Glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also known as prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) or N-acetylated-alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein enzyme. It is primarily expressed in the prostate epithelium, but can also be found in other tissues such as the kidney, brain, and salivary glands.

PSMA plays a role in the regulation of glutamate metabolism by cleaving N-acetylaspartylglutamic acid (NAAG) to produce N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. It has been identified as a useful biomarker for prostate cancer, with increased expression associated with more aggressive tumors.

In addition to its enzymatic activity, PSMA has been shown to have other functions, including involvement in cellular signaling pathways and regulation of angiogenesis. As a result, it is being investigated as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer and other malignancies.

Carboxypeptidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of peptide bonds at the carboxyl-terminal end of polypeptides or proteins. They specifically remove the last amino acid residue from the protein chain, provided that it has a free carboxyl group and is not blocked by another chemical group. Carboxypeptidases are classified into two main types based on their catalytic mechanism: serine carboxypeptidases and metallo-carboxypeptidases.

Serine carboxypeptidases, also known as chymotrypsin C or carboxypeptidase C, use a serine residue in their active site to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptide bonds. They are found in various organisms, including animals and bacteria.

Metallo-carboxypeptidases, on the other hand, require a metal ion (usually zinc) for their catalytic activity. They can be further divided into several subtypes based on their structure and substrate specificity. For example, carboxypeptidase A prefers to cleave hydrophobic amino acids from the carboxyl-terminal end of proteins, while carboxypeptidase B specifically removes basic residues (lysine or arginine).

Carboxypeptidases have important roles in various biological processes, such as protein maturation, digestion, and regulation of blood pressure. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Surface antigens are molecules found on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system as being foreign or different from the host's own cells. Antigens are typically proteins or polysaccharides that are capable of stimulating an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies and activation of immune cells such as T-cells.

Surface antigens are important in the context of infectious diseases because they allow the immune system to identify and target infected cells for destruction. For example, viruses and bacteria often display surface antigens that are distinct from those found on host cells, allowing the immune system to recognize and attack them. In some cases, these surface antigens can also be used as targets for vaccines or other immunotherapies.

In addition to their role in infectious diseases, surface antigens are also important in the context of cancer. Tumor cells often display abnormal surface antigens that differ from those found on normal cells, allowing the immune system to potentially recognize and attack them. However, tumors can also develop mechanisms to evade the immune system, making it difficult to mount an effective response.

Overall, understanding the properties and behavior of surface antigens is crucial for developing effective immunotherapies and vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer.

A dipeptide is a type of molecule that is formed by the condensation of two amino acids. In this process, the carboxyl group (-COOH) of one amino acid combines with the amino group (-NH2) of another amino acid, releasing a water molecule and forming a peptide bond.

The resulting molecule contains two amino acids joined together by a single peptide bond, which is a type of covalent bond that forms between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another. Dipeptides are relatively simple molecules compared to larger polypeptides or proteins, which can contain hundreds or even thousands of amino acids linked together by multiple peptide bonds.

Dipeptides have a variety of biological functions in the body, including serving as building blocks for larger proteins and playing important roles in various physiological processes. Some dipeptides also have potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of hypertension or muscle wasting disorders.

Organophosphorus compounds are a class of chemical substances that contain phosphorus bonded to organic compounds. They are used in various applications, including as plasticizers, flame retardants, pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and nerve gases), and solvents. In medicine, they are also used in the treatment of certain conditions such as glaucoma. However, organophosphorus compounds can be toxic to humans and animals, particularly those that affect the nervous system by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Exposure to these compounds can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness, and in severe cases, respiratory failure and death.

Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, a type of B vitamin (B9). It is widely used in dietary supplements and fortified foods because it is more stable and has a longer shelf life than folate. Folate is essential for normal cell growth and metabolism, and it plays a critical role in the formation of DNA and RNA, the body's genetic material. Folic acid is also crucial during early pregnancy to prevent birth defects of the brain and spine called neural tube defects.

Medical Definition: "Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate (vitamin B9), a water-soluble vitamin involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is used in dietary supplementation and food fortification due to its stability and longer shelf life compared to folate. Folic acid is critical for normal cell growth, development, and red blood cell production."

Tromethamine is a chemical compound with the formula (CH2OH)3CNH2. It is also known as tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane or THAM. Tromethamine is a tertiary amine that acts as a buffer, maintaining a stable pH in various solutions.

In medical terms, tromethamine is used as a medication to correct acid-base imbalances in the body. It works by binding hydrogen ions and converting them into water and carbon dioxide, which can then be eliminated from the body. Tromethamine is often used in critically ill patients who have severe metabolic acidosis, a condition characterized by an excess of acid in the body that can lead to organ dysfunction and failure.

Tromethamine is available as a sterile solution for injection or as a powder to be reconstituted with sterile water for injection. It may also be used as an additive to intravenous fluids to help maintain a stable pH. Common side effects of tromethamine include local irritation at the injection site, nausea, vomiting, and headache.

Carboxypeptidase H is also known as carboxypeptidase E or CPE. It is an enzyme that plays a role in the processing and activation of neuropeptides, which are small protein-like molecules that function as chemical messengers within the nervous system. Carboxypeptidase H/E is responsible for removing certain amino acids from the end of newly synthesized neuropeptides, allowing them to become biologically active. It is widely expressed in the brain and other tissues throughout the body.

Carboxypeptidase B is a type of enzyme that belongs to the peptidase family. It is also known as carboxypeptidase B1 or CpB. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the digestion of proteins by cleaving specific amino acids from the carboxyl-terminal end of polypeptides.

Carboxypeptidase B preferentially removes basic arginine and lysine residues from protein substrates, making it an essential enzyme in various physiological processes, including blood clotting, hormone processing, and neuropeptide metabolism. It is synthesized as an inactive zymogen, procarboxypeptidase B, which is converted to its active form upon proteolytic activation.

In addition to its physiological functions, carboxypeptidase B has applications in research and industry, such as protein sequencing, peptide synthesis, and food processing.

Carboxypeptidases A are a group of enzymes that play a role in the digestion of proteins. They are found in various organisms, including humans, and function to cleave specific amino acids from the carboxyl-terminal end of protein substrates. In humans, Carboxypeptidase A is primarily produced in the pancreas and secreted into the small intestine as an inactive zymogen called procarboxypeptidase A.

Procarboxypeptidase A is activated by trypsin, another proteolytic enzyme, to form Carboxypeptidase A1 and Carboxypeptidase A2. These enzymes have different substrate specificities, with Carboxypeptidase A1 preferentially cleaving aromatic amino acids such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, while Carboxypeptidase A2 cleaves basic amino acids such as arginine and lysine.

Carboxypeptidases A play a crucial role in the final stages of protein digestion by breaking down large peptides into smaller di- and tripeptides, which can then be absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and transported to other parts of the body for use as building blocks or energy sources.