Whales: Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.Humpback Whale: The species Megaptera novaeangliae, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by its huge flippers and the arching of their back when diving. They are also known for their breaching and singing.Fin Whale: The species Balaenoptera physalus, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by a large, strongly curved, dorsal fin. It is the second largest of the WHALES, highly migratory, but rarely seen near the shore.Minke Whale: The species Balaenoptera acutorostrata, in the family Balaenopteridae. It is the smallest of the WHALES in the family and though mainly oceanic, is often found in coastal waters including bays and estuaries.Sperm Whale: The species Physeter catodon (also called Physeter macrocephalus), in the family Physeteridae. The common name is derived from the milky wax substance in its head (spermaceti). The species also produces an intestinal secretion AMBERGRIS, which was previously used in perfumes. The sperm whale is the largest toothed MAMMAL in the world.Whales, Pilot: The genus Globicephala, in the family Delphinidae, consisting of two species of DOLPHINS. They are mostly black with a stocky shape and bulbous foreheads.Balaenoptera: A genus of WHALES in the family Balaenopteridae, consisting of five species: Blue Whale, Bryde's Whale, FIN WHALE, Sei Whale, and MINKE WHALE. They are distinguished by a relatively slender body, a compressed tail stock, and a pointed snout.Cetacea: An order of wholly aquatic MAMMALS occurring in all the OCEANS and adjoining seas of the world, as well as in certain river systems. They feed generally on FISHES, cephalopods, and crustaceans. Most are gregarious and most have a relatively long period of parental care and maturation. Included are DOLPHINS; PORPOISES; and WHALES. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp969-70)Bowhead Whale: The species Balaena mysticetus, in the family Balaenidae, found in the colder waters of the Northern Hemisphere. The common name is derived from the extreme arching of the lower jaw.Dolphins: Mammals of the families Delphinidae (ocean dolphins), Iniidae, Lipotidae, Pontoporiidae, and Platanistidae (all river dolphins). Among the most well-known species are the BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHIN and the KILLER WHALE (a dolphin). The common name dolphin is applied to small cetaceans having a beaklike snout and a slender, streamlined body, whereas PORPOISES are small cetaceans with a blunt snout and rather stocky body. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp978-9)Myoglobin: A conjugated protein which is the oxygen-transporting pigment of muscle. It is made up of one globin polypeptide chain and one heme group.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Pacific OceanEcholocation: An auditory orientation mechanism involving the emission of high frequency sounds which are reflected back to the emitter (animal).Metmyoglobin: Myoglobin which is in the oxidized ferric or hemin form. The oxidation causes a change in color from red to brown.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Porpoises: Mammals of the family Phocoenidae comprising four genera found in the North Pacific Ocean and both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean and in various other seas. They differ from DOLPHINS in that porpoises have a blunt snout and a rather stocky body while dolphins have a beak-like snout and a slender, streamlined body. They usually travel in small groups. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp1003-4)Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Phocoena: A genus of PORPOISES, in the family Phocoenidae, comprised of several species. They frequent coastal waters, bays, estuaries, and the mouths of large rivers.Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Azores: A group of nine islands and several islets belonging to Portugal in the north Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Portugal. The islands are named after the acores, the Portuguese for goshawks, living there in abundance. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p42)Ambergris: A gray substance found in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT of the SPERM WHALE.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Perfume: A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Forehead: The part of the face above the eyes.IcelandStenella: A genus comprised of spinner, spotted, and striped DOLPHINS, in the family Delphinidae. Schools of Stenella, that may number in the thousands, often associate with schools of TUNA, and are thus vulnerable to accidental harvesting.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)MuseumsPhilippinesTourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Chenopodium: A plant genus in the CHENOPODIACEAE family.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.
  • A Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), a member of Order Cetacea A Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), a member of infrafamily Pinnipedia A West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus), a member of Order Sirenia A pair of Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris), a member of family Mustelidae A Polar bear (Ursus maritimus), a member. (statemaster.com)
  • In rorqual whales, feeding and locomotion are integrated in a dynamic process called lunge feeding, where an enormous volume of prey-laden water is engulfed into a capacious ventral oropharyngeal cavity that is bounded superficially by skeletal muscle and ventral groove blubber (VGB). (biologists.org)
  • 1999. Phylogenetic relationships of Bryde's whales in the western North Pacific and adjacent waters inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences. (tolweb.org)
  • Ambergris is a valuable substance found in the lower intestine of a small percentage of sperm whales and is believed to form around squid beaks. (savethewhales.org)
  • Baleen is not widely used today, however, analyses of this biomolecular tissue have the potential to contribute to conservation efforts, studies of genetic diversity and a better understanding of the exploitation and use of Mysticeti whales in past and recent times. (bireme.br)
  • Why fin whales have this asymmetrical pigmentation, rare among mammals, is not known, although it has been speculated that it may have something to do with their feeding strategy. (nammco.no)
  • Mammals incorporate the for the most part embryo on the planet, the rorquals Mammal and different astronomical whales, as good as both of the to the highest degree intelligent, much as elephants Mammal, primates Mammal, terminal humans Mammal, and cetaceans Mammal. (megapubblicita-gratuita.tk)
  • Mammals purview in perimeter from the 30-40 mm 1.2-1.6 in bumblebee bat Mammal to the 33-meter 108 ft blue whale Mammal. (megapubblicita-gratuita.tk)
  • The latest sighting details and map for Killer Whale are only available to our BirdGuides Ultimate or our BirdGuides Pro subscribers. (birdguides.com)
  • We used aerial photogrammetry to determine total length (TL) of 221 individual Type C killer whales-a fish-eating ecotype that inhabits dense pack ice-in the southern Ross Sea in January 2005. (bioone.org)
  • Female Type A killer whales-offshore mammal-eaters-from Soviet whaling data in the Southern Ocean were approximately 1-2 m longer, and males were 2-3 m (up to 50%) longer (maximum length 9.2 m). (bioone.org)
  • Andrade AL, Pinedo MC, Barreto AS (2001) Gastrointestinal parasites and prey items from a mass stranding of false killer whales, Pseudorca crassidens , in Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil. (springer.com)
  • Most are groups of killer whales of between 5 to 15 individuals. (uac.gov.ua)
  • Eventually, it was recognized that bowheads and right whales were in fact different, and John Edward Gray proposed the genus Eubalaena for the right whale in 1864. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other right whales, the southern right whale is readily distinguished from others by the callosities on its head, a broad back without a dorsal fin , and a long arching mouth that begins above the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002, the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) accepted Rosenbaum's findings, and recommended that the Eubalaena nomenclature be retained for this genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fin whales are the most streamlined in appearance of all the rorquals, and the distinct ridge along the back behind the dorsal fin gives them the nickname "razorback" (Leatherwood and Reeves 1983). (nammco.no)
  • Fin whales have a falcate dorsal fin, about 60 cm high, set about two-thirds back along the body. (nammco.no)
  • Sperm Whales are amongst the most sexually dimorphic (that is, males and females differ greatly) of all cetaceans . (academickids.com)
  • The humpback whale is renowned for its impressive leaping displays and for the mysterious singing of solitary males. (eol.org)
  • The last idea was proposed by Peter Beamish of the Marine Ecology Laboratory in Nova Scotia after he noticed how the tusks of males 'throbbed in a disturbing way' (to quote Lyall Watson) while the whales made high-frequency noises. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Noad, Michael J., Dunlop, Rebecca A. and Mack, Amelia K. (2017) Changes in humpback whale singing behavior with abundance: Implications for the development of acoustic surveys of cetaceans. (edu.au)
  • Of these 9 fin whales, 2 were juveniles and 2 were calves found during January 2011-February 2013 along the coasts of Tuscany, Sardinia, and Liguria, Italy. (cdc.gov)
  • Baleen has been harvested by indigenous people for thousands of years, as well as collected by whalers as an additional product of commercial whaling in modern times. (bireme.br)
  • It was Sir Willam Hamilton, husband of Emma the inamorata of Lord Nelson, who founded the whaling port when he decided to invite a community of Quaker whalers from Nantucket to settle there in 1793. (bluestonewales.com)
  • During the 18th and 19th century, whalers were drawn to Sperm Whales for their ivory-like teeth (18-24), weighing up to 1kg each, embedded in the lower jaw. (onceinawhale.com)
  • A rejoinder and addendum to Hayashi (2011) regarding the systematics and biology of the turtle and whale barnacles (Cirripedia: Balanomorpha: Coronuloidea). (wikimedia.org)
  • One of the survivors, a 14 year old cabin boy at the time, Thomas Nickerson, later wrote an account of the sinking titled ' The Loss of the Ship "Essex" Sunk by a Whale and the Ordeal of the Crew in Open Boats' , eventually published in 1984. (onceinawhale.com)
  • Ecological drama happened due to the stranded whales with the low tide in West Iceland apparently on 18th of July ( here ). (google.com)
  • And it is not the first time that this natural harbour, which Nelson proclaimed the best in the world except Trincomalee, has handled cargoes of oil, although a different kind of oil, since the modern town was built as a Whaling port at the end of the 18th century. (bluestonewales.com)