Hominidae, also known as the "great apes," is a family of primates that includes humans (Homo sapiens), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and Gorilla beringei), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). This family is characterized by their upright walking ability, although not all members exhibit this trait. Hominidae species are known for their high intelligence, complex social structures, and expressive facial features. They share a common ancestor with the Old World monkeys, and fossil records suggest that this split occurred around 25 million years ago.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

"Pongo pygmaeus" is the scientific name for the Bornean orangutan, a great ape species native to the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. They are one of the two species of orangutans, with the other being "Pongo abelii," the Sumatran orangutan. Bornean orangutans are highly intelligent and exhibit advanced tool use, social behaviors, and emotional expressions. They have a reddish-brown fur coat, long arms, and a distinctively shaped face. Unfortunately, they are critically endangered due to habitat loss and hunting.

"Gorilla gorilla" is the scientific name for the Western Gorilla, a subspecies of the Gorilla genus. Western Gorillas are divided into two subspecies: the Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and the Cross River Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli). Western Gorillas are native to the forests of central Africa, with Western Lowland Gorillas found in countries such as Gabon, Cameroon, Congo, and Equatorial Guinea, and Cross River Gorillas having a more restricted range along the border region of Nigeria and Cameroon.

Western Lowland Gorillas are the most numerous and widespread of all gorilla subspecies, but they still face significant threats from habitat loss, poaching, and disease. Cross River Gorillas are one of the world's 25 most endangered primates, with only a few hundred individuals remaining in the wild. Conservation efforts are underway to protect both subspecies and their habitats, including anti-poaching patrols, habitat restoration, and community education programs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pan paniscus" is actually the scientific name for a species of primate, specifically the Bonobo or "Pygmy Chimpanzee." Here is the medical/scientific definition:

Pan paniscus, also known as the Bonobo or Pygmy Chimpanzee, is one of the two extant species in the genus Pan, the other being Pan troglodytes (the Common Chimpanzee). Bonobos are native to the Democratic Republic of Congo in Central Africa. They are smaller than Common Chimpanzees and have a more gracile build, darker coat, and distinctive hair parting down the middle of their head.

Bonobos share approximately 98.7% of their DNA with humans, making them our closest living relatives alongside Common Chimpanzees. They are highly social animals, living in complex fission-fusion communities with fluid membership. Bonobos exhibit unique behaviors such as sexual interactions to reduce tension and promote social bonding, which sets them apart from other primates, including Common Chimpanzees.

If you have any questions about veterinary medicine or animal health, please feel free to ask!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pongo" is not a recognized medical term. It is sometimes used informally to refer to a human being, especially in the context of belonging to the species Homo sapiens. In zoological terms, "Pongo" is the genus name for orangutans. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those!

"Pan troglodytes" is the scientific name for a species of great apes known as the Common Chimpanzee. They are native to tropical rainforests in Western and Central Africa. Common Chimpanzees are our closest living relatives, sharing about 98.6% of our DNA. They are highly intelligent and social animals, capable of using tools, exhibiting complex behaviors, and displaying a range of emotions.

Here is a medical definition for 'Pan troglodytes':

The scientific name for the Common Chimpanzee species (genus Pan), a highly intelligent and social great ape native to tropical rainforests in Western and Central Africa. They are our closest living relatives, sharing approximately 98.6% of our DNA. Known for their complex behaviors, tool use, and emotional expression, Common Chimpanzees have been extensively studied in the fields of anthropology, psychology, and primatology to better understand human evolution and behavior.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 17th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 17th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that. The 17th century was a time of great advancement in medical knowledge and practice, with several key figures and events shaping the course of medical history.

Some notable developments in medicine during the 17th century include:

1. William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of blood (1628): English physician William Harvey published his groundbreaking work "De Motu Cordis" (On the Motion of the Heart and Blood), which described the circulatory system and the role of the heart in pumping blood throughout the body. This discovery fundamentally changed our understanding of human anatomy and physiology.
2. The development of the microscope (1600s): The invention of the microscope allowed scientists to observe structures that were previously invisible to the naked eye, such as cells, bacteria, and other microorganisms. This technology opened up new avenues of research in anatomy, physiology, and pathology, paving the way for modern medical science.
3. The establishment of the Royal Society (1660): The Royal Society, a prominent scientific organization in the UK, was founded during this century to promote scientific inquiry and share knowledge among its members. Many notable scientists and physicians, including Robert Hooke and Christopher Wren, were part of the society and contributed significantly to the advancement of medical science.
4. The Smallpox Vaccination (1796): Although this occurred near the end of the 18th century, the groundwork for Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine was laid during the 17th century. Smallpox was a significant public health issue during this time, and Jenner's development of an effective vaccine marked a major milestone in the history of medicine and public health.
5. The work of Sylvius de le Boe (1614-1672): A Dutch physician and scientist, Sylvius de le Boe made significant contributions to our understanding of human anatomy and physiology. He was the first to describe the circulation of blood in the lungs and identified the role of the liver in metabolism.

These are just a few examples of the many advancements that took place during the 17th century, shaping the course of medical history and laying the foundation for modern medicine.

The appendix is a small, tube-like structure that projects from the large intestine, located in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. Its function in humans is not well understood and is often considered vestigial, meaning it no longer serves a necessary purpose. However, in some animals, the appendix plays a role in the immune system. Inflammation of the appendix, known as appendicitis, can cause severe abdominal pain and requires medical attention, often leading to surgical removal of the appendix (appendectomy).

"Medicine in Art" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used to describe the intersection and representation of medical themes, practices, or symbols in various art forms. It can include but is not limited to:

1. The depiction of medical scenes, practitioners, or patients in paintings, sculptures, or photographs.
2. The use of medical imagery such as X-rays, MRIs, or anatomical drawings in mixed media works.
3. The exploration of medical issues, diseases, or treatments in conceptual art.
4. The creation of art by artists with medical conditions, which can provide insight into their experiences.
5. The use of art therapy as a healing modality in medical settings.

This term is often used in the context of art history, visual culture, and medical humanities to analyze and understand the complex relationships between art, medicine, and society.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 18th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 18th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that! The 18th century was a time of great advancement and change in the medical field, with many notable discoveries and innovations. Some examples include:

* The development of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner in 1796
* The discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1774
* The invention of the thermometer by Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1714
* The publication of "An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae" by Edward Jenner in 1798, which helped to establish the concept of vaccination
* The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1773
* The development of new surgical techniques and instruments, such as the use of tourniquets and catgut sutures.

Appendicitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix, a small finger-like structure that projects from the colon located in the lower right abdomen. The appendix doesn't have a known function, and its removal (appendectomy) does not appear to affect a person's health.

The inflammation of the appendix can be caused by various factors, such as obstruction due to hardened stool, foreign bodies, or tumors. The blockage can lead to increased pressure within the appendix, reduced blood flow, and bacterial growth, resulting in infection and inflammation. If left untreated, appendicitis can progress to peritonitis (inflammation of the lining of the abdominal cavity) or even sepsis, a life-threatening condition.

Common symptoms of appendicitis include:

* Sudden onset of pain in the lower right abdomen, which may start around the navel and shift to the lower right side over several hours
* Pain that worsens with movement, coughing, or sneezing
* Nausea and vomiting
* Loss of appetite
* Fever and chills
* Constipation or diarrhea
* Abdominal swelling or bloating

If you suspect appendicitis, it's essential to seek immediate medical attention. The standard treatment for appendicitis is surgical removal of the appendix (appendectomy), which can be performed as an open surgery or laparoscopically. Antibiotics are also administered to treat any existing infection. Delaying treatment can lead to serious complications, so it's crucial not to ignore symptoms and seek medical help promptly.

"Arum" is a genus name that refers to a group of flowering plants in the family Araceae. These plants are commonly known as calla lilies, jack-in-the-pulpit, and wild arums. Some species of Arum contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause irritation and pain if ingested or come into contact with skin or mucous membranes.

It is worth noting that "Arum" is not a medical term per se, but rather a scientific name for a group of plants. However, it is possible to have an allergic reaction or other adverse effects from exposure to these plants, so it is important to be aware of their potential hazards if you come into contact with them.

An appendectomy is a surgical procedure in which the vermiform appendix is removed. This procedure is performed when a patient has appendicitis, which is an inflammation of the appendix that can lead to serious complications such as peritonitis or sepsis if not treated promptly. The surgery can be done as an open procedure, in which a single incision is made in the lower right abdomen, or as a laparoscopic procedure, in which several small incisions are made and specialized instruments are used to remove the appendix. In some cases, if the appendix has burst, a more extensive surgery may be required to clean out the abdominal cavity.