Organic chemistry processes refer to the chemical reactions, pathways, and mechanisms that involve organic compounds. These are primarily made up of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms, often along with other elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens, phosphorus, and silicon. Organic chemistry processes can include various types of reactions, such as substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangement reactions, which may occur under mild conditions and can be influenced by factors like temperature, pressure, catalysts, and solvents.

These processes are essential in understanding the behavior and transformation of natural and synthetic organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, polymers, dyes, and materials with unique properties. They form the basis for various industrial applications and scientific research in fields such as medicinal chemistry, biochemistry, materials science, and environmental studies.

Organic chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the study of carbon-containing compounds, their synthesis, reactions, properties, and structures. These compounds can include both naturally occurring substances (such as sugars, proteins, and nucleic acids) and synthetic materials (such as plastics, dyes, and pharmaceuticals). A key characteristic of organic molecules is the presence of covalent bonds between carbon atoms or between carbon and other elements like hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens. The field of organic chemistry has played a crucial role in advancing our understanding of chemical processes and has led to numerous technological and medical innovations.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question as "Organic chemistry phenomena" is a broad term and not a medical definition. However, I can provide you with an explanation of organic chemistry phenomena in a general context.

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon-containing compounds, their synthesis, reactions, properties, and structures. The term "organic" was originally used to describe biological materials, but now it refers to any compound that contains carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms, except for some simple oxides, sulfides, and halides.

Organic chemistry phenomena encompass a wide range of processes and events related to organic compounds. These can include:

1. Structural properties: Understanding the arrangement of atoms in organic molecules and how they influence chemical behavior and reactivity.
2. Stereochemistry: The study of three-dimensional spatial arrangements of atoms in organic molecules, which can significantly impact their properties and biological activity.
3. Functional groups: Recognizing and understanding the behavior of specific groupings of atoms within organic molecules that determine their chemical reactivity.
4. Reaction mechanisms: Investigating and describing the step-by-step processes by which organic reactions occur, including the movement of electrons, formation and breaking of bonds, and energy changes.
5. Synthetic methodologies: Developing strategies and techniques for creating complex organic molecules from simpler precursors, often involving multiple steps and protecting group strategies.
6. Physical properties: Examining how factors such as molecular weight, polarity, solubility, and melting/boiling points affect the behavior of organic compounds in various conditions.
7. Spectroscopic analysis: Utilizing techniques like NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), IR (Infrared) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to analyze the structure and composition of organic molecules.
8. Biochemistry and medicinal chemistry: Exploring how organic compounds interact with biological systems, including drug design, development, and delivery.

While not a medical definition per se, understanding organic chemistry phenomena is crucial for many areas within medicine, such as pharmaceutical research, toxicology, and biochemistry.

Chemical evolution is a term that refers to the set of processes thought to have given rise to life from simple inorganic compounds. It is a prebiotic process, meaning it occurred before the existence of life. The fundamental idea behind chemical evolution is that simple chemicals underwent a series of transformations, eventually leading to the formation of complex organic molecules necessary for life, such as amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. These building blocks then came together to form the first self-replicating entities, which are considered the precursors to modern cells.

The concept of chemical evolution is based on several key observations and experiments. For example, it has been shown that simple inorganic compounds can be transformed into more complex organic molecules under conditions believed to have existed on early Earth, such as those found near hydrothermal vents or in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. Additionally, experiments using simulated prebiotic conditions have produced a variety of biologically relevant molecules, supporting the plausibility of chemical evolution.

It is important to note that chemical evolution does not necessarily imply that life emerged spontaneously or randomly; rather, it suggests that natural processes led to the formation of complex molecules that eventually gave rise to living organisms. The exact mechanisms and pathways by which this occurred are still subjects of ongoing research and debate in the scientific community.

Biochemistry is the branch of science that deals with the chemical processes and substances that occur within living organisms. It involves studying the structures, functions, and interactions of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids, and how they work together to carry out cellular functions. Biochemistry also investigates the chemical reactions that transform energy and matter within cells, including metabolic pathways, signal transduction, and gene expression. Understanding biochemical processes is essential for understanding the functioning of biological systems and has important applications in medicine, agriculture, and environmental science.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Organic chemicals" is a broad term that refers to chemical compounds containing carbon, often bonded to hydrogen. These can include natural substances like sugars and proteins, as well as synthetic materials like plastics and pharmaceuticals.

However, if you're asking about "organic" in the context of farming or food production, it refers to things that are produced without the use of synthetic pesticides, fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, irradiation, and sewage sludge.

In the field of medicine, there isn't a specific definition for 'organic chemicals'. If certain organic chemicals are used in medical contexts, they would be defined by their specific use or function (like a specific drug name).

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which remains unchanged at the end of the reaction. A catalyst lowers the activation energy required for the reaction to occur, thereby allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly and efficiently. This can be particularly important in biological systems, where enzymes act as catalysts to speed up metabolic reactions that are essential for life.