Parish Nursing: A nursing specialty involving programs designed to bring wholeness and healing to a particular faith community through addressing the health needs of body, mind, and spirit. They are coordinated by registered NURSES and may involve HEALTH EDUCATION and counseling, facilitation, referral, PATIENT ADVOCACY, and health care plan interpretation, as influenced and defined by the unique needs of the congregation.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Clergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Protestantism: The name given to all Christian denominations, sects, or groups rising out of the Reformation. Protestant churches generally agree that the principle of authority should be the Scriptures rather than the institutional church or the pope. (from W.L. Reese, Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion, 1999)Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.LouisianaHistory, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: A group of religious bodies tracing their origin to Joseph Smith in 1830 and accepting the Book of Mormon as divine revelation. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Jamaica: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Kingston. It was discovered in 1494 by Columbus and was a Spanish colony 1509-1655 until captured by the English. Its flourishing slave trade was abolished in the 19th century. It was a British colony 1655-1958 and a territory of the West Indies Federation 1958-62. It achieved full independence in 1962. The name is from the Arawak Xaymaca, rich in springs or land of springs. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p564 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p267)Channel Islands: A group of four British islands and several islets in the English Channel off the coast of France. They are known to have been occupied prehistorically. They were a part of Normandy in 933 but were united to the British crown at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. Guernsey and Jersey originated noted breeds of cattle. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p242)Religion and Psychology: The interrelationship of psychology and religion.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Pastoral Care: Counseling or comfort given by ministers, priests, rabbis, etc., to those in need of help with emotional problems or stressful situations.New Orleans: City in Orleans Parish (county), largest city in state of LOUISIANA. It is located between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain.Radioactive Pollutants: Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Cyclonic Storms: Non-frontal low-pressure systems over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection and definite pattern of surface wind circulation.PaintingsAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Famous PersonsFloods: Sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. These include flash floods, seasonal river floods, and coastal floods, associated with CYCLONIC STORMS; TIDALWAVES; and storm surges.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Medicine in ArtHistoryDisasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.South CarolinaHistory of MedicineUganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.ArtSpirituality: Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)SwedenPersia: An ancient civilization, known as early as 2000 B.C. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus the Great (550-529 B.C.) and for 200 years, from 550 to 331 B.C., the Persians ruled the ancient world from India to Egypt. The territory west of India was called Persis by the Greeks who later called the entire empire Persia. In 331 B.C. the Persian wars against the Greeks ended disastrously under the counterattacks by Alexander the Great. The name Persia in modern times for the modern country was changed to Iran in 1935. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p546 & Asimov, Words on the Map, 1962, p176)North CarolinaUtahJurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Leper Colonies: Residential treatment centers for individuals with leprosy.Mental Healing: The use of mind to cure disease, particularly physical illness.Civilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Faith Healing: The use of faith and spirit to cure disease.KansasUnited StatesNobel PrizeHealth Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Religion and SexHistory of NursingMedicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Volunteers: Persons who donate their services.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Scurvy: An acquired blood vessel disorder caused by severe deficiency of vitamin C (ASCORBIC ACID) in the diet leading to defective collagen formation in small blood vessels. Scurvy is characterized by bleeding in any tissue, weakness, ANEMIA, spongy gums, and a brawny induration of the muscles of the calves and legs.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Th1-Th2 Balance: Homeostatic control of the immune system by secretion of different cytokines by the Th1 and Th2 cells. The concentration dependent binding of the various cytokines to specific receptors determines the balance (or imbalance leading to disease).Books, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Rhode IslandConsumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Literature, MedievalEuropeLos AngelesSculptureAppalachian Region: A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.BooksWater Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in water or bodies of water, which exhibit radioactivity.Mummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Gas PoisoningHistory, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.GeorgiaGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Lobbying: A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.Feminism: The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes and organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests. (Webster New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Moraceae: The mulberry plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. They have milky latex and small, petalless male or female flowers.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.MissouriRural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Manuscripts, MedicalDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Magic: Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Philosophy, MedicalMass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.TexasDemography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Heterotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as their nutrient sources. Contrasts with AUTOTROPHIC PROCESSES which make use of simple inorganic substances as the nutrient supply source. Heterotrophs can be either chemoheterotrophs (or chemoorganotrophs) which also require organic substances such as glucose for their primary metabolic energy requirements, or photoheterotrophs (or photoorganotrophs) which derive their primary energy requirements from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (AUTOTROPHY; heterotrophy; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrients and energy requirements.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)MexicoTextbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Skeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.MichiganHealth Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Engraving and EngravingsPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Abortion, Legal: Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)Fur Seals: A group comprised of several species of eared seals found in two genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to SEA LIONS, they have an especially dense wooly undercoat.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.BrazilAttitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Cultural Competency: Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.ItalyTheology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Founder Effect: A phenomenon that is observed when a small subgroup of a larger POPULATION establishes itself as a separate and isolated entity. The subgroup's GENE POOL carries only a fraction of the genetic diversity of the parental population resulting in an increased frequency of certain diseases in the subgroup, especially those diseases known to be autosomal recessive.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Communicable DiseasesEconomic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Periostitis: Inflammation of the periosteum. The condition is generally chronic, and is marked by tenderness and swelling of the bone and an aching pain. Acute periostitis is due to infection, is characterized by diffuse suppuration, severe pain, and constitutional symptoms, and usually results in necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Southeastern United States: The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Citrus aurantiifolia: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar lime fruit. Its common name of lime is similar to the limetree (TILIA).Developmental Biology: The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Genealogy and HeraldryCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.EnglandTerminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
  • The road to Crawley and Delly End (in Hailey), along which much of the modern village stands, connected probably with roads in Hailey's northern part recorded in 969, while Ridings Lane, along the eastern boundary with Crawley, led in the 10th century to Langley (in Shipton-under-Wychwood). (british-history.ac.uk)
  • The much-restored Church of Our Lady has remnants of 10th-century crypts. (britannica.com)
  • This early church was for a time the chief ecclesiastical site of eastern Scotland (a status yielded in the 10th century to St Andrews ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gloucestershire itself appeared in the early 10th century but is first mentioned by name in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1016, the year it absorbed Winchcombeshire . (wikishire.co.uk)
  • The first Jews arrived in the territory of modern Poland in the 10th century. (geni.com)
  • Both are villages that date back to the 10th century where they were collectively listed as Peccham. (houseofnames.com)
  • The late 10th century Norse settlement of Greenland was a part of a much wider pattern of Atlantic colonization ( Fig. 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • More significant and "far more interesting" work was then undertaken on the chancel in the third quarter of the 13th century: it was extended to the east, making it longer than the nave-a very rare pattern, whose only equivalent in a Sussex parish church is St Laurence's Church at Guestling according to one authority. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the next hundred years, up to about 1250 AD, the church was enlarged by extending the chancel, rebuilding the chancel arch (6), removing the south wall of the nave, erecting the pillars and so adding the south aisle (7). (allsaintscawood.org.uk)
  • The earliest datable parts of the church, about 1230 AD are the East Window, the smaller chancel pointed window and the trefoil arch of the south door. (dorsethistoricchurchestrust.co.uk)
  • The reredos, the figures of St Laurence and St Cecilia on the East chancel wall and of the Virgin and Child in the chapel were designed and carved by Loughnan Pendred of Cambridge, as also was the crucifix in the war memorial shrine in the garden of peace at the East end of the church. (dorsethistoricchurchestrust.co.uk)
  • Foulkes was taken to Newgate Prison to await execution, but that evening was visited by a Dr. Lloyd, who was vicar of the parish where the murder had taken place, as well as the Dean of Bangor (and would be made Bishop of St. Asaph a few years later). (historygeek.co.uk)
  • Moscow Stoglav Church Council]] declared in favour of revision. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • The council called for many irregularities in church life to be corrected. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • The Second Vatican Council declares in its Decree on Ecumenism ( Unitatis redintegratio ) that, when those who have been validly baptized in non-Catholic Churches or Ecclesial Communities spontaneously ask to enter full communion with the Catholic Church, either as individuals or as groups, "it is necessary to impose no burden beyond what is essential. (blogspot.com)
  • He's often helped by local craftsmen such as Philip Blatchford, a member of Binegar Parish Council which commissioned the new gate to replace a broken one first donated more than 50 years ago in the memory of a former rector of Binegar. (spotidoc.com)
  • Our seven Parish Council Commissions and our Stewardship & Development Council will feature their respective ministry materials with relevant information for all parishioners trying to navigate the ministries maze of the parish. (omosparish.org)
  • Our parish Stewardship & Development Council will have helpful information on the discernment of personal gifts and matching them to the appropriate ministry in the parish. (omosparish.org)
  • Jean gave the Clippesby Annual Report to the Fleggburgh Parish Council. (clippesbychurchandcountryside.co.uk)
  • Born in 1857 represented the parish on the District Council & was Chairman of the Wangford Rural District Council and Board of Guardians. (foxearth.org.uk)
  • Northamptonshire Archaeology, now MOLA Northampton, was commissioned by Opportunity Peterborough (Peterborough City Council) to undertake archaeological work ahead of an improvement scheme centred on Cathedral Square, the historic centre of Peterborough. (archaeopress.com)
  • Focusing on this relatively short period in Middle Ages, the paper will essentially look at who parish priests were in the context of lives of parishioners and the communities in which they were serving at. (zum.de)
  • It will reveal important roles of parish priests in the societal aspects including religious, economic, educational and communal ones. (zum.de)
  • By doing so, the paper hopes to put the drawn analysis into wider context to show how parish priests were playing crucial role in maintaining power of Catholic Christianity in the Middle Ages. (zum.de)
  • Within the parish, there were at least one church, priests serving in the church, and the parishioners. (zum.de)
  • In the latter case, the land owners possessed the church, revenues given to the church were collected by the owners and they were able to appoint parish priests. (zum.de)
  • As time passes, the initiative of the church and revenues shifted from landlords to parish priests. (zum.de)
  • Parish priests were clergymen serving in the parish church. (zum.de)
  • As priests living among people, they were affecting not only religious aspects in lives of people but also economic, educational and communal sections of the parish. (zum.de)
  • Rather they would both be referred to as parish priests. (zum.de)
  • Among other things, drunkenness among the clergy was to be eradicated, parish priests were to be better educated, and priests and laity alike were to be protected against rapacious episcopal tax collectors. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • Members of the clergy do not marry, unless they are parish priests of Eastern rites. (questia.com)
  • The church in Garway numbers ninety-five members, one Elder, seven Priests, three Teachers and one Deacon. (byu.edu)
  • To belong to the church one must accept as factually true the gospel of Jesus as handed down in tradition and as interpreted by the bishops in union with the pope. (questia.com)
  • Its unusual naming (for an English county) is explained to some extent by the relationship with the Bishops of Durham , who for centuries governed Durham as a county palatine , outwith the usual structure of county administration in England. (wikia.com)
  • Nine volumes for October have now appeared, the last embracing only two days, the 20th and 21st of October, and containing as much matter as the five volumes of Macaulay 's History of England . (thebookofdays.com)
  • A series of medieval expansions doubled its size by the 15th century, and the present building has changed little since then-despite a Victorian restoration overseen by architect R. H. Carpenter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within a century, the church underwent the first of several major structural alterations which have resulted in "seven different medieval styles [and] building periods" being represented. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many other medieval churches, as well as fine houses in regional Renaissance and French styles. (britannica.com)
  • The dedication of the later medieval cathedral was to St Columba . (wikipedia.org)
  • This medieval stone font was brought to this church in 1991 when the local Church of Ireland was closed to public worship. (meath.ie)
  • The crusades comprise a major chapter of Medieval History . (conservapedia.com)
  • The "medieval Mickey" is one of a group of animals and mythical creatures surrounding St Christopher on the exterior of a church in the village of Malta in the province of Carinthia. (netserf.org)
  • There was a church in Alderholt in medieval times. (dorsethistoricchurchestrust.co.uk)
  • Medieval villages were organised agricultural communities, sited at the centre of a parish or township, that shared resources such as arable land, meadow and woodland. (historicengland.org.uk)
  • In the Central Province of England, villages were the most distinctive aspect of medieval life, and their archaeological remains, together with those of their open field systems, are one of the most important sources of understanding about rural life in the five or more centuries following the Norman Conquest. (historicengland.org.uk)
  • The church serves a large rural parish which was reduced in size in 1882 when two residents of the hamlet of Highbrook paid for an additional church to be built there. (wikipedia.org)
  • ISBN 0-19-869156-4) Peckham was a hamlet, in the parish and union of Camberwell, E. division of the hundred of Brixton in Surrey , but is now a district in South-East London within the London Borough of Southwark. (houseofnames.com)
  • Until the construction of a new church in 1837, parishioners attended All Saints church instead, although burials continued in the churchyard. (wikipedia.org)
  • earnest and united desire to maintain the analogy of the faith once delivered to the saints, and happily preserved in the Church of Christ. (sermonindex.net)
  • Vale 1840-Enter 1841-List of Publications for and against the Church-Whereabouts of the Twelve Apostles-"Election and Reprobation"-Proclamation to the Saints. (byu.edu)
  • All Saints is one of the most delightful little churches in Dorset and benefits from an elevated position where the views can be really magnificent. (dorsethistoricchurchestrust.co.uk)
  • His design was to collect, under each day of the year, the saints' histories associated therewith. (thebookofdays.com)
  • Catholic and Protestant church leaders alike pursued the crusade against witchcraft with equal vigor, drawing their support from biblical passages such as Exodus 22:18, which commands, "Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Derbyshire can make some claims to be at the centre of Britain: a farm near Coton in the Elms has been identified as the furthest from the sea, whilst Rodsley and Overseal were the centres of population during the twentieth century. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The 15th Century craft was found buried in the riverbank, in Newport, south Wales, in June, when builders started hollowing out the orchestra pit of a new theatre and art centre. (netserf.org)
  • in the centre of the city of Durham, Durham Castle and Durham Cathedral are UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site . (wikia.com)
  • You can visit Bampton's Heritage Centre in the church on your return. (visitmiddevon.co.uk)
  • Both are words referring to those serving in parish church, but rector did not necessarily serve in the parish and lived elsewhere. (zum.de)
  • Morning Prayer was read in Christ Church at 9 o'clock by the Rev. W. E. Vibbert, D.D., Rector of St. James's Church, Fair Haven, and the Rev. J. E. Heald, Rector of Trinity Church, Tariffville. (sermonindex.net)
  • The Bishop was assisted in the service by the Rev. Dr. Beardsley of New Haven, the Rev. Dr. Seabury of New York, the Rev. Dr. Vibbert of Fair Haven, and the Rev. J. W. Bradin, Rector of the Parish. (sermonindex.net)
  • It is likely that there was an earlier building from the evidence of occupation and existence of a settlement in the 10 th century. (allsaintscawood.org.uk)
  • Although the term collapse has been widely used when referring to marked changes in social organization or cultural complexity, what is in reality meant is better captured by decline, a prolonged, decades- to centuries-scale process, which may differentially affect portions of societies or involve settlement reorganization rather than biological extinction. (pnas.org)
  • The place name, recorded in 1086, derived probably from a late Anglo-Saxon minster on the site of the present church, and the suffix Lovell, from the chief landholding family, was added from the 13th century. (british-history.ac.uk)
  • Another tollgate stood in the late 18th and early 19th century on the lane forming the parish's southern boundary, presumably to prevent travellers avoiding the main toll house since, at each end, the lane connected with the Burford road. (british-history.ac.uk)
  • By the late 11th century, a simple single-room stone building existed on the high, open ridge upon which the village developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • All that remains of that early church is the part of the gable-ended western wall, to the right of the door (5), and its doorway, consisting of a plain order forming a square opening and two shafts on each side, with semi-circular arch moulding (late Norman). (allsaintscawood.org.uk)
  • So almost four-fifths of the outer walls date from this period, giving a late perpendicular character to the church. (allsaintscawood.org.uk)
  • In the late 11th century, as it was recorded in the Domesday book, manors had been units based on which the recordings were done. (zum.de)
  • In fact, the structure is a late 19th century fantasy built to add class to the area. (wikitravel.org)
  • from the early 1st century - mid to late 1st century AD), also known asSaint Andrew and called in the Orthodox tradition Prōtoklētos (Πρωτόκλητος) or the First-called, was a Christian Apostleand the elder brother of Saint Peter. (standrewskovilthottam.org)
  • The Treasurer reported the late Miss Sara L. Cooke a member of this parish, had made this Church her residuary legatee. (anglicanhistory.org)
  • Three centuries of silence followed, when the city, by then reduced to only 5.000 inhabitants, was conquered and governed in succession by the Goths, the Byzantines, the Lombards and the Franks. (skyscrapercity.com)
  • From the artist's studio to the alchemist's lab, the stateroom to the secret chamber, the brick-and-mortar hall to the winding corridors of cyberspace, rooms and their contents have long influenced history and transformed their inhabitants. (sah.org)
  • Its commonest title in official use is Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. (questia.com)
  • Due to its long history, this is a city with numerous popular celebrations and traditions, such as the Fallas (featuring the traditional Spanish dish paella ), which were declared as Fiestas of National Tourist Interest of Spain in 1965 and Intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO in November 2016. (jakearchibald.com)
  • Prague is home to a number of famous cultural attractions, most of which survived the violence and destruction of twentieth century Europe. (mixbook.com)
  • The clown Coco (1900-1974) was arguably, in the middle of the twentieth century (roughly from 1930 to 1970), the most recognizable auguste In a classic European clown team, the comic, red-nosed character, as opposed to the elegant, whiteface Clown. (circopedia.org)
  • The Church was built in the mid nineteenth century, to replace a former building on this site. (meath.ie)
  • Built in the mid-nineteenth century, it closed its doors in 1910 when the new school was opened a short distance away to the west. (meath.ie)
  • It was built by Bevington in the latter part of the nineteenth century and underwent considerable refurbishment on installation. (dorsethistoricchurchestrust.co.uk)
  • This is a fair specimen of the wisdom of the nineteenth century that opposes itself to the work of the Most High God. (byu.edu)
  • Parts of the church tower are Anglo-Saxon, believed to date from about 1020. (wikipedia.org)
  • Worth, now part of the Crawley urban area but originally a large parish with a Saxon church, lies a similar distance to the northwest. (wikipedia.org)
  • The history of human habitation is long but expanded massively during Roman times , and played significant roles in the Saxon era and English civil war . (wikipedia.org)
  • The commercial center was Chester, where, in the eleventh century, the Roman-built fort was the last Saxon fortress to fall to William the Conqueror, completing the Norman conquest of England. (rootsweb.com)
  • when his researches into the matters which he had selected had approached something like completeness, he found it necessary to throw them into the form of two lectures - one on the Antiquities of the Parish, the other on the Share which the Parish had in the Sufferings of the Persecuting Period. (archive.org)
  • Usher's Antiquities of the British Churches. (archive.org)
  • famine in Ethiopia in the 1980s had an immense death toll, although Asian famines of the 20th century have also produced extensive death tolls. (schools-wikipedia.org)
  • The Green Revolution began in the 20th century with hybrid strains of high-yielding crops. (schools-wikipedia.org)
  • Stone and lime from the Huddlestone quarries at Sherburn in Elmet were brought to Cawood, possibly along the Bishop Dyke, for the Castle and the church. (allsaintscawood.org.uk)
  • Apart from the rites and foreign missions, the organization of the church is by diocese, the territory of a bishop. (questia.com)
  • Today, the second Sunday of the fast, because of long debates that took place in the fourteenth century about the place of the divine light, the Holy Church commemorates Saint Gregory Palamas, bishop of Thessalonica. (blogspot.ca)
  • Originally built on part of St John's Abbey cemetery around AD 1150, contains work from every century since. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the Norman Conquest, extensive lands and privileges in the county were acquired by the church, the Abbey of Cirencester alone holding seven hundreds at fee-farm, and the estates of the principal lay-tenants were for the most part outlying parcels of baronies having their caput in other counties. (wikishire.co.uk)
  • The church of San Lorenzo was consecrated as the city's first cathedral in 393 AD by Saint Ambrose, Archbishop of Milan. (skyscrapercity.com)
  • Foremost among them may be mentioned : Richard Whately, D.D., fifty-eighth Archbishop of Dublin (twenty-second since the Reformation), unquestionably the most distinguished member of the Episcopal Bench of the United Church, possessing as he did the rare combinations of great intellectual power, profound learning, and extraordinary public spirit, with an extremely kind and sympathetic heart aged 76 years. (irelandoldnews.com)
  • Most Rev. Michael Sheehan, the Archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico, gave the 4th annual Landregan Lecture on "Reconciliation and Healing in the Church Today. (udallas.edu)
  • Keevil and Bulkington villages both stand on a minor road which winds across the parish from west to east, joining the Westbury-Melksham road to the road from Seend to West Lavington. (british-history.ac.uk)
  • The Cotswolds are beautiful rolling hills, fine sheep country which has brought wealth to its towns and villages for many centuries. (wikishire.co.uk)
  • An important year in the history of the Christian conversion of Florence was 313 AD, the year of Constantine's Edict legalizing the worship of Christ throughout the Empire, when the city became a bishopric. (skyscrapercity.com)
  • These documents were compiled with commentary in a history written by Perrin, pastor at Lyons in the year 1618. (xenos.org)
  • In this lecture, we will go over the hundred year-old history of intelligent machines, discuss what they are, how they work, and why there is so much hype surrounding them right now. (carleton.ca)
  • The research shows (see appendices below) that roughly 3,000 Christian churches, schools, cemeteries and monuments were vandalized, looted or defaced in Europe during 2019 - which is on track to becoming a record year for anti-Christian sacrilege on the continent. (gatestoneinstitute.org)
  • Restoration work on an Austrian church has uncovered a 700-year-old fresco that some say bears a striking resemblance to Mickey Mouse. (netserf.org)
  • Capt. L. M. Jarvis, an old citizen of Sneedville wrote in his 82nd year: "I have lived here at the base of Newman's Ridge, Blackwater, being on the opposite side, for the last 71 years and well know the history of these people on Newman's Ridge and Blackwater enquired about as Melungeons. (melungeon.org)
  • Our parish Consistent Ethic of Life Committee strives to promote this vision of respect life throughout the year through different points of emphasis and activities. (omosparish.org)
  • Ninety-six historic places that bring the 200 year history of the city to life are presented in this National Register travel itinerary. (nps.gov)
  • At the first Meeting of 1891 the thanks of the Board were "tendered to Miss Sara L. Cooke for her generous gifts to the Church during the past year and for her warm interest in the welfare of the Parish. (anglicanhistory.org)
  • Apparently he succeeded, and on the 1st February, 1891, the Reverend H. L. Gamble became an assistant minister of the Parish at a salary of $1,200 a year. (anglicanhistory.org)
  • The presentation of the Host by elevating it a little, which we find more clearly expressed in the oriental rites, had also become more pronounced in the Roman Mass. Toward the end of the twelfth century stories were in circulation of visions imparted at this very moment: the Host shone like the sun, a tiny child appeared in the priest's hands as he was about to bless the Host. (blogspot.com)
  • From the reasons that prompted new commissions, to the people involved in its productions, and the inventive ways of paying for it, this study looks at the role that artists played in the development of Paris's churches, but also the role that religion played in the lives of the city's artists. (sah.org)
  • The area was already settled by the 11th century, and names recorded at that time include Hadlega and Hodlega-later standardised to Hodlegh and Hothelegh, then (West) Hoathly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The relics were divided in Kenneth's time between Dunkeld and the Columban monastery at Kells , Co. Meath , Ireland , to preserve them from Viking raids. (wikipedia.org)
  • I then checked the service histories for Hyderabad but the years around this time only show Gazzetted officers and he doesn't appear later. (rootsweb.com)
  • At the time of its construction, it was the most ambitious French cathedral project ever attempted and, with its vaults rising above 33 meters, it held a national height record for several decades. (gpsmycity.com)
  • This paper is a response to this art-historical conundrum of why eighteenth-century religious art, so important in its time, has since been so consistently overlooked. (sah.org)
  • At the same time and on till the 14t and 15th centuries, other synods contineud in various was to oppose any elevation before the consecration, 'lest' (as a London synod of 1215 put it) 'a creature be adored instead of the Creator. (blogspot.com)
  • Making paper angels proved a bit challenging in the time, but we achieved a few which now for a while join last month's plasticine models to adorn the church. (clippesbychurchandcountryside.co.uk)
  • At the time the church and state was struggling with the heightened paranoia from the events of the Popish Plot . (historygeek.co.uk)