Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) is not a universally accepted medical diagnosis, but it is a term used by the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe situations where building occupants experience acute health and comfort effects that seem to be linked to time spent in a building, without any specific illness or cause being identified.

The symptoms of SBS may include:

* Eye, nose, or throat irritation
* Headaches
* Dry cough
* Dry or itchy skin
* Dizziness and nausea
* Fatigue
* Difficulty concentrating
* Sensory irritability

These symptoms usually disappear after leaving the building. The causes of SBS are not well understood, but they are often attributed to inadequate ventilation, chemical contaminants from indoor or outdoor sources, biological contaminants such as mold or bacteria, and physical factors such as lighting, noise, or extremes of temperature or humidity.

It is important to note that the symptoms of SBS can also be caused by other factors, so it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional if you experience any of these symptoms. A thorough investigation of the building and its environment may also be necessary to identify potential causes and solutions.

Ventilation, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the process of breathing, which is the exchange of air between the lungs and the environment. It involves both inspiration (inhaling) and expiration (exhaling). During inspiration, air moves into the lungs, delivering oxygen to the alveoli (air sacs) where gas exchange occurs. Oxygen is taken up by the blood and transported to the body's cells, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, is expelled from the body during expiration.

In a medical setting, ventilation may also refer to the use of mechanical devices, such as ventilators or respirators, which assist or replace the breathing process for patients who are unable to breathe effectively on their own due to conditions like respiratory failure, sedation, neuromuscular disorders, or injuries. These machines help maintain adequate gas exchange and prevent complications associated with inadequate ventilation, such as hypoxia (low oxygen levels) and hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide levels).

I could not find a specific medical definition for "copying processes" as it is a fairly broad and non-specific term. However, in the context of biology and genetics, copying processes often refer to the mechanisms by which cells replicate their genetic material, specifically DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) during the cell cycle.

The main process involved in copying genetic material is called replication. During replication, an enzyme called helicase unwinds the double helix structure of DNA, and another enzyme called polymerase reads the template strand and synthesizes a new complementary strand. This results in two identical copies of the original DNA molecule.

In addition to DNA replication, there are other copying processes that occur in cells, such as transcription, which is the process by which the genetic information in DNA is copied into RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecules, and translation, which is the process by which the genetic code in RNA is translated into proteins.

It's worth noting that errors or mutations can occur during these copying processes, leading to changes in the genetic material that can have consequences for the function of cells and organisms.

Air conditioning is the process of controlling and maintaining a comfortable indoor environment through the regulation of temperature, humidity, air movement, and cleanliness. It typically involves the use of mechanical systems that circulate and treat air to meet specific comfort requirements. The goal of air conditioning is to provide a comfortable, healthy, and productive indoor environment while also saving energy and reducing environmental impact.

In medical terms, air conditioning can be particularly important in healthcare settings such as hospitals and clinics, where maintaining proper temperature and humidity levels is essential for the health and well-being of patients and staff. Proper air conditioning can help prevent the growth of bacteria, viruses, and mold, reduce the spread of airborne particles, and minimize the risk of infection and illness.

Air conditioning systems in healthcare facilities may include specialized components such as HEPA filters, UV germicidal irradiation, and humidity control to provide a higher level of air quality and protection against infectious diseases. Regular maintenance and testing of these systems is also critical to ensure their proper functioning and to maintain a safe and healthy indoor environment.

Building codes are a set of regulations that establish minimum standards for the design, construction, alteration, and maintenance of buildings and other structures to ensure safety, health, accessibility, and welfare of the public. These codes typically cover aspects such as structural integrity, fire protection, means of egress, lighting, ventilation, sanitation, energy efficiency, and accessibility for people with disabilities. Building codes are adopted and enforced by local or state governments to ensure that buildings are constructed in a safe and uniform manner.

Indoor air pollution refers to the contamination of air within buildings and structures due to presence of particles, gases, or biological materials that can harmfully affect the health of occupants. These pollutants can originate from various sources including cooking stoves, heating systems, building materials, furniture, tobacco products, outdoor air, and microbial growth. Some common indoor air pollutants include particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and mold. Prolonged exposure to these pollutants can cause a range of health issues, from respiratory problems to cancer, depending on the type and level of exposure. Effective ventilation, air filtration, and source control are some of the strategies used to reduce indoor air pollution.

A computer terminal is a device that enables a user to interact with a computer system. It typically includes an input device, such as a keyboard or a mouse, and an output device, such as a monitor or a printer. A terminal may also include additional features, such as storage devices or network connections. In modern usage, the term "computer terminal" is often used to refer specifically to a device that provides text-based access to a computer system, as opposed to a graphical user interface (GUI). These text-based terminals are sometimes called "dumb terminals," because they rely on the computer system to perform most of the processing and only provide a simple interface for input and output. However, this term can be misleading, as many modern terminals are quite sophisticated and can include features such as advanced graphics capabilities or support for multimedia content.

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS), also known as Idiosyncratic Intolerance, is a chronic condition characterized by symptoms that the affected person attributes to low-level exposure to chemicals in the environment. These reactions are not part of a recognized allergic response and are often delayed in onset.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) defines MCS as: "A heightened sensitivity to chemicals that most people tolerate well... Symptoms can include headache, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, confusion, joint pain, and digestive disturbances."

However, it's important to note that the medical community has not reached a consensus on the definition, cause, or diagnosis of MCS. Some healthcare providers question its validity as a distinct medical entity due to lack of consistent scientific evidence supporting the relationship between exposure levels and symptoms.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.