Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Flowmeters: Devices used to measure the flow of fluids (see RHEOLOGY) or the AIR to measure RESPIRATION.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Extraterrestrial Environment: The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Diagnostic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in examination.Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Spacecraft: Devices, manned and unmanned, which are designed to be placed into an orbit about the Earth or into a trajectory to another celestial body. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Myosin Light Chains: The smaller subunits of MYOSINS that bind near the head groups of MYOSIN HEAVY CHAINS. The myosin light chains have a molecular weight of about 20 KDa and there are usually one essential and one regulatory pair of light chains associated with each heavy chain. Many myosin light chains that bind calcium are considered "calmodulin-like" proteins.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Glare: Relatively bright light, or the dazzling sensation of relatively bright light, which produces unpleasantness or discomfort, or which interferes with optimal VISION, OCULAR. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Darkness: The absence of light.Blood Chemical Analysis: An examination of chemicals in the blood.Jupiter: The fifth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its sixteen natural satellites include Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, and Io.Saturn: The sixth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its twelve natural satellites include Phoebe and Titan.Dry Ice: A solid form of carbon dioxide used as a refrigerant.Insulin, Short-Acting: Insulin derivatives and preparations that are designed to induce a rapid HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECT.Electrolysis: Destruction by passage of a galvanic electric current, as in disintegration of a chemical compound in solution.Light Signal Transduction: The conversion of absorbed light energy into molecular signals.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Forced Expiratory Flow Rates: The rate of airflow measured during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination.Drug Dosage Calculations: Math calculations done for preparing appropriate doses of medicines, taking into account conversions of WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. Mistakes are one of the sources of MEDICATION ERRORS.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Ergometry: Any method of measuring the amount of work done by an organism, usually during PHYSICAL EXERTION. Ergometry also includes measures of power. Some instruments used in these determinations include the hand crank and the bicycle ergometer.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Blood-Aqueous Barrier: The selectively permeable barrier, in the EYE, formed by the nonpigmented layer of the EPITHELIUM of the CILIARY BODY, and the ENDOTHELIUM of the BLOOD VESSELS of the IRIS. TIGHT JUNCTIONS joining adjacent cells keep the barrier between cells continuous.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Curing Lights, Dental: Light sources used to activate polymerization of light-cured DENTAL CEMENTS and DENTAL RESINS. Degree of cure and bond strength depends on exposure time, wavelength, and intensity of the curing light.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Exobiology: The interdisciplinary science that studies evolutionary biology, including the origin and evolution of the major elements required for life, their processing in the interstellar medium and in protostellar systems. This field also includes the study of chemical evolution and the subsequent interactions between evolving biota and planetary evolution as well as the field of biology that deals with the study of extraterrestrial life.Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Atmosphere: The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Photometry: Measurement of the various properties of light.Health Physics: The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Rats, Hairless: Mutant strains of rats that produce little or no hair. Several different homozygous recessive mutations can cause hairlessness in rats including rnu/rnu (Rowett nude), fz/fz (fuzzy), shn/shn (shorn), and nznu/nznu (New Zealand nude). Note that while NUDE RATS are often hairless, they are most characteristically athymic.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Spectrometry, Gamma: Determination of the energy distribution of gamma rays emitted by nuclei. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Insulin Infusion Systems: Portable or implantable devices for infusion of insulin. Includes open-loop systems which may be patient-operated or controlled by a pre-set program and are designed for constant delivery of small quantities of insulin, increased during food ingestion, and closed-loop systems which deliver quantities of insulin automatically based on an electronic glucose sensor.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Electricity: The physical effects involving the presence of electric charges at rest and in motion.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Pacific OceanTropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Radiation ProtectionUrine Specimen Collection: Methods or procedures used to obtain samples of URINE.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Decompression: Decompression external to the body, most often the slow lessening of external pressure on the whole body (especially in caisson workers, deep sea divers, and persons who ascend to great heights) to prevent DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS. It includes also sudden accidental decompression, but not surgical (local) decompression or decompression applied through body openings.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Wireless Technology: Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Myosin-Light-Chain Kinase: An enzyme that phosphorylates myosin light chains in the presence of ATP to yield myosin-light chain phosphate and ADP, and requires calcium and CALMODULIN. The 20-kDa light chain is phosphorylated more rapidly than any other acceptor, but light chains from other myosins and myosin itself can act as acceptors. The enzyme plays a central role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Syringes: Instruments used for injecting or withdrawing fluids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Volcanic Eruptions: The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Remote Sensing Technology: Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Meteoroids: Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Cariogenic Agents: Substances that promote DENTAL CARIES.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Phonophoresis: Use of ultrasound to increase the percutaneous adsorption of drugs.Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Phytochrome: A blue-green biliprotein widely distributed in the plant kingdom.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.PeruMyosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Adaptation, Ocular: The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Mongolia: The country is bordered by RUSSIA on the north and CHINA on the west, south, and east. The capita is Ulaanbaatar.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Hydrothermal Vents: Hot springs on the ocean floor. They are commonly found near volcanically active places such as mid-oceanic ridges.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Bilirubin: A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Hypoglycemia: A syndrome of abnormally low BLOOD GLUCOSE level. Clinical hypoglycemia has diverse etiologies. Severe hypoglycemia eventually lead to glucose deprivation of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM resulting in HUNGER; SWEATING; PARESTHESIA; impaired mental function; SEIZURES; COMA; and even DEATH.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Ankle: The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Electric Wiring: An arrangement of wires distributing electricity.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Housing: Living facilities for humans.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Cryptochromes: Flavoproteins that function as circadian rhythm signaling proteins in ANIMALS and as blue-light photoreceptors in PLANTS. They are structurally-related to DNA PHOTOLYASES and it is believed that both classes of proteins may have originated from an earlier protein that played a role in protecting primitive organisms from the cyclical exposure to UV LIGHT.Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains: One of the types of light chain subunits of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Photobiology: The branch of biology dealing with the effect of light on organisms.Reflex, Pupillary: Constriction of the pupil in response to light stimulation of the retina. It refers also to any reflex involving the iris, with resultant alteration of the diameter of the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.
  • 1000 mL = 1 L so 0. (erztimes.com)
  • mL↔L 1 L = 1000 mL mL↔kL 1 kL = 1000000 mL mL↔dL 1 dL = 100 mL mL↔cL 1 cL = 10 mL mL↔uL 1 mL = 1000 uL mL↔Cc 1 mL = 1 Cc mL↔Drop 1 mL = 20 Drop mL↔Cup 1 Cup = 250 mL mL↔Teaspoon (metric) 1 Teaspoon (metric) = 5 mL mL↔Tablespoon (metric) coefficient: 0. (erztimes.com)
  • 1 L, l = 1000 mL 1 mL = 0. (erztimes.com)
  • This study by Yukinori Mukai, International Islamic University Malaysia, and Leong Seng Lim, University Malaysia Sabah, examined the retinomotor responses and prey ingestion rates of 10-, 15-, 20- and 30-day-old Asian seabass Lates calcarifer under different light intensities from 0 to 1000 lx to determine the visual thresholds. (thefishsite.com)
  • The three experiments described in the following sections were all performed in a dark-room laboratory with an illumination system that allowed exposure of larvae to eight light intensities of 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 lx. (thefishsite.com)
  • Asian seabass larvae 10, 15 and 20 days of age were tested for retinomotor response under eight light intensities (0-1000 lx) and processed for retinal examination (total n = 72 larvae). (thefishsite.com)
  • Where metres per second are several orders of magnitude too slow to be convenient, such as in astronomical measurements, velocities may be given in kilometres per second, where 1 km/s is 1000 metres per second, sometimes1 Kilometers/Hour is equal to how many Meters/Second? (selangor.ga)
  • A flux of 1000 lumens, spread uniformly over an area of 1 square metre, lights up that square metre with an illuminance of 1000 lux. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the same 1000 lumens spread out over 10 square metres produces a dimmer illuminance of only 100 lux. (wikipedia.org)
  • It comprises a coherent system of units of measurement built on seven base units that are ampere , kelvin , second , metre , kilogram , candela , mole , and a set of twenty prefixes to the unit names and unit symbols that may be used when specifying multiples and fractions of the units. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is based on the metre-kilogram-second system of units (MKS) rather than any variant of the CGS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solution: There are.Since the newton equals one kilogram metre per second squared, the unit can also be written as the newton per kilogram, Kilometer per (second squared), km/s Mile per (second squared), mi/s Seconds from 0 kilometer per hour. (selangor.ga)
  • International team of scientists suggest replacing the kilogram artifact -- a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy about the size of a plum --with a definition based on one of two unchanging natural phenomena, either a quantity of light or the mass of a fixed number of atoms. (slashdot.org)
  • A dosage of 16.6 kg Bayferrox pigmentation for every cubic metre of concrete was used for the mix of the concrete roads at the Sunward Lifestyle Centre. (engineeringnews.co.za)
  • The accepted units of measure for density are grams per millilitre (g/mL) or kilograms per cubic metre (kg/m 3 ). (astm.org)
  • Although smaller than a cubic metre, the satellites carries a wide-angle telescope for its main Earth-monitoring instrument, a pair of radiation sensors , a fibre optic connector experiment, a prototype radio transmitter based on the semiconductor gallium nitride , and a test receiver to track aircraft in flight all around the globe. (phys.org)
  • The new image, showing a very rich field of stars towards the Carina arm of the Milky Way, is centred on the star HD 87643, a member of the exotic class of B[e] stars [1]. (innovations-report.com)
  • For example, in 1983 the metre was redefined as the distance that light propagates in vacuum in an given fraction of a second, thus making the value of the speed of light in terms of the defined units exact. (wikipedia.org)
  • So the value of the speed of light in vacuum in the MKS system of SI units follows trivially from the 1983 definition of meter. (stackexchange.com)
  • 1.Convert km/h to m/s - Conversion of Measurement Units Quickly convert kilometers/hour into meters/second (km/h to m/s) using the online calculator for metric conversions and more. (selangor.ga)
  • Comfortable working conditions for staff in this monumental space of 66 000 m3 under beams are ensured by a temperature which varies between 12°C and 19°C. (archdaily.com)
  • Its application is restricted to liquids with total vapor pressures (see Test Method D5191 ) typically below 100 kPa and viscosities (see Test Method D445 or D7042 ) typically below about 15 000 mm 2 /s at the temperature of test. (astm.org)
  • 1.1.1 Waxes and highly viscous samples were not included in the 1999 interlaboratory study (ILS) sample set that was used to determine the current precision statements of the method, since all samples evaluated at the time were analyzed at a test temperature of 15 °C. Wax and highly viscous samples require a temperature cell operated at elevated temperatures necessary to ensure a liquid test specimen is introduced for analysis. (astm.org)
  • IBI KRANJ, which produces over 11 million square metres of fabric per year, is oriented towards innovations that satisfy customer needs. (eurekanetwork.org)
  • My program builds on two recent breakthroughs in our use of stable isotopes (13C, 17O, 18O) in atmospheric CO2: (1) Our discovery that observed δ¹³C in CO2 in the atmosphere is a quantitative measure for vegetation water-use efficiency over millions of square kilometers, integrating the drought response of individual plants. (europa.eu)
  • How many meters is 1 square meter?One millimeter of length converted to kilometer equals to 0.0000010 km. (selangor.ga)
  • The building is 100 m long, 56 m wide and 33 m high and occupies an area of 36 000 square metres for a built volume of 125 000 cubic metres. (epthinktank.eu)
  • [1] It is equal to one lumen per square metre. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is analogous to the radiometric unit watt per square metre , but with the power at each wavelength weighted according to the luminosity function , a standardized model of human visual brightness perception. (wikipedia.org)
  • DIMENSION (DIMENSION) [Double;Yes;0;15;0;Pop_Dep] This is the dimension of the linear feature in metres or the polygon feature in square metres as measured in the MGA94 projection of the appropriate zone. (ga.gov.au)
  • The metre long African spurred tortoise, which tips the scales at 70kg, is a regular sight on the streets of Tokyo's Tsukishima district, as he and owner Hisao Mitani take their snail-paced daily walk. (news24.com)
  • There are more than 10 000 registered users of Vegetation products worldwide, and the data have contributed to hundreds of scientific papers. (phys.org)
  • This direct normal illuminance is related to the solar illuminance constant E sc , equal to 128 000 lux (see Sunlight and Solar constant ). (wikipedia.org)
  • 000 liter = 1 m 3 Oct 10, 2017 · Conventional units to SI units - conversion factors. (erztimes.com)
  • Conférence générale des poids et mesures - CGPM), which was established by the Metre Convention of 1875, brought together many international organisations to establish the definitions and standards of a new system and standardise the rules for writing and presenting measurements. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 9th General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) instructed the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) in 1948 "to make recommendations for a single practical system of units of measurement, suitable for adoption by all countries adhering to the Metre Convention" [ 1 ]. (degruyter.com)
  • This image was obtained using the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) instrument mounted on Unit Telescope 1 ( Antu ) of the VLT , located at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile. (eurekalert.org)
  • The image was obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the 2400-metre-high La Silla Observatory in Chile. (innovations-report.com)
  • It was taken on 14 March 2005 (orbit number 1483) by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard ESA's Mars Express with a ground resolution of approximately 29 metres per pixel. (innovations-report.com)
  • The cost for the construction works for the overall project including the three buildings FST 01, FST 02 and CTF 01, amounted approximately to €20.342.000 (excluding V.A.T. (ucy.ac.cy)
  • At approximately 100 000 light-years across, Messier 77 is also one of largest galaxies in the Messier catalogue -- so massive that its gravity causes other nearby galaxies to twist and become warped ( eso1707 ) . (eurekalert.org)
  • The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole along a great circle , so the Earth's circumference is approximately 40 000 km. (wikibedia.ru)
  • The speed of light can be used with time of flight measurements to measure large distances to high precision. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there is no other way to measure distances with as much precision as by timing the travel of light, so there would be no practical effect of such an adjustment. (stackexchange.com)
  • The metre (Commonwealth spelling) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre , from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI). (wikibedia.ru)
  • In photometry , this is used as a measure of the intensity, as perceived by the human eye, of light that hits or passes through a surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • One can think of luminous flux (measured in lumens ) as a measure of the total "amount" of visible light present, and the illuminance as a measure of the intensity of illumination on a surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • The illuminance provided by a light source on a surface perpendicular to the direction to the source is a measure of the strength of that source as perceived from that location. (wikipedia.org)
  • The archeological site of Regourdou is located on the same hilltop as Lascaux, 800 metres from the famous caves. (donsmaps.com)
  • The light-year unit appeared a few years after the first successful measurement of the distance to a star other than the Sun, by Friedrich Bessel in 1838. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bessel added that light employs 10.3 years to traverse this distance. (wikipedia.org)
  • David, by contrast, was light and fast moving - with a weapon that from a distance of 35 metres has the stopping power of a modern handgun. (siliconcape.com)
  • They arrived at a figure for the solar parallax of 9.5 arcseconds, equivalent to an Earth-Sun distance of about 22 000 Earth radii. (wikibedia.ru)
  • In practical lighting problems, given information on the way light is emitted from each source and the distance and geometry of the lighted area, a numerical calculation can be made of the illumination on a surface by adding the contributions of every point on every light source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Design A time series analysis was conducted of emergency medical service caseload between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016. (bmj.com)
  • : 103-106 The units, excluding prefixed units, [Note 1] form a coherent system of units , which is based on a system of quantities in such a way that the equations between the numerical values expressed in coherent units have exactly the same form, including numerical factors, as the corresponding equations between the quantities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The definition of the speed of light is independent of its numerical value when it is measured in different media. (stackexchange.com)
  • Solar lights, which hang from shepherd hooks, trail up the hill, lighting the way. (iol.co.za)
  • On the Fermentation Room's lower level, beneath walkways, all the workspaces are naturally lit. (archdaily.com)
  • The collection of branches and fruits and the elaboration of air layers were conducted in a preserved population of P. laticuspis located in an oak forest, 2 km from Cerro "El Huisteco" park, in the municipality of Tetipac, Guerrero, Mexico, at 2 480 metres above sea level (18[grados]35'N - 99[grados]36'39"W) (INEGI, 2000). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Phase 1 of the contract comprised the upgrading of the lighting from SON discharge lamps units to more efficient 80w fluorescents installed in blocks of four in high bay fittings, controlled from a high level bus bar. (buildingcentre.co.uk)
  • Despite the height at which they are mounted - the internal height of the Midlands warehouse is 18 metres - Hi-Bay LightSpot controls can be easily programmed from ground level by using an infrared hand-held programmer. (buildingcentre.co.uk)
  • The alpine ecosystem of the Himalayas begins at about 3 000 metres above sea level. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • As we pull up at the camp, after a three-hour drive from Lake Manyara Airport, the air is notably cooler - we're now 2 670 metres above sea level. (iol.co.za)
  • Comment glander au Sustainability en custom crowd chapters to the preference office ease - Following in misleading Comment to implement deformation level articles, time History committee. (immos-24.de)
  • The facility is 740 metres long and composed of four sections: Injector with electron source, linear accelerator, an arrangement of undulators, and experimental facilities. (psi.ch)
  • For many practical purposes, light and other electromagnetic waves will appear to propagate instantaneously, but for long distances and very sensitive measurements, their finite speed has noticeable effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • All sizes from smallest models of lightest weight to largest captive or long vo}'age vessels with or without motors. (volaticum.com)
  • SMART-1 was launched on 27 September 2003, and it reached the Moon in November 2004 after a long spiralling around Earth. (esa.int)
  • Another distinctive characteristic of the cougar is its long tail: measuring up to a metre long, it is important for balance. (hww.ca)
  • To keep a online joe care nursery is required to implement the Online driver world or progressive web to interest happened from viewsAn to be the definitions stake systems chamber about kahului Able to facilitate it, n't if they die 27,780 Speeding strategy for no site but make you director in their lights with currently economic insurance knows literally been long die Is assigned at the television of the based said. (gofourth.org)
  • V disease, schizophrenia, and irritating the usual to work drove me with multiple and cons long saphenous and the moment of difficult sounds and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. (failedpilot.com)
  • At the outset, we imagined a free area of 6 000 m2, because we didn't want constraints on where to position the vats. (archdaily.com)
  • On 3 September 2006 the SMART-1 perilune, coinciding with the point of impact, will be on the lunar area called 'Lake of Excellence', located at mid-southern latitudes. (esa.int)
  • When the area is vacated, the lights automatically switch off. (buildingcentre.co.uk)
  • A given amount of light will illuminate a surface more dimly if it is spread over a larger area, so illuminance is inversely proportional to area when the luminous flux is held constant. (wikipedia.org)
  • To light a factory floor with dozens of times the area of the kitchen would require dozens of such fixtures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The camp is within the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, a Unesco World Heritage Site and multiple land use area, where protected wildlife wanders freely among the Maasai, who number 50 000 here. (iol.co.za)
  • Scientists are trying to clone extinct cave lions after the 12-000-year old, perfectly preserved remains of two cubs was discovered in Siberia. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Human activities are having an increasing effect on ocean biodiversity, although it remains the case that relatively few marine species are reported to have gone extinct [ 1 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Lorentzian Relativity (LR) for calculating the relative ticking rate of clockA compared to a clockB needs (1) a calculation of relative speed & then (2) a relativistic calculation using gamma & then (3) a calculation of relative ticking followed by (4) a further calculation of relative ticking (depending on the question & available info). (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Black & Veatch is teaming with Keppel Shipyard Limited to convert the Gimi into an FLNG vessel supporting the development of Phase 1 of the Greater Tortue / Ahmeyim field, located offshore Mauritania and Senegal. (bv.com)
  • Initially planned to operate six months around the Moon, SMART-1 was later given a mission extension of one further year, now about to be concluded. (esa.int)
  • The curtain raiser was presented by Peter Duffell-Canham on the exploits and fate of the German Light Cruiser SMS K nigsberg in East African water in 1914 and 1915 At the outbreak of WWI the K nigsberg was based in Dar es Salaam, Tanganyika, a German colony, from where she was to operate as a commerce raider in the Indian Ocean. (samilitaryhistory.org)
  • Able to operate in 2 metres of water, and with the aid of spotter aircraft and land based observers, they were able to get within range and damage the K nigsberg beyond repair. (samilitaryhistory.org)
  • For more than 4 000 years they were home to the indigenous San Bushman people, who created a vast body of rock art - the largest collection in the world, south of the Sahara desert. (mediaclubsouthafrica.com)
  • More than 17 000 people have been arrested countrywide over the last week for various crimes and contravening lockdown regulations. (health24.com)
  • As early as September 1970, the expected enlargement of the Community following the accession of the United Kingdom, Ireland and Denmark, called into question the size of the building and the project had to be revised, with the addition of an extra floor, thus increasing the building's capacity from 1 000 to 1 200 people. (epthinktank.eu)
  • 1 Thunderstorm asthma is a rare phenomenon, thought to occur when a source of allergen, typically pollen, and appropriate weather conditions, such as a thunderstorm, combine to trigger severe asthma among susceptible people in the vicinity. (bmj.com)
  • There are 10 deciliters = 1,000 milliliters = 1,000 cubic centimeters = 1. (erztimes.com)
  • L. This means that there is a constant proportion between the two, so just as 1,000 milliliters is equivalent to 1 L, multiplying both values by the same number will still give a true statement. (erztimes.com)
  • This means that there is a constant proportion between the two, so just as 1,000 milliliters is equivalent to 1 L, multiplying both values by the same number will still Merrill Lynch is not responsible for and does not endorse, guarantee or monitor content, availability, viewpoints, products or services that are offered or expressed on other websites. (erztimes.com)
  • The creation of the X-rays begins at the electron source: Electrons are initially set free when a burst of light strikes a metal plate. (psi.ch)
  • 4. Copy an complete the following table, which compares light microscopes with electron microscopes. (blogspot.com)
  • Each wavelength brings out a different quality: for example, the pinkish hydrogen-alpha highlights the hotter and younger stars forming in the spiral arms, while in red are the fine, thread-like filamentary structures in the gas surrounding Messier 77 [1]. (eurekalert.org)
  • The base units are derived from invariant constants of nature, such as the speed of light and the triple point of water , which can be observed and measured with great accuracy, and one physical artefact. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1865, James Clerk Maxwell proposed that light was an electromagnetic wave, and therefore travelled at the speed c appearing in his theory of electromagnetism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The latest large research facility at PSI generates very short pulses of X-ray light with laser-like properties. (psi.ch)
  • Deeply incised valleys of a depth ranging from 800 to 1 200 metres are clearly identifiable in the northern part of the scene. (innovations-report.com)
  • In 1970 he began work on a deep shaft, which eventually reached a depth of 35 metres, where he discovered Mesozoic marine fossils and an ochre deposit, which was used by Monique Peytral to paint the reproductions at Lascaux II. (donsmaps.com)
  • Imtech G&H project engineer Ian Pattenden explained that Phase 1 involved that part of the warehouse used as its national seasonal stock distribution centre. (buildingcentre.co.uk)
  • But Proba-V also marks a departure from previous technology demonstrators Proba-1 in 2001 and Proba-2 in 2009. (phys.org)