Thebaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid found in the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and is defined medically as follows:

A benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, Thebaine is a potent opioid agonist with complex pharmacology. It acts as an antagonist at mu and delta receptors while exhibiting agonist activity at kappa receptors. Due to its strong physiological effects and potential for abuse, thebaine has limited therapeutic use. However, it serves as a crucial intermediate in the semi-synthesis of various opioid analgesics, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and nalbuphine.

Please note that this definition is intended for informational purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Codeine is a opiate analgesic, commonly used for its pain-relieving and cough suppressant properties. It is typically prescribed for mild to moderately severe pain, and is also found in some over-the-counter cold and cough medications. Codeine works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which helps to reduce the perception of pain. Like other opiates, codeine can produce side effects such as drowsiness, constipation, and respiratory depression, and it carries a risk of dependence and addiction with long-term use. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking codeine, and to inform them of any other medications you are taking, as well as any medical conditions you may have.

"Papaver" is the genus name for the poppy plant family, which includes several species of plants that are known for their showy flowers and often contain medicinal alkaloids. The most well-known member of this family is probably Papaver somniferum, also known as the opium poppy. This particular species contains a number of pharmacologically active compounds, including morphine, codeine, and papaverine, which have been used in various medical contexts for their analgesic, sedative, and vasodilatory effects. However, it's worth noting that the use of Papaver somniferum and its derivatives is tightly regulated due to their potential for abuse and addiction.

Morphinans are a class of organic compounds that share a common skeletal structure, which is based on the morphine molecule. The morphinan structure consists of a tetracyclic ring system made up of three six-membered benzene rings (A, C, and D) fused to a five-membered dihydrofuran ring (B).

Morphinans are important in medicinal chemistry because many opioid analgesics, such as morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and levorphanol, are derived from or structurally related to morphinans. These compounds exert their pharmacological effects by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which are involved in pain perception, reward, and addictive behaviors.

It is worth noting that while all opiates (drugs derived from the opium poppy) are morphinans, not all morphinans are opiates. Some synthetic or semi-synthetic morphinans, such as fentanyl and methadone, do not have a natural origin but still share the same basic structure and pharmacological properties.

Opium is defined as the dried latex obtained from incisions made in the unripe seedpods of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). It contains a number of alkaloids, including morphine, codeine, and thebaine. Opium has been used for its pain-relieving, euphoric, and sedative effects since ancient times. However, its use is highly regulated due to the risk of addiction and other serious side effects.

Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic (pain reliever) derived from the opium poppy. It works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, blocking the transmission of pain signals and reducing the perception of pain. Morphine is used to treat moderate to severe pain, including pain associated with cancer, myocardial infarction, and other conditions. It can also be used as a sedative and cough suppressant.

Morphine has a high potential for abuse and dependence, and its use should be closely monitored by healthcare professionals. Common side effects of morphine include drowsiness, respiratory depression, constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Overdose can result in respiratory failure, coma, and death.

Heroin is a highly addictive drug that is processed from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seed pod of the Asian opium poppy plant. It is a "downer" or depressant that affects the brain's pleasure systems and interferes with the brain's ability to perceive pain.

Heroin can be injected, smoked, or snorted. It is sold as a white or brownish powder or as a black, sticky substance known as "black tar heroin." Regardless of how it is taken, heroin enters the brain rapidly and is highly addictive.

The use of heroin can lead to serious health problems, including fatal overdose, spontaneous abortion, and infectious diseases like HIV and hepatitis. Long-term use of heroin can lead to physical dependence and addiction, a chronic disease that can be difficult to treat.