Heinemann, 1972. p ... He thereafter left for Benin City to start a new life and there he met Crown Prince Idugbowa, later Oba Ovonramwen Nogbaisi who ... Obaseki played a crucial role in the events leading to the Fall of Benin from the Punitive Expedition of 1897. He had organized ...
... ruled the Benin court. Many Benin works of art entered the European art market after the Benin Expedition of 1897. The British ... The Art of Benin. London: The British Museum Press, 2010. Ben-Amos, P. Girshick. The Art of Benin. London: The British Museum ... Bronze Head of Queen Idia from Benin, 16th century (Ethnological Museum of Berlin) Bronze Head from Ife Benin ivory mask ... It is a very realistic representation of a young woman from the Benin court, who wears a high pointed ukpe-okhue crown of ...
Layiwola, Adepeju (2007) 'Benin Massacre; Memories and Experiences', Benin Kings and Rituals, Court Arts from Nigeria, Museum ... "The Oba of Benin Kingdom: A history of the monarchy". MG Africa. 2016-11-14. Retrieved 2017-11-11. "Peju Layiwola heads LIMCAF ... Layiwola received a BA (Metal Design) from University of Benin in 1988, and an MA and Ph.D.(Visual Arts) from the University of ... So, I opted for metal design at the University of Benin, which was broader spectrum from what she studied because she did metal ...
But in the 1700s, the Bight of Benin (also known as the Slave Coast) became the next most important hub. Ouidah (now part of ... Following the defeat of an unsuccessful foray by Consul General James R. Phillips, a larger retaliatory force captured Benin ... Out of reverence for traditional kingship, for instance, the Oba of Benin, whose office was closely identified with Edo ... Consequently, in 1849, John Beecroft was accredited as consul for the bights of Benin and Biafra, a jurisdiction stretching ...
Benin was never a significant exporter of slaves, as Alan Ryder's book Benin and the Europeans showed. By the early 18th ... At his death, the Benin Empire extended to Dahomey in the west, to the Niger Delta in the east, along the west African coast, ... After the 16th century, Benin mainly exported pepper, ivory, gum, and cotton cloth to the Portuguese and Dutch who resold it to ... Usman created an empire that included parts of northern Nigeria, Benin, and Cameroon, with Sokoto as its capital. He retired to ...
In Germany the Free Association of German Trade Unions was formed in 1897 after the conservative Anti-Socialist Laws of ...
... there is a future on the Benin River if Benin territories were opened. Benin had developed a reputation for sending strong ... Soni, Darshana (1997). The British and the Benin Bronzes. ARM Information Sheet 4, Campaign for the Return of the Benin Bronzes ... and looted Benin City, bringing to an end the west African Kingdom of Benin. As a result, much of the countrys art, including ... Most of the Benin bronzes sold at auction were purchased by museums, mainly in Germany. The dispersal of the Benin art to ...
Benin Diplomatic Handbook, p. 23. Meyerowitz, Eva L. R. (1943). "Ancient Bronzes in the Royal Palace at Benin". The Burlington ... "Benin bronzes sold to Nigeria". BBC News. March 27, 2002. Retrieved July 26, 2010. "Sculpture: The Bronzes of Benin". TIME. ... Some even concluded that Benin knowledge of metallurgy came from the Portuguese traders who were in contact with Benin in the ... Benin Diplomatic Handbook. International Business Publications. 2005. ISBN 0-7397-5745-8. Benin Plaques, Museum number Af1898, ...
1897 not bought out any manufacturer, and we an not over- ockcd. but we have correct (goods bought right, and for cash, land we ... Jessie Benin jr. Stenographer. : Seven of our Stucents have taken poeftlone recently. If you want to sesure a position attend ... December 10, 1897. Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 21. Publication: Logansport Pharos-Tribune i ... 10, 1897. Wheat-For Dec. opened. 8X.07; ihigh, $1.08; low, $1.03; closed, $1.03. Wheat-May, opened 93}c: closed, 9Uc. 1 Corn- ...
Oba Ovonrramwen (died 1914), Benin City, Kingdom of Benin, before 1897. Mr. Edwin Hokin (died 1990) and Mrs. Grace E. Hokin ( ... Edo, Court of Benin. Nigeria. Obas Altar Tusk, 1850/1888. Ivory. 150.5 x 195.6 x 12.7 cm (59 1/4 x 77 x 5 in.). Gift of Mr. ... Evan Maurer, "A Carved Ivory Tusk from Benin," Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 71, 3 (1976), pp. 6-9.. Art Institute ... Barbara Winston Blackmun, "Icons and Emblems in Ivory: An Altar Tusk from the Palace of Old Benin," African Art at the Art ...
1993-1997, London, Museum of Mankind, Great Benin: a West African Kingdom ...
Tags: 1890s, 1899, art, benin bronzes, benin city, human sacrifice, imperialism, juju, june 28, ologbosere, ologbosheri. ... The locale of todays post is "Benin", but its important to note that this is not the modern country of Benin but rather the ... More on this object, and its place in the story of Benin and Europe, in this episode of the BBCs History of the World in 100 ... Dispatched within days, the retaliatory Benin punitive expedition sacked Benin City by the end of February, sending its ...
Tags: 1890s, 1899, art, benin bronzes, benin city, human sacrifice, imperialism, juju, june 28, ologbosere, ologbosheri. ... The locale of todays post is "Benin", but its important to note that this is not the modern country of Benin but rather the ... 1899: Ologbosere, of the Benin Empire. June 28th, 2011. Headsman On this date in 1899, British forces occupying Benin City ... The British had no reason to force trade with the Benin Kingdom. If the Benin Kingdom refused trade, there was no reason to ...
The Benin Bronzes were hung on the walls of the Obas palace reflecting a view of Benins history and impressing guests. ... The value of Benin would lead to tragedy.. In 1892, Henry Gallwey, then the British Vice-Consul of Oil Rivers Protectorate, ... Benin had a tremendous culture of artistry and the export of carved ivory tusks became a lucrative industry for the Kingdom. ... The British sacked Benin City and the ancient kingdom was destroyed with Oba Ovonramwen sent into exile. ...
The British Museum has sold several Benin bronzes to their homeland Nigeria, which is campaigning to have the full set returned ... The fate of the plaques sent to Nigeria are in doubt as little of the collection of Benin bronzes is currently on display. ... The British Museum has sold off more than 30 controversial Benin bronzes for as little as 75 each since 1950, it has emerged. ... The revelation is an interesting one for those campaigning to see the Benin bronzes return to Nigeria - and the Elgin Marbles ...
"Rubber will not keep in this country": Failed development in Benin, 1897-1921. by Fenske, James ...
The Benin Empire (1440-1897), a large pre-colonial African state of modern Nigeria. The Kaabu Empire (1537-1867), a Mandinka ... the medieval city of Benin, Sungbos Eredo walls, the buildings of Timbuktu, and many other sites yet to be discovered. We need ...
Benin * Burkina Faso * Cape Verde * Ivory Coast * The Gambia * Ghana * Guinea * Guinea-Bissau * Liberia * Mali * Niger * ... The Benin Empire was a pre-colonial empire located in what is now southern Nigeria. Its capital was Edo, now known as Benin ... It should not be confused with the modern-day country called Benin, formerly called Dahomey. The Benin Empire was "one of the ... Benin. Burkina Faso. The Gambia. Ghana. Guinea-Bissau. Guinea. Ivory Coast. Liberia. Mali. Mauritania. Nigeria. Niger. Senegal ...
"We are an honest community, and after thorough investigation into the provenance of the Benin bronze…our job is to seek the ... and will be one of the first Benin bronzes to be returned to Nigeria by a major British institution. ... "belongs with the current Oba at the Court of Benin." ... An expedition in 1897 by British colonial forces saw thousands ... of bronzes stolen from Benin City, the Edo State capital.. [READ ALSO] IPPIS: FG says lecturers enrolling, despite ASUUs ...
The Benin Bronzes, which were taken from Africa by British troops in 1897, will be lent to a museum being set up in Nigeria. ... The Benin Bronzes, which were taken from Africa by British troops in 1897, will be lent to a museum being set up in Nigeria. ... The Benin Bronzes are to be loaned to Nigeria by the British Museum. A report commissioned by President Macron recommended ...
The burning of Benin city by Britain takes place, known also as the Punitive Exhibition of 1897. The excursion, led by Admiral ... During the expedition the British Admiralty destroyed much of the citys treasured art, including the Benin Bronzes, auctioning ... Events of 1897back to top. Current affairs. Queen Victorias Diamond Jubilee is marked by a series of celebratory events, and ... Sir Harry Rawson, was a response to an attack by Benin warriors on a British delegation sent to settle a dispute over customs ...
Benin mastered bronze during the 16th century, produced portraiture and reliefs in the metal using the lost wax process.[51] ... The earthworks are some of the largest man made structures in Africa and the world such as the walls of Benin and Sungbos ... The Walls of Benin City are collectively the worlds largest man-made structure and were semi-destroyed by the British in 1897. ... Akinwumi, Olayemi (1995). "BIOLOGICALLY-BASED WARFARE IN THE PRE-COLONIAL BORGU SOCIETY OF NIGERIA AND REPUBLIC OF BENIN". ...
The people of Benin, called Bini, are descended from the Ife, also known for their remarkable bronzes. Almost all Benin art was ... BENIN, OBJECT 9, 16.5, $300, SOLD. Although similar in style to many older works, this piece is 20th C. and was made to be ... The extraordinary bronzes of the Benin kingdom in what is now Nigeria exhibit a virtuosity and sophistication of style that has ... Their work was brought to Europe following a punitive expedition by the British in 1897, causing a great sensation. ...
BENIN, BRONZE KINGS HEAD 11, 5, $300, SOLD. Old Benin bronzes are very rare. Despite its appearance, this is a 20th C. piece ... The people of Benin, called Bini, are descended from the Ife, also known for their remarkable bronzes. Almost all Benin art was ... The extraordinary bronzes of the Benin kingdom in what is now Nigeria exhibit a virtuosity and sophistication of style that has ... forms developed after the classical or great period of Benin, when the bronzes stressed monumentality and effective ...
Already in 1897 a British force sacked Benin and looted thousands of artifacts following the killing of an embassy sent to open ... As the Daily Mail reported in 1897, the diamond jubilee procession displayed new types, new realms at every couple of yards, ... As the British Prime Minister Lord Salisbury said in 1897 in a speech on British colonization in tropical Africa: The objects ... manufactured for the Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The coronation of Edward VII in particular was given a strong imperial flavour, ...
Dr James Fenske (Oxford) presents his ongoing research on the history of the rubber trade in Benin, and presents a comparative ... Rubber Will Not Keep in this Country - Failed Development in Benin, 1897-1921 (African History and. ...
For his services in Benin, Startin was specially promoted to the rank of Captain on 25 May, 1897.[4] ... 2 Sep, 1895[19] - 21 Aug, 1897[20] Succeeded by. William F. Tunnard ...
... negotiating an agreement to set up a permanent exhibition in Nigeria of the Benin Bronzes looted by the British Army in 1897. ... British Museum offers to loan stolen Benin Bronzes to Nigeria. Curators from Europe and the United States are negotiating an ... agreement to set up a permanent exhibition in Nigeria of the Benin Bronzes looted by the British Army in 1897. ...
Benin and Togo in deep. Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkinas laid back second city, visit Lobi villages, Kara via Kabye villages. ... Destination(s): Benin Burkina Faso Togo Specialty Categories: Cultural Journey Ecotourism Season: January - December Airfare ... Burkina Faso - Benin - Togo (15 Days). offered by supplier M20898 (read about supplier) Key Information:. Tour Duration: 15 day ... After crossing the Monor River we cross into Benin and the town of Bohicon. This evening we may also have the opportunity to ...
ROTH FN (1903 / 1968) A diary of a surgeon with the Benin Punitive Expedition. In: HL Roth, Great Benin. Its customs, arts and ... A possible early glimpse of deaf people occurs in a description of the royal procession in the Kingdom of Benin. Based on ... That a language existed in the Kingdom of Benin by which deaf and hearing people might communicate, with reasonable certainty, ... Evidence is used from Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, both ...
The members of a British delegation to the oba of Benin are massacred in this year. In the reprisals Benin City is partly burnt ... see Sculpture of Ife and Benin). In terms of extent Benin is no match for Oyo, its contemporary to the north. In the 15th ... The kings of Benin are a story in themselves. In the 19th century they scandalize the west by their use of human sacrifice in ... All in all, among Nigerias many historic kingdoms, Benin has earned its widespread renown. ...
  • Olfert Dapper, a Dutch writer, describing Benin in his book Description of Africa (1668) The Benin Empire, which occupied present-day Nigeria between the fourteenth and nineteenth centuries, was very rich in sculptures of diverse materials, such as iron, bronze, wood, ivory, and terra cotta. (wikipedia.org)
  • The locale of today's post is "Benin", but it's important to note that this is not the modern country of Benin but rather the land just to the east currently situated in southern Nigeria - which was then the Benin Empire , at the tail end of a very long run. (executedtoday.com)
  • Ruled from Benin City (also presently in Nigeria), this great African state had been in direct contact with European countries since the 15th century. (executedtoday.com)
  • From the fifteenth through the nineteenth century, the powerful Benin Kingdom spread throughout southern Nigeria. (oberlin.edu)
  • The area that is now the Republic of Benin is in a unique geographic area of the West Coast of Africa, where the dense jungle coverage along the coast is broken by a less dense area of savannah stretching along the coast of what is now approximately Ghana, Togo, Benin and Western Nigeria. (blogspot.com)
  • The Benin Empire was a pre-colonial empire located in what is now southern Nigeria. (benin24tv.com)
  • The people popularly referred to as "Bini" by others and Edo by the indigenous, are descendants of the founders of the pre-colonial ancient and powerful Benin Kingdom and empire (originally called Igodomingodo), now located in South/Mid-Western Nigeria and encompassing what is now Edo State, as well as surrounding areas. (benintraditionalcouncil.ng)
  • The Benin people are those speaking varieties of the Edoid language, who occupy the Edo South senatorial district of Edo State in present-day Nigeria. (benintraditionalcouncil.ng)
  • The Benin culture is manifested in their values, a rich tradition and festivals which make them peculiar among other ethnic groups in Nigeria. (benintraditionalcouncil.ng)
  • By the 1860s a Yoruba Mission (Anglican) was established in Oyo, which is now the site of St. Andrew's College (founded 1897), one of the oldest teacher-training institutes in Nigeria. (britannica.com)
  • Artists of the once-mighty Kingdom of Benin, in present day Edo State, Nigeria, honed sophisticated techniques over centuries to craft detailed depictions of life in the Kingdom, from court scenes to foreign soldiers. (cnn.com)
  • The first Englishman to visit Nigeria being the explorer Thomas Windham, in 1553, who was taken by the Portuguese Sailor- Francisco Pinteador to visit the Oba of Benin- Orhogbua, who impressed him with his ability to speak, read and write Portuguese (he had been educated in a Catholic Mission school) and the advanced administrative/municipal systems evident in the city of Benin at the time. (slideshare.net)
  • Head of Oba of Benin: According to Dr. Opoku, as of February 24, 2018 the Head of Oba, a commemorative head and nine other Benin bronze relief panels were last seen in part of Nazi-looted art, up for auction, Zemanek-Münster, Wurzburg, Germany. (leadership.ng)
  • In tropical Africa of the continent's center, the technique of lost-wax casting was developed early, as the works from Benin show. (wikipedia.org)
  • Portuguese traders, traveling south down the coast of Africa in 1485, came across the Kingdom of Benin, under their Oba (or king) Ovonramwen Nogbaisi. (scholarsandrogues.com)
  • The Benin Empire was "one of the oldest and most highly developed states in the coastal hinterland of West Africa, dating perhaps to the eleventh century CE", until it was annexed by the British Empire in 1897. (benin24tv.com)
  • Amongst the taxonomic treatments of South African palms were those in 'Flora Capensis' (Wright 1897) and a book on the indigenous palms of southern Africa (Wicht 1969). (scielo.org.za)
  • Four species endemic to the Horn of Africa (A abyssinicus, A. dembeensis, A. blicki and A. somalicus) and a population of the 'A. niloticus' complex from West Africa (Benin) were investigated. (naturalsciences.be)
  • The Oba's palace in Benin, the site of production for the royal ancestral altars, also was the backdrop for an elaborate court ceremonial life in which the Oba, his warriors, chiefs and titleholders, priests, members of the palace societies and their constituent guilds, foreign merchants and mercenaries, and numerous retainers and attendants all took part. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ibis Bird: the bird was just one of the 3, 000 bronze artifacts removed by the British Military from the Oba's palace in Benin, in 1897. (leadership.ng)
  • 1898 envelope 'Via Liverpool' to Germany franked single d and a horizontal pair 1d tied "BENIN RIVER" c.d.s. (chrisrainey.com)
  • At the end of the 19th century, the Kingdom of Benin had managed to retain its independence and the Oba exercised a monopoly over trade which the British found irksome. (wikipedia.org)
  • For much of the 19th century the city was fought over by rival factions of the Kenedougou and Guiriko clans, wars that so depleted the strength and power of the Guiriko that they were eventually forced to hand the city over to the French in 1897. (infohub.com)
  • Oyo is bounded by the states of Kwara on the north, Osun on the east, and Ogun on the south and by the Republic of Benin on the west. (britannica.com)
  • The two previous editions of the Goonetilleke Heart of Darkness included a substantial selection of documents on the history of Benin, ranging from excerpts taken from Olaudah Equiano's eighteenth-century narrative to documents concerning the Benin massacre of 1897. (broadviewpress.com)
  • Rawson's troops captured, burned, and looted Benin City, bringing to an end the west African Kingdom of Benin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1894 after the invasion and destruction of Brohomi, the trading town of the chief Nana Olomu, the leading Itsekiri trader in the Benin River District by a combined British Royal Navy and Niger Coast Protectorate forces, Benin Kingdom increased her military presence on her southern borders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronze and ivory objects had a variety of functions in the ritual and courtly life of the Kingdom of Benin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Art in the Kingdom of Benin took many forms, of which bronze and brass reliefs and the heads of kings and queen mothers are the best known. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benin had a tremendous culture of artistry and the export of carved ivory tusks became a lucrative industry for the Kingdom. (scholarsandrogues.com)
  • Aside from Benin City, the system of rule of the Oba in his kingdom, even through the golden age of the kingdom, was still loosely based after the Ogiso dynasty, which was military and royal protection in exchange of use of resources and implementation of taxes paid to the royal administrative centre. (benin24tv.com)
  • In the ceremonies and celebrations, Ewere is the climax of Ugie, where goodwill leaves (Ewere leaves) are distributed throughout the kingdom to usher in peace, progress, good health and prosperity for the Oba and people of Benin. (benintraditionalcouncil.ng)
  • The Benin Kingdom is strategically located even as it is economically and culturally endowed. (benintraditionalcouncil.ng)
  • When the Portuguese made the first European contact with the west African kingdom of Benin in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the kingdom was experiencing a golden age. (newbooksinpolitics.com)
  • It opens with an introduction to the kingdom, court and culture of Benin, which is followed by thematic sections including kingship, ceremony, women, Europeans, and animals. (newbooksinpolitics.com)
  • Collectively, the plaques form the best known examples of Benin art, created by the Edo people from the thirteenth century, which also included other sculptures in brass or bronze, including some famous portrait heads and smaller pieces. (wikipedia.org)
  • It follows stylistic conventions established in Benin brass by at least the sixteenth century, when standing figures of horn-blowers or military officers were depicted on figurative plaques wearing similar pendants. (oberlin.edu)
  • After British consul Richard Burton visited Benin in 1862 he wrote of Benin's as a place of "gratuitous barbarity which stinks of death", a narrative which was widely publicized in Britain and increased pressure for the territory's subjugation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was only a matter of time before Britain (or someone else) made an offer Benin couldn't refuse. (executedtoday.com)
  • Whilst Britain set about making Benin safe for the olfactory nerves of long-barred merchandisers, Ologbosere persisted in the bush for more than two years . (executedtoday.com)
  • 1897 Great Britain overprinted 1d stationery card with message addressed to Hamburg cancelled "FORCADOS RIVER" c.d.s. (chrisrainey.com)
  • But the way Benin treated its slaves and the public display of large quantities of human remains hardened British attitudes towards Benin's rulers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major P. Copland-Crawford, Vice-Consul of the Benin District, made the first attempt, Mr. Locke, the Vice-Consul Assistant, made a second one and the third one was made by Captain Arthur Maling, the Commandant of the Niger Coast Protectorate Force detachment based in Sapele. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 19th, of course, it had waned with colonial incursions - but Benin itself had sagely declined to extend "free trade" to the powers that meant to dominate it, nor to cede sovereignty by signing a "protectorate" arrangement. (executedtoday.com)
  • Although no specific date has been fixed for the return of The Okukor, Jesus College has said that the bronze cockerel "belongs with the current Oba at the Court of Benin. (punchng.com)
  • The first contact with Europeans being c.1470, with Portuguese sailors, who visited the Niger Delta, starting a trading and diplomatic relationship with the Benin and Warri Kingdoms. (slideshare.net)
  • In what is now Benin, the principle slave port would be Whydah (Ouidah), access to which would be fought over among the the various European powers while bringing great wealth to the Ardra Rulers. (blogspot.com)
  • Brass leopard head ornaments such as this were given by the Benin monarch to his war officers, who wore them slung at the hips. (oberlin.edu)
  • The basis of knowledge is to appreciate improvements in all spheres of human life, for instance, the mechanical approach embarked upon by Oba Oguola (the famous Benin monarch who laid foundation of the Benin moat-system) many centuries ago will not be the same, abate mechanically, if a similar moat is to be erected in this 21st century. (thenigerianvoice.com)
  • Almost all Benin art was created to honor the king , or Oba, who has reigned, with his ancestors, from the 15th century. (hamillgallery.com)
  • In the 15th century the region brought under central control is a mere seventy-miles across (people and places being harder to subdue in the tropical forest than on the savanna), though a century later Benin stretches from the Niger delta in the east to Lagos in the west. (historyworld.net)
  • Today is World Mosquito Day and we commemorate the discovery back in 1897 of the link between mosquitoes and malaria. (wellcome.ac.uk)
  • British Doctor Ronald Ross made this first observation in India back in 1897, receiving a Nobel Prize for his discovery and laying the foundations for our relentless fight against this disease. (wellcome.ac.uk)
  • The issue of ``spurious correlation'', as the situation was phrased by Karl Pearson back in 1897, affects all data that measures parts of some whole, such as percentages, proportions, ppm and ppb. (wiley.com)
  • The Niger enters the country in the west along the border of the countries of Niger and Benin. (britannica.com)
  • The history of what is now Benin before the irruption of the West into the region in the fifteenth century is not well documented, and seems to have been characterized by the existence of a plethora of chiefdoms formed in the wake of various population migrations. (blogspot.com)
  • It is bounded by Benin to the west and by the Nigerian states of Niger to the north, Kogi to the east, and Ekiti, Osun , and Oyo to the south. (britannica.com)
  • On leaving Benin he travelled west to the land of the Yoruba where he reportedly became a king. (benin24tv.com)
  • Evan Maurer, "A Carved Ivory Tusk from Benin," Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago 71, 3 (1976), pp. 6-9. (artic.edu)
  • Barbara Winston Blackmun, "Icons and Emblems in Ivory: An Altar Tusk from the Palace of Old Benin," African Art at the Art Institute of Chicago, Art Institute of Chicago Museum Studies 23, 2 (1997), pp. 148-163, no. 24, figs. 6-8, 10-12 (ill. (artic.edu)
  • Brass, still a precious metal in Benin today, could in the past only be worn with the oba 's permission. (oberlin.edu)