Specimen handling is a set of procedures and practices followed in the collection, storage, transportation, and processing of medical samples or specimens (e.g., blood, tissue, urine, etc.) for laboratory analysis. Proper specimen handling ensures accurate test results, patient safety, and data integrity. It includes:

1. Correct labeling of the specimen container with required patient information.
2. Using appropriate containers and materials to collect, store, and transport the specimen.
3. Following proper collection techniques to avoid contamination or damage to the specimen.
4. Adhering to specific storage conditions (temperature, time, etc.) before testing.
5. Ensuring secure and timely transportation of the specimen to the laboratory.
6. Properly documenting all steps in the handling process for traceability and quality assurance.

A Pathology Department in a hospital is a division that is responsible for the examination and diagnosis of diseases through the laboratory analysis of tissue, fluid, and other samples. It plays a crucial role in providing accurate diagnoses, treatment planning, and monitoring of patients' health statuses. The department is typically staffed by pathologists (physicians who specialize in interpreting medical tests and diagnosing diseases), as well as laboratory technologists, technicians, and assistants.

The Pathology Department provides various services, including:

1. Anatomical Pathology - Examination of tissue specimens to identify abnormalities, such as cancerous growths or other diseases. This includes surgical pathology, cytopathology (examining individual cells), and autopsy pathology.
2. Clinical Pathology - Analysis of bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, to assess chemical, hematological, immunological, and microbiological aspects. This includes hematology (study of blood cells), clinical chemistry (analysis of body chemicals), immunopathology (study of immune system disorders), and microbiology (identification and classification of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites).
3. Molecular Pathology - Analysis of DNA, RNA, and proteins to identify genetic mutations or abnormalities that contribute to diseases, particularly cancer. This information can help guide targeted therapies and personalized treatment plans.
4. Forensic Pathology - Examination of bodies to determine the cause and manner of death in cases of suspected criminal activity, accidents, or other suspicious circumstances.

The Pathology Department's work is essential for providing accurate diagnoses, determining appropriate treatments, monitoring disease progression, and conducting medical research.