Parental notification is a term used in the context of medical care, particularly in situations involving minors (individuals who are under the age of majority, which is 18 years old in most states in the US). It refers to the practice of informing or notifying a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult relative of a minor's decision to seek certain medical services, treatments, or procedures.

In some cases, parental notification may be required by law before a minor can receive specific medical interventions, such as abortion, mental health treatment, or certain surgical procedures. The specific requirements for parental notification vary depending on the jurisdiction and the type of medical service being sought.

The purpose of parental notification is to ensure that parents or guardians are involved in important medical decisions affecting their minor children, and to provide an opportunity for them to offer guidance, support, and consent. However, there may be exceptions to parental notification requirements in cases where the minor is mature enough to make informed decisions about their own health care, or when notifying a parent could put the minor at risk of harm or abuse.

In medical and legal contexts, a minor is a person who has not yet reached the age of majority. The age of majority varies depending on the jurisdiction but is generally 18 or 21 years old. Minors are considered to be legally incompetent to make certain decisions for themselves, such as consenting to medical treatment or signing a contract. Therefore, in healthcare settings, minors typically require the consent of a parent or guardian before receiving medical care, except in specific circumstances where the minor is deemed mature enough to make their own decisions (e.g., emancipated minors).

A legal abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy through medical or surgical means, carried out in accordance with the laws and regulations of a particular jurisdiction. In countries where abortion is legal, it is typically restricted to certain circumstances, such as:

* To protect the life or health of the pregnant person
* In cases of fetal anomalies that are incompatible with life outside the womb
* When the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest
* When the continuation of the pregnancy would pose a significant risk to the physical or mental health of the pregnant person

The specific circumstances under which abortion is legal, as well as the procedures and regulations that govern it, vary widely from one country to another. In some places, such as the United States, abortion is protected as a fundamental right under certain conditions; while in other countries, such as those with highly restrictive abortion laws, it may only be allowed in very limited circumstances or not at all.

Disease notification is the process by which health care professionals, laboratories, or other relevant individuals or organizations inform public health authorities about cases of specific diseases or conditions that are reportable (also known as notifiable) within a particular jurisdiction. Reportable diseases are those that have been designated by law or regulation as posing a significant risk to public health and for which timely reporting is necessary to enable effective surveillance, control measures, and prevention strategies.

The specific diseases and conditions that must be reported, as well as the procedures for reporting, vary by jurisdiction. Common reportable diseases include infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, measles, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as non-infectious conditions like cancer and lead poisoning.

The purpose of disease notification is to provide public health officials with accurate and up-to-date information about the occurrence and spread of diseases in a population. This information can help inform policy decisions, guide resource allocation, and support the development and implementation of evidence-based interventions to protect and promote the health of communities.