Scientific misconduct is defined by the US Department of Health and Human Services as "fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research, or in reporting research results." Fabrication means making up data or results that never occurred. Falsification means manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately represented in the research record. Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person's ideas, processes, results, or words without giving appropriate credit.

Scientific misconduct also includes other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. It does not include honest error or differences of opinion.

It is important to note that scientific misconduct can have serious consequences for the individuals involved and for the integrity of the scientific enterprise as a whole. It is essential that researchers adhere to the highest standards of integrity in order to maintain public trust in science and to ensure that research results are reliable and reproducible.

"Retraction of publication" is the process by which a published article or paper is withdrawn from the scientific literature due to significant errors, misconduct, or unethical behavior found in the study. The retraction may be initiated by the authors themselves, the journal editorial board, or the publisher. A retraction notice is typically issued, explaining the reasons for the retraction and providing details about the original publication. This ensures that the scientific record remains accurate and reliable, while also alerting readers to any concerns with the validity of the research findings.

Plagiarism is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a more general term that refers to the practice of using someone else's ideas, words, or creative expressions without giving credit to the original author. This can include copying and pasting text from another source without providing proper citation, failing to put quotation marks around borrowed language, or presenting another person's work as one's own.

Plagiarism is considered unethical in academic, professional, and creative settings because it involves stealing someone else's intellectual property and passing it off as one's own. It can have serious consequences, including damage to one's reputation, loss of credibility, and even legal action in some cases.

In the context of medical research and writing, plagiarism is taken very seriously and can result in sanctions such as retraction of published articles, loss of funding, or damage to professional standing. It is important for medical professionals and researchers to always give credit where credit is due and to properly cite any sources they use in their work.

Professional misconduct, in the context of medical law, refers to any behavior or action by a healthcare professional that fails to meet the expected standards of conduct and violates professional regulations and ethical guidelines. This can include various forms of unethical or illegal behavior, such as:

1. Engaging in sexual relationships with patients or engaging in any form of sexual harassment.
2. Practicing medicine while impaired by drugs, alcohol, or mental illness.
3. Failing to maintain accurate and complete medical records.
4. Performing unnecessary medical procedures or treatments for financial gain.
5. Engaging in fraudulent activities related to medical practice, such as billing fraud.
6. Abandoning patients without providing appropriate care or notification.
7. Discriminating against patients based on race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or other protected characteristics.
8. Failing to obtain informed consent from patients before performing medical procedures.
9. Violating patient confidentiality and privacy.
10. Engaging in unprofessional behavior that harms the reputation of the medical profession.

Professional misconduct can result in disciplinary action by a state medical board or licensing authority, including fines, license suspension or revocation, and mandatory education or treatment.

The United States Office of Research Integrity (ORI) is a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that focuses on research integrity, misconduct, and dispute resolution. ORI oversees and directs Public Health Service (PHS) research integrity activities on behalf of the Secretary of HHS.

In this context, "research integrity" refers to the adherence to ethical principles and standards in the design, conduct, and reporting of scientific research. This includes being truthful about the methods and results of experiments, giving appropriate credit to the work of others, and avoiding conflicts of interest.

ORI's mission is to:

1. Promote integrity in biomedical and behavioral research supported by the Public Health Service (PHS).
2. Identify and address instances of research misconduct involving PHS-supported research.
3. Provide leadership and oversight of research integrity activities for HHS components, including developing policies, procedures, and regulations related to research integrity and misconduct.
4. Serve as a resource for the research community, providing guidance on responsible conduct of research, research misconduct, and related topics.

ORI achieves its mission through various activities, such as investigating allegations of research misconduct, providing guidance and training to researchers and institutions, and collaborating with other federal agencies and organizations to promote research integrity.

Duplicate publication is a form of scientific misconduct where an author publishes substantially similar research or articles in two or more publications. This can occur when an author submits the same manuscript to multiple journals without disclosing this fact, or when an author takes previously published work and adds minor changes before resubmitting it as a new manuscript.

Duplicate publication is considered unethical because it violates copyright agreements, wastes resources, and can lead to incorrect conclusions being drawn from the data due to the duplication of sample sizes. It also undermines the integrity of scientific research by artificially inflating an author's publication record and can contribute to the problem of redundant or unnecessary research.

In some cases, duplicate publication may be unintentional or accidental, such as when an author fails to recognize that their work has already been published elsewhere. However, it is still important for authors to take steps to avoid duplicate publication by carefully checking their work against existing publications and disclosing any potential overlap during the submission process.

Journals also have a responsibility to prevent duplicate publication by implementing rigorous editorial policies and using plagiarism detection software to screen submissions for similarity to previously published work. If a case of duplicate publication is discovered, journals may choose to retract the later publication or take other appropriate action to correct the record.

Nursing ethics refers to the principles that guide the behavior and decision-making of nurses in their practice. These principles are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence (do no harm), beneficence (do good), justice, and veracity (truthfulness). Nursing ethics provides a framework for nurses to make decisions that promote the health and well-being of their patients while also respecting their rights and dignity.

Nurses may encounter ethical dilemmas in their practice, such as when there is conflict between the interests of different patients or between the interests of the patient and those of the nurse or healthcare organization. In these situations, nurses are expected to engage in a process of ethical reasoning and decision-making that involves identifying the ethical issues involved, considering the relevant ethical principles and values, and seeking input from colleagues and other stakeholders as appropriate.

Nursing ethics is an essential component of nursing practice and education, and it is closely linked to broader bioethical considerations related to healthcare and medical research. Nurses are expected to be familiar with relevant ethical guidelines and regulations, such as those established by professional organizations and regulatory bodies, and to engage in ongoing reflection and learning to maintain and develop their ethical competence.

A nursing society is a professional organization composed of registered nurses and other healthcare professionals who share a common mission, vision, and goals to advance the nursing profession and improve patient care. These societies provide a platform for members to collaborate, network, and exchange knowledge and ideas related to their practice, research, education, and policy-making. They offer various opportunities for professional development, including conferences, seminars, workshops, publications, and awards. Nursing societies also advocate for the rights and interests of nurses and patients at local, national, and international levels. Examples of nursing societies include the American Nurses Association (ANA), the International Council of Nurses (ICN), and the Society of Pediatric Nurses (SPN).

Research personnel, in the context of medical and scientific research, refers to individuals who are involved in the design, conduct, or reporting of research studies. This can include, but is not limited to, principal investigators, co-investigators, research assistants, research coordinators, data managers, biostatisticians, and laboratory technicians. These individuals may have various levels of education, training, and expertise, and their roles and responsibilities will depend on the specific research study and their individual qualifications. It is important for research personnel to adhere to ethical guidelines and regulations in order to ensure the integrity and validity of research findings.

Editorial policies refer to a set of guidelines and principles that govern the development, selection, peer-review, production, and publication of manuscripts in a medical journal. These policies aim to ensure the integrity, transparency, and quality of the published research while adhering to ethical standards and best practices in scientific publishing.

Some essential components of editorial policies include:

1. Authorship criteria: Defining who qualifies as an author, their roles, and responsibilities, and specifying the order of authorship based on contribution.
2. Conflict of interest disclosure: Requiring authors, reviewers, and editors to declare any potential conflicts of interest that may influence their judgment or objectivity in the manuscript's evaluation.
3. Peer-review process: Outlining the steps involved in the peer-review process, including the selection of reviewers, the number of required reviews, and the criteria for accepting or rejecting a manuscript.
4. Plagiarism detection: Employing plagiarism detection software to ensure originality and prevent unethical practices such as self-plagiarism or duplicate publication.
5. Data sharing: Encouraging or requiring authors to share their data, code, or materials to promote transparency and reproducibility of the research findings.
6. Corrections and retractions: Establishing procedures for correcting errors, addressing scientific misconduct, and retracting published articles when necessary.
7. Post-publication discussions: Encouraging open dialogue and constructive criticism through post-publication discussions or letters to the editor.
8. Accessibility and copyright: Describing how the journal ensures accessibility of its content, such as through open-access models, and outlining the terms of copyright and licensing agreements.
9. Archiving and preservation: Ensuring long-term preservation and availability of published content by depositing it in appropriate digital archives or repositories.
10. Compliance with international standards: Adhering to guidelines and best practices established by organizations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME), and the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Formal social control, in the context of medical sociology or health sciences, refers to the systematic mechanisms and processes through which society regulates and guides the behavior of its members in accordance with established laws, rules, and norms, particularly in relation to health and healthcare. This can include various formal institutions and agencies such as governmental bodies, regulatory authorities, professional organizations, and healthcare providers that are responsible for enforcing standards, policies, and regulations aimed at ensuring quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare services and products.

Examples of formal social control in healthcare may include licensing and accreditation requirements for healthcare professionals and facilities, clinical guidelines and protocols for diagnosis and treatment, quality improvement initiatives, and regulatory oversight of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. These mechanisms help to maintain order, promote compliance with ethical and professional standards, and protect the public's health and well-being.

Research ethics refers to the principles and guidelines that govern the conduct of research involving human participants or animals. The overarching goal of research ethics is to ensure that research is conducted in a way that respects the autonomy, dignity, and well-being of all those involved. Research ethics are designed to prevent harm, promote fairness, and maintain trust between researchers and study participants.

Some key principles of research ethics include:

1. Respect for Persons: This means treating all individuals with respect and dignity, and recognizing their autonomy and right to make informed decisions about participating in research.
2. Beneficence: Researchers have a duty to maximize the benefits of research while minimizing potential harms.
3. Justice: Research should be conducted fairly, without discrimination or bias, and should benefit all those who are affected by it.
4. Confidentiality: Researchers must protect the privacy and confidentiality of study participants, including their personal information and data.
5. Informed Consent: Participants must give their voluntary and informed consent to participate in research, after being fully informed about the nature of the study, its risks and benefits, and their rights as a participant.

Research ethics are typically overseen by institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees (RECs), which review research proposals and monitor ongoing studies to ensure that they comply with ethical guidelines. Researchers who violate these guidelines may face sanctions, including loss of funding, suspension or revocation of their research privileges, or legal action.

A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person or organization has dual loyalties or is in a position to exploit their professional or personal relationships for personal or institutional gain. In the medical field, COIs can arise when healthcare providers, researchers, or institutions have financial or other interests that may influence their judgment or actions in providing care, conducting research, or making recommendations.

Examples of conflicts of interest in medicine include:

* A physician who has a financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and receives compensation for promoting the company's products to patients or colleagues.
* A researcher who owns stock in a company that is funding their study and may stand to benefit financially from positive results.
* An institution that accepts funding from industry partners for research or educational programs, which could potentially influence the outcomes of the research or bias the education provided.

COIs can compromise the integrity of medical research, patient care, and professional judgment. Therefore, it is essential to disclose and manage COIs transparently to maintain trust in the healthcare system and ensure that decisions are made in the best interests of patients and society as a whole.

Military psychiatry is a subspecialty of psychiatry that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illnesses and psychological issues in military personnel. It involves providing care to active-duty military members, veterans, and their families who are experiencing problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and other psychological challenges related to combat or military life. Military psychiatrists also play a crucial role in developing policies and programs that promote mental health and resilience within the military community. They may serve in various settings, including military treatment facilities, deployed units, and veteran affairs medical centers.

The United States Public Health Service (USPHS) is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide a definition and overview of it in the context of public health and healthcare.

The USPHS is a division of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and is responsible for promoting and protecting the health of the nation, particularly focusing on preventing and controlling infectious diseases and other health threats. The USPHS is composed of eight uniformed service components: the Surgeon General's Office, the Commissioned Corps, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Indian Health Service (IHS), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

The Commissioned Corps of the USPHS is a group of uniformed healthcare professionals who are appointed by the President and commissioned as officers. They serve in various capacities within the federal government, including research, clinical care, health policy, and emergency response. The Surgeon General serves as the head of the USPHS and is responsible for providing advice to the President and HHS Secretary on matters related to public health.

The USPHS plays a critical role in responding to public health emergencies, such as natural disasters, infectious disease outbreaks, and bioterrorism attacks. They also work to address health disparities and promote health equity by providing healthcare services to underserved populations, including American Indians and Alaska Natives through the IHS. Additionally, the USPHS supports research and surveillance efforts aimed at understanding and addressing various public health issues, such as tobacco use, substance abuse, and mental health.

Clinical nursing research is a branch of scientific inquiry that focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of studies aimed at improving patient care and outcomes through the development of evidence-based practices within the nursing profession. This type of research is conducted in clinical settings such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities, and often involves collaboration between nurses, other healthcare professionals, and researchers from various disciplines.

The goals of clinical nursing research include:

1. Identifying patient care needs and priorities
2. Developing and testing innovative interventions to improve patient outcomes
3. Evaluating the effectiveness of current practices and treatments
4. Disseminating research findings to inform evidence-based practice
5. Advancing nursing knowledge and theory

Clinical nursing research can encompass a wide range of topics, including symptom management, patient safety, quality improvement, health promotion, and end-of-life care. The ultimate aim of this research is to improve the quality of care delivered to patients and their families, as well as to enhance the professional practice of nursing.