Cleft Palate: Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Palate, Soft: A movable fold suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate. The uvula hangs from the middle of the lower border.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Pierre Robin Syndrome: Congenital malformation characterized by MICROGNATHIA or RETROGNATHIA; GLOSSOPTOSIS and CLEFT PALATE. The mandibular abnormalities often result in difficulties in sucking and swallowing. The syndrome may be isolated or associated with other syndromes (e.g., ANDERSEN SYNDROME; CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA). Developmental mis-expression of SOX9 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR gene on chromosome 17q and its surrounding region is associated with the syndrome.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Abnormalities, MultipleVelopharyngeal Insufficiency: Failure of the SOFT PALATE to reach the posterior pharyngeal wall to close the opening between the oral and nasal cavities. Incomplete velopharyngeal closure is primarily related to surgeries (ADENOIDECTOMY; CLEFT PALATE) or an incompetent PALATOPHARYNGEAL SPHINCTER. It is characterized by hypernasal speech.Palatal Muscles: The muscles of the palate are the glossopalatine, palatoglossus, levator palati(ni), musculus uvulae, palatopharyngeus, and tensor palati(ni).Mouth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the mouth.Micrognathism: Abnormally small jaw.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Lingual Frenum: MUCOUS MEMBRANE extending from floor of mouth to the under-surface of the tongue.Birth Order: The sequence in which children are born into the family.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Transforming Growth Factor beta3: A TGF-beta subtype that plays role in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during embryonic development. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta3 and TGF-beta3 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Craniofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.Teratogens: An agent that causes the production of physical defects in the developing embryo.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.MSX1 Transcription Factor: A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.Abnormalities, Drug-Induced: Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Maxillofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the maxilla and face or facial bones.Polychloroterphenyl Compounds: Compounds consisting of three benzene rings linked to each other in either ortho, meta or para positions and substituted with chlorine atoms.Mandibulofacial Dysostosis: A hereditary disorder occurring in two forms: the complete form (Franceschetti's syndrome) is characterized by antimongoloid slant of the palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower lid, micrognathia and hypoplasia of the zygomatic arches, and microtia. It is transmitted as an autosomal trait. The incomplete form (Treacher Collins syndrome) is characterized by the same anomalies in less pronounced degree. It occurs sporadically, but an autosomal dominant mode of transmission is suspected. (Dorland, 27th ed)Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Uvula: A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.Choanal Atresia: A congenital abnormality that is characterized by a blocked CHOANAE, the opening between the nose and the NASOPHARYNX. Blockage can be unilateral or bilateral; bony or membranous.Birth Intervals: The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Fetal Resorption: The disintegration and assimilation of the dead FETUS in the UTERUS at any stage after the completion of organogenesis which, in humans, is after the 9th week of GESTATION. It does not include embryo resorption (see EMBRYO LOSS).Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Limb Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural deformities of the upper and lower extremities collectively or unspecified.Interferon Regulatory Factors: A family of transcription factors that share an N-terminal HELIX-TURN-HELIX MOTIF and bind INTERFERON-inducible promoters to control GENE expression. IRF proteins bind specific DNA sequences such as interferon-stimulated response elements, interferon regulatory elements, and the interferon consensus sequence.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Palatal Obturators: Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Multiple Birth Offspring: The offspring in multiple pregnancies (PREGNANCY, MULTIPLE): TWINS; TRIPLETS; QUADRUPLETS; QUINTUPLETS; etc.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.DiGeorge Syndrome: Congenital syndrome characterized by a wide spectrum of characteristics including the absence of the THYMUS and PARATHYROID GLANDS resulting in T-cell immunodeficiency, HYPOCALCEMIA, defects in the outflow tract of the heart, and craniofacial anomalies.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Ectodermal Dysplasia: A group of hereditary disorders involving tissues and structures derived from the embryonic ectoderm. They are characterized by the presence of abnormalities at birth and involvement of both the epidermis and skin appendages. They are generally nonprogressive and diffuse. Various forms exist, including anhidrotic and hidrotic dysplasias, FOCAL DERMAL HYPOPLASIA, and aplasia cutis congenita.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Syndactyly: A congenital anomaly of the hand or foot, marked by the webbing between adjacent fingers or toes. Syndactylies are classified as complete or incomplete by the degree of joining. Syndactylies can also be simple or complex. Simple syndactyly indicates joining of only skin or soft tissue; complex syndactyly marks joining of bony elements.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Eustachian Tube: A narrow passageway that connects the upper part of the throat to the TYMPANIC CAVITY.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced: Congenital changes in the morphology of organs produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Consanguinity: The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.Facies: The appearance of the face that is often characteristic of a disease or pathological condition, as the elfin facies of WILLIAMS SYNDROME or the mongoloid facies of DOWN SYNDROME. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Triamcinolone: A glucocorticoid given, as the free alcohol or in esterified form, orally, intramuscularly, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p739)Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
  • Introduction: The buccal musculo-mucosal patch, described in 1989, can be used to correct palatine fistulas and fissures with stretching of the soft palate, or to cover bloody areas after tumor resection. (bvsalud.org)
  • This current work reports a case of an adult, female dog of undefined breed, with a history of secondary clef palate of traumatic origin in the soft palate due to bone ingestion. (bvsalud.org)
  • Behind this is the soft palate, consisting of a layer of nasal floor mucosa above and a layer of roof of mouth mucosa below, separated by sheets of muscle, nerves and blood vessels. (ponsonbymedical.co.nz)
  • RENAC is an official, national and hospital-based surveillance system of CA. The case definition includes newborns with major structural CA, external or internal, identified from birth until hospital discharge and detected by physical examination, complementary studies, interventions or autopsy. (scielo.org)
  • 3 - 9 In contemporary developed countries, however, where infectious diseases account for a smaller portion of infant mortality, 10 what effect, if any, breastfeeding has on mortality is not clear. (aappublications.org)
  • In addition to the control of confounding by parity, maternal age, birth weight, and other factors that are plausibly associated both with the decision to breastfeed and the welfare of the infant, there is a special problem with reverse causality. (aappublications.org)
  • The linked birth/infant death data set (linked file) is now being released in two different formats - period data and birth cohort data. (cdc.gov)
  • Period data - The numerator for the 1998 period linked file consists of all infant deaths occurring in 1998 linked to their corresponding birth certificates, whether the birth occurred in 1998 or 1997. (cdc.gov)
  • While the birth cohort format has methodological advantages, it creates substantial delays in data availability, since it is necessary to wait until the close of the following data year to include all infant deaths to the birth cohort. (cdc.gov)
  • The 1998 period linked birth/infant death data set includes several data files. (cdc.gov)
  • The first file includes all US infant deaths which occurred in the 1998 data year linked to their corresponding birth certificates, whether the birth occurred in 1998 or in 1997 - referred to as the numerator file. (cdc.gov)
  • The second file contains information from the death certificate for all US infant death records which could not be linked to their corresponding birth certificates - referred to as the unlinked death file. (cdc.gov)
  • It is important to identify dysphagia as soon as possible after birth, while the infant is still in the hospital, so that the appropriate short- and long-term dietetic and SLT management and parent training can commence. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • After a spontaneous rupture of membranes, a 2450 g male infant was delivered at the 33rd gestational week, with an Apgar score of 9-10. (hindawi.com)
  • The mutation is extremely rare in the wild, occurring in only about 1 in 10,000 births, and only in Bengal tigers. (answers.com)
  • 16 models with a visible difference, including several born with a cleft, had their portraits taken by world-renown photographer Rankin and were featured on Steven Tai's catwalk for London Fashion Week 2018. (clapa.com)
  • The thresholds are based on the 2003-2012 annual ICBDSR reports for oral clefts, neural tube defects, abdominal wall defects, hypospadias, limb deficiencies and microtia/anotia. (cdc.gov)
  • The figures suggest that one of every five persons in the developing world is chronically undernourished, 192 million children suffer from PEM and over 2 000 million experience micronutrient deficiencies. (fao.org)
  • Birth cohort data - The numerator for the 1998 birth cohort linked file consists of deaths to infants born in 1998 whether the death occurred in 1998 or 1999. (cdc.gov)
  • Malaria causes more than 600 000 deaths every year globally, most of them children under 5 years old. (jolkona.org)
  • The Cleft Lip and Palate (CLP) deformities comprise one group of a spectrum of facial clefting conditions. (ponsonbymedical.co.nz)
  • Clinically speaking, CL/P is classified in four groups based on its location in relation to the incisive foramen, as follows: pre-foramen clefts, or simply: labial fissures (LF), post-foramen fissures (PF), trans-foramen fissures or lip-palate fissures (LPF), and rarely facial fissures 18 . (scielo.br)
  • Register-based data were analyzed for children with congenital constriction bands in upper and lower extremities as a part of an ongoing study on 419 upper limb defects and 171 lower limb defects occurring among 753,342 births in Finland during 1993 to 2005. (ovid.com)
  • Out of all 1.6 million births in Norway in the period 1967-95, 836 475 and 1 290 298 births had information on maternal and paternal exposure, respectively. (bmj.com)
  • Analyses were based on tests for trend and were adjusted for parents' educational level, place of birth, maternal age, and year of birth. (bmj.com)
  • Irrespective of the dose (5000 or 10 000 ppm) of benomyl or Benlate, the levels of benomyl and carbendazim in maternal blood were very low. (inchem.org)
  • The largest and most recent studies suggest that maternal asthma increases the risk of perinatal mortality, preeclampsia, preterm birth, and low birth weight infants. (scribd.com)
  • In addition, studies of dose-response relationships, metabolism/distribution, mechanisms of action for induction of birth defects, and postnatal dysfunction in animals are of critical importance. (teratology.org)
  • Digoxin Mean decreases of 16 to 22 in serum digoxin levels were demonstrated get after single-dose intravenous and oral administration of albuterol, respectively, to normal volunteers who had received digoxin for 10 days. (scenic39.com)
  • In the cohort of hairdressers 3706 women gave birth to 6960 infants. (bmj.com)
  • Compared with the referents, the hairdressers more often gave birth to infants that were small for gestational age (SGA). (bmj.com)
  • Because infants who are sick from birth may be unable to breastfeed and children who become ill later may stop, breastfeeding infants may seem healthier because illness, especially mortal illness, prevents breastfeeding rather than because breastfeeding prevents illness. (aappublications.org)
  • UNICEF and the International Children s Palliative Care Network (ICPCN), in collaboration with national palliative care associations, commissioned this joint analysis to assess critical needs and gaps in children s palliative care (CPC) which is defined as care for infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 19 with life limiting and life threatening conditions. (docplayer.net)
  • Lethality of these disorders, causing death before birth or before diagnosis is made. (who.int)
  • 2FORMATS AND CONVENTIONS OF DIAGNOSIS CODING SYSTEMS Learning Outcomes After completing this chapter, students should be able to 2.1 Explain the layout of the ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM manuals. (docplayer.net)
  • The purpose of this paper is to present and summarize the experience in diagnosis of cleft lip/palate by means of MRI. (docplayer.pl)
  • It may contain 10% citric acid solution or 10% sodium citrate solution to adjust pH between 3.0 and 5.0. (nih.gov)
  • It now covers 1.2 million births per year, a quarter of births in Europe (table 1), and includes almost all population based registers of congenital anomaly in Europe as its members. (bmj.com)
  • MRI was less useful than ultrasound in 1 case (6.7%), in 4 cases (26.7%) it did not add any significant new information, in the remaining 10 cases (66.6%) important additional information was obtained on MRI. (docplayer.pl)
  • These trends will indicate the for the re-examination of 10% of children, degree of success of oral health care strate- to assess examiner reproducibility. (who.int)
  • The cleft palate is the communication between the oral and nasal cavity through an aperture in the palate, it's causes include an infinitude of factors: congenital, traumatic, mineral deficiency or hormonal. (bvsalud.org)
  • In its simplest essence, the palate may be thought of as a shelf of tissue which separates the mouth (oral cavity) from the nose (nasal cavity). (ponsonbymedical.co.nz)
  • Usually, daily oral dosages of 0.5 - 10 mg are sufficient. (medicinep.com)
  • Absorption: Following oral administration of Trileptal ®, oxcarbazepine is completely absorbed and metabolized significantly in its pharmacologically active metabolite (monohydroxy derivative 10, or MHD). (medicinamexico.com)
  • Results: The total risk of birth defects was not associated with parental exposure. (bmj.com)
  • The risk of birth defects owing to synthetic vitamin A analogs has already been documented in humans, and recently the ingestion of excess vitamin A (25,000 IU or more) as retinol/retinyl esters during pregnancy has been associated with some birth defects in a small number of case reports, although it is not known that the relationship is causal. (teratology.org)
  • Reproductive technologies and the risk of birth defects. (jamanetwork.com)
  • It is not too surprising then, to discover that towards the front of the mouth, the palate comprises a shelf of bone covered above by the mucosa of the floor of the nose, and below, by the mucosa of the roof of the mouth. (ponsonbymedical.co.nz)
  • The front, bony part of the roof of the mouth, is termed the hard palate. (ponsonbymedical.co.nz)
  • the "roof" of the mouth is called the palate. (wikipedia.org)
  • 14-18 5 FIPSOCCB Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) Geographic Codes (Occurrence) - Birth Refer to the Geographic Code Outline further back in this document for a detailed list of areas and codes. (cdc.gov)
  • The doses were 125 mg/kg bw per day by gavage or 5000-10 000 ppm in the diet (about 400-800 mg/kg bw). (inchem.org)
  • 10 000 From Kuna (1955) Dogs Groups of five male and five female beagle dogs were fed diets containing the phenylurea and the pyrimidone components (purity unspecified) in a ratio of 3:1 on six days per week for two years. (inchem.org)
  • Seasonal allergic eczema in kids: Management of atopic eczema in kids rhinitis is related to a detrimental impact on examination from birth as much as the age of 12 years. (spanishjournal.com)
  • 3 The period of increased risk has been estimated to be between 10 and 15 years following a first pregnancy. (hkmj.org)
  • Having worked hard on his own confidence over the years, David hopes that sharing his story will help to inspire young people born with a cleft who are still finding their way. (clapa.com)
  • LHC increases by 2% for every year you don't join, up to a maximum of 70%, and can only be removed after 10 years of continuous hospital cover. (apia.com.au)
  • FOREIGN RESIDENTS: Occurred in Guam to a resident of any place other than Guam or the U.S. 12-13 2 BRSTATE Expanded State of Residence - NCHS Codes - Birth This item is designed to separately identify New York City records from other New York State records. (cdc.gov)
  • Breeder: Harlan Laboratories, B.V., Kreuzelweg 53, 5961 NM Horst, Netherlands- Number of Animals: 40 males (10 per group), 40 females (10 per group)- Age (at Start of Treatment): 11 weeks- Body Weight Range (at Start of Treatment): Male (289 to 333 g), Females (186 to 216 g)- Identification: Cage card and individual animal number (ear tattoo). (europa.eu)
  • The selected F1-weanlings were exposed 10 weeks with acquisition of vaginal patency and the assessment of preputial separation in males and vaginal cytology evaluated during the last three weeks. (europa.eu)
  • Did that mean Casper would need more palate surgery? (clapa.com)
  • Whether you vote for mother/child health care in India, prosthetics and amputee rehabilitation in Haiti, or cleft palate surgery in Bolivia, you are part of a global movement to save lives. (jolkona.org)