Kampo medicine is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been officially integrated into the Japanese healthcare system since the late 19th century. It is based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principles and theories, but it has evolved independently in Japan over centuries to reflect local medical needs, cultural preferences, and pharmacological research.

Kampo medicine typically involves the use of complex formulas containing multiple herbs, rather than single herbs, to address various health conditions and restore balance within the body. The formulas are often adjusted based on individual patient's symptoms, constitution, and physical condition. Kampo practitioners receive extensive training in both modern Western medicine and traditional Japanese medicine, allowing them to integrate both approaches for a more holistic treatment strategy.

Kampo has been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a valuable component of traditional medicine and is increasingly being studied in clinical trials to evaluate its efficacy and safety for various health issues, including gastrointestinal disorders, menopausal symptoms, and mental health conditions.

Chinese herbal drugs, also known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), refer to a system of medicine that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that the body's vital energy, called Qi, must be balanced and flowing freely for good health. TCM uses various techniques such as herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercise to restore balance and promote healing.

Chinese herbal drugs are usually prescribed in the form of teas, powders, pills, or tinctures and may contain one or a combination of herbs. The herbs used in Chinese medicine are typically derived from plants, minerals, or animal products. Some commonly used Chinese herbs include ginseng, astragalus, licorice root, and cinnamon bark.

It is important to note that the use of Chinese herbal drugs should be under the guidance of a qualified practitioner, as some herbs can interact with prescription medications or have side effects. Additionally, the quality and safety of Chinese herbal products can vary widely depending on the source and manufacturing process.

"Glycyrrhiza" is the medical term for the licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra), which belongs to the legume family. The root of this plant contains glycyrrhizin, a sweet-tasting compound that has been used in traditional medicine for various purposes such as treating coughs, stomach ulcers, and liver disorders. However, excessive consumption of glycyrrhizin can lead to serious side effects like high blood pressure, low potassium levels, and even heart problems. Therefore, it is important to use licorice products under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a system of medicine that has been developed in China over thousands of years. It is based on the philosophy that the body's vital energy (Qi) circulates through a network of channels called meridians, and that disease results from an imbalance or blockage in this flow of Qi.

TCM uses a variety of treatments to restore balance and promote health, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, moxibustion (the burning of herbs near the skin), cupping, dietary therapy, and tuina (Chinese massage). The use of Chinese herbal medicines is a major component of TCM, with formulas often consisting of combinations of several different herbs tailored to the individual patient's needs.

In addition to these treatments, TCM practitioners may also use diagnostic techniques such as pulse diagnosis and tongue examination to assess a person's overall health and determine the underlying cause of their symptoms. The goal of TCM is not only to treat specific symptoms or diseases but to address the root causes of illness and promote overall wellness.

Herbal medicine, also known as botanical medicine or phytomedicine, refers to the use of plants and plant extracts for therapeutic purposes. This traditional form of medicine has been practiced for thousands of years across various cultures worldwide. It involves the utilization of different parts of a plant, such as leaves, roots, seeds, flowers, and fruits, either in their whole form or as extracts, infusions, decoctions, tinctures, or essential oils.

Herbal medicines are believed to contain active compounds that can interact with the human body, influencing its physiological processes and helping to maintain or restore health. Some herbs have been found to possess pharmacological properties, making them valuable in treating various ailments, including digestive disorders, respiratory conditions, sleep disturbances, skin issues, and cardiovascular diseases.

However, it is essential to note that the regulation of herbal medicines varies significantly between countries, and their safety, efficacy, and quality may not always be guaranteed. Therefore, consulting a healthcare professional before starting any herbal medicine regimen is advisable to ensure proper usage, dosage, and potential interactions with other medications or health conditions.

"Cedrus" is a genus of evergreen coniferous trees in the plant family Pinaceae. It includes several species commonly known as cedars, such as the Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica), the Deodar cedar (Cedrus deodara), and the Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani). These trees are native to the mountains of the Mediterranean region and the Himalayas. They are known for their distinctive, pyramidal shape, thick, scaly bark, and long, needle-like leaves. The wood of Cedrus species is highly valued for its durability, aroma, and resistance to pests, making it a popular choice for use in construction, furniture-making, and essential oil production.

"Textbooks as Topic" is a medical subject heading (MeSH) used in the National Library of Medicine's cataloging system to describe works that are about textbooks as a genre or medium, rather than a specific subject. This can include discussions on the history of medical textbooks, their role in medical education, comparisons between different types of textbooks, and analysis of their content and effectiveness. It may also cover issues related to the production, distribution, and accessibility of medical textbooks.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Ephedra is a genus of plants that contain various alkaloids, including ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. These plants, also known as "joint-fir" or "Mormon tea," have been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years to treat various conditions such as asthma, nasal congestion, and hay fever.

Ephedra has been used as a stimulant to increase energy, alertness, and physical performance. However, the use of ephedra-containing supplements has been linked to serious side effects, including heart attack, stroke, and death, particularly when taken in high doses or combined with other stimulants. As a result, the sale of dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids was banned in the United States in 2004.

It's important to note that while ephedra has been used in traditional medicine, its safety and effectiveness have not been thoroughly studied in clinical trials, and its use is not recommended without medical supervision.

Herb-drug interactions (HDIs) refer to the pharmacological or clinical consequences that occur when a patient takes a herbal product concurrently with a prescribed medication. These interactions can result in various outcomes, such as decreased, increased, or altered drug effects due to changes in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of the drug.

Herbs may contain various bioactive compounds that can interact with drugs and affect their pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. For example, some herbs may induce or inhibit drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, leading to altered drug metabolism and potentially increased or decreased drug concentrations in the body.

Similarly, herbs can also affect drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, which can further alter drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Moreover, some herbs may have pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs, leading to additive or synergistic effects, or antagonism of the drug's therapeutic action.

Therefore, healthcare providers should be aware of potential HDIs when prescribing medications to patients who use herbal products and consider monitoring their patients' medication responses closely. Patients should also be advised to inform their healthcare providers about any herbal products they are taking, including dosage and frequency of use.

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine, is a medical model that uses molecular profiling and various diagnostic tests to understand the genetic and environmental variations affecting an individual's health and disease susceptibility. It aims to tailor medical treatments, including prevention strategies, diagnostics, therapies, and follow-up care, to each person's unique needs and characteristics. By incorporating genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and other "omics" data into clinical decision-making, individualized medicine strives to improve patient outcomes, reduce adverse effects, and potentially lower healthcare costs.

Senna extract is a herbal preparation made from the leaves and fruit of the senna plant (Cassia senna or Cassia angustifolia), which belongs to the Fabaceae family. The active components in senna extract are anthraquinone glycosides, primarily sennosides A and B, that have laxative properties.

The medical definition of Senna extract is:
A standardized herbal extract derived from the leaves or fruit of the senna plant, containing a specific amount of sennosides (usually expressed as a percentage). It is used medically as a stimulant laxative to treat constipation and prepare the bowel for diagnostic procedures like colonoscopies. The laxative effect of senna extract is due to increased peristalsis and inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption in the large intestine, which results in softer stools and easier evacuation.

It's important to note that long-term use or misuse of senna extract can lead to dependence, electrolyte imbalances, and potential damage to the colon. Therefore, medical supervision is recommended when using senna extract as a laxative.

East Asian traditional medicine (ETAM) refers to the traditional medical systems that have been practiced in China, Japan, Korea, and other countries in this region for centuries. The most well-known forms of ETAM are Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Kampo (Japanese traditional medicine), and Korean traditional medicine (KTM).

TCM is a comprehensive medical system that includes acupuncture, moxibustion, herbal medicine, dietary therapy, tuina (Chinese massage), and qigong (breathing exercises) among its modalities. TCM is based on the concept of balancing the flow of qi (vital energy) through a system of channels or meridians in the body.

Kampo is a Japanese adaptation of Chinese medicine that emphasizes the use of herbal formulas to treat illness and maintain health. Kampo practitioners often prescribe individualized herbal formulas based on the patient's unique pattern of symptoms, which are determined through careful diagnosis and examination.

KTM is a traditional Korean medical system that combines elements of Chinese and Japanese medicine with indigenous Korean practices. KTM includes acupuncture, moxibustion, herbal medicine, cupping, and various forms of manual therapy.

While ETAM has been practiced for centuries and has a rich cultural heritage, it is important to note that its safety and efficacy have not always been rigorously studied using modern scientific methods. As such, it is essential to consult with a qualified healthcare provider before pursuing any form of traditional medicine.

"Poria" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology. However, it might be a reference to "Poria cocos," a type of fungus that is sometimes used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this context, "Poria" is said to have anti-inflammatory, diuretic, and sedative properties, although its efficacy and safety are not well-studied or established by modern medical standards.

It's important to note that the use of traditional herbal remedies like "Poria cocos" can interact with other medications and have side effects, so it's crucial to consult with a healthcare provider before using them.

Internal Medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of internal diseases affecting adults. It encompasses a wide range of medical conditions, including those related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, endocrine, infectious, and immune systems. Internists, or general internists, are trained to provide comprehensive care for adult patients, managing both simple and complex diseases, and often serving as primary care physicians. They may also subspecialize in various fields such as cardiology, gastroenterology, nephrology, or infectious disease, among others.

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various diseases. The radiopharmaceuticals are taken internally, usually through injection or oral administration, and accumulate in specific organs or tissues. A special camera then detects the radiation emitted by these substances, which helps create detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions.

The images produced in nuclear medicine can help doctors identify abnormalities such as tumors, fractures, infection, or inflammation. Additionally, some radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat certain conditions, like hyperthyroidism or cancer, by delivering targeted doses of radiation directly to the affected area. Overall, nuclear medicine provides valuable information for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of many medical conditions.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.