Tobacco use cessation is the process of discontinuing the use of tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and electronic cigarettes. This is often a critical component of treatment for tobacco-related diseases and conditions, as well as a key strategy for preventing tobacco-related illnesses and premature death.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a combination of behavioral support and medication as the most effective approach to tobacco use cessation. Behavioral support may include counseling, group therapy, and self-help materials, while medication can include nicotine replacement therapies (such as gum, lozenges, patches, inhalers, or nasal sprays), as well as prescription medications such as bupropion and varenicline.

Tobacco use cessation is a challenging process that often requires multiple attempts before successful long-term abstinence is achieved. However, with the right support and resources, many tobacco users are able to quit successfully and improve their health outcomes.

Tobacco use cessation products are a type of pharmacological or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) designed to help individuals stop using tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. These products include:

1. Nicotine gum: A chewing gum that delivers nicotine to the body through the lining of the mouth.
2. Nicotine lozenges: Similar to nicotine gum, but in the form of a small tablet that dissolves slowly in the mouth.
3. Nicotine patch: A transdermal patch that delivers a steady dose of nicotine through the skin.
4. Nicotine inhaler: A device that looks like a cigarette and delivers nicotine vapor to be inhaled.
5. Nicotine nasal spray: A spray that delivers nicotine through the nostrils.
6. Non-nicotine prescription medications: Such as bupropion (Zyban) and varenicline (Chantix), which help reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

These products are intended to help manage nicotine dependence and make it easier for individuals to quit tobacco use by alleviating the unpleasant symptoms of withdrawal. It is important to note that these products should be used as part of a comprehensive cessation plan, which may also include counseling and behavioral support.

Smoking cessation is the process of discontinuing tobacco smoking. This can be achieved through various methods such as behavioral modifications, counseling, and medication. The goal of smoking cessation is to improve overall health, reduce the risk of tobacco-related diseases, and enhance quality of life. It is a significant step towards preventing lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other serious health conditions.

Tobacco is not a medical term, but it refers to the leaves of the plant Nicotiana tabacum that are dried and fermented before being used in a variety of ways. Medically speaking, tobacco is often referred to in the context of its health effects. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "tobacco" can also refer to any product prepared from the leaf of the tobacco plant for smoking, sucking, chewing or snuffing.

Tobacco use is a major risk factor for a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and various other medical conditions. The smoke produced by burning tobacco contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause serious health problems. Nicotine, one of the primary active constituents in tobacco, is highly addictive and can lead to dependence.

Tobacco Use Disorder is a clinical diagnosis described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), used by healthcare professionals to diagnose mental health conditions. It is defined as a problematic pattern of tobacco use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by at least two of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

1. Tobacco is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
2. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control tobacco use.
3. A great deal of time is spent on activities necessary to obtain or use tobacco, or recover from its effects.
4. Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use tobacco, occurs.
5. Recurrent tobacco use results in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
6. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of tobacco use.
7. Tobacco use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by tobacco.
8. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:
a. A need for markedly increased amounts of tobacco to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
b. Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of tobacco.
9. Characteristic withdrawal syndrome for tobacco, or tobacco is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

The diagnosis excludes nicotine withdrawal that is a normal response to the cessation of tobacco use, intoxication, or substance/medication-induced disorders. Tobacco Use Disorder can be further specified as mild, moderate, or severe based on the number of criteria met.

Smokeless tobacco is a type of tobacco that is not burned or smoked. It's often called "spit" or "chewing" tobacco. The most common forms of smokeless tobacco in the United States are snuff and chewing tobacco. Snuff is a finely ground tobacco that can be dry or moist. Dry snuff is sniffed or taken through the nose, while moist snuff is placed between the lower lip or cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is plugs, leaves, or twists of tobacco that are chewed or sucked on.

Smokeless tobacco contains nicotine, which is addictive. When you use smokeless tobacco, the nicotine is absorbed through the lining of your mouth and goes directly into your bloodstream. This can lead to a rapid increase in nicotine levels in your body, which can make it harder to quit using tobacco.

Smokeless tobacco also contains harmful chemicals that can cause cancer of the mouth, esophagus, and pancreas. It can also cause other health problems, such as gum disease, tooth decay, and precancerous lesions in the mouth. Using smokeless tobacco can also increase your risk of developing heart disease and having a stroke.

Tobacco use is the act of consuming or ingesting tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco, and snuff. The primary active chemical in tobacco is nicotine, which is highly addictive and can have serious health consequences.

When tobacco is smoked, nicotine is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and travels to the brain, where it activates the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine, leading to feelings of pleasure and relaxation. However, smoking also exposes the user to a range of harmful chemicals and toxins that can cause serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, lung disease, and stroke.

Chewing tobacco and snuff can also lead to nicotine addiction and are associated with an increased risk of oral cancer, gum disease, and other health issues. Overall, tobacco use is a major public health concern and is responsible for millions of preventable deaths each year worldwide.

A Tobacco Industry is a commercial sector involved in the cultivation, production, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. This can include growers who produce tobacco leaves, manufacturers who process the leaves into various forms (such as cigarettes, chewing tobacco, or snuff), and companies that market and distribute these products to consumers. It is important to note that the tobacco industry has been associated with significant health risks, as the use of tobacco products can lead to a range of serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.