I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "propaganda" is not typically used as a medical definition. Propaganda is a form of communication that is aimed at influencing the attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of a population. It often presents a biased or misleading view of information in order to further an agenda or promote a particular point of view.

However, in the context of public health and medical communications, propaganda can refer to the dissemination of misinformation or manipulated information about health-related topics with the intention of shaping public opinion or behavior. This can be particularly problematic in the field of medicine, where accurate and unbiased information is critical for making informed decisions about healthcare and treatment options.

It's important to note that while propaganda can be used to promote positive messages and behaviors, such as encouraging people to get vaccinated or practice safe sex, it can also be used to spread misinformation and fear, leading to harmful consequences for individuals and communities.

Peer review in the context of research refers to the evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others working in the same field. The purpose of peer review is to ensure that the research is rigorous, valid, and relevant to the field. In a peer-review process, experts in the relevant field assess the research article, report, or other type of scholarly work for its accuracy, quality, and significance before it is published or presented at a conference.

The peer-review process typically involves several stages:

1. Submission: The author(s) submit their manuscript to a journal, conference, or other publication venue.
2. Assignment: The editor of the publication assigns the manuscript to one or more reviewers who are experts in the field.
3. Review: The reviewers evaluate the manuscript based on criteria such as originality, methodology, data analysis, interpretation of results, and contribution to the field. They provide feedback and recommendations to the editor.
4. Decision: Based on the feedback from the reviewers, the editor makes a decision about whether to accept, reject, or request revisions to the manuscript.
5. Revision: If the manuscript is rejected or requires revisions, the author(s) may have an opportunity to revise and resubmit the manuscript for further consideration.

Peer review is a critical component of the scientific process, as it helps ensure that research is held to high standards of quality and integrity. It also provides a mechanism for identifying and correcting errors or weaknesses in research before it is published or disseminated widely.