Paramyxovirinae is a subfamily of viruses in the family Paramyxoviridae, order Mononegavirales. These viruses are enveloped, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that cause various diseases in animals and humans. The subfamily includes several important human pathogens such as:

1. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): A major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, young children, and older adults.
2. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV): Another common cause of respiratory illness, particularly in children.
3. Parainfluenza viruses (PIVs): Responsible for upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including croup, bronchitis, and pneumonia.
4. Mumps virus: Causes the infectious disease mumps, characterized by swelling of the salivary glands.
5. Measles virus: A highly contagious virus that causes measles, a serious respiratory illness with characteristic rash.
6. Hendra virus and Nipah virus: Zoonotic viruses that can cause severe respiratory and neurological diseases in humans and animals.

These viruses share common structural and genetic features, such as an enveloped virion with a helical nucleocapsid, and a genome consisting of non-segmented, negative-sense single-stranded RNA. They also utilize similar replication strategies and have related gene arrangements.

Morbillivirus is a genus of viruses in the family Paramyxoviridae, order Mononegavirales. It includes several important human and animal pathogens that cause diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. The most well-known member of this genus is Measles virus (MV), which causes measles in humans, a highly contagious disease characterized by fever, rash, cough, and conjunctivitis.

Other important Morbilliviruses include:

* Rinderpest virus (RPV): This virus caused rinderpest, a severe disease in cattle and other cloven-hoofed animals, which was eradicated in 2011 through a global vaccination campaign.
* Canine Distemper Virus (CDV): A pathogen that affects dogs, wild canids, and several other mammalian species, causing a systemic disease with respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological symptoms.
* Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV) and Porpoise Morbillivirus (PMV): These viruses affect marine mammals, such as seals and porpoises, causing mass mortality events in their populations.

Morbilliviruses are enveloped, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses with a genome size of approximately 15-16 kilobases. They have a pleomorphic shape and can vary in diameter from 150 to 750 nanometers. The viral envelope contains two glycoproteins: the hemagglutinin (H) protein, which mediates attachment to host cells, and the fusion (F) protein, which facilitates membrane fusion and viral entry.

Transmission of Morbilliviruses typically occurs through respiratory droplets or direct contact with infected individuals or animals. The viruses can cause acute infections with high fatality rates, particularly in naïve populations that lack immunity due to insufficient vaccination coverage or the absence of previous exposure.

In summary, Morbillivirus is a genus of viruses in the family Paramyxoviridae that includes several important human and animal pathogens causing acute respiratory infections with high fatality rates. Transmission occurs through respiratory droplets or direct contact, and vaccination plays a crucial role in preventing outbreaks and controlling disease spread.

Paramyxoviridae is a family of negative-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that include several medically important pathogens. These viruses are characterized by their enveloped particles and helical symmetry. The paramyxoviruses can cause respiratory infections, neurological disorders, and other systemic diseases in humans, animals, and birds.

Some notable members of the Paramyxoviridae family include:

* Human respirovirus (also known as human parainfluenza virus): causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children and adults.
* Human orthopneumovirus (also known as respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV): a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children.
* Measles morbillivirus: causes measles, a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever, rash, and cough.
* Mumps virus: causes mumps, an acute infectious disease that primarily affects the salivary glands.
* Hendra virus and Nipah virus: zoonotic paramyxoviruses that can cause severe respiratory and neurological disease in humans and animals.

Effective vaccines are available for some paramyxoviruses, such as measles and mumps, but there are currently no approved vaccines for others, such as RSV and Nipah virus. Antiviral therapies are also limited, with only a few options available for the treatment of severe paramyxovirus infections.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.