Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Violaceae: A plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.Carica: A plant genus of the family Caricaceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is the source of edible fruit and PAPAIN.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Annonaceae: The custard-apple plant family of the order Magnoliales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members provide large pulpy fruits and commercial timber. Leaves and wood are often fragrant. Leaves are simple, with smooth margins, and alternately arranged in two rows along the stems.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Methylnitrosourea: A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.Toxicity Tests, Acute: Experiments designed to determine the potential toxic effects of one-time, short-term exposure to a chemical or chemicals.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Orthosiphon: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that contains pimarane-type diterpenes. Several species of Orthosiphon are also called Java tea.BenzoxazolesDose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Toxicity Tests: An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.Startle Reaction: A complex involuntary response to an unexpected strong stimulus usually auditory in nature.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Hypothalamus: Ventral part of the DIENCEPHALON extending from the region of the OPTIC CHIASM to the caudal border of the MAMMILLARY BODIES and forming the inferior and lateral walls of the THIRD VENTRICLE.9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene: 7,12-Dimethylbenzanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in tobacco smoke that is a potent carcinogen.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Dopamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate dopamine receptors.Monocrotaline: A pyrrolizidine alkaloid and a toxic plant constituent that poisons livestock and humans through the ingestion of contaminated grains and other foods. The alkaloid causes pulmonary artery hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pathological changes in the pulmonary vasculature. Significant attenuation of the cardiopulmonary changes are noted after oral magnesium treatment.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Rats, Inbred F344Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Testosterone: A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Ovariectomy: The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Streptozocin: An antibiotic that is produced by Stretomyces achromogenes. It is used as an antineoplastic agent and to induce diabetes in experimental animals.Anticarcinogenic Agents: Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Oxidative Stress: A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Malondialdehyde: The dialdehyde of malonic acid.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Corticosterone: An adrenocortical steroid that has modest but significant activities as a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid. (From Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1437)Rats, Inbred WKY: A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).Pyrazoles: Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Rats, Inbred SHR: A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Superoxide Dismutase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reaction between superoxide anions and hydrogen to yield molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme protects the cell against dangerous levels of superoxide. EC 1.15.1.1.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Lipid Peroxidation: Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Cocaine: An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Estradiol: The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Sprague, Owen & Nash. This book also contains Eddy's report of January 1777 as well as additional documents and reports. Public ... Archives of Canada, Douglas Brymner; Arthur George Doughty; Edouard Richard (1895). 1894 Annual Report - Public Archives of ...
Royal T. Sprague, who died in February 1872, when Isaac S. Belcher was appointed in his place, his successor, E. W. McKinstry, ... Sprague, William Cyrus (1895). The Law Student's Helper: A Monthly Magazine for the Student in ..., Volume 3. Collector ... McKinstry filled the seat of former Chief Justice Royal Sprague, who died in office, and whose appointed successor, Isaac S. ... After stepping down from the bench, from 1888 to 1895 he was a professor of law at the University of California's Hastings ...
". "PlantFiles: Egg Magnolia Talauma". Charles Sprague Sargent (1895). Garden and Forest: A Journal of Horticulture, Landscape ...
Charles Sprague Sargent (1895). "The silva of North America: a description of the trees which grow naturally in North America ...
Grandfather of Charles F. Sprague.Charles F. Sprague (1857-1902), Boston, Massachusetts Common Councilman 1889-90; ... SPRAGUE, Peleg - Biographical Information The Political Graveyard: Index to Politicians: Sprague The Political Graveyard: Index ... Grandson of Peleg Sprague. Michael Sprigg (1791-1845), Maryland House Delegate 1821 1823 1837 1840 1844, U.S. Representative ... Peleg Sprague (1793-1880), Massachusetts State Representative 1821-22, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1825-29, U.S. ...
Arizona oak Sargent, Charles Sprague 1895. Garden & Forest 8: 92-93 Pavek, Diane S. 1994. Quercus arizonica. In: Fire Effects ... Flora of North America, Quercus arizonica Sargent, 1895. ...
Toumey oak Sargent, Charles Sprague 1895. Garden & Forest 8: page 92 description and commentary in English Sargent, Charles ... Sprague 1895. Garden & Forest 8: page 95, figure 14 line drawing of Quercus toumeyi photo of herbarium specimen at Missouri ...
Caryll Mudd Sprague (1914-1978). His paternal uncle was Seeley G. Mudd (1895-1968). His paternal grandfather was Seeley W. Mudd ...
Arthur Colby Sprague, Beaumont and Fletcher on the Restoration Stage. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1926; pp. 89, ... Cambridge, MA, Library of Harvard University, 1895; p. 12.. ...
The Sprague Electric company installed six elevators for the building on February 16, 1895. The Ahrens Building remained in the ... Miller, Tom (September 20, 2014). "The 1895 Ahrens Bldg - Nos. 70-74 Lafayette Street". Daytonian in Manhattan. Retrieved March ...
Miller married Mary Sprague, daughter of a prominent Chicago businessman. In 1902, Benjamin Wheeler, President of the ...
Rosetta Douglass Sprague, My Mother as I Recall Her (1900), The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress. Painting ... February 23, 1895. p. 14. "Women in the World of Frederick Douglass" by Leigh Fought (Oxford University Press, 2017); contains ... Frederick Douglass was buried next to her after his death on February 20, 1895. List of African-American abolitionists ^ Note a ... 1895, she was moved to Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, New York. ...
Albert Arnold Sprague Memorial Hall (1917), renovated in 2003. Abby and Mitch Leigh Hall (1930), Gothic style, renovated in ... 1895), Romanesque style. John Adams, Professor of Composition (past) Nancy Allen, Professor of Harp (past) Emanuel Ax, Visiting ...
He joined the Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company, and by 25 was a chief design engineer of the Edison General Electric ... "Magnetic Data of the Sprague Street Car Motor". Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 7 (1): 218. doi ... Parshall, H.F.; Hobart, H.M. (1895), Armature windings of electric machines Parshall, H.F.; Hobart, H.M. (1900), Electric ... published between 1895 and 1906. He was involved in installing electrical equipment on the Dublin tramways, Glasgow tramways, ...
Sprague's use of a trolley pole for D.C. current pick up from a single line (with ground return via the street rails) set the ... By 1889 110 electric railways incorporating Sprague's equipment had been started or were planned on several continents. By 1895 ... Sprague in Richmond, Virginia, and was operating by February 2, 1888. The Richmond system had a large impact upon the ... for a street railway vehicle derives from the work that Sprague did in Richmond and quickly spread elsewhere. ...
Tanzania, Kenya Warburgia ugandensis Sprague - Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Zaire, Ethiopia to Malawi Kew World Checklist of ... "Prophylactic and curative activities of extracts from Warburgia ugandensis Sprague (Canellaceae) and Zanthoxylum usambarense ( ... Warburgia is a genus of plant in family Canellaceae described as a genus in 1895. It was named for the German botanist Otto ... 1895. Die Pflanzenwelt Ost-Afrikas C: 276 PlantzAfrica: Warburgia salutaris Muchugi, A.; et al. (2008). "Genetic structuring of ...
William Sprague (R-RI) 1873-1875. *Richard Oglesby (R-IL) 1875-1879 ...
This system, for rail traffic with a unipolar line, was invented by Frank J. Sprague in 1888. From 1889 it was used at the ... 10 August 1895. Siemens press release TMSV: Tramway level crossings in Victoria "Kamerasystem skal advare lokoførere mod ...
M.M. Sprague, Daughter, and Grandchildren Are Chief Beneficiaries". The New York Times. 4 May 1940. Retrieved 19 July 2017. " ... M. S. Rutherfurd Wed To F. L. Sprague", The New York Times, New York City, 27 November 1939 . Margaret was the daughter of Anne ... They also divorced and in 1939, she married Frederick Leybourne Sprague. On April 29, 1903, she married her third husband, ... and Frederick Leybourne Sprague (1907-1993). "W. K. VANDERBILT'S COMING MARRIAGE; Mrs. Lewis Morris Rutherfurd the Prospective ...
Augusta, Maine: Press of Sprague, Owen and Nash, 1878. Carroon, Robert G. and Dana B. Shoaf. Union Blue: The History of the ... Our Army Nurses: Stories from Women in the Civil War (1895) excerpts Josyph, Peter ed. The Wounded River: The Civil War Letters ... Louisville, Kentucky: The Prentice Press, 1895. Johnston, Joseph E. Narrative of Military Operations. New York: D. Appleton and ... Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin, 1895. Jackson, Mary Anna. Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson. ...
Thomas Archibald Sprague regarded this plant sufficiently different from Loranthus undulatus (now renamed Plicosepalus ...
Frank Sprague (18 January 1902). "Mr Sprague answers Mr Westinghouse". New York Times. Retrieved 16 June 2012. US Loco MU ... Sprague's MU system was adopted for use by diesel-electric locomotives and electric locomotives in the 1920s; however, these ... The multiple unit traction control system was developed by Frank Sprague and first applied and tested on the South Side ... Frank Sprague invented a multiple unit controller for electric train operation. This accelerated the construction of electric ...
Frank Sprague (18 January 1902). "Mr Sprague answers Mr Westinghouse". New York Times. Retrieved 16 June 2012. Media related to ... The multiple unit traction control system was developed by Frank Sprague and first applied and tested on the South Side ... Frank Sprague invented a multiple unit controller for electric train operation. This accelerated the construction of electric ... In 1895, derived from his company's invention and production of direct current elevator control systems, ...
List of Justices of the Supreme Court of California Joseph B. Crockett Royal Sprague William T. Wallace Augustus Rhodes William ... 3 February 1895. p. 11. Retrieved July 22, 2017. "Leaves Entire Estate to His Wife". San Francisco Call (91 (18)). California ... Longstreet, James (1895). From Manassas to Appomattox Memoirs of the Civil War in America. Prabhat Prakashan. ISBN 8184306164 ...
They had two children: Henry T. Mudd (1913-1990) and Caryll Mudd Sprague (1914-1978). Caryll's husband was Norman F. Sprague, ... Harvey had a younger brother, Seeley (1895-1968), who was a physician and cancer researcher at the California Institute of ...
Carleton Sprague, 1885-1895 James O. Putnam, 1895-1902; New York State Senator and Postmaster General of Buffalo, first ...
Ira Sprague Bowen, Harold Clayton Urey • 1967: Hannes Alfvén, Allan Rex Sandage • 1968: Fred Hoyle, Walter Munk • 1969: Albert ... 1892: George Darwin • 1893: Hermann Carl Vogel • 1894: Sherburne Wesley Burnham • 1895: Isaac Roberts • 1896: Seth Carlo ...
... though fellow Harvard Law alumni Seth Sprague Terry would subsequently serve John J. as his counsel. John J. returned to ... Between 1894 and 1895, John J. joined the law firm of Shepard, Terry, McKelvey, & Prentiss-a short-lived partnership, ... practicing law alone, between 1895 and 1899. With his brother-in-law Frederick W. Mattocks, John J. formed his second longest ...
The Sprague River is named after him. The Sprague River Valley, the town of Sprague River, and Sprague River Park in Fremont ... Today, the Sprague River in southern Oregon bears his name. Sprague was born on July 16, 1825 in Delaware, Ohio. His parents ... Spragues account of the visit was reported to Jacksonvilles leading newspaper, the Oregon Sentinel on August 25. Spragues ... During his military service, Sprague explored much of Southern Oregon. While building a road near Fort Klamath, Sprague led a ...
He was the son of Lorenzo Sprague and Laura G. (Meade) Sprague. He enrolled at the University of Michigan where he played ... Sprague later worked for 18 years as a construction manager for Bethlehem Steel. He died in Cleveland at age 73 in 1938. ... Ernest Marshall Sprague (October 20, 1865 - May 10, 1938) was an American football player, public official, and engineer. He ... Biography of Ernest M. Sprague, A History of Cuyahoga County and the City of Cleveland, by William R. Coates, 1924. The Book of ...
Volume 1895) by Leslie Stephen (page 58 of 113) : the collection of free ebooks ... Sprague Albert A. iall Thos. C. Lanin L. E. Osborn E. E. Sprague Fredk W. ialsey Edward A. Lamb Benj. B. Otis Chas. T. ... read the ebook The Chicago blue book of selected names of Chicago and suburban towns (Volume 1895) ... The Chicago blue book of selected names of Chicago and suburban towns (Volume 1895) online. . (page 58 of 113) ...
Annabell Fitzgerald married Clifton A. Sprague and the couple had two daughters, Courtney Sprague and Patricia Sprague. ... Anita Wright (1895-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gorman, and died in Ramsey County. [See note ... In 1895, D. R. McGinnis was the secretary of the St. Paul Commercial Club. In 1902, the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce merged ... E. C. Mitchell resided at this address in 1895. In the 1930s, Homer P. Clark resided here. Homer Pierce Clark (1868-1970,) the ...
William Sprague (R-RI) 1873-1875. *Richard Oglesby (R-IL) 1875-1879 ...
Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were anesthetized with isoflurane (1.7% in 100% O2). The left femoral vein and ... Sprague-Dawley rat pups (P5-P20) were anesthetized with 2-5% isoflurane (Veterinary Companies of Australia) in oxygen and moved ...
SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS FEMALE 0 NG/KG 30 NG/KG 100 175 300 550 NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG ... SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS FEMALE 0 NG/KG 30 NG/KG 100 175 300 550 NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG ... SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS FEMALE 0 NG/KG 30 NG/KG 100 175 300 550 NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG ... SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS FEMALE 0 NG/KG 30 NG/KG 100 175 300 550 NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG NG/KG ...
7. Sprague JM. Interaction of cortex and superior colliculus in mediation of visually guided behavior in the cat. Science 1966; ... 8. Sprague JM, Meikle TH. The role of the superior colliculus in visually guided behavior. Exp Neurol 1965;11:115-146. ... 9. Sprague JM, Chambers WW, Stellar E. Attentive, affective and adaptive behavior in the cat. Science 1961;133:165-173. ... Brain 1895;18:497-522.. 13. Watson RT, Heilman KM, Miller BD, et al. Neglect after mesencephalic reticular formation lesions. ...
Frank Headley Sprague Part Details Part Name. Condition. Disposition. #. Remarks. whole animal (pinned). unknown. in collection ...
Mature female Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 200 to 250 g each, were obtained from Taconic Farms (Germantown, NY). All of the ... 1895) Untersuchungen am uberlebenden Saugethierherzen. Pflugers Arch Gesamte Physiol Menschen Tiere 61:291-332. ... 1895). The hearts were then mounted in a Langendorff-perfusion apparatus. Perfusion (nonrecirculating) was at a constant flow ...
They were represented by Sprague, Gorham, and Bacon. On September 23, 1878, Octaves mother Marie Salomee died in Illinois. On ... Octave is not listed in City Directory in 1895. On December 24, 1894 Dr. C. Frank Bruso was appointed as a Commissioner of ... Saving Bank in Superior Court on July, 7 1878 (Liber 244, Page 138, Series to 1895, Notice of Respondency to Action). ... Deeds (Proceedings, 1894, p. 2084) and resigned soon thereafter, on January 21,1895 (Proceedings, 1895, p. 109). ...
Mary Bryant Sprague( Visual ). 2 editions published in 1904 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide 250 ... 2 editions published between 1895 and 1896 in Latin and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide 47 Bookplate ... 3 editions published in 1895 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide 40d Bookplate designed by Edwin Davis ... 2 editions published between 1895 and 1896 in Latin and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide 60b Bookplate engraved by ...
Artifactual Changes in Sprague-Dawley Rat Hematologic Parameters after Storage of Samples at 3 °C and 21 °C. Journal of the ... Artifactual Changes in Sprague-Dawley Rat Hematologic Parameters after Storage of Samples at 3 °C and 21 °C. Journal of the ... and cadmium telluride in Sprague-Dawley rats. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol., 1997 Dec;147(2):399-410. [Abstract Morgan DL, Shines CJ ... Maternal and Developmental Toxicity Evaluation of Melatonin Administered Orally to Pregnant Sprague Dawley Rats - A Screening ...
Sprague Funeral Home Ledgers. St. Joseph City Hall, The Edmund Eckel - Otto Brunner Architectural Collection. ... 28th ANNUAL REPORT MISSOURI State Board of Agriculture YEAR 1895. JEFFERSON CITY, MO. : TRIBUNE PRINTING COMPANZ, STATU ... 28th ANNUAL REPORT MISSOURI State Board of Agriculture YEAR 1895. JEFFERSON CITY, MO. : TRIBUNE PRINTING COMPANZ, STATU ... general status of agriculture for 1895; state veterinary service (cattle inspections, disease outbreaks of anthrax, Texas ...
Edisons other noteworthy employees included streetcar pioneer Frank J. Sprague and electrical engineer Nikola Tesla.. Edisons ... Rumford Prize 1895. Congressional Gold Medal 29-May-1928. National Inventors Hall of Fame French Legion of Honor 1881. ... was made at Edison Labs in 1895, and a former employee of Edisons, Edwin Stanton Porter, directed the first action movie, The ...
Sprague, Curiosity, Stanza 25. *No, he was no such charlatan-. Count de Hoboken Flash-in-the-Pan-. Full of gasconade and ... Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)[edit]. Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilberts Dictionary of ... Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895). *The rich are like beasts of burden, carrying treasure all day, and at the night of ...
Sprague TC, Saproo S, Serences JT (2015) Visual attention mitigates information loss in small- and large-scale neural codes. ...
Charge To: E.T. SPRAGUE. Address: PALMYRA. Order Given By: E.T. SPRAGUE. How Secured: PER. Veteran State War: NO. Occupation of ... Charge To: E.T. SPRAGUE. Address: PALMYRA. Order Given By: E.T. SPRAGUE. How Secured: PER. Veteran State War: NO. Occupation of ...
"The Gnarly Man", L. Sprague de Camp (Unknown 1939). * "The Temptation of Harringay", H. G. Wells (The St. Jamess Gazette 1895) ...
Adult female Sprague Dawley rats (250-300 g) were anesthetized with a ketamine (70 mg/kg) and xylazine (7 mg/kg) solution ... In our present experiments we used the C2 hemisection model of SCI on adult female Sprague Dawley rats. ... 1895) The path of the respiratory impulse from the bulb to the phrenic nuclei. J Physiol 17:455-485. ... 1895; Nantwi et al., 1999; Fuller et al., 2003; Goshgarian, 2003; Golder and Mitchell, 2005; Zimmer et al., 2007). ...
Sprague, John Francis. (1917). Spragues Journal of Maine History, August, September, October 1917. John Francis Sprague, Dover ... Sprague, John Francis. (1906). Sebastian Ralé: A Maine tragedy of the eighteenth century. Heintzemann Press, Boston, MA. ... Sprague, Owen & Nash, printers to the state, Augusta, ME. Chase, Edward E. (1926). Maine railroads. A. J. Huston, Portland, ME ... Sprague, John Francis. (1915). Baron de Saint Castin. Smith and Sale, printers, Portland, ME. ...
"The Gnarly Man", L. Sprague de Camp (Unknown 1939). * "The Temptation of Harringay", H. G. Wells (The St. Jamess Gazette 1895) ... "The Gnarly Man", L. Sprague de Camp (Unknown 1939). * "The Temptation of Harringay", H. G. Wells (The St. Jamess Gazette 1895) ...
Publication info: Augusta,Sprague & son, printers to the state,1887.. Holding Institution: Library of Congress ...
Hoyt v. Sprague, 103 U. S. 613, 631; Lamar v. Micou, 112 U. S. 452, 470, 5 Sup. Ct. 221. The statutes of Kansas do authorize ...
Groups of Sprague-Dawley female rats (12-20 animals per group) were exposed to erythrosine in the diet at dose levels of 0 or ... adult Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing erythrosine at levels of 0, 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0% for 2 weeks before mating and ... 1895 Lu & Lavallee, 1964 7100 Butterworth et al., 1976a 1840 Hansen et al., 1973a Rabbit i.v. 200 Emerson & Anderson, 1934 ...
  • In 1875, Sprague ran as the Democratic Party's candidate for Delaware County Probate Judge, and was elected. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 1865, Sprague was leading a patrol of eleven cavalry troopers from C Company of the 1st Oregon Cavalry south of Warner Lake in present-day Lake County, Oregon, when they were ambushed by approximately 125 Indians in two groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ernest Marshall Sprague (October 20, 1865 - May 10, 1938) was an American football player, public official, and engineer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two years later, 1889, his first treatise, 'Electro-Therapeutics,' was published, followed in 1895 by a new and original work on neurosis, and in 1901 by his 'Electricity in Medicine and Surgery' (second edition, 1902), a work recognized as standard with the electro-medical world. (homeoint.org)
  • The landmark short The Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots , a one-minute recreation of the monarch's beheading, was made at Edison Labs in 1895, and a former employee of Edison's, Edwin Stanton Porter , directed the first action movie, The Great Train Robbery , in 1903. (nndb.com)
  • In addition to fighting Indians, Sprague learned to speak their languages and counted many Indians among his friends, including the Modoc chief known as Captain Jack. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like the majority of Oregonians at the time, Sprague was a strong supporter of the Union during the American Civil War. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1895 it befell the American Journal of interesting Languages and Literatures, and in 1942 it inspired its British download the father, the Journal of Near Eastern Studies. (spiritualsongs.net)
  • After the construction work was completed, Sprague published a list of the best camp sites along the road in the Jacksonville newspapers so that the wagon masters could find the best water and grass along the way. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sprague and his troops were caught between a lake, high cliffs, and the two groups of Indians. (wikipedia.org)
  • A subsequent notice in The Strand notified readers that the baking cure technique did not originate with Mr Sprague, but with Lewis A Tallerman, and that the 'Tallerman treatment' was available in hospitals across London and the UK. (rcplondon.ac.uk)
  • On 12 January 1895, JF Sarjeant reported that in a trial at the North-West London Hospital 'there was not a single failure' when treating cases of sprains, gout, rheumatoid arthritis, a tuberculous knee-joint, and a chronic leg ulcer. (rcplondon.ac.uk)