I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Museums" are not a medical term and do not have a medical definition. The term "museum" generally refers to a building or institution that cares for and displays a collection of objects for the public to view, learn from, and enjoy. These collections can include art, historical items, scientific specimens, and more. If you have any questions about a specific medical topic, I'd be happy to help answer those for you!

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 18th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 18th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that! The 18th century was a time of great advancement and change in the medical field, with many notable discoveries and innovations. Some examples include:

* The development of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner in 1796
* The discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1774
* The invention of the thermometer by Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1714
* The publication of "An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae" by Edward Jenner in 1798, which helped to establish the concept of vaccination
* The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1773
* The development of new surgical techniques and instruments, such as the use of tourniquets and catgut sutures.

I'm not entirely sure what you're looking for with "Exhibits as Topic" in the context of medical definitions. However, I can provide some general information about how medical conditions or findings might be exhibited, as well as examples of medical resources that discuss various medical topics through exhibits.

In medical terminology, "exhibit" generally refers to something that is shown or displayed, such as a symptom, sign, finding, or condition. For example, a patient with diabetes might exhibit symptoms like increased thirst, frequent urination, and fatigue. In a laboratory setting, a sample might be examined for the presence of certain exhibits, such as bacteria or abnormal cells.

There are many medical resources that use exhibits to help illustrate various topics. For example, museums and educational centers often have exhibits on health-related topics, such as anatomy, disease processes, and medical technology. Medical schools and teaching hospitals may also have exhibits of specimens, models, or other materials used for educational purposes.

In addition, there are many online resources that use interactive exhibits to help explain complex medical concepts. For example, the National Library of Medicine's "Medical Museum" website has a variety of virtual exhibits on topics such as medical instruments, historical medical practices, and public health campaigns. The American Cancer Society also has an interactive exhibit on cancer cells and treatments that allows users to explore different types of cancer and learn about the latest research and treatment options.

Overall, "Exhibits as Topic" in a medical context can refer to a variety of resources and materials used to illustrate and explain medical concepts, findings, or conditions.

"History, 19th Century" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to the historical events, developments, and figures related to the 1800s in various fields, including politics, culture, science, and technology. However, if you are looking for medical advancements during the 19th century, here's a brief overview:

The 19th century was a period of significant progress in medicine, with numerous discoveries and innovations that shaped modern medical practices. Some notable developments include:

1. Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine (1796): Although not strictly within the 19th century, Jenner's discovery laid the foundation for vaccination as a preventive measure against infectious diseases.
2. Germ theory of disease: The work of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and others established that many diseases were caused by microorganisms, leading to the development of antiseptic practices and vaccines.
3. Anesthesia: In 1842, Crawford Long first used ether as an anesthetic during surgery, followed by the introduction of chloroform in 1847 by James Simpson.
4. Antisepsis and asepsis: Joseph Lister introduced antiseptic practices in surgery, significantly reducing postoperative infections. Later, the concept of asepsis (sterilization) was developed to prevent contamination during surgical procedures.
5. Microbiology: The development of techniques for culturing and staining bacteria allowed for better understanding and identification of pathogens.
6. Physiology: Claude Bernard's work on the regulation of internal body functions, or homeostasis, contributed significantly to our understanding of human physiology.
7. Neurology: Jean-Martin Charcot made significant contributions to the study of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.
8. Psychiatry: Sigmund Freud developed psychoanalysis, a new approach to understanding mental illnesses.
9. Public health: The 19th century saw the establishment of public health organizations and initiatives aimed at improving sanitation, water quality, and vaccination programs.
10. Medical education reforms: The Flexner Report in 1910 led to significant improvements in medical education standards and practices.

The "History of Medicine" refers to the evolution and development of medical knowledge, practices, and institutions over time. It includes the study of key figures, discoveries, theories, treatments, and societal attitudes that have shaped the way medicine is practiced and understood in different cultures and historical periods. This can encompass various fields such as clinical medicine, public health, medical ethics, and healthcare systems. The history of medicine provides valuable insights into the advances and setbacks in medical knowledge and offers lessons for addressing current and future medical challenges.

Cimicidae is an family of small, wingless insects known as "bed bugs." These parasitic pests feed on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded animals. They are typically active at night and can be difficult to detect due to their small size and ability to hide in tight spaces. Infestations of bed bugs can cause skin irritation, allergic reactions, and psychological distress. It is important to seek professional help for the detection and elimination of bed bugs if an infestation is suspected.

Phascolarctidae is a family of marsupials commonly known as koalas or koala bears, although they are not actually bears. They are native to Australia and are recognized by their thick, woolly fur, large ears, and distinctive nose. The medical definition related to Phascolarctidae might refer to any health issues specifically affecting koalas, such as diseases that impact their unique gut microbiome or conservation efforts addressing threats to their population.

A biography is a written or oral account of someone’s life. It can be written in either objective or subjective style, depending on the author’s approach and purpose. A biography typically includes information about the person’s birth, major life events, relationships, accomplishments, and death. It may also include an analysis of the person’s character and impact on society.

Biographies can be written about people from all walks of life, including politicians, artists, scientists, religious figures, and historical figures. They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as to educate readers about a particular person or period in history, to inspire or entertain, or to provide insight into the human experience.

Biographies can be classified into several types, including:

1. Autobiography: A biography written by the subject themselves.
2. Memoir: A type of autobiography that focuses on specific events or aspects of the author's life.
3. Authorized biography: A biography written with the cooperation and approval of the subject or their estate.
4. Unauthorized biography: A biography written without the subject's cooperation or approval.
5. Collective biography: A biography that covers multiple subjects who share a common theme, such as members of a particular family, group, or profession.
6. Fictionalized biography: A biography that includes fictional elements to enhance the narrative or fill in gaps in the historical record.

Regardless of the type, a well-written biography can provide valuable insights into the life and times of its subject, shedding light on their achievements, struggles, and contributions to society.

"Extinction, Biological" refers to the state or process of a species or taxonomic group becoming extinct, meaning that there are no surviving members remaining alive anywhere in the world. This can occur due to various factors such as environmental changes, competition with other species, overexploitation by humans, or a combination of these and other elements. It is an important concept in the field of biology and conservation, as the extinction of a species can have significant impacts on ecosystems and biodiversity.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 17th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 17th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that. The 17th century was a time of great advancement in medical knowledge and practice, with several key figures and events shaping the course of medical history.

Some notable developments in medicine during the 17th century include:

1. William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of blood (1628): English physician William Harvey published his groundbreaking work "De Motu Cordis" (On the Motion of the Heart and Blood), which described the circulatory system and the role of the heart in pumping blood throughout the body. This discovery fundamentally changed our understanding of human anatomy and physiology.
2. The development of the microscope (1600s): The invention of the microscope allowed scientists to observe structures that were previously invisible to the naked eye, such as cells, bacteria, and other microorganisms. This technology opened up new avenues of research in anatomy, physiology, and pathology, paving the way for modern medical science.
3. The establishment of the Royal Society (1660): The Royal Society, a prominent scientific organization in the UK, was founded during this century to promote scientific inquiry and share knowledge among its members. Many notable scientists and physicians, including Robert Hooke and Christopher Wren, were part of the society and contributed significantly to the advancement of medical science.
4. The Smallpox Vaccination (1796): Although this occurred near the end of the 18th century, the groundwork for Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine was laid during the 17th century. Smallpox was a significant public health issue during this time, and Jenner's development of an effective vaccine marked a major milestone in the history of medicine and public health.
5. The work of Sylvius de le Boe (1614-1672): A Dutch physician and scientist, Sylvius de le Boe made significant contributions to our understanding of human anatomy and physiology. He was the first to describe the circulation of blood in the lungs and identified the role of the liver in metabolism.

These are just a few examples of the many advancements that took place during the 17th century, shaping the course of medical history and laying the foundation for modern medicine.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "art." In general, art refers to creative works that express or evoke emotions through meaning, symbolism, form, and/or color. This can include various forms such as visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography), performing arts (theater, music, dance), literary arts (poetry, novels), and more.

However, there is a field of study called medical humanities that explores the intersection between medicine and the humanities, including art. In this context, art can be used as a tool for healing, communication, reflection, and understanding in healthcare settings. For example, art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses creative activities like drawing, painting, or sculpting to help patients explore their emotions, improve their mental health, and enhance their well-being.

Therefore, while there may not be a specific medical definition for "art," it can have significant implications for healthcare and the human experience.